Who Betrayed Jesus Judas And Peter

Peter and Judas: A Tale of Two Betrayals

When Jesus came to the world, He did so with a purpose and a mission: to serve, to redeem by offering Himself as a sacrifice for our sins, and to establish the church through His apostles until the day of His resurrection. The church was then tasked with the task of spreading the Gospel. Each of Jesus’ twelve disciples, who were hand-picked by Him, followed Him throughout their lives. Most believers would agree that Judas and Simon Peter, two of the most well-known of these twelve, are diametrically opposed to one another.

However, a close examination of the Gospels reveals an intriguing pattern.

Peter was the one who was always losing his cool.

Peter received revelation from the Holy Spirit regarding the true nature of Jesus.

By contrasting and contrasting these two men, a picture of two types of sinners is painted: those who come to Jesus and those who do not.

What Do the Gospels Say about Judas?

Judas Iscariot’s early life may only be inferred from what is known about him now. The Gospel of John claims that he was the son of a man named Simon Iscariot, according to the Gospel of John. The title “Iscariot” is also up for question among experts, with some believing it relates to a place, a Jewish group, or even a slang term meaning liar. The last two scenarios are regarded the least plausible, although they are still being discussed. Judas is listed by name as one of the twelve apostles who were hand-picked by Jesus in all four of the Gospels.

  1. There is no indication that Judas failed in this endeavor.
  2. In John 12:6, the apostle adds that Judas was in charge of the apostle’s moneybag, a position of trust that required honesty and integrity.
  3. The avarice of Judas is a theme that appears repeatedly in the Bible, notably in the Gospel of John.
  4. In his Gospel, John illustrates the extent to which Judas’ desire of money extends.
  5. He asked this question not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief, and having charge of the moneybag he used to help himself to what was put into it (John 12:4-6).

Given how desirous the religious leaders were to have Jesus arrested, it’s likely that he might have negotiated a property deal or political advantages in exchange. He asked for what he actually desired – financial gain – and received it.

What Do the Gospels Say about Peter?

This apostle, who was born Simon son of Judah and renamed Peter by the Lord Jesus, began his life as a fisherman in the town of Capernaum. Peter did have a wife, albeit it is not known who she was at this time. It is mentioned in all three of the Synoptic Gospels that Jesus cured his mother-in-law. His brother Andrew was also an apostle, and the two of them collaborated with the Sons of Zebedee, who were also apostles at the time of Jesus’ death. Peter, like Judas, is mentioned in all four Gospel accounts of Jesus’ life, and he would go on to write two more writings that would be included in the New Testament.

  • Peter and his brother were invited to be fishers of mankind.
  • According to Matthew, Jesus affirms that the Holy Spirit is directing Peter by saying, “Simon Peter responded, ‘You are the Christ, the Son of the living God,'” confirming that the Holy Spirit is guiding Peter.
  • As for you, I say, “You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell will not prevail against it.
  • Peter was completely devoted to Jesus and His teachings, and he followed Him.
  • While Judas wrestled with greed, Simon Peter is characterized by arrogance and a short fuse.
  • Peter’s hubris was so powerful that, even after Jesus foretold his denial, he failed to repent of his sin.
  • ‘Truly, I tell you, this very night, before the rooster crows, you will deny me three times,’ Jesus declared to him.

“And all of the disciples agreed on this.” (Matthew 26:33-35; Mark 10:33-35).

His initial inclination was to attack the first person he came across.

He attempted to fight in the manner of a warrior, but this proved to be the incorrect strategy.

During the course of Jesus’ trial, he denied his Lord three times.

Peter betrayed his Savior in order to spare himself anguish and suffering.

He was still far from perfect; for example, he was reprimanded by Paul for refusing to associate with Christians who were not Jewish.

Peter’s conduct was changed once he was reminded to live like Christ.

Peter’s Christian journey was one of development, as he faced his sins, repented, and continued to progress. He placed his confidence in the proper place, in his savior Jesus Christ, and matured in character as a result of his faith in Christ.

How Did Judas and Peter Respond to Jesus Christ?

There has been a tremendous lot of discussion as to what Judas’ final motivation for betraying Christ was. Was it a case of sheer greed? Were his expectations dashed when Jesus did not lead a military uprising against Rome, as many had believed the foretold Messiah would? The question of whether or not Judas can be held accountable for his treachery is likewise a source of heated dispute. Was he complicit in this crime despite his displeasure with it? The verse “Then Satan entered Judas named Iscariot” in Luke 22:3 does not mention so.

