Where In The Bible Does It Say Jesus Died For Our Sins

Christ Died for Our Sins According to the Scriptures

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by Gil Rugh

The first and most essential fact of the gospel Paul proclaimed was that “Christ died for our sins.” This was the first and most important fact of the gospel Paul preached (1 Cor. 15:3). Paul’s epistles make it very obvious that His death was genuine and that it had a specific purpose. The most fundamental reality of the gospel is Christ’s death on the cross for our sins. However, you point out that millions of people have died throughout history. In truth, with a few exceptions, every everyone who has ever lived has died or will die at some point in the future.

Christ was crucified beside two other men on the day of His death on the cross, one on either side of Him.

  • Simply put, it is because He died as a result of our sins.
  • No, He did not die in order to atone for his own sins; He died on our behalf, in order to reconcile us to a holy God and allow us to come into proper relationship with Him in the first place.
  • It is not just that He died, but that He died in order to atone for our sins.
  • Consequently, we are able to see that we are sinners and, as a result, comprehend our need for Christ to die in our place in order to pay the penalty for our sin.
  • 2:24).
  • Thousands of individuals believe they are saved just because they attend church and perform charitable deeds.
  • 3:23).
  • 6:23).
  • 9:22).
  • The substitutionary atonement of Christ is the topic of the texts that follow.
  • ‘For the love of Christ rules us, having concluded this that one died for all,’ says 2 Corinthians 5:14. As a result, everyone died.” “He caused Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf,” says 2 Corinthians 5:21, “so that we may become the righteousness of God in Him.” This text clearly refers to a substitutionary death—Christ died in our place. Jesus Christ came to earth in order to pay the punishment for your transgression. You will not be saved unless you come to terms with the truth that you are a sinner, apart from God, and under His punishment. The punishment for your transgression is not church membership, baptism, or any other kind of religious practice. It is the end
  • Galatians 1:14 (NIV): He who “gave Himself for our sins in order that He could rescue us from this present wicked age, according to the will of our God and Father” is the Lord Jesus Christ. As stated in Galatians 3:13, “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law.” He sacrificed Himself as a sacrifice for our sins, paying the penalty and providing atonement
  • What method did He use to accomplish this? “Having become a curse for us, for it is written, cursed is everyone who hangs from a tree,” means that “everyone who hangs from a tree is cursed.” He was found guilty of sin and sentenced to death. Paul writes in Romans 5:6-8, “For while we were still helpless, Christ died for the ungodly at the appropriate time.” He became a curse for us and paid the punishment that was due us. For it is rare that someone will die for a good man, yet it is possible that someone may even risk his life for a decent guy. God, on the other hand, proves His own love for us by sending Christ to die for us while we were still sinners.” In a word, this is the astounding message of the gospel: Christ died for our sins
  • Christ rose again to life for us.

Christ died for our sins, according to the Scriptures, according to the next verse in 1 Corinthians 15:3. No one Scripture was mentioned, but rather all of the Old Testament passages that highlight God providing a Savior who would die and pay the penalty for sin. Paul was not referring to a single passage in particular. Early in this letter, Paul made a passing reference to one such Old Testament text when he stated, “For Christ’s sake, our Passover has been sacrificed” (1 Cor. 5:7). The death of Christ served as our Passover lamb, and it was slaughtered on our behalf.

  1. The people of Israel was enslaved in Egypt, and God had decreed that the firstborn of every Egyptian household would be slaughtered.
  2. During the course of that night, as He proceeded to murder the firstborn, He made a point of passing over any homes where He noticed blood on the doorposts and lintel.
  3. 12).
  4. In his introduction of Jesus to the people of Israel, John the Baptist exclaimed, “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sins of the world” (John 1:29).
  5. Consequently, all of Israel’s atonement offerings in the Old Testament looked forward to the arrival of Christ.
  6. Year after year, the Old Testament sacrifices required by the Law served as a reminder of sin (Heb.
  7. “For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to wipe away sins,” according to Hebrews 10:4, “since the blood of bulls and goats cannot take away sins.” Clearly, the difficulty with animal sacrifices was that they were unable to cleanse people of their sins.
  8. 10:5).
  9. He is the Passover Lamb for us.

Both the Old and New Testaments are replete with references to this lesson. He died in our place in order to grant atonement and forgiveness, as well as to fully and permanently pay the penalty for our sins.

Christ Died For Our Sins, Was Buried and Raised According to the Scriptures

According to the Scriptures, Paul says in one of the most renowned chapters of his first epistle to the Corinthians, that “Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures” (1 Cor. 15:3). This declaration is interspersed with a series of affirmations about the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, and it serves as a concise confessional summation of topics of primary significance about the gospel. He claims in his own words that he was making the gospel that they had received known to the Corinthians, as well as the gospel by which they had been saved and in which they had placed themselves.

