Where Did Jesus Cast The Demons Named Legion?

Luke 8:30 ″What is your name?″ Jesus asked. ″Legion,″ he replied, because many demons had gone into him.

New International Version (New International Version) ″What is your name?″ Jesus inquired of him.“Legion,” he replied, because many demons had gone into him.New Living Translation (New Living Translation) ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus inquired.

“Legion,” he replied, for he was filled with many demons.Version standardized in English Jesus then asked him, “What is your name?” And he said, ″Legion,″ because he had been possessed by a large number of demons.Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) “What is your name?” Jesus asked.“Legion,” he replied, because many demons had gone into him.Berean Literal Bible And Jesus asked him, ″What is your name?″ And he said, ″Legion,″ because many demons were entered into him.King James Bible And Jesus asked him, saying, What is thy name?

And he said, Legion: because many devils were entered into him.New King James Version Jesus asked him, saying, “What is your name?” And he said, “Legion,” because many demons had entered him.New American Standard Bible And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” And he said, “Legion”; because many demons had entered him.NASB 1995 And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” And he said, “Legion″; for many demons had entered him.NASB 1977 And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” And he said, “Legion”; for many demons had entered him.Amplified Bible Then Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” And he answered, “Legion”; because many demons had entered him.

  1. Christian Standard Bible “What is your name?
  2. ” Jesus asked him.
  3. “Legion,” he said, because many demons had entered him.
  4. Holman Christian Standard Bible “What is your name?” Jesus asked him.
  5. ” Legion,” he said—because many demons had entered him.
  6. American Standard Version And Jesus asked him, What is thy name?

And he said, Legion; for many demons were entered into him.Aramaic Bible in Plain English But Yeshua asked him, “What is your name?” But he said to him, “Legion”, because many demons had entered him.Contemporary English Version Jesus asked the man, ″What is your name?″ He answered, ″My name is Lots.″ He said this because there were ″lots″ of demons in him.Douay-Rheims Bible And Jesus asked him, saying: What is thy name?But he said: Legion; because many devils were entered into him.

Good News Translation Jesus asked him, ″What is your name?″ ″My name is ‘Mob,’″ he answered-because many demons had gone into him.International Standard Version Jesus asked the man, ″What’s your name?″ He answered, ″Legion,″ because many demons had gone into him.Literal Standard Version And Jesus questioned him, saying, “What is your name?” And he said, “Legion,” because many demons were entered into him, New American Bible Then Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” He replied, “Legion,” because many demons had entered him.NET Bible Jesus then asked him, ″What is your name?″ He said, ″Legion,″ because many demons had entered him.New Revised Standard Version Jesus then asked him, “What is your name?” He said, “Legion”; for many demons had entered him.

  1. New Heart English Bible Jesus asked him, ″What is your name?″ He said, ″Legion,″ for many demons had entered into him.
  2. Weymouth New Testament ″What is your name?″ Jesus asked him.
  3. ″Legion,″ he replied-because a great number of demons had entered into him; World English Bible Jesus asked him, ″What is your name?″ He said, ″Legion,″ for many demons had entered into him.
  4. Young’s Literal Translation And Jesus questioned him, saying, ‘What is thy name?’ and he said, ‘Legion,’ (because many demons were entered into him) (because many demons were entered into him,) Additional Translations.
  5. Context The Demons and the Pigs… 29 For Jesus had commanded the unclean spirit to come out of the man.
  • Many times it had seized him, and though he was bound with chains and shackles, he had broken the chains and been driven by the demon into solitary places.
  • 30 “What is your name?” Jesus asked.
  • “Legion,”he replied, because many demons had gone into him.
  • 31 And the demons kept begging Jesus not to order them to go into the Abyss.
  • … Cross References Matthew 4:24 News about Him spread all over Syria, and people brought to Him all who were ill with various diseases, those suffering acute pain, the demon-possessed, those having seizures, and the paralyzed-and He healed them.
  • Matthew 26:53 Are you not aware that I can call on My Father, and He will at once put at My disposal more than twelve legions of angels?
  • Mark 5:9 ″What is your name?″ Jesus asked.
  • ″My name is Legion,″ he replied, ″for we are many.″ Luke 8:29 For Jesus had commanded the unclean spirit to come out of the man.
  • Many times it had seized him, and though he was bound with chains and shackles, he had broken the chains and been driven by the demon into solitary places.
  • Treasury of Scripture And Jesus asked him, saying, What is your name?
  • And he said, Legion: because many devils were entered into him.