  1. The manner in which Judas approached Jesus is perhaps the most obvious indicator that he felt differently about Jesus than the other disciples.
  2. It is recorded in Matthew’s narrative that when Jesus predicted that someone would betray Him, “and they were exceedingly unhappy, and one after another they started to cry to him, ‘Is it I, Lord?'” (Matthew 26:22; Mark 12:22).
  3. It is recorded in the Gospel of John that the disciple asked Jesus, “Lord, who is it?” as he leans back on Jesus’ feet.
  4. A significant discrepancy may be found in the Gospels’ account of Judas’ interrogation: “Judas, who would betray him, said, ‘Is it I, Rabbi?'” “He told him, ‘You have said so,'” he explained (Matthew 26:25).
  5. Judas addressed Him as “Rabbi.” This Hebrew term meaning teacher was an honorable and distinguished title that acknowledged Jesus’ understanding of the Old Testament, but it did not accept Jesus’ divinity, authority, or due status as the Son of God, as the New Testament does.
  6. Jesus was only a guy in Judas’ eyes.
  7. The fact that he had betrayed someone who had not committed a crime and who had been condemned rather than the murderer Barabas made him feel awful.
  8. Peter, on the other hand, was well aware of who Jesus Christ was.
  9. He was well aware that he was the Son of the Living God.
  10. When Jesus appeared to Judas, he performed the same miracles and taught him the same things as the other apostles and disciples.

He did not place his confidence in Jesus in the same way that Peter did. The essential distinction between Judas and Peter is their differing perspectives on who Jesus was and what he did.

What Can We Learn from These Two Men?

Both Peter and Judas fought with sin during their time with Jesus throughout His earthly ministry – one with pride, the other with greed – but they were able to overcome their difficulties. They both sat at His feet, watched His miracles, and learnt about the Kingdom of Heaven throughout their time with Him. Both Peter and Judas made the decision to betray Jesus on the night of Passover. Judas sold the Rabbi to the religious officials in order to achieve financial benefit, while Peter denied any relationship with the man whom He addressed as Lord.

  • Both of them betrayed their Lord, but only one of them came to repent.
  • Jesus made bold statements about Himself, and his claims were backed up by miracles like as healing the sick, feeding the hungry, and raising the dead prior to His crucifixion and death.
  • In the end, Judas was unable to bring himself to place his faith in Jesus Christ, which finally led to his demise.
  • The apostle Peter placed his trust in Jesus, despite the fact that he first looked to be struggling with external sins; in fact, Jesus said that Peter did not always grasp His teachings.
  • Even after he had betrayed Jesus by denying Him and failing to defend Him at the trial, he returned.
  • This is an example that Christians can follow in the modern era.
  • Sin and mistakes will occur, but God is always willing to forgive and forget.

Sources

Calvin, Jean, David Torrance, and Thomas Torrane are all members of the Torrane family. A Musical Arrangement of the Gospels Volume 1 of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. The William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1994. Alfred Edersheim’s work is a good example of how to combine a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formal The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah are detailed in this book.

  1. The William B.
  2. Feinberg, John S., and Basinger, David.
  3. Kregel Publications, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2001.
  4. On the subject of illustrious men The CUA Press, in Washington, D.C., published this book in 1999.
  5. Dwight.
  6. Dwight.” Jesus Christ’s Words and Deeds are the foundation of the Christian faith.
  7. Source: Public Domain Image courtesy of Leonardo Da Vinci

Bethany Verretti is a writer and editor who works as a freelancer. She writes a religion and lifestyle blog, graceandgrowing.com, where she ponders the Lord, life, culture, and ministry, as well as other topics.

Bethany Verretti is a writer and editor who works as a freelancer. She writes a religion and lifestyle blog, graceandgrowing.com, where she ponders the Lord, life, culture, and ministry, as well as other topics.

Last Supper Thoughts: The True Difference Between Peter and Judas

Jesus intentionally picked twelve persons from among all of the men and women on the face of the earth to be His closest companions, confidants, disciples, and followers. They were sinners with flaws, just like the rest of us. No one else is proved to be more wicked than Simon Peter and Judas Iscariot, who are the two most sinful of the twelve. Despite this, no two persons could be more unlike in terms of their eventual positions in the early Church and their current reputations. When the events of the Passion of Christ are carefully examined, it becomes clear that Simon Peter and Judas Iscariot act in very similar ways.

It is at this time that one solidifies his reputation as a betrayer of Christ, while the other transforms his life and becomes renowned as one of Jesus’ most dedicated servants, with churches named after him, books published about him, and innumerable offspring carrying his name as evidence.

