Which Day Did Jesus Die?

What day of the week was Jesus crucified?

  • Friday is traditionally considered to be the day on which Jesus was crucified.
  • While some current academics believe that He was crucified on Wednesday or Thursday, others believe that He was crucified earlier.
  • The theories’ supporting arguments are discussed in further detail below.
  • The Gospels claim that Jesus died on the day before the Sabbath, which lends support to the notion of a Friday crucifixion.

″And when evening had come, because it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the Sabbath, Joseph of Arimathea, a respected member of the council, who was also himself seeking the kingdom of God, took courage and went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus,″ Mark 15:42-43 says.″Because it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the Sabbath, Joseph of Arimathea, a respected member of the The Sabbath has traditionally been observed on Saturday, the concluding day of the week.As a result, it appears that Mark is explicitly referring to Christ’s death on Friday.It is taught in the Bible that Jesus resurrected from his tomb on the third day (1 Corinthians 15:4), and that this third day was Sunday, the first day of the week, according to the Bible.

In Jewish timekeeping, a portion of a day was treated as if it were a whole day.His funeral would take place on Friday, Saturday (the Sabbath), and Sunday, a total of three days.In Matthew 16:21 and Luke 9:22, we learn that Jesus foretold His own death and resurrection on the third day.Some believe that a Friday death and a Sunday resurrection do not conform to the teachings of Matthew 12:40.It is in this passage that Jesus declares, ″For just as Jonah was swallowed up by a colossal fish for three days and nights, so will the Son of Man be swallowed up by the earth for three days and nights.″ Because Jesus was not in the grave for ″three nights,″ some believe that either Jesus’ prediction was incorrect or that the crucifixion took place sooner than Friday as stated in the Bible.The most common day suggested by such proponents is Thursday, however some also advocate for Wednesday.

The scripture stating that Jesus would be in the grave for three days and three nights does not necessarily imply that He would be in the dead for exactly 72 hours as stated in the Bible.For example, it’s possible that Jesus would stay in the tomb for around three days.Jesus’ connection to Jonah’s story was intended to convey the idea that Jesus, like Jonah, would appear to have passed away from this world.He would, however, return to finish God’s will, just as Jonah did.In addition, some who argue for a Thursday or Wednesday date believe that there were too many events that occurred between the crucifixion and the resurrection for the time period to be accurate.However, this argument provides no convincing evidence, as one would expect the Gospel authors to provide greater information about the concluding parts of Christ’s life than they do at other points in the narrative.

The incidents might have taken place between Friday and Sunday, according to a thorough investigation of the evidence.Some have argued for a Wednesday date for the crucifixion, claiming that there were two ″Sabbaths″ or holy days during Passover week, one on Wednesday and one on Friday.After the first one, which happened on the evening of the crucifixion (Mark 15:42; Luke 23:52-54), the ladies went out and bought spices (Mark 15:42; Luke 23:52-54).(after the Sabbath, Mark 16:1).According to this interpretation, the Passover was the first Sabbath, and the normal Sabbath (Saturday) followed only a few days later.

  1. There is no question that Jesus’ resurrection took place on the first day of the week, as recorded in the Bible (Sunday).
  2. And, based on the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, it appears that He was crucified on Friday, rather than the previous day.
  3. Truths that are related: What is the source of Christ’s zeal?
  4. What are the meanings of Christ’s last seven statements, and what are they about?
  5. Is it any wonder that blood and water gushed out of Jesus’ side when he was pierced?
  6. What happened to Jesus during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection?

What are some of the reasons why I should believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ?Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

What time was Jesus crucified? What time did Jesus die on the cross?

  • Answer The gospel authors make a number of references to the period of Jesus’ crucifixion in their writings.
  • When we put all of these allusions together, we may obtain an approximation of when time of day Jesus died.
  • The New American Standard Bible (NASB) will be used in this article since it provides a literal translation of the time references given in the original Greek.
  • We know that Jesus was arrested in the middle of the night and brought before Pilate the next morning.

″Now when the morning came, all the chief priests and elders of the people conspired together against Jesus, deciding that He should be put to death; and they tied Him, carried Him away, and handed Him to Pilate the governor,″ Matthew 27:1–2.There was a series of hearings before Pilate and Herod, who had come to Jerusalem for the Passover (see Luke 23:6–15 for further information).Pilate, on the other hand, had to make the final call.Pilate had originally intended to release Jesus (Luke 23:20), but finally decided that appeasing the multitude would be more useful.

Pilate saw he was achieving nothing and that a riot was about to break out.He grabbed water and washed his hands in front of the multitude, declaring, ‘I am innocent of this Man’s blood; you see to it yourselves.’″ Then everyone cried out, ″His blood shall be on us, and his blood shall be on our children!″ When he had finished scourging Jesus, he delivered Him over to be crucified″ (Matthew 27:24–26).Then he freed Barabbas for them.Matthew gives various clues as to when Jesus was killed, including the following: ″Now, from the sixth hour to the ninth hour, darkness descended throughout the entire area.″ When it was at the ninth hour, Jesus cried out in a loud voice and said, ‘Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?’ (Who is like God?) in other words, ‘My God, My God, why have You abandoned Me?’ In fact, when they heard it, several of the people who were gathered there immediately began to exclaim, ‘This man is asking for Elijah.’ So one of them dashed to the side of the road and, taking a sponge, filled it with sour wine, placed it on a reed, and handed it to Jesus to drink.The rest, on the other hand, replied, ‘Let us wait and see whether Elijah will arrive to save Him.’ And Jesus cried out with a loud voice once again, this time yielding up His spirit.

Then the curtain of the temple was ripped in two from top to bottom, and the ground shook with a great earthquake, and the rocks were split″ (Matthew 27:45–51, emphasis added).Consequently, Jesus died ″about the ninth hour,″ according to Matthew.Jesus’ death is recorded in Luke 23:44–47, which corresponds with Matthew’s description of darkness at the sixth hour and Jesus’ death being recorded in the ninth hour.Mark 15:25 provides more detail, stating, ″It was the third hour when they crucified Him,″ and the rest of the tale is consistent with Matthew and Luke’s accounts of the hours of darkness and the death of Jesus.As a result, when the stories of the Synoptic Gospels are combined, Jesus was killed at the third hour.It was at the ninth hour when darkness descended from the sixth hour until the ninth hour, and Jesus died at about that time.