Legion.Matthew 26:53 Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels?Mark 5:9 And he asked him, What is thy name?And he answered, saying, My name is Legion: for we are many.many.

Luke 8:2 And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils, Matthew 8:29 And, behold, they cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God?art thou come hither to torment us before the time?Mark 16:9 Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils.

(30) Legion.- Here again St.Mark and St.Luke agree.

Verse 30.- And Jesus asked him; saying, What is thy name?And he said, Legion: because many devils were entered into him The Master vouchsafed no reply to the demons’ prayer, but puts a quiet suggestive question to their unhappy victim.The Lord’s words, as Dean Plumptre suggests, would serve ″to recall to the man’s mind that he had once a human name, with all its memories of human fellowship.

  1. It was a stage, even in spite of the paroxysm that followed, in the process of recovery, in so far as it helped to disentangle him from the confusion between himself and the demons which caused his misery.
  2. But, at first, the question seems only to increase the evil.
  3. ‘My name is Legion, for we are many.’ The irresistible might, the full array of the Roman legion, with its six thousand soldiers, seemed to the demoniac the one adequate symbol of the wild, uncontrollable impulses of passion and of dread that were sweeping through his soul.″ Parallel Commentaries.Greek “WhatΤί (Ti)Interrogative / Indefinite Pronoun – Nominative Neuter SingularStrong’s 5101:Who, which, what, why.
  1. Probably emphatic of tis; an interrogative pronoun, who, which or what.
  2. isἐστιv (estin) (estin) Verb – Present Indicative Active – 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 1510:I am, exist.
  3. The first person singular present indicative; a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist.
  4. yourσοι (soi)Personal / Possessive Pronoun – Dative 2nd Person SingularStrong’s 4771:You.
  • The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.name?”ὄνομά (onoma)Noun – Nominative Neuter SingularStrong’s 3686:Name, character, fame, reputation.
  • From a presumed derivative of the base of ginosko; a ‘name’.
  • JesusἸησοῦς (Iēsous)Noun – Nominative Masculine SingularStrong’s 2424:Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord and two other Israelites.
  • asked.
  • Ἐπηρώτησεν (Epērōtēsen) Verb – Aorist Indicative Active – 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 1905:To interrogate, question, demand of.
  1. From epi and erotao; to ask for, i.e.
  2. Inquire, seek.
  3. “Legion,”Λεγιών (Legiōn) Noun – Nominative Feminine SingularStrong’s 3003:Of Latin origin; a ‘legion’, i.e.
  4. Roman regiment.
  5. he answered, εἶπεν (eipen) (eipen) Verb – Aorist Indicative Active – 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 2036:Answer, bid, bring word, command.
  6. A primary verb; to speak or say.

becauseὅτι (hoti) (hoti) ConjunctionStrong’s 3754:Neuter of hostis as conjunction; demonstrative, that; causative, because.manyπολλὰ (polla) (polla) Adjective – Nominative Neuter PluralStrong’s 4183:Much, many; often.demons δαιμόνια (daimonia) (daimonia) Noun – Nominative Neuter PluralStrong’s 1140:An evil-spirit, demon; a heathen deity.