  • Simon was a fisherman who lived in Capernaum with his wife and mother-in-law. He was the brother of Andrew and the son of Jonah. Simon’s brother Andrew introduces him to Jesus, and within a short period of time, Simon decides to follow Christ and give up everything he knows. In his acts, he is hasty and aggressive, and at times he appears to be somewhat unsure, but he is resolutely loyal to Jesus and believes that He is the promised Messiah. Peter is given a new name by Jesus, and he is given the keys to the kingdom of heaven by Jesus (Matthew 16:16-20). Peter is frequently summoned to Jesus’ side, and in his capacity as their leader, he speaks on their behalf. It is undeniable that Simon Peter had a specific function among the twelve, but it is possible that his leadership role caused him to feel like an alien to the rest of the twelve
  • Judas, unlike the rest of the twelve, was not from Galilee. His given name, Iscariot, indicating that he came from the tribe of Judah. No Gospel informs us how Jesus invited him to accompany Him, but the Gospel of John recalls that he, too, played a unique duty among the twelve apostles: he was in charge of the money bag (12:6). Even though Judas looks reckless, brash, and at times somewhat unsure in his acts, it is clear from his actions that he must have had some form of confidence in Jesus to follow Him during the course of Jesus’ years in the ministry. Because of his geographical origin, he may have felt like an outcast among the other twelve members.
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These two individuals appear to have many of the same or very comparable conditions and experiences that would lead them to have trust in Jesus prior to the crucifixion and death of Jesus, by all means and measurements. The fact that they witnessed firsthand the numerous miracles performed by Christ, listened to His profound teachings, and were able to encounter Him very directly is enough to merit praise. They both, however, betray Jesus.

  • A man named Judas Iscariot makes money by selling information about Jesus to the very people who want Him killed. He takes the chief priests and Pharisees to Jesus, identifying Him among the disciples and betraying Him to them. He is the one who brought them to Jesus. The Bible says (Matthew 26:47
  • Mark 14:43
  • Luke 22:47
  • John 18:3) that Simon Peter, like Judas, betrays Jesus. Despite the fact that he accompanies Jesus after His arrest, he sits in the courtyard at a distance. He takes a further step away from both Jesus and his closest friends, the other apostles of Christ, by asserting that he has never met either Christ or the followers of Christ. In the following passages: (Matthew 26:58-75
  • Mark 14:54-72
  • Luke 22:54-62
  • John 18:15-27)

When it comes to Jesus, Judas Iscariot sells knowledge to the very ones who want Him dead. He takes the chief priests and Pharisees to Jesus, identifying Him among the disciples and betraying Him to them. He is the one who brings them to Jesus. The Bible says (Matthew 26:47; Mark 14:43; Luke 22:47; John 18:3) And so does Simon Peter, who turns on his Master. Despite the fact that he accompanies Jesus after His arrest, he sits in the courtyard at a distance from him. When he claims to have never met Jesus or any of his closest friends, the other apostles of Christ, he further isolates himself from both Jesus and his closest companions.

  • Judas’s innermost thoughts were known to Jesus. “Jesus knew from the beginning the ones who would not believe and the ones who would betray him,” John writes in his account of the Feeding of the Five Thousand (John 6:65). In addition, He announces at the Passover meal that someone will betray Him (Matthew 26:24-25
  • Mark 14:18-21
  • Luke 22:21-23
  • John 13:21-30)
  • Peter professes in front of the other disciples at the Last Supper that he would willingly die for Jesus (Matthew 26:24-25
  • And the disciples themselves profess their willingness to die for Peter’s heart, on the other hand, was known to Jesus. Specifically, He predicts that Peter would refuse Him three times (Matthew 26:30-35
  • Mark 14:26-31
  • Luke 22:31-34
  • John 13:33-38)
  • And He predicts that Peter will deny Him once (Matthew 26:30-35
  • Mark 14:26-31)

In a similar vein, Jesus anticipates that we will commit sin. Maybe it isn’t quite as dramatic and detailed as Jesus’ prophecies for Judas and Peter, but Jesus is well aware that we will all fail at some time in our lives. We do, however, have a choice in every situation. Judas made the decision to betray Jesus in exchange for money. Peter made the decision to deny Jesus in order to ensure his own safety and security. They were under no obligation to do such things, just as you and I are under no obligation to sin.

  1. Unlike puppets, we are not being led about by a Divine Puppet master.
  2. We are God’s adopted children.
  3. Children have free will, as every parent, godparent, grandmother, aunt, uncle, or nearly anybody who has had any experience with a little kid understands instinctively.
  4. What a remarkable accuracy Jesus has in referring to us as children!) We may not be dealing with the same issues, but Jesus understands what’s going on within each of our hearts.
  5. He knows, and He offers us the opportunity to choose Him, to choose good, to choose the difficult in whatever case.
  6. And even if (and, let’s be honest, when) we fail, He provides us with the opportunity to repent and return to Him.
  7. It is the foundation of all He does and preaches.

All He asks of us when we sin, when we turn away from Him and His most loving desire, is that we repent and return to Him. Despite this, they are both filled with regret.

  • After discovering that Jesus has been sentenced to die, Judas Iscariot expresses sorrow for his actions. Matthew 27:4 says that he returns the money to the chief priests and Pharisees, saying, “I have sinned in betraying innocent blood.” A rooster crows just as Simon Peter is about to reject Jesus for the second time. In Matthew 26:75, Jesus is reminded of his treachery and “began to cry bitterly” as a result.