  • As I’ve argued in length previously, in order to provide an authentic biblical understanding of the gospel, the terminology and concepts of the gospel found in the Bible must be thoroughly examined and evaluated.
  • In 1 Corinthians 15:3-4, on the other hand, Paul explicitly affirms that the crucifixion and resurrection are the most fundamental parts of the gospel.
  • According to 1 Corinthians 15:3, however, what sort of death does Paul believe Jesus died, and why does the resurrection of Jesus make this form of death efficacious for those who were offered it, is unclear.
  • In Paul’s theology, Jesus’ death has a number of distinctive characteristics, in my opinion.
  • 15:3 that Jesus died as a substitution for sinners, which is a significant teaching.
  • 15:3, would imply that Jesus took upon himself the punishment for sins in order for the sinners for whom he died to receive the reward of salvation if they repent and believe.
  • His statement there is that the gospel “saved” the Corinthians when he says that they “accepted” it (1 Cor.
  • Paul uses the term “received” to indicate that the Corinthians accepted the gospel.
  • Those who respond to the gospel with real faith and repentance are the only ones who will receive the salvation blessings of the gospel message.

When Paul summarizes the first principles of the gospel in 1 Corinthians 15:3, he states that the Corinthians could indeed benefit from the gospel by receiving/believing it: “Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures,” which means that Christ died for their sins according to the Scriptures.

  • So their involvement in the gospel via receiving and believing in it resulted in their obtaining the saving advantages of the gospel since Jesus died for their sins in order to convey those benefits to the sinners whose sins were at the root of the gospel’s saving message.
  • I believe Paul’s response is found in 1 Corinthians 15:4, which refers to the resurrection.
  • According to the Scriptures, both in verse 3 and verse 4, Paul declares that the death and resurrection of Jesus took place in history.
  • 53:5, 8, 10).
  • His death, on the other hand, was a triumphant one because of the resurrection.

Conclusion As we approach Maundy Thursday and the beginning of the resurrection season, we Christians should remind ourselves once more of the absolute necessity of both Jesus’ substitutionary death for our sins and his own physical resurrection from the dead in order to bring about the saving benefits for those of us who receive and believe the gospel.

  • The resurrection season is all about God appeasing his wrath on the cross via the death of Jesus for the sins of sinners and God rising Jesus from the dead to demonstrate that Jesus’ death has resulted in redemption for everyone who receive and believe the gospel.
  • Jarvis J.
  • Who Was It That Christ Died For?
  • (Milton Keynes, United Kingdom: Paternoster Press, 2012).
  • Williams has a doctorate in biblical studies from the University of Kentucky.

A prolific author, he has authored various volumes, including a commentary on Galatians (Cascade, 2020). In addition, he works as a teaching pastor at Sojourn Community Church Midtown, which is located in Louisville. You can keep up with him on Twitter, where he goes by the handle @drjjwilliams.

Christ Died for Our Sins That We Might Die to Sin

You have been called to this because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example to follow in His footsteps; and while being reviled, He did not revile back; while suffering, He did not threaten, but kept entrusting Himself to him who judges righteously; and while suffering, He Himself bore our sins in His body on the cross, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness; for it is through His wounds that you have been healed.

Due to the fact that you had been straying like sheep, you have now returned to the Shepherd and Guardian of your souls.

Introduction

I informed Tom before I left last week that I was delighted for him to proceed with the planning of the summer preaching series on the “one another” mandates of the New Testament, which will take place in the coming months. I expressed my belief that my sermon this morning may be viewed as a type of basis for those instructions in my sermon this morning. I intended to finish at least the second chapter of 1 Peter before I went on holiday and took some time off from my writing duties. As a result, we will be concentrating on the final paragraph of that chapter this morning.

  1. It has been significantly more painful than if a number of members of our team had perished.
  2. Other times, it appeared as though the Lord had something else to say to us.
  3. However, that is not the most important thing we observe at the conclusion of 1 Peter 2.
  4. And nothing that has occurred to us can prevent God from accomplishing his plan for his people.
  5. In addition, I hope you understand that this goal has everything to do with the “one another” directives and how we treat one another.

Christ Died That We Might Live Righteously

This passage contains three instances in which Peter informs us that Christ died and that the goal of his death was to enable us to live in a new manner. Or, to put it another way, he tells us that God’s aim for us as a church is that we live like Christ, that we live righteously; and he tells us three times that his unshakeable, endlessly compelling commitment to accomplish that purpose in us is the death of his Son in order to make it a reality.