Jesus remained on the crucifixion for approximately six hours, with three of those hours spent in complete darkness.Considering that a new day begins at midnight, the third hour would be 3:00 a.m., according to current reckoning.The Jewish day, on the other hand, began at sundown, but the hours were counted from sunup, which would be around 6:00 a.m.As a result, the third hour when Jesus was crucified would have been three hours after sunrise, or around 9:00 a.m.This means that the sixth hour when darkness fell would be around noon, and the ninth hour, when Jesus died, would be approximately 3:00 PM.

  1. All of this is rather clear, except for the fact that John appears to record something entirely different.
  2. ″Therefore, when Pilate heard these statements, he dragged Jesus out and sat down on the judgment seat in a spot known as The Pavement, but in Hebrew, Gabbatha,″ according to John 19:13–14.
  3. It was approximately the sixth hour on the day of preparation for the Passover.″ It was now the day of preparation for the Passover.
  4. The hearing before Pilate appears to have taken place ″around″ noon, which would be in disagreement with Mark’s account, which states that Jesus was crucified at the third hour, or 9:00 a.m.
  5. There are a number of plausible answers to the apparent disparity in the data.
  6. Some have proposed that John is counting hours from midnight (the ″Roman″ approach), which would place the sixth hour at around 6:00 a.m.

If this is the case, the sixth hour would be approximately 6:00 a.m.According to D.A.Carson, who cites study by Henry Morris, this resolves the difficulty of chronology; nevertheless, Carson believes this is doubtful because this method of calculating was generally reserved for Roman legal papers (Pillar New Testament Commentary, ″John,″ Eerdmans, 1991, p.

605).It has been pointed out by Merrill Tenney that this ″Roman″ technique would be incongruent with John’s other notations of time (NIV Bible Commentary, Volume 2, New Testament, ″John,″ Zondervan, 1994).Andrew Kostenberger also notes that when referring to time in John 1:39, John appears to be referring to late afternoon (4:00 PM), rather than the traditional sunup-to-sundown frame of reference (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ″John,″ Baker Academic, 2004, p.74–75; Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ″John,″ Baker Academic, 2004).

  • As a result, it appears that the ″Roman time″ option is doubtful.
  • Another possibility is to credit John’s statement of the sixth hour to a scribal mistake, which would make sense.
  • The Greek digit digamma, or 6, was accidentally written by an early copyist of John, according to this idea, instead of the correct number 6.

(the Greek numeral gamma, or 3).The two men would be in total agreement, according to this interpretation; nevertheless, Carson points out that there is no textual evidence for this form (op cit, p.606).As a result, this solution is solely based on assumption and speculation.

Even though Kostenberger does not necessarily agree with the notion, he speculates that John may be making a theological argument rather than seeking to provide a literal indicator of the time (op cit, p.536).The choosing of the Paschal lamb would generally take place at midday on the day before Passover, according to tradition.

When Jesus was chosen for crucifixion, John makes reference to noon (the sixth hour) in order to stress the fact that he had been chosen to be the Lamb of God.This approach, on the other hand, has its own set of chronological challenges.According to John 19:14, the ″day of preparation″ refers to preparation for the Passover Sabbath, rather than the Passover Feast, which would need the selection of a lamb for the occasion.Given that Jesus had previously eaten the Passover with His followers, it appears that the dinner itself had already taken place at that point in time.According to Kostenberger (p.

538) and Carson (p.605), an imperfect technique of ancient timekeeping should be used to solve the problem.The day was commonly split into three-hour blocks before the invention of watches and other exact timekeeping technologies, and people frequently approximated and rounded off the time.Someone may have rounded down to the third hour (9:00 AM) if it was mid-morning, say 10:30; another person might have rounded up to the sixth hour (6:00 AM) if it was mid-morning, say 10:30.

  • (noon).
  • There is no disagreement in this solution; rather, there is a variance in the way each writer assessed the amount of time.
  • The nearest quarter or half hour is frequently used, even in current times when digital clocks can determine time to the second.
  • According to this idea, the decision between the third and sixth hours would be based on the individual’s judgment.
  • Alternatively, it is probable that John and Mark ″rounded off″ the timings as a matter of tradition.

Ultimately, it is possible that this is an example of current scientific accuracy being expected from an ancient literature.″More than likely, we are in risk of requiring a level of accuracy in both Mark and John that could not have been accomplished in the days before watches,″ Carson says.Time was always going to be approximate for the majority of people since they couldn’t take sundials or astronomical charts with them everywhere they went.″If the sun was moving toward the center of the sky, two separate observers may readily have peered up and determined that it was ‘approximately the third hour’ or ‘about the sixth hour,’″ the author writes″ (p.605).Considering all of the evidence, it appears that Jesus was crucified at some point in the morning and died at some point later in the afternoon.

  • He would have been hanging on the cross for somewhere between three and six hours, with a significant chunk of that time spent in complete darkness.
  • In this particular topic, the gospel authors were not excessively concerned with accuracy.
  • In contrast, they were significantly more concerned with the theological ramifications, which they meticulously documented.

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  • According to the teachings of my religion, Jesus died on a Friday and resurrected on Sunday, after which He remained in the tomb for three days.
  • According to my calculations, there are just two days remaining until His death and resurrection.
  • Is it possible that I’m mistaken?
  • The traditional teaching within the church is that Jesus was crucified on a Friday, and churches commonly observe the Friday before Easter Sunday as the day of Jesus’ death.

However, observing the Friday before Easter Sunday as the day of Jesus’ death is a matter of church tradition rather than biblical fact.The Bible states unequivocally that Jesus was buried for three days and three nights, as follows:

Matt. 12:40 for just as JONAH WAS THREE DAYS AND THREE NIGHTS IN THE BELLY OF THE SEA MONSTER, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.
  • In Jewish counting, the terms ″day″ and ″night″ relate to periods of light and darkness inside a 24-hour day, respectively.
  • As a result, any portion of the daylight hours counts as a ″day,″ and any portion of the nighttime hours counts as a ″night.″ As a result, to include ″three days and three nights,″ it is necessary to include at least a portion of three different daytime and overnight periods.
  • But, on what day of the week should we start counting down from?
  • While the Bible does not specify the day of the week Jesus died on, it does specify the day on which Jesus resurrected from the grave.

