Who Did Jesus Die For

Whom did Jesus die for? Did Jesus die for everyone?

QuestionAnswer Theological dispute exists among evangelical Bible believers over who Jesus died for and for what purpose he died. Some Christians believe that Jesus died exclusively for the elect; this is known as the concept of limited atonement, sometimes known as theLin Calvinism’s TULIP (the doctrine of limited atonement). Another school of thought holds that Jesus died for everyone who has ever lived or will live in the future; this is known as the theory of limitless atonement, which is supported by Arminians and the vast majority of four-point Calvinists, known as Amyraldians.

According to this logic, because only the elect of God would be rescued, Jesus must have died specifically for them.

If Jesus died for everyone, then hell would be overflowing with those for whom Jesus died—was His atonement insufficient to cover all of humanity’s needs?

Every person for whom Jesus died will be reunited with their loved ones in paradise.

  1. To put it another way, Jesus’ death was adequate for everybody, but only effective for a select few (those who have faith).
  2. Verse such as 1 John 2:2 teaches that Christ is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of all people everywhere.
  3. We are commissioned to be students of the Word of God (2 Timothy 2:15).
  4. Because of theological systems (namely, Calvinism and Arminianism), the subject of for whom Jesus died would almost certainly never be raised—but it has!
  5. According to the opposing viewpoint, if Christ died for those who will never be saved, then His death, in a sense, has failed to fulfill its goal in some way.
  6. This produces an unnecessarily difficult situation and a sense of tension when none should exist.
  7. The problem is a fictitious one that we have created for ourselves.
  8. It’s also important to note that, no matter how extensive Christ’s atonement is, it is restricted in one respect: it is only effective for those who believe in him (John 3:18).
  9. As we can see in that scripture, Christ died to save His sheep (John 10:11, 15).
  10. When we communicate the gospel, we don’t strive to “pre-screen” the people who will hear the message, as other churches do.
  11. Discussions like this are detrimental to the overall objective of evangelization.

No attempt is made to cut it any finer than that in the teaching of the apostles throughout the New Testament. Questions about Theology (return to top of page) Who was it that Jesus died for? Is it true that Jesus died for everyone?

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Did Jesus Die for Everyone?

“Did Jesus die in order to save everyone?” The topic of discussion tonight is one that has been highly disputed throughout the history of the church. One of the possible explanations is the one provided by the individual who submitted the query. Her issue is whether or not she should inform people that “Jesus died for you” when evangelizing. The fact that Jesus died for everyone is unquestionable in a certain sense, particularly in terms of the significance and fitness of his sacrifice for the redemption of all sinners, which is something that no one disputes.

  1. As a result, anybody may be informed that Jesus died in order to extend to them a free gift of forgiveness and acceptance with God.
  2. In the Bible, it is explicitly stated that not everyone has been or will be saved.
  3. Regardless of the atoning sacrifice that Jesus offered on their behalf, or is it because they refuse to believe, Jesus did not atone for their sins and hence did not make atonement?
  4. In this case, it is not ultimately Jesus’ sacrifice that saves people, but rather their faith; for some people do not think they are lost, despite the fact that Jesus offered his blood to rescue them.
  5. Unbelievers perish not just as a result of a lack of faith, but also as a result of a lack of atonement in this circumstance.
  6. Some adherents of the doctrine point forth passages from the New Testament that refer to Christ as “the Savior of the world.” 1 “He is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not just for our sins, but also for the sins of the whole world,” says John 2:2, for example.
  7. The problem is that they have rebellious hearts and will not accept the blood that has been sacrificed for their sake.

In the case of John, there is sufficient reason to conclude that he is referring to the Savior of all people, rather than the Savior of Gentiles as well as Jews.

Instead of emphasizing a broad redemption that includes unbelievers, John emphasizes the spread of salvation throughout every tribe, language, and country on the face of the earth.

1 Furthermore, there are other compelling arguments in favor of dismissing the concept of universal redemption and concluding that Jesus only atoned for those who were entrusted to him by God.

It is in this passage that we find Jesus praying to the Father on the night of his arrest.

20:28).

Again, when Jesus instituted the Lord’s Supper, he declared, “This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for the forgiveness of sins from the heart of man.” (Matthew 26:28) According to the idea of election, there is a second reason to assume that Jesus offered atonement solely for his own.

  • Those who disagree with the biblical teaching of election are primarily motivated by a desire to believe that Jesus died only for his own.
  • For those who were predestined, God also called them; those who were called, God also justified them; those who were justified, God also glorified them, according to the apostle Paul.
  • Is it true that Jesus died solely to make it possible for sinners to be saved if they place their faith in him?
  • Even if the initiative of faith were required for salvation, this is precisely what would occur since, as Paul states, “There is no one who understands, and there is no one who seeks God” (Rom.
  • According to Titus 2:14, Jesus “gave himself for us” in order to “redeem us from all evil and purify for himself a people who are his very own, ready to do what is right.” Those are active verbs that demonstrate what Jesus’ death was truly able to accomplish.
  • In the Bible, we are not allowed to separate the crucifixion from the whole redemption that it offers us.
  • If Jesus provided atonement for people who do not believe and are condemned, then God has unfairly punished sin twice: first on the cross and again when sinners who do not believe are condemned.