  • Neuter of a derivative of daimon; a d?
  • Monic being; by extension a deity.
  • had goneεἰσῆλθεν (eisēlthen) Verb – Aorist Indicative Active – 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 1525:To go in, come in, enter.
  • From eis and erchomai; to enter.
  • intoεἰς (eis) (eis) PrepositionStrong’s 1519:A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.
  1. him.
  2. αὐτόν (auton)Personal / Possessive Pronoun – Accusative Masculine 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 846: He, she, it, they, them, same.
  3. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.
  4. Jump to PreviousDemons Devils Entered Great Jesus Legion Questioned Spirits Jump to Next Demons Devils Entered Great Jesus Legion Questioned Spirits Links Luke 8:30 NIVLuke 8:30 NLTLuke 8:30 ESVLuke 8:30 NASBLuke 8:30 KJVLuke 8:30 BibleApps.com Luke 8:30 Biblia Paralela Luke 8:30 Chinese Bible Luke 8:30 French Bible Luke 8:30 Catholic Bible NT Gospels: Luke 8:30 Jesus asked him What is your name?
  5. (Luke Lu Lk)

Legion (demons) – Wikipedia

A new International Version has been published ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus inquired of him.Because he had been possessed by a large number of demons, he replied, ″Legion.″ Translation into Living Language ″Can I ask what your name is?″ Jesus inquired of him.″Legion,″ he replied, because he was possessed by a large number of demons.

the standard version of the english language Following that, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ Many demons had entered him, so he called out, ″Legion.″ ‘Berean Study Bible’ is a biblical text that was written by the Bereans.″Can I ask what your name is?″ Jesus inquired.Because he had been possessed by a large number of demons, he replied, ″Legion.″ The Literal Bible of the Bereans Afterwards, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ And he called himself ″Legion″ because he had been possessed by a large number of demons.The King James Version of the Bible And Jesus inquired of him, asking, ″What is your name?″ And he explained, Legion, that he had been possessed by a large number of devils.New The King James Version (KJV) is a translation of the King James Bible.″Can I ask you what your name is?″ Jesus inquired of him.

And he called himself ″Legion″ because he had been possessed by a large number of demons.The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.Afterwards, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ And he said, ″Legion,″ because he had been infiltrated by a large number of demons.NASB (National Association of School Boards) 1995 Afterwards, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ And he said, ″Legion,″ because he had been infiltrated by a large number of demons.NASB 1977 (National Association of School Boards) Afterwards, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ And he said, ″Legion,″ because he had been infiltrated by a large number of demons.The Bible with an amplification system Then Jesus inquired, ″What is your name?″ he said.

  1. And he replied, ″Legion,″ because he had been infiltrated by a large number of demons.
  2. The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.
  3. ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus inquired.
  4. ″Legion,″ he said, referring to the large number of demons that had entered him.
  5. Holman The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.
  6. ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus had inquired of him.

″Legion,″ he said, referring to the large number of demons that had entered him.The American Standard Version is the version used in the United States.And Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ And he said, ″Legion,″ because he had been possessed by a large number of demons.The Aramaic Bible translated into plain English ″What is your name?″ Yeshua, on the other hand, inquired.However, he addressed him as ″Legion″ because a large number of demons had entered him.

Version in the Present Tense of the English Language ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus inquired of the man.″My name is Lots,″ he said when asked his name.The reason for this is that he had ″a lot″ of demons in him, he explained.The Bible of Douay-Rheims And Jesus inquired of him, saying, ″What is your name?″ But he responded with the word Legion, indicating that a large number of devils had been implanted in him.Translation of the Good News ″What is your name?″ Jesus inquired of him.