According to the Bible, Jesus was risen before the sun came up on the first day of the week:

Luke 24:1 But on the first day of the week, at early dawn, they came to the tomb bringing the spices which they had prepared. Luke 24:2 And they found the stone rolled away from the tomb, Luke 24:3 but when they entered, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus.
  • Sunday is the first day of the week according to the Jewish calendar, and according to the Bible, the tomb was discovered empty on a Sunday morning. In order to get to the day of Jesus’ death, we must count backward three days and three nights from Sunday to arrive at the day of his death. It is not possible to calculate Sunday daytime itself because the Bible states that Jesus was out of the tomb before sunrise on Sunday morning. For this reason, beginning with the Saturday evening period, we count back three daylight periods and three overnight periods to arrive at the current time. On Saturday, one night will be spent and one day will be spent on Saturday, Friday nighttime will be spent and two days will be spent on Friday, and Thursday nighttime will be spent and three days will be spent on Thursday, and Friday daytime will be spent and three days will be spent on Thursday, and so on.
  • If Jesus remained in the tomb for three days and three nights and then rose from the dead before the break of dawn on Sunday, there is just not enough time for him to have died on a Friday and risen before the break of light on the following Sunday.
  • It is required that Jesus be killed on a Thursday, according to Matthew 12:40.
  • However, wasn’t the day after Jesus’ death a Sabbath?
  • No doubt, but according to the Bible, the day after Jesus’ crucifixion was not a typical Saturday Sabbath, but rather a ″high day″ Sabbath.
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John 19:31  Then the Jews, because it was the day of preparation so that the bodies would not remain on the cross on the Sabbath (for that Sabbath was a high day), asked Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away.
  • In the context of feast observances, a special Sabbath day is defined as one that occurs on a certain day of the week, independent of the day of the week on which the feast is observed.
  • Passover commemorates Jesus’ death, and the Jewish festival of Passover is usually followed the next day by another Jewish festival known as the Feast of Unleavened Bread.
  • According to scripture (Lev 23:6-8), the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread is always a high day Sabbath, which corresponds to the Bible’s witness that the day after Jesus’ death was a Sabbath.
  • As a result, Jesus died and was buried on Passover, a Thursday, which also happened to be the day of preparation (John 19:14) before to the opening of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, which was a high day Sabbath on the Jewish calendar.

Following the keeping of the Sabbath on Friday, which was a high holy day, followed the observance of the regular weekly Sabbath on Saturday.As a result, two consecutive Sabbath days were kept throughout the week after Jesus’ death (i.e., Friday and Saturday).More importantly, according to the Gospel of John (12:12), Jesus paid visits to Martha, Mary, and Lazarus six days before Passover, and the next day (that is, five days before Passover), Jesus entered Jerusalem:

John 12:1  Jesus, therefore, six days before the Passover, came to Bethany where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised from the dead. . John 12:12  On the next day the large crowd who had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem, John 12:13 took the branches of the palm trees and went out to meet Him, and began to shout, “Hosanna! BLESSED IS HE WHO COMES IN THE NAME OF THE LORD, even the King of Israel.”
  • To put it another way, if Jesus arrived in Jerusalem on the fifth day before Passover, which happened to be a Sunday (as is generally observed), then Passover occurred on a Thursday (counting Sunday to Thursday).
  • By examining lunar data from the second and third decades of the first century, we are able to confirm that the death occurred on a Thursday for the last time.
  • According to lunar activity, Jewish feasts are observed on specific days of the week.
  • For example, in the year Jesus died, the day of Passover began Wednesday night and ended Thursday at sunset, and the seven-day feast of Unleavened Bread began the next day, on a Friday.

In this case, the weekly Sabbath day came to an end at sunset on Saturday night, and the women discovered an empty tomb sometime before dawn on Sunday morning, which is why Scripture states Jesus was risen before the break of day on the first day of the week (Mark 16:1).As a result, if we count from Thursday afternoon to Saturday night, we will discover three days and three nights, just as prescribed by Scripture.Please check our explanation on how the two Marys were able to purchase spices during this time period.Please watch our lesson from the Gospel of Matthew Bible study for a more in-depth overview of the events that took place during the week leading up to Jesus’ death.

When Did Jesus Die? The Year, Day & Time

  • There has been much speculation concerning the day and year of Christ’s crucifixion and death, owing to the absence of clear day-to-day linkage in the stories of the four Gospels.
  • We know that Jesus died on Preparation Day because it is mentioned in each of the four Gospel narratives.
  • But was it a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday when that happened?
  • In addition, what hour did Jesus die?

There has even been discussion over the year in which he passed away.To figure out the day of Jesus’ death on the cross, we must piece together the evidence from his four Gospels and our understanding of his historical period and cultural context.

Cultural Information to Keep in Mind

  • 1.
  • The gospel writers were more concerned with depicting Jesus as a person than they were with the precise chronology of his appearance.
  • Dates have become increasingly important in today’s environment in order to provide proper news coverage.
  • However, the Gospel authors were more concerned with the events themselves than they were with the precise date of the occurrences.

They were attempting to introduce Jesus to a variety of audiences rather than providing a thorough biography.It was the day before the Sabbath that was designated as the Day of Preparation.Each of the four Gospel narratives of Jesus’ death and burial mentions the Day of Preparation as a day of preparation.This is the day on which Jews prepared meals and completed all of the tasks that were prohibited from being completed on the Sabbath but that still needed to be completed.

Because Jews were required to refrain from working on the Sabbath at this time, Jesus’ companions made certain that he was buried before the Sabbath began on Friday at sunset.Visit THIS LINK to download your FREE 8-Day Prayer and Scripture Guide – Praying Through Holy Week (PDF).Create your own copy of this wonderful daily devotional to use in the weeks leading up to Easter.

What the Gospels Say about Jesus’ Burial

  • The Gospel of Matthew contains the most detailed account of Jesus’ death and burial (Matthew 27:31-62).
  • In this tale, we learn about Joseph, a wealthy man from Arimathea who ″had himself become a follower of Jesus,″ according to the text (Matthew 27:57b).
  • In Matthew 27:58-61, Joseph is said to have requested Pilate for permission to bury Jesus’ body.
  • This is according to tradition.

Later in Matthew 27:62, we find out that Joseph was successful in carrying out his plan on Preparation Day: ″The next day, the day after Preparation Day, the chief priests and the Pharisees went to Pilate.″ On Preparation Day, according to Mark’s account, Joseph buried his son Jesus.In other words, ″it was Preparation Day″ (i.e., the day before the Sabbath).(Matthew 15:42 a.) … Joseph then went out and got some linen material, carried the corpse down and covered it in the linen before putting it in a tomb that he had dug out the rock.And he proceeded to roll a large stone against the tomb’s entrance″ (Mark 15:46).