When Peter heard Christ’s summons for penance and repentance, he rushed running to Him. I can only guess that Judas was attracted to the exact same message that I was attracted to. Both of them were aware from the outset that Jesus was compassionate, forgiving, and loving toward them. He told them stories about chasing after a lost sheep, a lost penny, or a lost kid, among other things (Luke 15). They have often heard him preach forgiveness to them. They seen him treat sinners on a number of occasions.

  1. In a way, Peter and Judas had to have known that Jesus would return their affections and forgiveness.
  2. While one disciple returns to the other disciples and waits with them in terror, the other rushes to the empty tomb, confronts Our Lord, repents, proclaims his mission with renewed determination, leads many to conversion, and eventually gives his life in defense of the faith.
  3. What was it in Peter’s heart that compelled him to return, repent, and confess all of the injustice he had done to the church?
  4. We can conjecture, but only God knows what is in the hearts of men, what is in the minds of Judas and Peter, and when their betrayals took place.
  5. We will never know what was in Judas’s heart when he committed suicide, and we will never know if he was doomed for his wickedness.
  6. However, I believe both Judas and Peter possessed hearts that were akin to ours, hearts that were flawed like ours.
  7. I believe that the same faith that moved Judas to return the money as an act of repentance was also the same faith that moved Peter to weep bitterly and then wait in hope with the rest of the disciples, as well.

The other, on the other hand, returns.

Jesus never left their side, despite the fact that they had both left His.

St.

” Without a doubt, grace was even more present to both Judas and Peter at their deepest moments of sin, during their betrayal of Jesus, than it had been previously.

The grace of the Holy Spirit, the mercy of Jesus, and the love of God were all present to them in the midst of their particular sins and betrayals of Jesus, even in the midst of their darkness.

Grace, on the other hand, elicited a response from Peter.

Both had heard Jesus announce that he would be crucified, buried, and resurrected from the dead.

Both of them were really sorry for what they had done.

Both of them had no concrete information, no tangible evidence, no assurance, and no absolute sure that the Lord would accept their repentance after what they had done, and they were both terrified.

It was a more scary risk than making the decision to follow Christ in the first place, a more terrifying gesture than abandoning all they knew and loved, and a more arduous route than they had ever travelled before in their lives.

Coming back meant putting their faith into action in a way that they had never done before, which was unprecedented.

What a bleak period of time preceded the Resurrection!

Peter was well aware that Jesus would die.

Alternatively, Peter could have continued to run, run all the way back to his hometown of Capernum and back to his boat, back to his fishing nets, and back to his safe, comfortable, and certain way of life.

After the courtyard, he went to the other disciples, waiting in hope with them for the Lord to fulfill His promises, trusting that even in the darkest of times and the most serious of sins that the Lord would not promise forgiveness to everyone but him.

He did not begrudge Peter.

He rose, just as He said.

Jesus later appears in the flesh multiple times to Peter, allowing him to re-profess his love for Christ.

Well, if he’s anything like the bumbling idiot in the Gospels that I dearly love as a brother in Christ, I’m quite certain the answer is yes.

As much as we like to think our sin defines us, it does not.

Pope John Paul II said in Toronto during World Youth Day in 2002,“We are not the sum of our weaknesses and failures; we are the sum of the Father’s love for us and our real capacity to become the image of his Son.” – St.

Judas only allows himself to be defined by his sin because he runs away, does not allow the Lord to heal him, and does not redefine himself through Jesus as a son of God.

Peter and Judas both betrayed Jesus.

Really, imagine if the roles were reversed.

At some point, you and I have to decide who we are.

We all betray Jesus.

But our sin is not the end of the story.

Jesus was raised, and through Him, we can be reborn to a new life.

Christ is calling you home.

Christ wants you to run to His empty tomb, to see His glory, to embrace His love.

The question is:are you Judas and hanging yourself by your sin, keeping your distance from Christ, or are you Peter, coming to your spiritual brothers and sisters in hopeful waiting and running to the empty tomb when Christ calls?

Which Disciple Betrayed Jesus

Hearing Christ’s plea for penance and repentance, Peter responded by coming to Him. To guess further, I can only assume that Judas was drawn to the same message as the apostles. Both of them realized right once that Jesus was compassionate, forgiving, and loving. To them, he told parables about searching for a missing sheep, a misplaced penny, or a misplaced kid (Luke 15). He preached forgiveness over and over again to the crowds in the church. Throughout the course of the day, they witnessed him heal sinners.

  • Jesus had to have known that Peter and Judas would be returned to him in some way.
  • While one disciple returns to the other disciples and waits with them in terror, the other rushes to the empty tomb, confronts Our Lord, repents, proclaims his mission with renewed commitment, leads many to conversion, and eventually gives his life in defense of the faith.
  • Who knows what was going on in Peter’s heart that caused him to turn around, repent, and confess all he had done wrong.
  • But only God knows what is in the hearts of men, and only He knows what was going on in the hearts of Judas and Peter at the moment of their betrayals.
  • We will never know what was going through Judas’s mind when he committed himself, nor will we ever know if he was doomed for his sins.
  • Jedidiah and Peter had hearts like ours, I believe, albeit they were both betrayed by their own consciences.
  • I believe that the same faith that moved Judas to return the money as an act of repentance was also the same faith that moved Peter to weep bitterly and then wait in hope with the rest of the apostles.