His determination to see it through is demonstrated by the sacrifice of his Son to see it through. Allow me to draw your attention to these three assertions of purpose, as well as three statements of God’s commitment to seeing that it is accomplished via the death of Jesus.

1. “Follow in His Steps”

The first is found in verse 21, which states, “Christ likewise suffered for you, setting you an example for you to follow in His footsteps.” “Christ likewise suffered for you, setting you an example, so that you may follow in his footsteps,” the verse reads literally. In other words, Christ suffered for us—even to the point of death—in order that we would be able to follow in his footsteps. As a result, God’s plan for us is for us to follow in the footsteps of Jesus. This mission is made possible by Christ’s “suffering for us,” which is the driving force behind it.

  1. He endured “for us,” which means that he suffered in our place and on our behalf.
  2. Someone or something happened in Christ’s death “for us,” and thus ensures that it will be successful in its goal of getting us to follow in his footsteps.
  3. The substitutionary death of Jesus is the source of power.
  4. And living like him entails obeying all of the New Testament’s “one another” requirements as well.

2. “Die to Sin and Live to Righteousness”

To take a second look at verse 24a, it says, “He Himself bore our sins in His body on the cross, so that we may die to sin and live to righteousness.” The purpose of God for us, as well as the commitment of God behind the purpose, as seen by Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross for us, are once again revealed. This is how God describes his goal for us: “so we could die to sin and live to righteousness.” This is what God wants for us. God’s dedication to seeing it through is shown in the following way: “He Himself bore our sins in His body on the cross.” On the Cross, Christ bore our sins in His own flesh and blood.

  1. In verse 21, Peter expresses quite plainly what he meant when he said, “Christ suffered for you.” He was referring to the fact that “Christ carried our sins in his body on the cross.” Among Christ’s agonies was the torment of being nailed to the cross and dying in that position.
  2. It was a substitute on my part.
  3. Isaiah 53:6 says, “We have all gone astray like sheep; we have turned each to his own way, and the Lord has put on him the iniquity of us all.” This is the fulfillment of that verse.
  4. In 1 Corinthians 15:1, 3, Paul said, “I remind you, brethren, in what terms I taught to you the gospel.
  5. Those are the words that Peter is emphasizing here, using terminology derived from the Scriptures: On the cross, Christ carried our sins in his body, which means that, in accordance with Isaiah 53:6, he died in our place.
  6. It is the sole ray of hope for a church that has endured what we have endured in recent years.
  7. He took the sins of Leah and Dean, as well as my sins and your sins—all the sins of his people—on his shoulders.

We need to take our time here.

The ramifications of this for each of us personally and as a church are enormous!

We can say, for example, “Because of your sacrifice and suffering for my sins, I have faith that all of my sins—public and private—have been lifted, carried, suffered for, and as a result, have been erased from me.

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I do not take their remorse or shame with me into the future.” Allow this to sink in.

The feeling of guilt does not have to accompany you to work or to bed each day.

Even if you are not a member of this church, please participate this morning.

24): God’s purpose is to cleanse the world of sin.

in order that we may die to sin and live to righteousness,” says the author.

In both situations, the vicarious suffering of Jesus in verse 21 and the substitutionary death of Jesus in verse 24 are identified as the method by which God wishes to make us righteous in the same way that his Son was made righteous.

Is this anything that you consider to be good news?

Does it feel like good news that the message of the cross is both a lifting of guilt and a laying on of load on one hand, and on the other, a laying on of burden?

On the other side, God’s plan for Jesus’ suffering and death is to raise up individuals who will follow in Jesus’ footsteps and live lives of righteousness.

For them, the grace of the cross means just one thing: freedom from the burden of guilt and humiliation.

God’s Purpose Increases the Spread of the Good News The causes for this can be attributed to a variety of factors, ranging from internal rebellion to unpleasant recollections from the past to theological misinterpretations.

What I want to do is simply emphasize that the cross’s aim to free people from the enslaving power of sin as well as the shame that comes with sin does not lessen the good news; rather, it multiplies it tenfold.

If that seems like excellent news to you—that you might continue to live your life the way the rest of the world does, only without being punished—it demonstrates that you have a strong affection for sin rather than for God.

What is being said in verse 24a is that when Christ bore our sins in his body on the cross, he not only achieved the eradication of our guilt, but he also secured our liberation from our slavery.

In the cross, God expresses his design, purpose, and commitment in this way.

As a result of the new covenant, he promises himself to do just that. You could wonder if it is simply an offer rather than a recognition of success. The cross, it is possible, does not truly safeguard and guarantee anything for us, but rather merely offers something to us.