Jesus’ death on the Day of Preparation is confirmed by the Gospels of Luke and John: ″Then he carried it down, covered it in linen cloth, and buried it in a tomb carved into the rock, in which no one had yet been lain.″ It was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was just around the corner″ (Luke 23:54).The tomb was nearby, so they put Jesus there because it was the Jewish day of Preparation and because it was close by (John 19:42).

What Day Did Jesus Die? Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday?

  • Over the years, academics have developed a variety of hypotheses about what occurred during the days of the week preceding up to Jesus’ death on the cross. These versions each offer a different day for Christ’s death, such as Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday. Wednesday The fact that Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday permits for Him to have been buried for three full days and nights
  • nevertheless, this also means that He resurrected on the fourth day. Furthermore, the Triumphal Entry would have taken place on Saturday, which was a day of Sabbath rest
  • Thursday was a working day. With a Thursday crucifixion, the Triumphal Entry is moved to Sunday, which makes more sense and removes the necessity for a ″quiet day″ (a day during the Passion Week when no events were recorded). However, we do know that the Pharisees rushed to put Jesus in the tomb on The Day of Preparation (John 19:34-42), which was Friday, and before the Sabbath began at nightfall (the Jews measured days from nightfall to nightfall).
  • Friday was the Day of Preparation, which was Friday and before the Sabbath began at nightfall. Upon closer examination of the facts, we find that Friday is the most consistent with the Gospel narratives and the historical context. According to the New Testament, Jesus rose from the grave on the third day—not necessarily after three complete, literal days—and was buried on the third day (e.g., Matthew 16:21
  • Acts 10:40). As previously stated, Jesus had to be hustled inside the tomb on the day of preparation because of the crowds. In contrast to a Friday crucifixion, which would demand a ″quiet day″ (most likely Wednesday), this day gives the Sanhedrin the opportunity to make plans for Jesus’s arrest and following trials. As a result, the day is just ″quiet″ since we haven’t documented anything significant

What Time Did Jesus Die?

  • According to Matthew Henry’s interpretation, Jesus was nailed to the crucifixion between the third and sixth hours, which corresponds between nine and twelve o’clock in the morning.
  • After then, he died shortly after the ninth hour, which was sometime between three and four o’clock in the afternoon.
  • Commensurate with the aforementioned practice, the Jews throughout the time of Christ measured days from dusk to nightfall.
  • So Bible scholars may convert the Matthew 27:46 KJV, which reads ″ninth hour,″ into the Matthew 27:46 NIV, which reads ″three o’clock in the afternoon,″ as a result of this.

Timing of Jesus Death in Mark, Luke, and John

  • Mark 15:33:34, 37, 38, 39 ″At midday, darkness descended across the entire region, lasting until three o’clock in the afternoon. Also, about three o’clock in the afternoon, Jesus said, ″Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?″ in an obnoxiously loud voice. (which translates as ‘My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?’). ″Jesus breathed his last with a piercing scream.″
  • Matthew 23:44-46 Because the sun had ceased shining, it was now around midday, and darkness fell over the entire region until three o’clock that afternoon. And the temple’s curtain was split in two by the earthquake. I put my spirit into your hands,’ Jesus said with a resounding voice, calling out to the Father. At the moment he stated this, he exhaled his final breath.″ (See also John 19:14-16.) ‘It was around midday on the day of Preparation of the Passover,’ I recalled. ‘Your king has arrived,’ Pilate said to the Jews. They, on the other hand, cried out, ″Take him away!″ Take him away from me! ‘Put him to death!’ ‘Do you want me to crucify your king?’ Pilate was the one who inquired. ‘We do not have a monarch other than Caesar,’ the leading priests responded. Eventually, Pilate gave him over to them, and they crucified him.”

What Year Did Jesus Die?

  • During this video, Doug Bookman, a New Testament professor at Shepherds Theological Seminary, shows why biblical academics have reached an agreement about the year Jesus died.
  • ″It all boils down to this…
  • Pilate served as prefect of Judea and Samaria from 26 A.D.
  • to 36 A.D., according to the evidence we have.

So that’s our view out the window.The following question is: On what day of the week did Passover occur during the year that Jesus died?In the opinion of the majority, it occurred on Thursday or Friday.From nightfall on Thursday till sundown on Friday, the event was taking place every day.

Given all of this, the vast majority of researchers will agree that it leads to one of two conclusions: ” Theory 1: Jesus died about the year 30 A.D.Theory 2: Jesus died around the year 33 A.D.″At this point, the argument becomes pretty technical,″ says Bookman of the situation.″With regard to every one of the chronological questions, there is a case to be formed on both sides of the argument,″ he continues.I am convinced that the year 33 A.D.″I teach the life of Jesus within the framework of that structure.″

3 Significant Events Shortly After Jesus’ Death

  • Matthew 27:51-54, Matthew 27:51-54 In that instant, the temple’s curtain was ripped in half from top to bottom.
  • The ground trembled, the rocks cracked, and the tombs burst into flames.
  • Many pious persons who had died were brought back to life by the power of the Holy Spirit.
  • They emerged from the graves following Jesus’ resurrection and proceeded to the holy city, where they appeared to a large number of people.

They were startled and cried, ″Surely he was the Son of God!″ when the centurion and others with him who were guarding Jesus witnessed the earthquake and everything that had transpired.1.The temple curtain had been ripped in half.This curtain divided the temple’s worshipers from the Ark of the Covenant and its apex – the Mercy seat – where God would only meet with the High Priest once a year to accept an atonement sacrifice on the High Priest’s behalf.

We know from the laws of the Old Testament that entering God’s presence was a severe matter.Following the deaths of two men who attempted to approach the Lord in the wrong manner, the Lord provided Moses detailed instructions in Leviticus 16 on how to approach him without dying.The fact that this curtain was destroyed represented the completion of Jesus Christ’s accomplished work on the cross, which eliminated the barrier between sinful humans and holy God by becoming the ultimate High Priest and the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of all people.Furthermore, the fact that the curtain was torn ″from top to bottom″ represented that it had been torn by God himself, rather than by the efforts of any man or woman.2.An earthquake unsealed tombs, allowing deceased saints to be resurrected from their graves.