It is true that Christ’s atoning act is not restricted in its power or value—indeed, it saves us to the furthest extent possible—but it is limited in its scope to those who are members of Christ’s body and, as a result, place their confidence in him.

Returning to the initial issue, how does this teaching have an impact on our evangelization efforts?

It asserts that the only way to be saved is to place one’s faith in Jesus Christ.

They have no role in Christ’s redemptive death apart from faith; in fact, they are crucifying Christ all over again in their unbelief, and they cannot hope to reap any benefits from his saving work.

Each Christian should understand that Jesus died not just to provide you with the opportunity to save yourself if your faith is strong enough, but also to truly and effectively rescue you.

8:1).

1 Chapter 3 of B.

Warfield’s The Savior of the World contains a more in-depth exploration of this topic.

His death brings redemption to the newly regenerated universe. And yet, unbelieving sinners are excluded from that redemption, just as they are excluded from the world that Christ saves at the end of the story.

For Whom Did Christ Die?

When you hear the question, “For whom did Jesus die?” it’s important to consider the context. What are your thoughts? The solution may appear to be self-explanatory: for the entire globe. Indeed, John 1:29 states that Jesus is the Lamb of God, who is sacrificed to atone for the sins of the entire world. “God so loved the world” (John 3:16), according to the Bible, that “he gave his only Son, that whomever believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.” The upshot is that a large number of interpreters believe that Jesus died for the entire world, rather than for a predetermined number of people.

  • Is it intended to apply to everyone without difference or to everyone without exception?
  • If Jesus died for everyone without discrimination, this would imply that he died for people of all types from every tongue, tribe, people, and nation.
  • In this latter perspective, even individuals who die rejecting Jesus might claim that Jesus’ blood was shed for them since those for whom Jesus died may or may not have faith in him, according to the proponents.
  • Moreover, Jesus died not only in order to make abona fideoffer of salvation to everyone, but also in order to truly purchase and execute the ultimate redemption of his elect.
  • Paul does not describe Jesus’ death as a hypothetical event that results in the redemption of all people without exception, but rather as an event that results in the salvation of all those for whom he died in reality.

Jesus’s Blood and Justification by Faith

When it comes to justification by faith in Christ, Paul writes in Romans 3:24–30 that Jesus’ death justifies (declares righteous) sinners who put their trust in him, and that justification by faith is linked to Jesus’ blood. He claims that God justifies sinners via faith since he provided Jesus to die as a sacrifice for their sins on the cross. Because all people (Jews and Gentiles) have sinned, God’s salvation delivered by Jesus must be freely applied to all sinners (Romans 1:18–3:24). Justification is a gracious gift from God that is made available to all sinners via the redemption wrought by the shed blood of Jesus (Romans 3:24–25).

Justification by faith is mentioned in Romans 3:21–22 and 3:24, and it is associated with the concept of “redemption” (3:24) and the idea of a bloody sacrifice (Romans 3:25).

Because of Paul’s statements in Romans 3:20, which state that the law justifies no one, and in Romans 3:24, which state that all people must be graciously justified through redemption in Jesus Christ, Paul explains in Romans 3:25–26 how God justifies sinners via the redemption of Jesus Christ.

When we consider election and predestination (Ephesians 1:4–5), redemption and forgiveness of sins by the blood of Christ (Ephesians 1:7–8), and redemption and forgiveness of sins (Ephesians 1:7–8), the security of those justified becomes further evident (Ephesians 1:7).

It appears from a plain reading of Ephesians 1:4–7 that God chose some Jews and Gentiles to be in Christ before creation and predestined them in love to be in God’s family, and that Jesus redeemed those whom God chose and predestined by obtaining their remission of sins.

Six Reasons for Your Joy

The fact that Jesus’ death was a death for all chosen Jews and Gentiles without discrimination should serve as an inspiration to all believers. Here are six reasons why we should rejoice in the teaching of Jesus’ death on the cross in order to save the elect.