3. “By His Wounds You Were Healed”

That is highly implausible, as evidenced by the third and last explanation of the cross’s function in this passage. Once again, Isaiah 53 (v. 5) is cited in verse 24b: “You were cured by His wounds,” says the author. It does not state that healing is delivered through his wounds. Alternatively, healing is a possibility as a result of his wounds. It adds, “You were cured as a result of his wounds.” In other words, the cross has shown to be effective. It does what God has set out for it to accomplish.

  1. Peter is not primarily concerned about physical recovery for cancer, arthritis, and other ailments at this point.
  2. That, however, is not Peter’s way of thinking in this situation.
  3. “For you had been straying like sheep for a long time, but now you have returned to the Shepherd and Guardian of your souls,” says verse 25.
  4. This is the third declaration about the design and function of the cross, and it concludes the series.
  5. The second point made in verse 24a was that Christ died so that we can live lives of righteousness in his place.

Is This Good News?

I’m wondering if this is good news. The fact that the cross was created to redeem us not just from the shame of our sin, but also from the strength of our sin, is welcome news, isn’t it? The way Peter explains it in verse 25 makes it clear that he wants you to perceive it as good news, which I believe you will. It is the word of the cross that leads us to a shepherd rather than a slave master. Yes, the Shepherd serves as a guide. He does not allow his sheep to stray for an extended period of time or go great distances.

He is the one who supplies.

All the while, Christ pursues us persistently with goodness and mercy throughout our lives.

In other words, it is the New Covenant, which has been sealed by the blood of the Covenant.

What Does It Mean to Die to Sin?

Before we conclude this book, I’d want to pose one more question. What does it mean to die to one’s sin (v. 24a) imply exactly? When I pose that question, I wait until the very end because the answer comes from Peter’s description of the Shepherd in verse 25. Christ carried our sins in his body on the cross so that we can die to sin, according to the text in verse 24a. What does this entail in terms of our own personal experience? What causes this to happen? I believe it operates in the following way: When God’s Word, spoken through the power of the Holy Spirit (cf.

It is our death that we succumb to the deception of sin, which attempts to persuade us that a brighter future may be attained via sin rather than through virtue.

We are alive to sin, believing in sin, and pursuing sin until the cross releases on us the victorious love of God and compels us to see that we are wandering; we are erring; we are self-destructing on the road of sin, and that we must repent and turn away from it.

While resting in the pasture of our all-satisfying Shepherd, we are awoken to the splendor of righteousness.

Accept it and shift your attention back to the Shepherd and Guardian of your soul. In doing so, we will discover that the will and joy of all of the “one another” instructions of the New Testament have been released as well as the strength to move ahead from our collective shame and suffering.

What does it mean that Jesus died for our sins?

QuestionAnswer Simply said, no one would have everlasting life if Jesus had not died on the cross as a sacrifice for our sins. “I am the way, the truth, and the life,” Jesus himself declared. “There is no other way to the Father but through me” (John 14:6). Using this remark, Jesus states the purpose of His birth, death, and resurrection: to offer a road to heaven for sinful humans, who would otherwise be unable to reach it on their own. At the time of God’s creation of Adam and Eve, they were without flaw and lived in a virtual paradise known as the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:15).

  1. Genesis 3 goes on to detail how Adam and Eve were deceived and tempted by Satan’s falsehoods and temptations.
  2. (Genesis 2:16-17; 2:20-21).
  3. God has proclaimed that those who sin shall perish, both physically and spiritually, according to His Word.
  4. In His generosity and mercy, God provided a way out of this predicament through the spilt blood of His perfect Son on the cross, which was the only way out.
  5. When it came to being deemed “sinless” or “right” in the sight of God, the Law of Moses established a method for the people to do so: by sacrificing animals as sacrifices for each sin they committed.
  6. As a result of His coming and death, Jesus was able to fulfill His mission as the ultimate and last sacrifice, the perfect (without blemish) offering for our sins (Colossians 1:22; 1 Peter 1:19).
  7. “This is done in order that what was promised, which is delivered through faith in Jesus Christ, may be given to those who believe” (Galatians 3:22).
  8. Our salvation is secured by our faith in the spilt blood of Jesus Christ, which atones for our sins and grants us eternal life.

Questions regarding Salvation (return to top of page) What does it imply that Jesus died in our place because of our sins?

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1 John 2:2 – Bible Gateway

New International Version (New International Version) (NIV) His sacrifice atones for our sins, and not only for ours, but also for those of all people throughout history. In addition, he is the propitiation for our sins; and not just for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world. And He is the propitiation for our sins; and not only for our sins, but for the sins of the whole world as well. In addition, He serves as the propitiation (the atoning sacrifice) for our sins, not just for ours but for the sins of the entire world.