John Gill’s remark on the event states that ″this was a demonstration of Christ’s authority over death and the tomb.″ When Jesus rose from the dead on the third day after his death, he demonstrated that he had destroyed both the power of death and the permanence of the grave.″These saints, I believe, remained on earth until our Lord’s ascension, and then, joining the entourage of angels, gloriously ascended with him to heaven, as trophies of his victory over sin, Satan, death, and the tomb,″ Gill added.In addition to its grandiose claims, this event is noteworthy because it is a narrative predicting Christ’s second coming to collect the remainder of his people.According to Matthew, this incident also fulfills a prophesy found in Isaiah 26:19, which reads, ″But your dead will live, LORD; their bodies will rise— let those who dwell in the dust awaken and cry for joy— your dew is like the dew of the dawn; the earth will give birth to her dead.3.Jesus is brought back to life from the dead.

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This paragraph in Matthew glosses over such a remarkable occurrence, but Christ’s resurrection is told in greater detail in Matthew 28, which is the book of Matthew (as well as in Mark 16, Luke 24, and John 20).Photograph courtesy of Joshua Earle via Unsplash.

What Day Did Jesus Die?

  • Some Christians are divided about the exact date of Jesus’ death, and this has sparked debate.
  • Some (known as Wednesday Crucifixionists) think that Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday rather than a Friday, contrary to popular belief.
  • The fact that Jesus indicates that ″just as Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of the huge fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth″ is a contributing factor to this idea (Matt 12:40 NKJV).
  • For example, it is possible that Jesus died on Wednesday in order to be entombed for three literal days and three literal nights (Thursday through Friday and Saturday), after which he would have been raised on Sunday.

There are a number of other variants on this notion.The Hebrews and other ancient peoples practiced ″inclusive counting,″ which means that a portion of a day is treated as if it were a whole day.Aside from that, the Bible records many periods of ″three days″ that ended during the third day rather than after it, and so spanned fewer than three complete 24-hour days (Gen 42:17-19, for one example).To maintain His own timekeeping, Jesus would have ″rested″ on the seventh-day holy Sabbath and risen fairly early on the first day of the week, according to the Hebrew calendar.

Without considering the meaning of words in Biblical times, as well as their methods of accounting and speaking of time, we will be unable to correctly comprehend the Bible.But, based on the Scriptures, can we determine the exact day on which Jesus died?In order to do so, we will examine the book of Mark.Day 1: Unleaven Day 2: In Mark 10:32-34, Jesus is on His journey to Jerusalem, and He is talking with the disciples.His disciples are informed that ″Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem; and the Son of man shall be delivered unto the chief priests, and unto the scribes; and they shall condemn him to death, and shall deliver him to the Gentiles: and they shall mock him, and shall scourge him, and shall spit upon him, until he is killed; and on the third day he shall rise again.″ On the same day, He speaks to James and John about the privilege of sitting on His right and left hands, and then He restores Bartimaeus’ sight to him.In Mark 11:1, he is on his way to Jerusalem, ″until he comes to Bethphage and Bethany, at the summit of Olives,″ according to the text.

Let us refer to this as Day1.Despite the fact that we do not know what day it is, we will consider it to be the first day of our count.Mark 11:2-11 tells the story of what Jesus performs for the rest of that particular day.He rides into Jerusalem on the colt and then enters the temple complex.When we read verse 11, it was nightfall, the conclusion of the day, and He was on his way to Bethany to stay with the twelve disciples, maybe at Martha and Mary’s house.Day 2: In Mark 11:12, we learn that it is the following day, ″on the morrow,″ and that Jesus is hungry for breakfast while they are on their way back to Jerusalem from Bethany.

Then, as they pass a barren fig tree, Jesus curses it and descends to Jerusalem, where He cleanses the temple for the second time in His career and instructs the inhabitants of the city.This was Day 2 of the experiment.In verse 19, it says that ″when evening came,″ he ″went out of the city″ and ″found a place to remain for the night.″ Day 3: The Bible informs us in Mark 11:20 that, ″″in the morning,″ which refers to the beginning of Day3, signifies that Jesus returns to the city of Jerusalem, where he spends the rest of the day doing a lot of things.The disciples are the first to notice that the fig tree that Jesus had cursed had become shrivelled.The priests, scribes, and elders interrogate Him about the power He invokes in order to perform miracles.

  1. He narrates a story, and the Pharisees attempt to ″catch him in his words″ (Mark 12:13) by posing a variety of questions and raising numerous points of contention.
  2. After that, Jesus goes to the treasury and observes people depositing their money, after which He makes a statement about the widow’s mite.
  3. In the next section, He provides the disciples with a list of indicators to look out for that will occur before to His Second Coming.
  4. A complete list of all of the topics He addresses with the Pharisees, Sadducees, and scribes is found in Mark chapter 12.
  5. After the dispute with the Pharisees, Jesus walks to the Mount of Olives, where he is likely to relax and get away from the persecution.
  6. There, Christ speaks privately with Peter, James, John, and Andrew about the indications that point to His Second Coming.

The rest of the chapter is a transcription of what He said.Day4: Mark 14:1 is the next day (Day4), and the Bible tells us that the Passover is two days away (see Mark 14:1).Judas Iscariot forms a contract with the chief priests to betray Jesus on this day, and Mary anoints him with her ″alabaster bottle of ointment of spikenard″ (Mark 14:3) at a lavish banquet prepared in Jesus’ honor.Page 12 of Mark 14 has the passage referring to Day 5, which was the Passover, when the Jews slaughtered a ram for the holiday.

The disciples rent an upstairs chamber on this day, and it is in this room that Jesus has His last supper with His disciples before His death.On the same night, Jesus travels to Gethsemane, where he spends hours in excruciating prayer while His followers are sound asleep.Afterwards, Judas arrives with a ″large crowd with swords and staves″ (Mark 14:43), and kisses Jesus on the lips.After that, the crowd captures Jesus, and His followers all desert him (Matthew 26:53).

  • (verse 50).
  • After that, Jesus is brought before the chief priests for a nighttime trial, during which they sentence Him to death.
  • The three times Peter rejects Jesus during this trial are recorded in the Gospel of John.

After then, Jesus is lowered into the pit where he will spend the night.Day 6 begins with the passage from Mark 15:1.in the morning, it’s a straight shot″ ″When Jesus is brought before Pilate, Herod, and Pilate again, he is sentenced to death.Finally, Pilate signs the death sentence and orders that Jesus be crucified.