  1. Christians may be certain that the blood of Jesus will be able to defeat the forces of sin and death. Faith in the gospel of Jesus Christ brings salvation to everyone for whom Jesus died, and this is true for everyone who has ever lived. The triumphant death of Jesus frees sinners from their sin and destroys the power of the devil’s kingdom. Neither of these facts becomes obvious until individuals for whom Jesus died react to his redeeming work in faith and obedience
  2. When people die in unbelief, this does not imply that God’s intention to rescue the world via the sacrifice of his Son was a complete failure. Jesus died in order to save his sheep (John 10:11–16), and he did it both universally and specifically. Yes, it is true that everyone who desires to be rescued will be able to do so. This holds true for everyone for whom Jesus died, as well as for those who do not. As a matter of fact, this is one of the primary reasons why he died
  3. Jesus’ blood ensures that his elect will be saved when the Spirit awakens them after hearing the gospel. Jesus descended from heaven in order to seek, locate, and acquire his chosen flock. The blood of Jesus provides a place in the sheepfold for all who believe in him. Because of this, Christians should cling to the blood of Jesus Christ as our only hope in life and death, along with his victorious resurrection
  4. Christians can evangelize with confidence in God’s redemptive plan to redeem everyone for whom Jesus died to redeem
  5. Christians can evangelize with confidence in the victorious resurrection of Jesus Christ. Jesus sacrificed his blood in order to rescue those whom God had predestined to be in Christ. The verbal proclamation of the gospel makes the salvation accomplished by Christ for them known to the elect, and the Spirit — when he is willing — will create faith in the hearts of all the elect and apply the benefits of Jesus’ death specifically to those who have been chosen by God through faith in Christ. Evangelism, then, is simply the act of proclaiming to all sinners what God has done in Christ to rescue them, as defined by the Christian faith. In addition, Christians should spread this message to anybody who would listen to it. When the Spirit chooses to do so, he will breathe life into the hearts of the elect and apply the benefits of Jesus’ death to them
  6. Jesus’ sacrifice for the elect should provide Christians with assurance of their eternal salvation. Many Christians have reservations about their salvation. Due to the fact that Jesus’ blood was spilt particularly for chosen Jews and Gentiles, we may be certain that the blood of Christ will completely cleanse us from all of our sins. Moreover, we may be confident that Jesus’s blood alone is sufficient to bring our cases before the throne of God above
  7. Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, shed his blood for both the Jews and the Gentiles who were chosen by God. Consequently, the church of Jesus Christ should be tireless in its pursuit of gospel racial reconciliation, placing Jesus’ death (as well as his resurrection) at the very core of all appeals for racial harmony and justice in the world. As a result of Jesus’s spilt blood on the cross for the elect from every tongue, tribe, and nation, Christians of every ethnic background have the required desire to work toward gospel unity among all people in the church.
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Believers can have faith that the blood of Jesus will defeat the forces of sin and death. Faith in the gospel of Jesus Christ brings salvation to everyone for whom Jesus died, and it is this faith that brings salvation. Death on the cross of Jesus liberates sinners from sin and weakens the devil’s hold on their hearts. Neither of these facts become obvious until individuals for whom Jesus died react to his redeeming work in faith and obedience; when people die in unbelief, this does not imply that God’s purpose to rescue the world via the sacrifice of his Son was a complete failure.

  • In reality, everybody who desires to be rescued will have the opportunity to do so.
  • Jesus’ blood assures that his elect will be saved when they are awakened by the Spirit after hearing the gospel, and this is, in fact, a primary cause for his death.
  • Christ’s shed blood ensures that we will have a place in the sheepfold.
  • Christians should cling to the blood of Jesus Christ as our only hope in life and death, as well as in his victorious resurrection; Christians can evangelize with confidence in God’s plan to redeem everyone for whom Jesus died.

The verbal proclamation of the gospel makes the salvation accomplished by Christ for them known to the elect, and the Spirit — when he is willing — will create faith in the hearts of all the elect and apply the benefits of Jesus’ death specifically to those who have been chosen by God through faith in Jesus.

  • Moreover, Christians should spread this message to anybody who would listen to them.
  • Jesus’ death for the elect should provide Christians with assurance that they are saved.
  • However, because Jesus’ blood was shed particularly for chosen Jews and Gentiles, we may be certain that the blood of Christ will completely cleanse us of all of our sins (Romans 6:23).
  • Consequently, the church of Jesus Christ should be tireless in its pursuit of gospel racial reconciliation, placing Jesus’ death (as well as his resurrection) at the very core of all appeals for racial peace and justice in this world.

As a result of Jesus’s spilt blood on the cross for the elect from every tongue, tribe, and nation, Christians of all ethnic backgrounds have the required desire to work toward gospel unity among all people in the church.

Did Jesus Die for Everyone?

The concept of atonement is fundamental to Christian philosophy and practice. When we pour into the Word in order to get a greater understanding of Christ’s work, we are the ones who benefit. We frequently come into questions while doing so. Another concern that frequently arises when considering the atonement is whether Jesus died for everyone or only for those who are predestined. My response to this question is as follows: I believe that Jesus died on the cross in order to save those who believe.

The Bible states in 1 John that Jesus was the propitiation “for the whole world,” and in John 3:16 we find that God “loved the world.” The Bible also says in Hebrews 2:9 that “Jesus tasted death for everyone,” and lastly in 1 John that Jesus was the propitiation “for the whole world” (1 John 2:2).

  1. Those are some key passages and questions to consider.
  2. First and first, let me state that everyone recognizes the boundaries of atonement.
  3. In his view, the atonement is limited in its efficacy, because the cross did not definitively redeem anybody, but rather made redemption possible for all.
  4. Everyone (with the exception of universalists) believes that atonement should be limited.
  5. As a Calvinist, I believe that the atonement is limited in scope.
  6. There is no way to improve on Christ’s work since it is unlimited and flawless in its own right.
  7. We have a choice when it comes to how we think about this restricting situation.
  8. B.
  9. “The two just cannot be combined.” Jesus Christ either died for everyone, for no one, or for those who have been chosen.

Nature of the Atonement

The Old Covenant sacrifices foreshadow the death of Christ in a number of ways, including types and shadows. They were created in the image of their source material, the ultimate sacrifice, the Lamb of God (Heb. 9:11-14; 13:10-13). When we read a scripture like as Leviticus 16, which describes the Day of Atonement, we see innocent animals being beaten to death for the sins and crimes of the humans. Imputation was the process by which the priest transferred the blame of the people to the chosen animal.