  1. Due to the large number of demons that had entered him, he answered with the moniker ″Mob.″ The International Standard Version (ISO) is a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus inquired of the man.
  2. He responded with the word ″Legion″ because he had been possessed by a large number of demons.
  3. Standard Version in its literal sense And Jesus confronted him, asking, ″Can I ask what your name is?″ And he called himself ″Legion,″ because he had been possessed by a large number of demons.
  4. The New American Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.
  5. Then Jesus inquired, ″What is your name?″ he said.
  • He replied, ″Legion,″ because he had been infiltrated by a large number of demons.
  • NET Bible is an abbreviation for Networked Information Technology.
  • Following that, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ He called himself ″Legion″ because a large number of demons had entered him.
  • Revised Standard Version (New Revised Standard Version) Following that, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ He called out, ″Legion,″ because he had been possessed by a large number of demons.
  • The New Heart English Bible is a translation of the New Heart Bible.
  • ″What is your name?″ Jesus inquired of him.
  • He called out, ″Legion,″ for he had been possessed by a large number of demons.
  • The New Testament of Weymouth ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus had inquired about him.
  • ″Legion,″ he said, referring to the large number of demons that had infiltrated him.
  • The English Bible for the Whole World ″What is your name?″ Jesus inquired of him.
  • He called out, ″Legion,″ for he had been possessed by a large number of demons.

Young’s Literal Translation of the Text In response, Jesus inquired about his identity, asking, ″What is thy name?″ To which he replied, ″Legion″ (because many demons were entered into him,) Translations in addition to the above.Context The Demons and the Pigs, oh my…29 Because Jesus had commanded the unclean spirit to leave the man, the guy obeyed.It had possessed him several times, and despite the fact that he was bound with chains and shackles, he had managed to break free and be driven by the demon into secluded locations on several occasions.

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30 ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus was the one who inquired.Because he had been possessed by a large number of demons, he answered, ″Legion.″ 31 And the devils kept pleading with Jesus not to send them into the Abyss, which he refused.… References to Other Sources 4:24 (Matthew 4:24) News of Him spread across Syria, and people brought to Him everyone who was sick with various ailments, including those who were in great agony, those who were demon-possessed, those who were experiencing convulsions, and those who were paralyzed-and He cured them all.

Matthew 26:53 (KJV) Are you aware that I have the ability to invoke My Father’s assistance, and He will immediately dispatch more than twelve legions of angels to my aid?Mark 5:9 (KJV) ″Can you tell me your name?″ Jesus was the one who inquired.’My name is Legion,’ he said, referring to the fact that ″we are numerous.″ Luke 8:29 (KJV) Because Jesus had commanded the unclean spirit to leave the man, the guy obeyed.

It had possessed him several times, and despite the fact that he was bound with chains and shackles, he had managed to break free and be driven by the demon into secluded locations on several occasions.The Scriptures are a treasure trove.And Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ he said.And he said, Legion, that he had been possessed by a large number of devils.

  1. Legion.
  2. Matthew 26:53 (KJV) Do you honestly believe that I cannot now pray to my Father and that he will immediately provide me with more than twelve legions of angels?
  3. Mark 5:9 (KJV) And he inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ And he responded by stating, ″My name is Legion,″ implying that we are many.many.
  1. Luke 8:2 (NIV) And there were several ladies who had been cleansed of bad spirits and infirmities by Mary, known as Magdalene, and out of whom seven demons were expelled.
  2. Matthew 8:29 (KJV) And, lo, they screamed out, saying, ″What do we have to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God?″ they cried out.
  3. Is it possible that you’ve arrived to punish us before the appointed time?
  4. Mark 16:9 (KJV) When Jesus was raised from the dead early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, from of whom he had driven seven demons earlier in the day.
  • (30) Legionnaires.- St.
  • Mark and St.
  • Luke both agree on this point.
  • Verse 30.
  • – ″I am the Lord’s servant.″ And Jesus inquired of him, asking, ″What is your name?″ And he explained, Legion: because a large number of devils had been implanted in him.
  1. The devils’ request was not answered by the Master, but he did pose a quiet provocative inquiry to their miserable victim in response to it.
  2. According to Dean Plumptre, the Lord’s remarks would serve to ″remind the man’s mind that he previously had a human name, with all of its recollections of human association.″ Even with the subsequent paroxysm, it was an important step in the path of rehabilitation because it assisted him in disentangling himself from the misunderstanding he had created between himself and the demons who had caused him so much suffering.
  3. However, at first glance, the inquiry appears to be adding to the evil.
  4. My name is Legion, and we are a large group.’ ″To the demoniac, the unstoppable strength of the Roman legion, with its six thousand troops, appeared to be the only suitable representation of the wild, uncontrollable impulses of desire and horror that were washing through his mind.″ Greek Parallel Commentaries.
  5. Parallel Commentaries Strength 5101: Who, which, what, and why.
  6. ″What″ (Ti)Interrogative / Indefinite Pronoun – Nominative Neuter SingularStrong’s 5101: ″What″ It is most likely emphatic of tis; an interrogative pronoun, such as who, which, or what; and a question mark.