Beginning at the sixth hour, darkness descends across the entire nation until the ninth hour, and at the ninth hour, Jesus cries out: ″My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?″ Jesus dies a short time after that (verses 33-37).″Now when nightfall had come, because it was the Preparation Day, that is, the day before the Sabbath,″ Mark writes in verse 42, ″because it was the Preparation Day, that is, the day before the Sabbath,″ ″…..The phrase ″the preparation day″ in Mark 15:42 refers to the day before the seventh-day Sabbath, and it is the only time this phrase is used (or Saturday).

As a result, the preparation day is Friday, which also happens to be the day on which Jesus died.According to Mark, Jesus is brought down from the crucifixion and wrapped swiftly before being laid in Joseph of Arimathaea’s new tomb, so that He does not remain on the cross over the Sabbath.Day 7: The seventh-day Sabbath is observed on the day that falls between Mark 15:47 and Mark 16:1.No record exists of what happened on this day, however Mark 16:1-2 informs us that Jesus was crucified on this day ″when the Sabbath had come to an end The first day of the week began very early in the morning, as the sun rose above the horizon ″When Jesus died on Friday, three women returned to the tomb to anoint Him with spices (because they hadn’t been able to finish the job when He died on Friday because the Sabbath was approaching, and they wanted to keep the Sabbath holy).This is the seventh day of our countdown.

In Mark 16:1, it states, ″Now that the Sabbath had passed,.″ Day 8: ″As a result, today is the first day of the week.We designate the first day of the week, which would have been a Sunday, as Day8, commemorating the day on which Jesus resurrected from the dead.If we go backwards in time, Day8 would have been the Sunday following the Sabbath, the first day of the week, and the day after the Sabbath would have been Day7.Day 7 was a Sabbath, and nothing was recorded about it since Jesus was resting and His followers were grieving at the same time.

  • It would have been Day 6 on Friday, which was the Preparation Day, and the day on which Jesus took His last breath.
  • Day 5 would have been Thursday, the day of the final supper and the Garden of Gethsemane, according to the calendar.
  • In our development, day 4 was unmistakably Wednesday.
  • Tuesday is the third day.
  • Day 2 was Monday, and Day 1 – the day we began our count with was the previous Sunday, the day on which Jesus triumphantly entered Jerusalem – was the day before that.

This whole week was dedicated to Passover, and Jesus, the Passover Lamb, died in accordance with Jewish tradition and in fulfillment of prophesy.If you found this post interesting, please forward it to a friend.

What Day Did Jesus Die?

  • Some Christians are divided about the exact day of Jesus’ death, and this has sparked debate.
  • However, others (known as Wednesday Crucifixionists) think that Jesus was crucified on the third day of the week rather than the Friday.
  • The fact that Jesus indicates that ″just as Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of the huge fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth″ is a contributing factor to this viewpoint (Matt 12:40 NKJV).
  • For example, it is possible that Jesus died on Wednesday in order to be entombed for three literal days and three literal nights (Thursday through Friday and Saturday), after which he would be raised the following day.

In addition, there are several variants on this idea.According to the Hebrews and other ancient peoples, ″inclusive reckoning″ was utilized, which means that just a portion of a day is considered to be a whole ″day.″ Aside from that, the Bible recounts many periods of ″three days″ that ended during the third day rather than after it, and so spanned fewer than three complete 24-hour days (Gen 42:17-19, for one example).To maintain His own timekeeping, Jesus would have ″rested″ on the seventh-day holy Sabbath and awoken fairly early on the first day of the week in order to observe His own calendar.Without considering the meaning of words in Biblical times, as well as their methods of accounting and speaking of time, we will be unable to properly comprehend the Bible.

Does it matter which day Jesus died because the Scriptures tell us that he died on the third day?To do so, we will look at the book of Mark as a source of inspiration.Day 1: unleaven During the events of Mark 10:32-34, Jesus is on His journey to the Holy City.His disciples are informed that ″Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem; and the Son of man shall be delivered unto the chief priests, and unto the scribes; and they shall condemn him to death, and shall deliver him to the Gentiles: and they shall mock him, and shall scourge him, and shall spit upon him, and shall kill him: and on the third day he shall rise again.″ Later that day, He speaks with James and John about sitting on His right and left hands, respectively, before restoring Bartimaeus’ sight.In Mark 11:1, he is on his way to Jerusalem, ″until he comes to Bethphage and Bethany, at the hill of Olives,″ according to the Bible.Call today Day 1 of the week.

Despite the fact that we are unsure of what day it is, we will treat it as the first day of our counting.What Jesus accomplishes for the remainder of the day is described in Mark 11:2-11.He rides into Jerusalem on the colt and enters the temple on the mount.When we read verse 11, it was nightfall, the conclusion of the day, and He was on his way to Bethany to stay with the twelve disciples, maybe at Martha and Mary’s home.Day 2: According to Mark 11:12, it is the following day, ″on the morrow,″ and Jesus is hungry for breakfast while they are on their way back from Bethany, as we can see in verse 13.As they pass by a barren fig tree, Jesus curses the tree and descends to Jerusalem, where He cleanses the temple for the second time in His career and educates the people who have gathered.

Day 2 had come to an end.In verse 19, it says that ″when evening came,″ he ″went out of the city″ and ″found a place to remain for the evening.″ Day 3: The Bible informs us in Mark 11:20 that ″″in the morning,″ which refers to the beginning of Day3, signifies that Jesus returns to the city of Jerusalem, where he spends the rest of the day doing a variety of things.To begin with, the disciples take note of the shrivelled fig tree that Jesus had cursed.What authority He employs to perform miracles is a source of contention among the priests, scribes, and elders present.Using numerous inquiries and arguments to ″catch him in his words″ (Mark 12:13), the Pharisees attempt to ″catch him in his words″ (Matthew 12:13).

  1. In the following chapter, Jesus travels to the temple treasury and observes people putting money in the offering box, making a comment about the widow’s mite.
  2. In the next section, He provides the disciples with a list of indicators to look out for that will occur before to His Second Advent.
  3. In Mark chapter 12, Jesus talks about what he has to say to the Pharisees, Sadducees, and scribes.
  4. After the fight with the Pharisees, Jesus proceeds to the Mount of Olives, where he is likely to relax and get away from the persecution.
  5. It is in this location that He speaks privately with Peter, James, John, and Andrew concerning the signals of His Second Coming.
  6. In the following chapters, what He said is documented.
See also:  Where Is Jesus Body

Day4: Mark 14:1 is the next day (Day4), and the Bible reminds us that the Passover is only two days away (Mark 14:2).Judas Iscariot forms a contract with the chief priests to betray Jesus on this day, and Mary anoints him with her ″alabaster bottle of ointment of spikenard″ (Mark 14:3) at a lavish banquet prepared in Jesus’ honor.Day5: In Mark 14, we discover the fifth day, which was the Passover, when the Jews slaughtered the Passover lamb (verse 12).During the day, the disciples rent an upstairs chamber, and it is in this room that Jesus has His last supper with them prior to His death.