  • The Day of Atonement was dedicated to atoning for the sins of the people (even if only for a year).
  • As an alternative, it represents a completed atonement for the people of Israel.
  • He offered himself as a substitute for us.
  • He caused him, who had never known sin, to be sin on our behalf, so that we would be made the righteousness of God in him through our faith.
  • 3:13) For Christ also died for our sins once and for all, the righteous for the unjust, in order to reconcile us to God, having been put to death in the flesh but raised to life in the spirit (1 Pet.
  • What exactly does the term “redemption” imply?
  • It signifies that Christ paid for and obtained salvation on our behalf.

Christ’s blood purchased our redemption from sin and brought us closer to God (Rev.

He was able to gain eternal salvation (Heb.

The Bible says, “He gave himself for us in order that he might redeem us from all iniquity and purify us to himself a people zealous of good works for his own possession” (Tit.

It is insulting to the concept of redemption as an effective securement of release through the payment of a price and the exercise of power to consider it anything other than the effective accomplishment that secures the salvation of those who are its objects.

In the end, the only question is whether he did or did not do something.

If he doesn’t do it, then who is going to?

But, if he did, for whom was he doing it? According to the Bible, it would be unbiblical to conclude that Jesus satisfied the wrath of God by bearing the sins of those who were already in hell. Why is God punishing them a second time if he has already paid their penalty for their sin?

Intent of the Atonement

What was the motivation for the atonement? I appreciate how Steve Lawson responds to the question: “The scope of the atonement is determined by the aim of the atonement.” What did Jesus want to accomplish? What exactly was his plan for atonement entail? He assures us that he would give his life for his sheep—and only his sheep—if it meant the world to him. And I lay down my life for the sheep because I am the good shepherd, and I know my sheep, and my sheep know me, just as the Father knows me, and I know the Father; and I know my sheep because I am the good shepherd.

  • (See also John 10:16.) Does his intent and determination come over in this scene?
  • they will hear my voice.” Alternatively, if we may use a shorter phrase: “I must.
  • Jesus is having a conversation with several of the Jewish leaders about the purpose of his death as he speaks about it.
  • He keeps the scope of his sacrifice to a minimum.
  • (See also John 10:26.) Remember that Jesus has previously stated that he is willing to die for his flock (John 10:15).
  • The Lord is stating that his death is for those who are his sheep, and that they will recognize his voice when it is heard.
  • In his High Priestly prayer the night before his death, Jesus places a similar restriction on himself: “I am praying for them.” No, I’m not praying for the entire world; rather, I’m praying for those whom you have given me, since they are yours.

(See John 17.9-10 for further information.) Jesus intercedes on behalf of those who are his.

I don’t just pray for these things; I also ask for those who will believe in me because they will say so.

Jesus was crucified, died, and was resurrected in order to atone for our sins (1 Cor.

This occurred at a specific period in time that will never be duplicated in the future (Heb.

As a result, Jesus was able to complete the required salvation for all of his followers.

In talking about limited atonement, we’re talking about a restricted scope rather than a limited worth or power. As a result, many theologians prefer to use the terminology of specific redemption or specific atonement rather than general atonement.

Some Supposed Unlimited Atonement Passages

2nd chapter of Hebrews As a result of his death, we see him who was made for a brief period of time lower than the angels; that is, Jesus, who has been crowned with glory and honor because of his suffering, in order that he may taste death for everyone, by the mercy of God (Heb. 2:9) The importance of context cannot be overstated. Who exactly is everyone? We learn that he brings “many sons to glory” in verse 10, that they are “brethren” in verse 11, that they are “the children” in verse 14, that they are the descendants of Abraham in verse 16, that they are “his brethren” in verse 17, and that they are again “the people” in verse 18.

In other words, it is a reference to his flock or to everyone who is willing to believe.

(See John 3:16 for more information.) God’s love for the world is plainly stated in this scripture.

It restricts the scope of salvation to those who are willing to believe, saying, “that whomever believes in him shall not perish.” In this unique way, God showed his love for the world: those who believe (the participle is in the present tense), who maintain believing (that is to say, those who are believers), will have eternal life.