isv is an abbreviation for isv (estin) Indicative of the Present Tense Active – 3rd Person Pronoun ‘I am, exist,’ says SingularStrong in 1510.I exist in the first person singular present indicative; it is a protracted form of a primary and deficient verb; it is in the first person singular present indicative.the personal / possessive pronoun you (soi) is a Dative Pronoun.

  • 2nd Person Pronoun you, according to SingularStrong’s 4771:you.
  • ″name?″ (onoma)Noun – Nominative Neuter SingularStrong’s 3686:Name, character, fame, and reputation.
  • Inferred from ginosko’s assumed derivation; the word is translated as ″name.″ Noun – Nominative Masculine SingularStrong’s 2424:Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord and two other Israelites are all known as Jesus (Isous).
  • asked.
  • (Eprtsen) is an abbreviation for ″eprtsen″ (eprtsen).
  1. The Aorist Indicative Active tense is in the third person.
  2. SingularStrong’s 1905: to question, interrogate, or demand anything from someone.
  3. From the Greek words epi and erotao, which means ″to beg for,″ ″to seek,″ and ″to look for.″ ″Legion,″ (Legin) is an abbreviation for ″Legion.″ Noun – Nominative grammatical form Feminine This is SingularStrong’s 3003:A word of Latin origin that means ″legion,″ as in ″Roman regiment.″ He said, ″I don’t know.″ Strong’s 2036:Answer, bid, bring word, command, and so on.
  4. A fundamental verb, which means to talk or utter anything.
  5. as a result of (hoti) Strong’s 3754:Neuter of hostis as a conjunction; demonstrative, that; causative, since a number of (polla) Nominative – Adjective – Nominative Neuter PluralStrong’s 4183: a great deal, a great deal; frequently.
  6. demons Noun – Nominative grammatical form a demon, a wicked spirit, or a pagan divinity, according to Neuter PluralStrong’s 1140: A d?
  • is the neutral form of a derivative of daimon.
  • A demonic being, and thus a deity by extension.
  • had left (eislthen) the scene Strong’s 1525: to go in, come in, or enter is an aorist indicative active in the third person singular.
  • To enter is derived from the Greek words eis and erchomai.
  • in order to an an an an an an an an an an an an an an an an an a (eis) 1519:A main preposition; a preposition that refers to a location, a period of time, or a goal; used in adverbial phrases.
  • him.

In the Accusative Masculine, the pronoun (auton) is used to refer to oneself or one’s possession.3rd Person Pronoun SingularStrong’s 846 is as follows: He, she, it, they, them, and the same are all correct.The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.Previous: Demons and Devils Infiltrated the Great Jesus Legion and Interrogated Spirits Continue to Next Page Demons and Devils Infiltrated the Great Jesus Legion and Interrogated Spirits.Links Luke 8:30 p.m.The NIVLuke 8:30, the NLTLuke 8:30, the ESVLuke 8:30, the NASLuke 8:30, and the KJVLuke 8:30 are all the same.

  1. BibleApps.com Paralela Biblia (Parallel Bible) at 8:30 a.m.
  2. Luke 8:30 Chinese Version of the Bible Bible translation of Luke 8:30 p.m.
  3. The Catholic Bible (Luke 8:30) Gospels of the New Testament: Luke 8:30 p.m.
  4. Jesus inquired of him What’s your name, by the way?
  5. (Source: Luke Lu Lk)

Development of the story

Historically, the earliest version of this story appears in the Gospel of Mark, where it is described as taking place in ″the country of the Gerasenes.″ A possessed man is encountered by Jesus, who summons the demon to appear before him and demands to know the demon’s name – an important element of traditional exorcism practice.He discovers that the man has been possessed by a swarm of demons who have collectively taken the name ″Legion.″ For fear of being expelled from the world and cast into the depths of the abyss, they beg Jesus to instead cast them into a herd of pigs, which he agrees to do.Mark 5:1–5:13 describes the pigs’ panicked dash into the sea, where they drown.