That same night, when His followers are sleeping, Jesus travels to Gethsemane and spends hours in excruciating prayer.Afterwards, Judas arrives with a ″large crowd with swords and staves″ (Mark 14:43), and kisses Jesus on the cheek.Later, Jesus is arrested by a crowd, and His followers abandon Him as a result of the arrest (verse 50).After that, Jesus is brought before the chief priests for a nighttime trial, during which they sentence Him to death by hanging.

  • The three times Peter rejects Jesus during this trial are recorded in the Bible.
  • After then, Jesus is lowered into the pit where he will spend the rest of the evening.
  • In Mark 15:1, we begin our sixth day.

in the morning, it’s a straight shot ″Following this, Jesus is brought before Pilate, Herod, and Pilate once more until Pilate ultimately signs the death sentence and commands that Jesus be crucified.″My God, my God, why have you left me?″ Jesus cries out as the clock strikes six o’clock, and darkness descends on the entire region until nine o’clock.Jesus dies a short time after this (verses 33-37).″Now when nightfall had come, because it being the Preparation Day, that is, the day before the Sabbath, because it was the Preparation Day, that is, the day before the Sabbath,″ Mark writes in verse 42 ″,,,,,,,,, The phrase ″the preparation day″ in Mark 15:42 refers to the day before the seventh-day Sabbath, and it is the only time the phrase is used (or Saturday).

Accordingly, Friday—and thus, the date of Jesus’ death—serves as preparation day.In Mark’s account, Jesus is brought down from the crucifixion and hastily wrapped before being laid in Joseph of Arimathaea’s new tomb so that He does not remain on the cross for the whole Sabbath.The seventh-day Sabbath is observed on the day that falls between Mark 15:47 and Mark 16:1.

Despite the fact that there is nothing recorded about this day, Mark 16:1-2 informs us that it occurred on this day ″as soon as the Sabbath had ended The first day of the week began very early in the morning, as the sun was rising ″When Jesus died on Friday, three women returned to the tomb to anoint Him with spices (since they hadn’t been able to do that job before the Sabbath was coming, and they wanted to keep the Sabbath holy).Day 7 of our tally has arrived.In Mark 16:1, it states, ″Now when the Sabbath had passed,.″ ″As a result, it is the first day of the work week.We designate the first day of the week, which would have been a Sunday, as Day8, commemorating the day on which Jesus rose from the tomb for the first time in history.If we go backwards in time, Day8 would have been the Sunday after the Sabbath, the first day of the week, and the day after that would have been Day7.

After the seventh day, which was a Sabbath, there was nothing written about it because Jesus was resting and His followers were in mourning.Jesus’ final breath would have occurred on Friday, which was the Preparation Day, and hence Day 6.Friday, the day of the final supper and Jesus’ arrest in Gethsemane, would have been the fifth day.In our development, day 4 was unmistakably a Thursday.

  • It’s the third day of the week.
  • We began our count on the previous Sunday, which was the day on which Jesus triumphantly entered Jerusalem.
  • Day 2 was Monday, and Day 1 was the day we began our count on.
  • This entire week was dedicated to Passover, and Jesus, the Passover Lamb, died in accordance with Jewish tradition and in fulfillment of prophesy as part of the celebration of the festival.
  • It would be great if you could spread the word about this article to a friend.

Contradictions (1): On Which Day Did Jesus Die?

  • According to critics, the Bible has numerous faults and discrepancies that demonstrate that it was neither inspired nor the work of eyewitnesses.
  • Those who disagree with the biblical writers assert that if they can’t agree on the most basic of things, how can we possible accept what they have to say on crucial spiritual matters?
  • The gospel writers, for example, are divided on whether Jesus was executed on the first day of Passover or the day before Passover, according to one claim leveled against them.

The Alleged Contradiction

  • Bart Ehrman is arguably the most well-known contemporary biblical critic.
  • According to him, there are hundreds of discrepancies in the gospel stories, and he especially singled out an alleged disparity in the day on which Jesus died as an example in a 2010 argument.
  • Mark 15 ″explicitly″ indicates that Jesus was crucified on the morning following the Passover supper, whereas John 19 ″explicitly″ states that Jesus was crucified on the day of Preparation for the Passover feast, which would be the day before the meal.
  • ″Don’t just take my word for it,″ he declares emphatically.

Read John 19 and Mark 15 for yourself to see what I mean.″They are in direct conflict with one another!″

The Truth

  • The most essential thing to do when analyzing apparent mistakes and inconsistencies is to pay attention to what the text really says and explore the potential (and often many) interpretations of specific words and phrases.
  • Ehrman is correct in asserting that Jesus and his followers ate the Last Supper on the day of Passover in Mark 15, as recorded in the Bible.
  • In light of this, let us have a look at what John 19 says about Jesus’ trial (which would have taken place after the Last Supper): ″It was now the day of preparations for the Passover Seder.
  • ″ It was around six o’clock at the time.

″Behold your monarch!″ he (Pontius Pilate) said to the Jews.According to the English Standard Version, John 19:14 At first glance, it appears that Ehrman is correct.″the day of preparation for the Passover″ is clearly stated in the scripture, which implies that it must be the day before the holiday begins, correct?Wrong.

There is a typo in the text: it states ″the day of preparation for the Passover,″ not ″the day of preparation for the Passover.″ However, while this may appear to be a little and trivial alteration, the simple change in the preposition has a tremendous impact on the meaning.It is necessary to grasp what is meant by the ″day of Preparation″ in order to comprehend why.Fortunately, Mark, the writer who is alleged to be in disagreement with John, also uses the same term and describes what it means in his own words.″And when the evening had come, because it being the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the Sabbath,″ he says in Mark 15:42, ″since it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the Sabbath,″ he continues (English Standard Version).Consequently, the day of Preparation is a day dedicated to getting ready for the Sabbath, rather than for the Passover.Because Jewish law forbade anybody from working on Sabbath days, even the most basic tasks such as cooking and cleaning had to be completed in advance, in preparation for the Sabbath.