  1. Believing brings together the acts of loving and rescuing.
  2. We tend to conceive of “whosoever” as being extremely broad (with arms spread wide) rather than the particularity to which John appears to be alluding in this context (to believers).
  3. (1 John 2.2) 1 John 2.2 I believe that there is a valid explanation for the discussion around this paragraph.
  4. The point is essentially this: in what sense does Jesus serve as the propitiation for the sins of the entire human race?
  1. Second Chapter of Hebrews In contrast to this, we observe Jesus, who was made for a little period of time lower than the angels and crowned with glory and honor as a result of his death, in order that he may taste death on behalf of all people by the grace of God (Heb. 2:9) Having a sense of where you are is critical. Everybody? Who are you talking about here? We learn that he brings “many sons to glory” in verse 10, that they are “brethren” in verse 11, that they are “the children” in verse 14, that they are the descendants of Abraham in verse 16, that they are “his brethren” in verse 17, and that they are once more “the people” in verse 18 of the same chapter. I do not believe that everyone in this room is referring to everyone who has ever lived, but rather to the specific set of individuals who have previously been mentioned: Abraham’s numerous sons and daughters, his offspring, his descendants, his brethren, and the inhabitants of the land of Israel. For the sake of clarity, the phrase refers to his sheep, or anybody who would believe in them. the third chapter of John In fact, God loved the world so much that he gave his only born Son, so that whomever believes in him will not perish but but have eternal life with God. (See John 3:16 for more information. ) Clearly, God’s love for the world is expressed in this passage. The text, however, does not state that all of mankind will be saved just because Jesus came into the earth. It restricts the scope of salvation to those who are willing to believe, stating, “that whomever believes in him shall not perish. In this unique method, God showed his love for the world: those who believe (the participle is in the present tense), who maintain believing (that is to say, the believers), will be granted eternal life. In more literal terms, we may say, “God loves the world in this unique way, that he sent his only Son so that those who believe in him will not perish but will have eternal life. People who believe shall be rescued, according to the passage. Believing is the glue that holds loving and saving together. When John speaks of atonement, he is not referring to its scope, but rather to the motivation behind it (love) and the method of accessing it (faith). Rather than the particularity with which John appears to be emphasizing here, we tend to conceive of “whosoever” as extraordinarily broad (with arms spread wide) (to believers). the second chapter of 1 John He is the propitiation for our sins, and not just for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, as a result of his sacrifice. (1) 1 John 2.2
  2. (1 John 2.2) I believe that there is a valid explanation for the dispute around this passage of literature. People have had difficulty comprehending what John is trying to say because of this last remark. Simple enough: in what sense is Jesus the propitiation for the sins of the entire world is the question at hand. For this assignment, we need to answer three important questions:
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There are certain instances when it can refer to the entirety of creation, and other instances where it can refer to a bigger group of individuals than was first intended. Is it possible to comprehend John’s usage of this phrase if propitiation has been completed but not every person who has ever lived will be saved? Once again, I believe this is a more difficult stage. In the case of ambiguous passages, we should allow the portions that are more clear to throw light on the parts that are less obvious to us.

  1. At the same time, I believe that John’s other writings may include a clue to the solution.
  2. John is a Jew who served in a ministry that was mostly directed at Jews (Gal.
  3. Throughout the Old Testament, there was a growing expectation that the Messiah would save not only the Jews but also the entire world, that is, Gentiles as well as Jews (Gen.
  4. 56:8; Ezek.

This conclusion is voiced by Caiaphas in John’s Gospel, which is a bit surprising given the circumstances: However, one of them, Caiaphas, who happened to be the high priest that year, told them, “You know absolutely nothing.” “You also fail to see that it is preferable for you if one individual dies for the people rather than the entire nation perishes.” He did not declare this on his own initiative; rather, as high priest that year, he predicted that Jesus would suffer for the nation, and not just for the nation, but also for the purpose of uniting all of God’s children who were spread across the world.

As a result, they began making preparations to execute him the next day.

I’ll have to bring them along as well, and perhaps they’ll pay attention to my voice.

This leads me to conclude that just as Jesus is the advocate for his people, he also serves as the propitiation for their sins.

Everyone, not only Jews, but people from every tribe and tongue are included in this category of individuals (Rev. 5). I believe that by using the word “world” in this context, John is referring to a group of people from all over the world, rather than only the people of Israel.

John Owen’s Helpful Questions

It can apply to the entirety of creation at times, and it can also allude to a bigger group of individuals than was originally intended. Is it possible to comprehend John’s usage of this phrase if propitiation has been completed but not everyone who has ever lived will be saved? Another difficult paragraph, in my opinion. The rule of interpretation is to allow the portions that are more clear to throw light on the parts that are less clear. To help me grasp this verse, I’m fine with marshaling numerous other texts that relate to the nature and depth of the atonement into one place.

  1. To begin with, there are the Jews, followed by the rest of the world—everyone else in the first-century Jewish world.
  2. 2).
  3. 12:1-3; Is.
  4. 34:23; 37:24; Luke 2:22-38).
  5. Because of this, they began making preparations for his execution the following morning.
  6. According to John 10:16, “And I have other sheep that are not of this fold,” Jesus is saying.
  7. This means that the flock and the shepherd will be the same.
  8. This leads me to the conclusion that just as Jesus is the advocate for his people, he is also the propitiation for the sins of his people.
  9. 5).

Patience and Precision

I began by stating that when we pour into the Word in order to gain a greater understanding of Christ’s work, we are the ones who benefit. In order to assist ourselves and others in learning, we must do it with a feeling of humility.

Think for a moment about how inappropriate it is to find personal satisfaction in one’s own achievements when discussing atonement for one’s crimes! The kindness, care, and accuracy that this dialogue necessitates should be reflected in the way it is conducted.

Did Jesus Die for the Sins of Every Person Who Ever Lived?

In my introduction, I stated that when we study the Bible in order to gain a deeper understanding of Christ’s work, we are the benefactors. The fact that we are doing this to assist ourselves and others in learning should not be taken lightly. To understand how inappropriate it is to find personal pride when discussing atonement for our crimes, one simply has to think about it for a moment. The tenderness, patience, and accuracy that this type of communication demands should be evident throughout.

Did Jesus die for all sins?