  • God in human form is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our own, but also for those of all people on the face of the earth.
  • In addition, he is thekapparah for our sins – and not only for our sins, but for the sins of the entire world as well.
  • as well as the propitiation for our sins; but not just for our sins, but for the sins of all people everywhere.
  • As well as this, he is the propitiation for our sins: not just for our own sins, but for the sins of the entire world.
  • And he is the means by which all others might have their sins forgiven as well.
  • He is the propitiation for our sins, and not just for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, because he died on the cross.
  • He died in our place in order to atone for our sins, and not only our sins, but the sins of the entire human race.

He is the atonement for our sins, and not just for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, since he is the payment for them.

He is the propitiation for our sins, and not just for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, since He is the Son of God.

All individuals can have their sins forgiven since Jesus is the means by which they may do so.

I’m writing these things to you (may I refer to you as “my children” since that’s how I think of you) in order to assist you in avoiding sin.

In addition, Jesus is the mediator between us and God for our sins, not only for ours but also for the sins of the entire world.

Furthermore, he is the propitiation for our sins: and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

In him, God’s anger against our sins was turned away, and we were able to enter into a relationship with him.

I write this letter to you, my children, in order to lead you away from sin.

When he offered himself as a sacrifice for our sins, he effectively ended the sin issue for all time—not just for us, but for the entire world.

Keep his commands in mind.

· Our sins have been atoned for by him; yet, he has atoned not just for our own sins but also for those of the entire world.

He is the ultimate atonement for our sins, and not only for our sins, but for the sins of the entire world.

Furthermore, He, Himself, is the propitiation for our sins; and not only for our sins, but also for those of the entire world.

He died in our place in order to atone for our sins, and not only our sins, but the sins of the entire human race.

he himself is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire human race.

However, Christ did more than only atone for our sins.

In other words, Jesus is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our sins, but for all of the sins of the entire universe.

And He, Himself, is the propitiation for our sins, not only for ours but also for the sins of the entire human race.

He didn’t just pay for our sins; he paid for the sins of the entire world as well.

Furthermore, he is the propitiation for our sins; and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

Furthermore, Jesus is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

Furthermore, Jesus is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

And he is the kapporah for chattoteinu, not just for our own, but also for the entire kol HaOlam Hazeh (world of the living).

As an atonement for our sins, and not only for ours, but also for the sins of the entire world, Jesus is the Son of God.

He is the substitutionary atonement for our sins, and not only for our sins, but for the sins of the entire world.

However, He did not stop there; He died in order to atone for the sins of the entire world.

He is the atonement that God made to atone for the injustice that we have done to one another.

.

Furthermore, Jesus serves as a propitiation for our sins, not just for ours, but also for the sins of the entire world.

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Jesus Did Not Die For Your Sins

a new International Version has been published (NIV) His sacrifice atones for our sins, and not only for ours, but also for those of all people everywhere on this planet. and he is the atonement for our sins; and not only for our sins, but for the sins of the entire world. Moreover, He is the propitiation for our sins; and not only for ours, but for the sins of the entire world as a whole. And He is the propitiation (the atoning sacrifice) for our sins, not only for ours but also for the sins of the entire world, which He accomplished through His death on the cross.

  1. God in human form is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our own, but also for those of all people on the face of this planet.
  2. In addition, he is thekapparah for our sins — and not only for our sins, but for the sins of the entire world as a whole.
  3. as well as the propitiation for our sins; but not only for our sins, but for the sins of all people on earth.
  4. As well as that, he is the propitiation for our sins: not only for our own sins, but for the sins of the entire world.
  5. All people can have their sins forgiven because he is the only way.
  6. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, as a result of his sacrifice.
  7. God sent His Son to die in our place in order to atone for our sins, as well as the sins of all mankind.

He is the atonement for our sins, and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, and he is the only way to find forgiveness.

As a result of His sacrifice, we are absolved of our sins, and not only of our own, but also of the sins of the entire universe.

As a result, Jesus is the only way for anyone to have their sins forgiven.

It is my intention in writing these things to you (may I refer to you as “my children”—because that is how I think of you—in order to assist you in avoiding sin.

In addition, he is the mediator between us and God for our sins, and not just for ours, but for all of mankind’s sins.

In addition, he is the propitiation for our sins: not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

In him, God’s wrath against our sins was turned away, and we were able to enter into a relationship with him.

We do have a Priest-Friend in the presence of the Father, however, and that is Jesus Christ, who is also known as the Righteous One.

How can we be certain that we are knowing God in the correct manner?