There are parallels to this story in the other two Synoptic Gospels.The story is condensed in the Gospel of Luke, but the majority of the details, including the name, are preserved (Luke 8:26–8:33).While the Gospel of Matthew shortens the story even further and changes the possessed man to two men (a particular stylistic device of this writer), the setting remains the same: ″the country of the Gadarenes.″ This is most likely due to the fact that the author was aware that Gerasa is actually approximately 50 kilometers away from the Sea of Galilee (although Gadara is still 10 kilometers away).According to this version (Matthew 8:28–8:32), the demons are not named.

Cultural background

The name Legion, according to Michael Willett Newheart, professor of New Testament Language and Literature at the Howard University School of Divinity (2004), could well have been intended for readers to associate the name Legion with the Roman military formation that was active in the area at the time of the author’s writing (around 70 AD).It’s possible that the goal is to demonstrate that Jesus is more powerful than the Roman colonial troops.The Biblical scholar Seyoon Kim, on the other hand, points out that the Latin legio was frequently employed as a loanword in Hebrew and Aramaic to denote a big number, and that this was widespread in the ancient world.

It is used as a proper name in this context, and it is ″rich with meaning.″

See also

  • Legion in popular culture

References

Citations

  1. Baruch Hochman’s Character in Literature (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1985), page 37
  2. Senior 1996, page 84.
  3. Boring 2006, page 148.
  4. Newheart 2004, page 44.
  5. Blount & Charles 2002, page 77.
  6. Kim 2008, page 120.

Sources

External links

EarlyChristianWritings.com See the discussion at the bottom of the page for further information on the Gospel of Mark.