We must also comprehend the significance of the Passover.Passover is a seven-day event that celebrates the Jewish escape from Egypt after centuries of enslavement.The phrase appears nine times in the gospel of John, and it is usually used to refer to the celebration as a whole, rather than simply the Passover dinner.Combining John’s real words with the right meanings for the day of preparation and the Passover, we can clearly see what he was getting at.Not the day before Passover, as some have claimed, but rather on the day before Sabbath of the Passover week (the day of Preparation of Passover), according to the Gospel of John.This is precisely what the disciple himself says later in John, completely agreeing with Mark: ″Because it was the day of Preparation, and in order that the bodies would not remain on the cross over night on the Sabbath (for that Sabbath was a high day), the Jews petitioned Pilate to have their legs broken and that they be taken away.″ Jesus said this in John 19:31 of the English Standard Version.

Here, John employs the same ″day of Preparation″ term as previously, but he makes a stronger connection between it with the Sabbath rather than the Passover (since the remains had to be removed on the ″day of Preparation,″ which occurred before the Sabbath).

Conclusion

  • Upon closer examination of this particular accusation, a number of things become apparent.
  • First and foremost, there are sections in the Bible that appear to be in conflict with one another at first glance.
  • This is a truth that we must acknowledge.
  • The second reality, on the other hand, is that a thorough grasp of syntax and vocabulary, along with an awareness of the cultural background, can typically overcome these concerns quickly and effectively.

We must acknowledge, however, that there are many individuals who wish to find fault with the Bible, which brings us to the third point we must acknowledge.Consequently, they are always on the lookout for it and alerting others when they believe they have located it.Even if it means spreading false information that might be resolved with a little investigation.What’s most important is this: The New Testament has been in existence for for 2,000 years now.

In spite of the allegations of opponents, it has continuously withstood the test of time.Despite the fact that outspoken experts such as Bart Ehrman freely state alleged discrepancies, there is no need to be fearful of them.

Source:

According to Timothy McGrew (Professor and Director of Graduate Teaching at Western Michigan University), Alleged Contradictions in the Gospels, Part II, Presentation at St. Michael Lutheran Church, MI, 20 August 2012, pages 8 and 15-23, viewed on July 13, 2015.

Why Is Good Friday Called “Good Friday”? Not for the Reason You Think.

  • Beat Your Brows This piece was initially published in 2014, but it is still relevant today.
  • It is reproduced in its entirety below.
  • On this Friday, Christians commemorate the crucifixion and death of Jesus Christ, which takes place on the first Friday of Lent.
  • Since the day is traditionally regarded as solemn, many Christians and nonbelievers may find the name to be contradictory, especially considering that fasting and solemn processions are commonly performed.

What is the significance of the name ″Good Friday″?Most likely because ″good″ used to be synonymous with ″holy.″ The origin of the name Good Friday has been speculated about by linguists and historians, but only one appears to be supported by both linguistic and historical evidence.The first of these beliefs is that Nice Friday is called Good Friday because, according to Christians, there is something particularly good about it: it marks the anniversary of Jesus’ suffering and death for their sins, which they feel is a very good thing.″That awful Friday has been dubbed Good Friday because it resulted in the Resurrection of Jesus and his victory over death and sin, as well as the celebration of Easter, which is considered to be the pinnacle of Christian festivities,″ according to the Huffington Post.

However, this rationale may have contributed to the name’s persistence—it is definitely how many Christians today understand the name—but it is not the source of the name’s genesis.The second explanation is that the goodness of Good Friday comes from God, and so it is known as ″God’s Friday.″ The Catholic Encyclopedia published an item in 1909 that supports this view, which is cited by Wikipedia as an example.The Huffington Post, in a second story on the same issue, does exactly the same thing.This etymology, on the other hand, appears to be without foundation.According to Anatoly Liberman, a professor at the University of Minnesota who researches the origins of English words, ″the derivation from God is out of the question.″ In addition, Liberman explained to me that English speakers have a long history of guessing about a link between the words good and god when there is none.It was agreed upon by Ben Zimmer, who pointed out that the German word for Good Friday isn’t truly ″Gottes Freitag,″ as the Catholic Encyclopedia implies, but rather Karfreitag (″Sorrowful Friday,″ as the Catholic Encyclopedia suggests).

I don’t think this is anything more than speculative etymology because none of the early examples in the Oxford English Dictionary suggest that it began out as God’s rather than Good, and I don’t think it’s anything more than that.″ Zimmer said.Another possible explanation, endorsed by the Oxford English Dictionary and every language expert I spoke with, is that the term derives from an archaic definition of the word ″excellent.″ When I posed this topic to Jesse Sheidlower, the president of the American Dialect Society, he said, ″The answer seems quite plainly to be that it’s from excellent ‘holy,’ ″ he said when I asked him.As Liberman pointed out, ″the OED’s interpretation makes good sense″ if you examine the various names for Good Friday, such as ″Sacred Friday″ in the Romance languages (Viernes Santo, for example), and ″Passion Friday″ in Russian.The Oxford English Dictionary also mentions that there was previously a Good Wednesday, which was the Wednesday before Easter, but it is now more generally referred to as Holy Wednesday.

Quake Reveals Day of Jesus’ Crucifixion

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  • According to the New Testament, Jesus was most likely crucified on Friday, April 3, 33 A.D., according to the historical record. The most recent analysis, which was published in the journal International Geology Review, was focused on earthquake activity near the Dead Sea, which is located 13 miles from the Israeli capital of Jerusalem. The earthquake that occurred at the crucifixion is mentioned in the Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 27: ″And after Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.″ The temple’s curtain was split in half from top to bottom at that same time. ″The earth trembled, the rocks cracked, and the graves burst open,″ he says. To better understand earthquake activity in the region, geologists Jefferson Williams of Supersonic Geophysical and Markus Schwab and Achim Brauer of the German Research Center for Geosciences examined three cores taken from the beach of the Ein Gedi Spa, which is located adjacent to the Dead Sea. The results were published in the journal Nature Geoscience. In the sediments, varves, which are annual layers of deposition, reveal that the core was affected by at least two major earthquakes: a widespread earthquake that occurred in 31 B.C. and a seismic event that occurred between 26 and 36 AD in the early first century, both of which occurred in the core. Specifically, W

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