Our sins, as well as those of the entire world, are atoned for by His death, which is a sacrifice for all of humanity’s sins.

He is the atonement for our sins, and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, and he is the only way to find forgiveness.

Furthermore, He alone is the propitiation for our sins; and not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

And not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world, he offers himself as a sacrifice to atone for them all.

as well as the atoning sacrifice for our sins, not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world He sacrificed his life in order to atone for our transgressions against him.

As a result, he atoned for all of humanity’s sins.

In other words, he is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for our sins, but for all of the sins of the entire world.

The blood of Jesus was shed in our place to atone for our sins.

Our sins, as well as the sins of the entire world, are expiated by Him, who gives himself as a sacrifice for us.

In addition, he is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

In addition, he is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, not only for our sins, but also for the sins of the entire world.

In him, we find the atonement for our sins – and not just our sins, but the sins of the entire world as well.

As the atonement for our sins, and not only for ours, but also for the sins of the entire world, he is the Son of God.

We are sinners, and He is the atonement for our sins, as well as sins committed by everyone else on the face of the planet.

However, He did not stop there; He died in order to atone for the sins of the entire human race.

In order to make amends for the wrong we have done, God offered him as a sacrifice.

and he is the source of forgiveness for our sins; and not only for our sins, but for the sins of the entire world as a whole.

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How Paul Came To The Conclusion Jesus Died For Our Sins

  • As a Pharisaic Jew, Paul was fully aware of the legalistic practices of Judaism that necessitated the performance of blood sacrifice ceremonies. .
  • The offering of a sacrifice was regarded to be an act of obedience to God by those who participated. The apostle Paul used the analogy of “sacrifice” to explain Jesus’ crucifixion as an act of obedience to God in order to atone for the sins of the entire human race. “For just as many people were made sinners by one man’s (Adam’s) disobedience, so many people will be made righteous by one man’s (Jesus’) obedience,” wrote the apostle Paul (Romans 5:19). .
  • In his epistle to the Christians in Rome, Paul explains his view as to why Jesus had to be crucified. As an explanation for the origins of sin and death, Paul utilized the account of “Adam and Eve,” which may be found in the Hebrew book of Genesis. The conviction that we are redeemed from sin and death by Jesus’ death on the cross (his crucifixion) is demonstrated here by Paul, who explains that his extrapolation of Genesis is the source of this belief. Consequently, sin entered the world through one man (Adam), and death entered the world through sin, and death spread to all men as a result of all men’s sin” (Romans 5:12). In contrast, God demonstrates his love for us by the fact that Christ (Jesus) died for us while we were still sinners. Because of this, we have been justified by his blood, and we will be rescued by him from the wrath of God much more (Romans 5:8-9). This is the last touch! When it comes to Jesus’ death, Paul explains it in terms of a blood sacrifice to atone for Adam and Eve’s (claimed) transgressions. (Can you guess where John got the concept that “For God so loved the world. Jesus died for our sins” came from?
See also:  How Many Times Did Jesus Fall

Paul’s Context and Culture

Throughout the New Testament, Paul cites his pharisaic knowledge of the Old Testament as well as his awareness of universal religious “sacrifice” rituals as sources for the concept of “atonement for sin, redemption by faith.” Paul was well aware that the giving of a sacrifice was seen as an act of obedience to the will of God. The apostle Paul used the analogy of “sacrifice” to explain Jesus’ crucifixion as an act of obedience to God in order to atone for the sins of the entire human race. It should be noted that Paul “interpreted” rather than receiving supernatural revelation.

In this passage, Paul makes no claim that God/Jesus revealed this “truth” to him!

Evolution Refutes Paul’s Reasoning

The “sin” of Adam and Eve, which is the basis of Christianity’s fundamental doctrine, did not actually occur. However, we are here as a result of Evolution. As we currently understand, the evolution of man, plants, and animals took place over a period of 3.5 billion years. There were no Adam and Eve in the biblical story. There was no “original sin” that needed to be atoned for by Jesus’ death. This alone is ample evidence that Jesus did not die in our place because of our sins. Paul’s justification is completely illogical.

If one believes in the validity of evolution, then one must also believe that Paul’s conclusion, “Jesus Died For Our Sins,” is founded on a false Old Testament text and, as a result, cannot be real.

Suppose a single guy writes one statement based on an event (AdamEve) that never occurred, and this misunderstanding of reality gives rise to the most fundamental tenet of the Christian faith?

Paul belonged to the Pharisaic school of thought.