Jesus died for all sins in one sense, but he did not die for all sins in another. He died for every single sin committed by anybody who puts their confidence in him; otherwise, they would not be able to be redeemed from God’s just punishment. Another interpretation is that Jesus did not die for blasphemy against the Holy Spirit since it is unforgiveable. “Therefore, I tell to you, every sin and blasphemy committed against mankind will be forgiven, but blasphemy committed against the Spirit will not be forgiven,” says Jesus (Matt.

  • Some people claim that Jesus did not die because of disbelief, however this cannot be accurate because there are numerous examples of individuals who did not believe in Jesus at the time of his death but later came to believe.
  • When we talk about Christians, we claim that Jesus paid the price for all of their sins, both past and present.
  • As a result, we must infer that Jesus took the full brunt of our sins.
  • God, who is all-knowing (1 John 3:20), is aware of every sin you have committed and will commit in the future.
  • The question of whether or not Jesus paid the penalty for the sins of people who are condemned to hell continues to be debated within Christianity.
  • Others (Calvinists) believe that Jesus only paid for the sins of those who have been redeemed; otherwise, there are persons in hell whose sins have already been paid for by Christ.
  • So, if you are a Christian, you may rest assured that Jesus has paid the price for all of your sins.
  • As a result, Jesus did not bear the penalty for that sin.

That means you have not committed the sin if you are concerned about it since that would indicate your sins have not been forgiven and the Holy Spirit would not be there to convict you of your sin.

Did Jesus die for everyone? My Calvinist friends say no.

Jesus died for all sins in one sense, but he did not die for all sins in another one. A person could not be redeemed from God’s just wrath unless he or she trusted in Christ to die for every single sin on their behalf. However, in another sense, Jesus did not die because of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, which is unforgivable. Therefore, I declare to you that any sin or blasphemy committed against mankind will be forgiven, but that blasphemy committed against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven” (Matt.

  1. It has been asserted that Jesus did not die because of unbelief, however this cannot be accurate because there are several examples of individuals who did not believe in Jesus at the time of his death, but afterwards came to believe.
  2. When we talk about Christians, we say that Jesus paid the penalty for all of their sins, both past and present.
  3. It follows that Jesus took upon himself the burden of all of our sins.
  4. Each and every sin you have committed and will commit is known to God, who is all-knowing (1 John 3:20).
  5. The question of whether or not Jesus paid the penalty for the sins of people who are in hell continues to be debated within Christianity.
  6. Others (Calvinists) believe that Jesus only paid for the sins of those who have been redeemed; otherwise, there are those in hell whose sins have already been paid for by Jesus.
  7. To sum it all up, as a believer in Jesus Christ, you may rest certain that He has atoned for all of your sins.
  8. As a result, Jesus did not atone for that particular sin.
  9. In that case, you have not committed the sin since your crimes would not have been forgiven and the Holy Spirit would not have been present in you to convict you of your sins.

For Limited Atonement

Is it possible that Jesus truly died for the sins of everyone who has ever lived? If that is the case, then why does anybody go to hell? This argument asserts that if Jesus truly did pay the price for everyone’s sins, including disbelief, then no one should be condemned to eternal punishment in hell. People must believe in order to be rescued, according to the counter-argument. As a result, even disbelief is a sin that has been paid for, and no one should be sent to torment as a result. However, given the fact that individuals do go to hell, it is reasonable to think that Jesus exclusively carried the sins of the believers.

Even if Jesus’ sacrifice was sufficient for everyone who believe in him, the Reformed theologians believe that it was not intended to be adequate for everyone. The following passages of Scripture are cited to justify limited atonement:

  • For this is My blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the remission of sins,” says Jesus in Matthew 26:28.
  • In accordance with Matt. 25:32-33, Jesus died for the sheep, not the goats.
  • “I am the good shepherd
  • The good shepherd lays down His life for the sheep.” John 10:11, 15 “I am the good shepherd
  • The good shepherd lays down His life for the flock.” 15In the same way that the Father knows Me and I know the Father, I lay down My life for the sheep.”
  • “And all the nations will be gathered before Him
  • And He will separate them from one another, just as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats
  • 33and He will place the sheep on His right and the goats on His left,” says Matthew 25:32-33.
  • In prayer, Jesus interceded just for those who had been assigned to Him, not for the entire world
  • The Bible says in John 17:9, “I pray on their behalf
  • I do not pray on behalf of the world, but on behalf of those whom Thou hast given Me
  • For they are Thine
  • ” and “I pray on their behalf
  • Not all mankind, but only the Church, was purchased by Christ.
  • Eph. 5:25-27, “Husbands, love your wives as Christ loved his church and gave himself up for her
  • 26that He might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word,27that He might present her to Himself in all her glory, having no spot or wrinkle or any other flaw.”
  • Acts 20:28, “Be on guard for yourselves and for all the flock, among which the Holy Spirit has appointed you overseers, to shepherd the church
  • Prediction of Jesus’ crucifixion, in which he would bear the sins of many (but not all) people
  • He will be allotted a part with the renowned, and He will divide the spoils with the powerful, because He poured out Himself to death, and was counted among the transgressors
  • Yet He Himself carried the sin of many, and interceded for the transgressors, according to Isaiah 53:12.
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Against Limited Atonement