Jesus casts out Legion. Mark 5:1-20

  • The literary structure of Mark 5:1-21 may be found here. We’re back in the thick of our study of the Gospel of Mark, which began last week. Remember with me – after spending the entire day teaching in parables, Jesus boarded a boat and traveled to the opposite side of the Sea of Galilee with his disciples. When a huge storm erupted on the route to Jerusalem, Jesus calmed it, leaving his followers startled and wondering, ″Who is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?″ (4:41). Our narrative begins immediately after this, as they cross the bridge to the opposite side. Mark 5:1-20 Mark 5:1-20 5:1 They traveled over the water to the kingdom of the Gerasenes on the other side of the sea. Given the information provided by the gospels, it is hard to pinpoint the specific location of this event. The city of Gerasa is around 35 miles distant, as seen on the map. It is considerably closer to the lake, but it is still 5 miles away, according to Matthew, who claims it is in ″the district of Gadara.″ What Mark is doing here is use the word ″country or territory of the Gerasenes″ as a manner of referring to the region known as Decapolis, which will be discussed later in the tale by the Gerasenes (v. 20). He is referring to the section of the Decapolis or territory of the Gerasenes that borders on the Sea of Galilee, as well as the surrounding area. When Jesus initially arrived in this Gentile territory, Mark describes it as his ″first visit to a Gentile territory.″ It used to be a part of ancient Israel, but it is now a part of the Roman Empire. 2And as soon as Jesus got out of the boat, a man with an evil spirit appeared out of the tombs and approached him, claiming to be his disciple. 3He made his home amid the graves. He was no longer tied, not even with a chain, 4for he had been chained many times before with shackles and chains, but he tore the chains apart and shattered the shackles to smithereens. No one had the strength to bring him under control. (5)He might be heard wailing (or screaming) at all hours of the day and night amid the tombs and on the mountains, and beating (or cutting) himself with stones. The following are three things that stick out in these passages. From a Jewish perspective, the ritual uncleanness associated with the act is underlined. There are several reasons for this, not the least of which being that the Decapolis is a Gentile neighborhood
  • this particular guy also has a ″unclean″ spirit and lives near graves, which were considered unclean according to the Law (Numbers 19:11, 16
  • Matthew 23:27). These tombs were most likely caverns in the side of a hill, where he could take refuge from the elements. Second, he is beyond the reach of anyone’s assistance. No one has the strength to bring him under control. Even chains and shackles, that is, handcuffs and leg irons, are unable to keep him down for long periods of time. Because of his demonic superhuman power, he is able to tear them apart. Finally, his deplorable condition stands obvious. He doesn’t seem to be in his right mind (v. 15). He takes up residence in graves. The way he behaves is like a rabid beast, screaming and howling while running around nude (v. 15). As well as this, he is participating in self-destructive conduct. In fact, Mark informs us that he does this ″night and day.″ What a dreadful and awful existence it must be! 6And when he caught a glimpse of Jesus from a distance, he ran up to him and bowed down before him. 7 ″What do you have to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God?″ he said, yelling with a loud voice. Please, by the grace of God, refrain from tormenting me.″ 8 Due to the fact that he was yelling to him, ″Come out of the guy, you filthy demon!″ Mark informs us that the demons are aware of Jesus’ identity (as we see in 1:34), and they recognize his supremacy over them, which is why he submits. Also valid is his identification of Jesus as the ″son of the most high God,″ that is, as the one and only genuine creator God, as well. (In a similar vein, 1:24, 3:11) We learn in verse 8 that Jesus is in the process of casting out the unclean spirit, which explains the demon’s inquiry, ″What do you have to do with me?″ We also learn in verse 8 that the unclean spirit is a demon. As we previously discussed, this phrase signifies something along the lines of ‘what business do we have with each other?’ Alternatively, you may ask, ‘why are you interfering in my affairs?’ The devil, on the other hand, advances rapidly to plead for pity. Normally, an exorcist would tell the demon, ″I adjure you by God,″ but in this case, the demon tells Jesus the same thing. And he appears to be stating that when devils are afflicted, one must adhere to the bounds that God has established. In other words, the Son of God, the final judge, has already arrived, but the devil claims that it is not yet time for the pain of the last judgment to begin. As Luke describes it, the devil does not want to be sent ″into the Abyss″ – 8:31
  • or as Matthew 8:29 states, the demon asks, ″Have you come here to afflict us before the appointed time?″ 9 Afterwards, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ ″My name is Legion, since there are many of us,″ he said. A legion of Roman soldiers is generally regarded to be a group of soldiers numbering slightly more than 5,000 men. So we’re talking about tens of thousands of devils in this man’s body here! (See Matthew 12:45 and Luke 8:2 for further accounts of many demons.) 10And he urged him fervently not to send them out of the nation, which brought us to an unusual twist in the narrative. The pigs were eating on the hillside at the time, and they implored him, saying, ″Send us to the pigs
  • let us to enter them.″ He agreed. 13As a result, he granted them permission. And the bad spirits came out and entered the pigs, and the herd, which numbered around two thousand, ran down the steep slope into the sea and perished in the water, according to legend. According to Daniel 10:13, demons are territorial, and as a result, the demon that is speaking does not want to be thrown out/disembodied, causing it to, as Jesus says, ″travel through waterless areas seeking rest but finds none.″ In Matthew 12:43, Jesus says: The presence of a pig herd nearby proves that this is a Gentile neighborhood, as Jews were not permitted to consume or breed pigs during the time of Jesus. Take note of how Jesus just speaks and the devils are forced to flee. There are a lot of questions that arise from these passages that are difficult to address, including: Is it possible for demons to inhabit animals? What transpired suggests that this is not the case, as the pigs promptly committed themselves. Also, why did Jesus allow them to enter the pig pen? Whatever the cause, it did become a visible manner of demonstrating that the demons had indeed been thrown out, as well as the fact that there were thousands of them.
  • Who knows what happened to the demons after the pigs were killed. Apparently, they were disembodied in the first place
  • Is there anything you can tell me about the pigs? Isn’t it true that someone was upset over the large loss of wealth? After all, it was the demons that put them to death. And perhaps this was a tiny price to pay for the freedom from thousands of devils that the community had gained. Furthermore, from a Jewish point of view, it is possible that pigs should not be reared in areas that were formerly a part of ancient Israel. We’ll never know, will we?