The other, on the other hand, comes back again.

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However, even though they both left His side, Jesus never abandoned them.

For, as St.

” Without a doubt, grace was even more present to both Judas and Peter at their deepest moments of sin, during their betrayal of Jesus, than it had before been.

Even in the midst of their particular sins, their betrayals of Jesus, the grace of the Holy Spirit, Jesus’ mercy, and God’s love were present to both of them in the darkness.

Grace, on the other hand, elicited a positive response from Peter.

After hearing Jesus announce that he would be crucified and risen from the dead, they were both moved to action.

Their sin had left them both feeling extremely regretful.

Neither had any concrete evidence, no tangible evidence, no assurance, and no absolute surety that the Lord would accept their repentance for what they had done after what they had done.

It was a more scary risk than making the decision to follow Christ in the first place, a more terrifying gesture than abandoning all they knew and loved, and a more arduous route than they had ever traveled before.

For them, returning meant putting their faith to the test, maybe more so than any other time in their lives.

Prior to the Resurrection, what a dismal period of time it was.

Peter had a premonition that Jesus was going to be crucified.

Alternatively, Peter might have continued to run, run all the way back to his hometown of Capernum, back to his boat, back to his fishing nets, and back to his secure, comfortable, and assured way of life.

After leaving the courtyard, he joined the other disciples in waiting for the Lord to fulfill His promises.

Peter, on the other hand, was not forgotten by the Lord.

He followed through on His promises.

“But go and tell his disciplesand Peter, ‘He is going before you to Galilee; there you will see him, as he promised you,'” the angels tell the women, who were the first to see the empty tomb.

Is it possible that Peter sinned again?

He continued to struggle and seek Christ until he died on the cross, which we know because of his martyrdom, preaching, travels, and letters that he wrote to his family and friends.

During World Youth Day in Toronto in 2002, St.

Pope John Paul II, accessible in his address here When we turn away from the rich, forgiving love of the Father, we allow ourselves to be defined by our sin.

In the end, Peter’s ministry is all that defines him because he returned, enabled the Lord to heal him through forgiveness, and reinvented himself as a cherished son of God through Jesus Christ.

Consider what might have happened if Peter had hung himself and Judas had repented.

What would we make of each and every one of them?

We are all guilty of sin.

We are all trying to get away from God, and we are hurting each other in the process.

Similarly, just as the cross does not mark the conclusion of Jesus’ tale, sin is not intended to mark the conclusion of ours.

However, the first step toward redemption is recognizing that we need redemption, confessing that we’ve strayed from God, admitting that we need to return to God, and responding to the grace to return that is currently available.

Despite your best efforts, Christ will never cease calling you back to Himself.

The dilemma is: are you Judas, hanging yourself by your sin and keeping your distance from Christ, or are you Peter, going to your spiritual brothers and sisters in hopeful waiting and sprinting to the empty tomb when Christ summons you to come and see him?

Judas, the betrayer

By the time the Gospel authors were ready to record their encounters with Jesus, enough time had passed for them to reflect on all that had transpired during their time with him. It is possible to acquire brief glimpses of their sentiments about Judas as a result of this. The three Gospel authors who spent time with Jesus, Matthew, Mark, and John, are nearly unable to control their emotions. Every single one of them includes personal comments about Judas in their narrative. Towards the end of Matthew’s introduction to the disciples, he concludes with Judas, saying, “.

It was around this period that Jesus alienated many of His disciples by talking of eating His flesh and drinking His blood, according to John.

Peter answered in a sensible manner, “Who, Lord, do you want us to go?

We have come to accept and recognize that you are the Holy One of God, and we thank you for that “(See also John 6:68–69.) John goes on to say: “Jesus then said, ‘Have I not selected you, the Twelve?’ ‘Yet one of you is a demon,’ says another.

Judas’s problematic behavior

In retrospect, it’s likely that the disciples compared notes and concluded that something wasn’t quite right with Judas from the start. Nonetheless, there was no reason not to provide the benefit of the doubt to Judas at the moment. However, the Gospel authors reveal that there were issues with Judas from the beginning. This is the narrative that John tells us: Approximately six days before the Passover holiday, Jesus traveled to Bethany, where Lazarus resided, whom Jesus had resurrected from the grave six days before the holiday.

  • Meanwhile, Lazarus was among those seated around the table with him, serving as his server.
  • Furthermore, the perfume enveloped the entire house with its scent.
  • It was worth the equivalent of a year’s earnings.” In fact, he did not say this because he cared about the poor, but rather because, in his capacity as keeper of the money bag, he used to take advantage of the situation by taking what was placed in it (John 12:1–6, emphasis added).
  • They probably all noticed him doing things that were out of the ordinary, but they didn’t pay attention to them.