Because the Bible states that Jesus died for everyone, it follows that Jesus died for everyone. God loves the world, not just the Christian, so much that He died for everyone, and it is up to each individual to decide whether or not to embrace Jesus as Savior. If he rejects Jesus, the atonement will not be applied to him, and he will be condemned to eternal damnation. However, Jesus’ death was not only adequate for everyone, but it was also planned for all. The following passages of Scripture are cited in favour of a limitless atonement:

  • When recorded in John 1:29, “The following day, as Jesus approached, he exclaimed, ‘Behold, the Lamb of God, who wipes away the sin of the world!'” For God so loved the world that He gave His only born Son, that whomever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. For example, John 4:42 states that the disciples told the woman, “It is no longer because of what you said that we believe, but because we have heard for ourselves and know that this One is actually the Savior of the world.” For example, 1 Tim. 4:10 says, “For it is for this that we struggle and strive, because we have set our hope on the living God, who is the Savior of all mankind, particularly of Christians.” The Bible says in 1 John 2:2, “and He Himself is the propitiation for our sins
  • And not only for ours, but also for the sins of the entire world.” John 4:14 says, “And we have seen and testified that the Father has sent his Son to be the Savior of the world.”

Conclusion: Did Jesus die for everyone?

There are some valid points and counter-points to be made on this subject. Both sides of the debate are populated by brilliant theologians. However, whether you believe in limited atonement or not, you must recognize that both people who believe in it and those who do not are still Christians (provided they acknowledge and trust in the true God and Christ). When it comes to teachings that do not directly influence our salvation, we must be tolerant of people with whom we disagree. So, whichever side of the Christian faith you identify with, remember to be courteous to people who do not share your beliefs.

Why Did Jesus Die?

According to EveryStudent.com The killing of Jesus Christ through crucifixion was reserved for the most heinous of offenders. In Jesus’ situation, it seems that almost everyone helped in some way. All of the Jewish religious authorities, the Gentile Roman authority, and an enraged crowd of people demanded his execution. Why? It all began in a little town in Israel, not far from the capital city of Jerusalem. Having reached the age of thirty, Jesus began to educate others about life and God. He drew a large number of people to him.

  1. He accepted not only the affluent and powerful, but also prostitutes, the impoverished, the sick, and others who were excluded in society.
  2. “He who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will be illuminated by the light of life,” Jesus says.
  3. As a result of what they witnessed.
  4. He started with a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread and worked his way up to feeding a 4,000-person hungry gathering.
  5. At sea, Jesus arose and ordered the wind and rain to cease, bringing about a brief respite from the storm.

“Who is this, that even the wind and the seas bow down to him?” the guys in the boat inquired. 3On several occasions, he was able to bring the dead back to life. It’s no surprise that Jesus drew large audiences and that news about him spread.

So Why Was Jesus Crucified?

As Jesus taught the masses, he was also critical of the religious authority in power at the time. They made a show of their authority, insisting on strict adherence to their stringent rituals, rules, and cultural customs. “They bind together huge loads that are difficult to carry and place them on people’s shoulders,” Jesus remarked of them. 4 “You hypocrites!” he said, in a direct challenge to their position. Isaiah accurately saw your future when he declared, “This nation respects me with their lips, but their hearts are distant from me; in vain do they worship me, teaching the laws of men as doctrines.” 5 In the case of the Sabbath, for example, they were very rigid.

  • It was more limiting than it was soothing in its effects.
  • In response, Jesus instructed the guy to take up his mat and walk.
  • “It is the Sabbath, and it is not permissible for you to be carrying your mat,” the Pharisees told him when they spotted him.
  • He did not take a break on the Sabbath.
  • 6

Jesus Was Clear about His Deity.

Knowing Jesus, according to him, was to know God. 7To behold him was to behold God. 8Believing in him was the same as believing in God. 9To accept him was to accept God as well. 10To despise him was to despise God. 11And to honor him was to worship God, for he was the embodiment of holiness. Following Jesus’ popularity, the Jewish Pharisees and Sadducees determined that they needed to get rid of him in order to restore control over the people’s hearts and minds. They captured Jesus and took him before the high priest, who questioned Jesus, “Are you the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?” (Are you the Son of the Blessed?) I am,” Jesus said, and you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of Power, descending on the clouds of sky to meet you.

And they all agreed that he was a murderer who deserved to die.

This means that both Jewish and Gentile people took part in Jesus’ murder.

He thought that Jesus should be freed from his imprisonment.

“Crucify him!” they cried out in unison. “Put him to death!” Pilate acceded to the demands of the throng. The judgment was death by crucifixion, the form of torture and execution used by the Roman authorities.

Jesus Knew This Would Happen

Jesus was completely unsurprised by all of this. Jesus informed his followers several times previous to his crucifixion that he was going to be arrested, beaten, and crucified, and he was right. His predictions included the possibility of a resurrection three days after his burial. By physically returning to life, Jesus would be able to demonstrate what he had declared about his deity. The soldiers grabbed Jesus and beat him after making a wreath of long thorns and pressing it into his head to serve as a false crown for him.