Other Evidence (Theological) That Jesus Did Not Die for Our Sins

As far as we know, Paul is the only individual on the planet who has written that Jesus died in order to rescue us from the sin of Adam and Eve. Jesus never stated that his death was necessary in order to rescue us. Is it likely that God would entrust the transmission of the most fundamental notion in all of Christianity to a man whose beliefs were diametrically opposed (faith vs works, Gentiles vs Jews) to those of his “Son”? Are the chances that God will allow the redemption of all people to rest on a single remark said by a single individual that is diametrically opposed to the message Jesus delivered in the synoptic gospels high?

What would cause God to suddenly alter the message that He sent His only born Son to earth to preach and spread? Who could possibly be trusted to communicate such a monumental shift to such a small group of people? This is a significant issue.

Theological Problem II

Jesus is God, according to the doctrine of the Trinity. This is what Jesus says in: John 8:58 (NIV) As he spoke to them, Jesus declared: “Truly, verily, I say vnto you, before Abraham was, I am.” 10:30 a.m. (John 10:30 a.m. My Father and I are one and the same. Then the Jews picked up their stones and began to stone him once more. 10:38 (John 10:38) The Father resides inside me, and I likewise resides within him. As a result, they attempted to kidnap him once more. John 14:9 (KJV) Those who have seen me have also seen the Father.

God did not die, and God is not no more alive.

Theological Problem III

Even putting aside that line of logic, how precisely would “God devoting himself to Himself in order to save us from Himself” function? What does this have to do with the sin of Adam and Eve? It is only via Paul’s complex mental process that we are saved as a result of God’s/Jesus’ “sacrifice,” and not through any other means. It’s hard to imagine that an omnipotent, omniscient, loving, merciful, and just God who created everything in six days could come up with anything other than murdering himself or his son as punishment.

  1. However, let us agree that “Jesus died for our sins” is true for the sake of argument.
  2. Why is it necessary for one to believe in Jesus’ Resurrection in order to be saved?
  3. Because of Jesus’ death, the sins of Adam and Eve were atoned for.
  4. It will never be seen again!
  5. It is the responsibility of everyone who continues to live after Jesus’ death.
  6. It has already been redeemed in some form.
  7. What is the relationship between one’s religious beliefs and salvation?

Theological Problem IV

The flood was the means by which Adam’s “original sin” was forgiven! These are the generations of Noah: Noah was a righteous man and perfect in his generations, and he had a close relationship with God.” Genesis 6:9 is a verse that states that God created man in his own image. Noah was “excellent in his generations,” according to the Bible. “Perfect” implies not having a single sin, because else one would not be considered perfect. The fact that Noah was flawless “in his generations” implies that all of his descendants were likewise perfect, and as a result, we are also perfect and devoid of sin.

The Credibility of Paul

We must look into Paul’s credibility since his theory of “Jesus Died For Your Sins” is the focal point of Christian doctrine, thus we must look into Paul’s credibility.

There are a number of reasons to be skeptical about Paul’s ability to convey any trustworthiness.

  • Paul does not have the authority to speak since it has not been granted to him by God. One’s power to speak on behalf of God does not come from seeing an apparition. At one point, Paul claims that his knowledge comes from “Revelation,” yet this claim turns out to be false and contradicts what Jesus taught. He doesn’t go into detail about this “Revelation,” Paul contradicts himself, and Paul makes promises about things that didn’t come to fruition.

This page will not repeat all of the above allegations concerning Paul’s credibility, which have been developed and supported by evidence on another website – “Paul is so incorrect about so many things, why do you accept anything he says?,” for the simple reason that we will not repeat it here. The conclusion reached on that page is that Paul’s claims are completely untrustworthy. Don’t raise any doubts about that assumption until you’ve read the page.

The Credibility of John

No Biblical Scholar thinks that the book of John was authored by the apostle John, despite the fact that many others do. According to the majority of scholars, John was authored by a committee sometime after the year 90 AD. See Who Wrote the Book of John for further information. The most odd aspect of John’s role as author is that he appears to arrive out of nowhere and seemingly out of nowhere he is the author. Neither the Old or New Testaments include any mention of a person who is referred to as “the disciple whom Jesus loved.” This sentence is unique to this author’s gospel and cannot be found anywhere else.

  1. John would have become a 90-year-old man suffering from senility and Alzheimer’s disease!
  2. That is like to a 90-year-old guy recalling every word, every scene, and every circumstance from a play he was in 55 years ago, as if it happened yesterday.
  3. Such is exactly what John would have done in that situation.
  4. Why did it take “John” 55 years to make the decision to write about the event that will affect the fate of all humans for the rest of his or her life?

Conclusion

The book of John, on the other hand, is not believable.