Most likely, it was at this point that they began to notice Judas’s habits. Judas makes a great deal about caring for the poor in this scene, but John reveals that his true purpose was to pilfer the money from the poor.

Striking a deal with the chief priests

The decision to betray Jesus comes at some time, and Matthew informs us that Judas is the one who approaches the chief priests and arranges a deal: “What are you ready to offer me if I bring him up to you?” demanded one of the Twelve, the man known as Judas Iscariot, as he approached the chief priests. As a result, they counted out thirty pieces of silver for him. The rest of Matthew 26:14–16 tells how Judas waited for a chance to deliver him up to the authorities. What could possibly motivate him to do such a thing?

  • Because of this, it is possible that Judas was filled with regret when, instead of demonstrating His might and strength, Jesus was captured and condemned to die.
  • It also helps to explain why Judas promptly returned the money he had taken as a reward for betraying the Lord and then proceeded to hang himself (Matthew 27:1–5) once he was caught.
  • The following is Luke’s account of Judas’ betrayal: In preparation for the Passover festival, the chief priests and other teachers of the law were scrambling to find a method to expel Jesus from Jerusalem because they were scared of the people’s reaction to his teachings.
  • Afterwards, Judas proceeded to the leading priests and officers of the temple guard, where he discussed with them the possibility of betraying Jesus.
  • Then he consented and waited for a moment to deliver Jesus over to them when there was no throng around (Luke 22:1–6, emphasis added).
  • Apparently, Luke wants us to realize that there were supernatural powers at work in this situation.
  • As soon as Jesus passed his test, Luke informs us that “after the devil had done all of his enticing, he withdrew and left him till an appropriate moment” (Luke 4:13).
  • Judas then led the leading priests and guards into the garden, adding more agonizing insult to the wounds.
  • “Judas, are you betraying the Son of Man with a kiss?” Jesus said, knowing why Judas was present.

Judas, the son of perdition

When all was said and done, Judas’s image had been tarnished irreparably. As a misunderstood person in need of compassion, the other disciples never looked him in the eyes again. The last chapter of John’s Gospel contains Jesus’ prayer to God for the protection of the disciples. He makes the following observation: “While I was with them, I protected them and kept them secure by using the name you gave me,” he says. Except for the one who was condemned to destruction, no one has been lost in order for Scripture to be fulfilled (John 17:12, emphasis added).

The employment of the same terminology in this context is not an accident. Judas allowed himself to be used by the devil to accomplish evil purposes, and Judas will never be remembered for anything other than his role as a traitor. This is in stark contrast to Peter’s previous experience.

Peter turns his back on Jesus

There’s no denying that Peter was a vital member of the community. Peter was a member of Jesus’ inner group, along with the brothers James and John. Jesus was acknowledged as the long-awaited Messiah by both Peter and the rest of the disciples. As a result, how did Peter come to betray his Lord and Savior? A Passover feast is the setting for this story, which takes place immediately before Jesus is arrested. Towards the end of the evening, they engage in the following conversation: Jesus then informed them that “this very night you will all slip away as a result of my presence, for it is written: ‘I will strike the shepherd, and all the sheep of the flock will be dispersed.'” I will, however, travel ahead of you into Galilee once I have risen from the dead.” “Even if everything falls apart because of you, I will never give up.” Peter said.

In response, Jesus stated, “Truly I tell you, this very night, before the rooster crows, you will disown me three times.” Nevertheless, Peter stated, “Even if it means dying with you, I would never abandon you.” Matthew 26:31–35 indicates that all of Jesus’ other disciples agreed with him.

Peter can’t envision ever being in a position where he would be forced to deny his Lord.

This discussion most likely influenced Peter’s decision to chop off the ear of the high priest’s servant in order to establish his allegiance (Matthew 26:51).

Peter denies Jesus

With little doubt, Peter was a valuable member of the community of disciples. Peter was a member of Jesus’ inner group, along with James and John. Jesus was acknowledged as the long-awaited Messiah by Peter, who publicly declared him to be. Then, how did Peter come to betray his Lord in the end? A Passover feast is the setting for this story, which takes place immediately before Jesus’ arrest. In an interaction that takes place toward the end of the meal: Jesus then informed them that “this very night you will all fall away because of me,” since it is said, “‘I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock will be dispersed.’ ” I will, however, travel ahead of you into Galilee when I have risen from the dead.

As was often the case with Peter, he speaks from the heart in this passage, refusing to consider the possibility that Jesus is correct.

Nevertheless, Peter is completely unaware of what is about to take place. This discussion most likely influenced Peter’s decision to chop off the ear of the high priest’s servant in order to demonstrate his commitment (Matthew 26:51). After all was said and done, Jesus was still arrested.

What is the difference between these betrayals?