  • In many cases, forty lashes were enough to bring down a person.
  • He died of gradual asphyxia and heart failure while hanging there.
  • Death on the cross was not only a natural result of Jesus’ miracles and teachings; it was also a deliberate act.
  • Jesus had previously demonstrated that he has complete control over nature, illness, and even death.
  • Jesus might have walked away from the crucifixion at any point, given the circumstances.
  • Jesus made the decision to die.
  • “I choose to lay it down of my own own.” 14 The decision to do so was deliberate on his part.
  • Intentional.

Why Did Jesus Allow His Crucifixion?

We operate in ways that are diametrically contrary to God’s methods to varied degrees. Take a short look at the news on any given day and you will see what I mean. Racism, murders, sexual abuse, falsehoods, greed, corruption, terrorism, and wars, to name a few examples of wrongdoing. As individuals, we have a proclivity for causing havoc in our own and other people’s lives. God views us as lost and blind, and he holds us accountable for our actions. Consider how appalled and heartbroken we are to learn that a 6-year-old child has been taken from her family and is being subjected to sexual exploitation.

  • All of human sin, on the other hand, is an insult to a holy God.
  • We don’t even live up to our own expectations, let alone those of another person.
  • So, what would a God who is absolutely holy see?
  • 15 God instructs the Israelites to sacrifice a lamb once a year for the remission of their sins in the Old Testament, which explains why they must do so once a year.
  • However, this was just a momentary reprieve.
  • When Jesus arrived, the prophet John the Baptist proclaimed about him, “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sins of the world.” (John 1:29) 16 Jesus came to earth to bear the penalty for humanity’s sin, namely for our sin, on the cross in our place.
  • To save us from God’s wrath, condemnation, and punishment for our sin, Jesus came to earth as our Savior in order to save us from ourselves.

Jesus was fully aware of every sin you have ever done or will commit while he was hanging on the cross. It was Jesus who bore the penalty for our sins on our behalf.

DaVinci’s Last Supper

You’ve probably seen the iconic artwork by Leonardo da Vinci depicting the “Last Supper,” in which Jesus sits at a long table with the disciples seated next to him on each side of him on either side of the table. The supper that Jesus shared with his followers the night before he was captured and killed was shown by Da Vinci in this painting. As part of that “Last Supper,” Jesus promised his followers that his blood would be shed “for the remission of sins” for all people. 17 On the cross, Jesus, who had done no sin, paid the penalty for our sin.

We weren’t deserving of him taking our position in the world.

The Bible tells us that “God demonstrates his love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” 18

Our Response to the Crucifixion of Jesus

What is it that he expects of us? In order to make amends and gain our forgiveness? No. We will never be able to repay Jesus for all he has done for us. What he demands of us is straightforward. to put their faith in him He urges us to embrace his dying on our behalf, as well as his total and unconditional forgiveness, as a gift from him. Surprisingly, many people do not want to go through with it. They desire to put up an effort to win their salvation. They must earn their way into paradise.

  • In response to their rejection of everything Jesus has done for them, Jesus stated they will die in their sin and face judgment.
  • Moreover, everlasting life and an intimate, personal contact with God are also available now, while we are living on the earth.
  • Jesus was not simply absorbing the consequences of our wrongdoing.
  • He was extending far more than just forgiveness to those who needed it.
  • This is analogous to a wealthy billionaire not only canceling a debt owed to him, but also transferring ownership of his whole estate to the individual who was unable to pay the amount back in full.
  • It is entirely up to us whether or not we accept the gift of a connection with him that he is presenting to us.

His Offer to Us

Anyone who would invite Jesus into their lives and accept his free gift of forgiveness and eternal life will establish a relationship with him that will last for the rest of their lives. Following Jesus’ crucifixion, they buried him in a tomb and stationed a trained Roman guard of soldiers at the tomb to keep watch over him. Why? Jesus had stated on several occasions that he will rise from the dead three days after his his body. Everything he had declared about himself will be proven correct.

After then, Jesus appeared physically to the disciples several times, first to a throng of 500 people, then to individuals.

Each of them was murdered for it, in separate parts of the world from one another, because they were so sure of Jesus’ identity.

“We have come to know and believe in the love that God has for us,” says the apostle John in his book of Revelation.

Whoever lives in love is a part of God.

Here’s how you can do it.

Please accept my apologies.

You have complete control over my life.

Amen.” In the case of someone who has only recently asked Jesus into their lives, his crucifixion signifies that you have accepted his gift, that you have been forgiven, and that you have an eternal connection with him.

Footnotes: (1) John 8:12; (2) Matthew 9:35; (3) (3) 4:41 (Matthew 4:41) (4) Jesus said in Matthew 23:4 (5), Matt 15:9 (6), and John 5:18 (7) John 8:19 (eighth) John 12:45 (eighth) John 14:9 (ninth) (9) John 12:44 and 14:1 are two of the most important passages in the Bible (10) 9:37 (Matthew 9:37) (11) 15:23 (John 15:23) John 5:23 (12) (13) Mark 14:61,62 (KJV) (14) 10:18 (John 10:18) (15) Acts 10:43 (16) Romans 6:23 (17) John 1:29 (18) Matthew 26:28 (19) Romans 5:8 (20) Acts 10:43 (20) Paul writes in Romans 6:23 that (21) 14:6 (John 14:6) (22) (23), John 5:24 (24), John 17:25,26 (23) 1John 4:16,17 (24)

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