BTW = BY THE WAY

What exactly are the “scriptures” that Paul is referring to? Paul is so eager to establish a connection between his notion and scripture that he asserts, without any basis, that his “died for your sins” idea was foreshadowed in the Bible. Where are the scriptures that prophesy that a messiah will suffer, die, and be risen from the grave in order to save mankind? Where have the prophecies that are mentioned in 1Cor 15:3-4 gone to rest? Could it be Hosea 6:1-2? So let us return to the LORD, because he has ripped us apart and will mend our wounds, and he has struck us down but will mend us back together.

Nevertheless, because this phrase is addressed to an audience, it pertains to the people who were alive at the time (thus the word “us”) and cannot be fulfilled by the death and resurrection of Jesus. It is the only viable option.

BTW 1.1A Word About Sacrifice

The most common method of appeasing the ancient gods was through sacrifice. The sacrifice of animals and other goods was demanded by the majority of faiths. A number of them necessitated human sacrifice. To acquire entrance to everlasting life, Christianity devised the ultimate marketing ploy: instead of sacrificing your goat or killing another person to gain access to everlasting life, you simply had to believe that God sacrificed a human, and a particular human at that, his SON! There you have it.

That’s pretty cool, huh?

It was simple to put into effect, and it came at no cost to the believers.

Paul’s Christianity was an appealing alternative for his Jewish audience because it offered the following benefits:

  1. You are under no obligation to circumcise yourself. A promise of a glorious afterlife at no cost
  2. All you have to do is “believe” in order to get it. You will no longer be required to sacrifice your goat as a result of the one sacrifice. Because of the one sacrifice, you will never have to ponder about your own sin again. You have the option of ignoring the 613 unchanging mitzvot (commandments) that God handed to the Jewish people in the Torah. You are free to maintain your religious beliefs in reborn Gods and blood sacrifice.

Christianity was seen as a “low-cost” alternative for people to consider. Don’t start telling us about all of the Christians who have been murdered now. Yes, some people were slain because of their religious views, just as others were killed because of their religious beliefs. A Jewish woman who commits adultery may be stoned to death.

BTW 2

The Gospel of John is the only one that even proposes that believe in Jesus’ death for our sins, as well as trust in his resurrection, is a necessary and sufficient condition for everlasting life to be realized. Jesus, on the other hand, provides at least 23 distinct routes to salvation in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, according to scholars. “The Path to Salvation Is Not Clear” outlines each of Jesus’ paths to salvation in a clear and concise manner. Here’s an example of one of them: Because the Son of Man will appear in the glory of His Father, accompanied by His angels, and He will repay each person according to his or her deeds.

Never say it out loud!

BTW 3

Paul’s statement with this well-known paraphrasing of his own is then picked up by John, who is the only disciple to do so. For God so loved the world that he gave his only born Son, in order that whomever believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life (John 3:16). John 3:16 is a biblical passage that teaches that God is love. Whosoever believes in him will not die, but will have eternal life, according to the Bible. Interesting.if Jesus said those words, then the “him” refers to God, his father, and not to Jesus himself!

Jesus’ continual message that you must have confidence and belief in his Father would be compatible with a reference to “HIM.” Additionally, it is congruent with the first section: “For GOD so loved the world that HE gave his only born Son.” Now, the pronoun “him” obviously refers to God, rather than to Jesus.

  1. 5:24 (John 5:24) Not only does Jesus completely contradict John 3:16, John 6:47, and John 11:25 with John 5:24, but he also makes it obvious that John 3:16 is being misread by Christians by stating, “John 3:16 is being misinterpreted by Christians.” “.
  2. God, in this instance.
  3. You simply need to hear Jesus’ words and put your faith in Him who sent me in order to be raised from the dead and enter into life.
  4. I say this with all sincerity.
  5. And whomever believes and trusts in me will never perish from the earth.
  6. And.

Which passage do you prefer: John 5:24 or John 6:47? It appears that we have two radically opposite dogmas from the same source in this instance. What makes you think you should believe anything John says?

BTW4

The following is written by Brian Zahnd, the founder and head pastor of Word of Life Church, a Christian congregation located in the heartland of America in the city of St. Joseph. The following is an excerpt from his article “How Does “Dying For Our Sins” Work? ” The Bible is unequivocal in its assertion that God did not kill Jesus. Jesus was offered as a sacrifice in the sense that the Father was ready to put his Son into our wicked system in order to reveal it as entirely sinful and to present us with an alternative way of life (John 3:16).

However, it was neither a sacrifice to pacify a vengeful deity, nor was it a payment for the services of a penultimate god who was subservient to Justice.

In praying, “Father, forgive them,” Jesus was not requesting that God respond in a way that was counter to his nature.

What part of that rambling doesn’t make sense?

All of these will make approximately the same amount of sense as the preceding.

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