In contrast to Judas, Peter’s reputation was not tarnished for the rest of his life. At Pentecost, Peter takes over as the chief apostle, presenting a speech that inspires more than 3,000 people to join Jesus. Finally, his devotion to Jesus would lead to his execution at the hands of those he had chosen. Why did Judas’ treachery completely destroy his life, whilst Peter appeared to emerge from his ordeal stronger and more passionately devoted than before? First and foremost, Judas’ betrayal was a cruel act.

  1. It’s possible that he never imagined for a second that Jesus would be tried, convicted, and condemned to death, but that doesn’t really matter.
  2. On top of that, Judas’s character flaws made him a candidate for Satan to exploit as a weapon to bring Jesus’s ministry to a premature conclusion.
  3. A stressful circumstance, on the other hand, had a negative impact on Peter.
  4. When compared to Judas’s premeditated betrayal, Peter was caught off guard in a scenario when he was overcome by terror.
  5. No, but it helps to make things more clear.
See also:  How Did Jesus Teach

Conflicting examples of remorse

While both Judas and Peter expressed regret in their respective accounts, there is much to be learned from their responses to their sins. Judas attempted to return the money he received in exchange for handing Jesus in right away. He was well aware that what he’d done was terrible, and he confessed to the priests, saying, “I have sinned because I have betrayed innocent blood.” When the chief priests refused to accept the money, Judas tossed the money into the temple and walked out of the building.

  1. When Peter understood that he had done precisely what Jesus had indicated he would do, he broke down and sobbed loudly.
  2. He didn’t let his embarrassment keep him from socializing.
  3. When the disciples are out fishing and Peter sees Jesus on the shore, he doesn’t waste any time in recognizing him and calling out to him.
  4. Instead of driving him away from Jesus, his grief draws him closer to him.
  5. “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Jesus said yet another time.
  6. “Take good care of my sheep,” Jesus instructed.
  7. Peter was saddened when Jesus questioned him, for the third time, “Do you love me?” Peter didn’t know how to respond.

‘Jesus said,’ he said “Please feed my sheep.

Afterwards, he instructed him to “Follow me” (John 21:15–19).

They’d heard Him preach on the need of loving one’s adversaries.

Regardless of the cause, their similar encounter with Jesus prompted them to respond in very different ways.

Peter had faith in the kindness and grace of his fellow disciples as well as in the Lord, while Judas had no such confidence.

Although Judas spent years traveling beside Jesus, he never completely understood the lesson that kindness wins over judgment, and so when he needed mercy, he didn’t know where to turn.

Remember to run toward Jesus

Every single one of us will make errors at some point in our lives. We can only hope that they are not deliberate acts of disobedience, but even if they are, we must not allow such sins to drive us from God’s presence. Our greatest need for Jesus is when we are at our lowest points. And if there is anything we can take away from the contrast between Peter and Judas, it is that we should always use our failings to push us into the arms of Jesus. Looking for inspiration to get you through a difficult time?

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PETER AND JUDAS?

Peter is a hero of mine. His faults appear to be more frequent than those of the other disciples, but he is my hero because of what he does in the aftermath of his missteps. Every time, he repents and returns to Jesus with humility and faith in his heart. It is not how frequently you fall down that matters; rather, it is what you do after you go down. Peter, on the other hand, always does the right thing once he has fallen. He serves as an excellent role model for us. To listen to the sermon, use the play button on your computer’s keyboard: The following link may be downloaded by selecting “Save target as” from the context menu of your browser (or whatever you do on a Mac): Matthew’s Part is available for download.

Matthew96. Matthew 26:69-27:10

There is a lot going on in this room right now. Because Matthew is telling the story in the order in which it occurred, we are going back and forth between distinct incidents. So far, I have not spoken about the physical pain that Jesus endured, which began with his arrest and continued throughout his life. Instead, we will concentrate on Peter and Judas for the remainder of this message, and I will continue to push it off until the next one. In the book of Acts, Luke recounts Judas’s downfall in the following terms: 18 With his ill-gotten gains, this man has now purchased a piece of land.

19 This became known to all of the citizens of Jerusalem, and the field has been given the name Hakeldama in their own tongue (that is, Field of Blood).

It is my intention to warn you that this paragraph contains some nasty notions.

Then, anytime it came crashing down, the “bursting open” would be a common occurrence.

When it came to dealing with both money (which they couldn’t use for themselves or the treasury) and pollution, the Jewish religious leaders decided that purchasing the field as a burial cemetery for non-Jews would be the best answer because the land wasn’t any good to Jews in the first place.

  • Following that, the same reasoning is applied for the duration of the game.
  • I believe Matthew added it here to bring the account of what happened to him to a close, but I have a strong suspicion that it did not all take place on the same day that Jesus was executed.
  • According to my estimation, Judas changed his mind and committed himself within a week or two after Jesus’ execution.
  • People have pointed out that Judas felt remorse since he confessed to betraying innocent blood, as he put it.
  • To put it another way, Judas truly believed in Jesus and just needed a little “push” to get him to go to battle with the Romans.
  • However, both John and Luke teach us that Satan was the one who compelled Judas to betray Jesus and his followers (John 13:27; Luke 22:3).
  • I believe it is no coincidence that Matthew places the narrative of Peter’s treachery immediately following the story of Judas’ death.

It is true that Judas’ treachery was planned in advance.

You might, on the other hand, say the same thing about Peter.

When Peter refused Jesus for the first time, you might argue he was acting in the heat of the moment, which was true.

Peter may have re-examined his options after each one.

So what was different this time?

I believe it all goes down to the heart of what the Bible teaches: repentance and faith in Jesus Christ.

Judas felt guilt for what he had done, according to Matthew.

The English Standard Version (ESV) translates it as “changed his mind.” Despite the fact that they are similar, they are not the same term as “repentance.” Judas was remorseful for what he had done, at least on some level.

But, despite all of his negative emotions, he never turned back to Jesus.

Regret eats away at you from the inside out.

Nothing happens; you just sit there wishing you had done something different.

That is why “regret” is one of the favorite words used by politicians in meaningless “apologies,” and why it is one of the most frequently used words in political speeches.

This is not the same as saying, “I’m sorry,” or, “It is my fault; please forgive me,” or, “I’m going to change,” or any other similar expression.

It’s possible that there’s something else going on.

Alternatively, you could say it like this (please pay close attention to the italicized emphasis): “I’ve betrayed Jesus!” Peter thought to himself as he sat there.

What I’m trying to say is that it’s possible that Judas was more upset about the fact that he made a mistake than he was about the fact that he committed a sin against Jesus.

He felt regret, but he did not feel repentance.

Despite the fact that herepented for the incident (in a profound way), there is no evidence that herepented It was the fact that he had hurt the man he had grown to know and love that brought Peter to tears.

), but that he had done something that had caused Jesus to be hurt.

Repentance, on the other hand, is God-centered, whereas regret is self-centered.

Peter, on the other hand, is my hero.

Every time, he repents and returns to Jesus with humility and faith in his heart.

Peter, on the other hand, always does the right thing after he falls.

Repentance necessitates humility.

Putting yourself in a position of need with regard to the person you have hurt is not a good thing.

In a sense, you are giving them the ability to control your actions.

In his later writings, he demonstrates that he understands what he is talking about: “God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” 6 Because God is concerned about you, humble yourselves under His mighty hand so that He may exalt you at the appropriate time.7 Cast all your anxieties on Him, because He is concerned about you.

  1. Despite the fact that Jesus had foretold everything, neither Judas nor Peter understood what was taking place when Jesus was crucified.
  2. In his heart, he believed that Jesus would have mercy on him and forgive him for his mistakes.
  3. He could have been, in my opinion.
  4. Even after, Judas had the same opportunity that Peter had.
  5. So how do we apply these things to our lives today?
  6. Here are my thoughts: The Bible says we have all sinned: 9 What then?
  7. Not at all!
  8. 11There is no one who understands;there is no one who seeks God.

12All have turned away;all alike have become useless. There is no one who does what is good,not even one. (Rom 3:9-12, HCSB) We aren’t any better than Judas or Peter. We all stand on the same ground. The question is, will we be more like Judas, or Peter? Obviously, we want to be like Peter, but how?

  1. Be on the lookout for remorse, and be wary of regret. Regret does nothing to assist you in any manner. You’re left with nothing as a result. Repentance inspires you to do better and to return to the Lord. If you discover that you are sorry but not repentant, I advise you to instead pray to God to assist you in repenting. Changing your mind, turning away from your sin and toward God, even if it means sacrificing other things, is what repentance is all about. Make an effort to be humble. You cannot repent until you first demonstrate humility. In repentance, you acknowledge your mistakes, you acknowledge that your acts (or inactions) were wrong, and you express genuine regret for them. In addition, by acknowledging that you are powerless and in need of God’s (and potentially other people’s) forgiveness, you grant God (and possibly other people) control over your life and your destiny. You must have humility in order to do this
  2. You must believe that Jesus’ death was genuinely sufficient to atone for your sins. You can put your faith in what the Bible says:

Through trust in Jesus Christ, everyone who believes receives God’s blessing and acceptance. There is no distinction between individuals. Everyone has sinned and fallen short of God’s glory as a result of their transgressions. They receive God’s acceptance freely as a result of God’s grace, which is made possible by the price paid by Christ Jesus to set us free from sin. In the Greek text of Romans 3:22-24, the word “God” is translated “God’s Word.” When I observe individuals failing to understand that God truly forgives them, I ask them the following question: “Are you saying that the suffering Jesus endured wasn’t enough to atone for your sin?” Are you implying that he should have been subjected to further suffering?

If this is the case, then stop fooling about and trust that you have been forgiven.

More than that, he had faith in the character of Jesus, believing that somehow, he would be able to set everything right.

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