14The herdsmen escaped and spread the news across the city and the countryside.It attracted the attention of onlookers who wanted to know what had happened.When they arrived at Jesus’s place of execution, they were startled when they found the demon-possessed man, the one who had been in charge of the legion, seated there, fully clothed and in complete control.

He is not in a rage, but rather sitting.He is not nude, but he is dressed.As well as being of sound mind rather than being delusional or hallucinating What a remarkable change Jesus has brought about in this man’s heart and life!He has regained his entire and whole health.16After then, people who had witnessed it told them what had occurred to the demon-possessed man and to the pigs.17And they started to ask Jesus to leave their territory, which he refused.

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He was going into the boat when the guy who had been possessed by demons asked him to allow him to accompany him on his journey.Nevertheless, he refused, telling him to ″go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you and how he has shown compassion to you.″ 19 Moreover, after leaving, he proceeded to announce around the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, to the amazement of everyone there.A significant amount of begging occurs throughout this narrative.The demons plead for compassion on a number of occasions.Then the crowds beg Jesus to depart, and he obliges.They are so terrified of his might that they have begged him to go.

  1. As a result of Jesus casting out demons from their zone, they reply by throwing him out of their region as well!
  2. And ultimately, the guy asks Jesus ″so he may be with him,″ as the song ends.
  3. (He expresses a desire to be a member of the disciple group – 3:14).
  4. Strangely enough, Jesus accepts the wishes of the devils and the crowds, but not the desire of a single man.
  5. Most likely because he was a Gentile and that just would not function in the context of his Jewish ministry.
  6. He has, on the other hand, been commissioned for ministry.

Although those who were healed were muted in order to prevent being crushed by the throng, there is no need to do so now because Jesus is departing the area.) In response to the man’s plea, Jesus instructs him to ″go home to your friends and tell them what a great deal the Lord has done for you and how he has shown mercy on you″ (v.19).Furthermore, he was steadfast in informing everyone about ″how much Jesus had done for him.″ v.20, n.Take note of the fact that what Jesus does is exactly what the Lord does.

It’s the same as before.It’s no longer a secret what this narrative teaches us — Jesus has the power to restore wholeness to anybody.This is a man who was beyond the reach of anyone’s assistance.Who was possessed by a swarm of demons numbering in the thousands.Nevertheless, Jesus is readily able to expel these devils and restore the man to health, leaving him ″clothed and in his right mind″ (v.

  1. 15) When he was possessed, he was able to shatter real chains that were placed around him.
  2. But it was Jesus who broke his actual bonds – his servitude to demons.
  3. This is the nature of Jesus, the Son of God.
  4. And this is the hope we have: no matter how awful our position appears to be, Jesus will not be overcome.
  5. Because of Jesus, there is always reason to be hopeful.
  • And secondly, intimately related to this, we are to share with others how Jesus has restored our health and wholeness.
  • This morning, the voice of Jesus may be heard in verse 19.
  • ″When you return home, tell your family and friends how much the Lord has done for you and how he has shown mercy to you.″ Once we have experienced the changing power of Jesus, we are to inform others about God’s compassion and mercy extended to us.

Jesus Christ Casts Out Legion Demons – Mark 5:1-20, Matthew 8:28-34

On Monday, the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, and Wednesday, the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time, the Bible Verse of the Day will be posted.Following Jesus’s gaze from a distance, he went up to him and prostrated himself before him, exclaiming in an obnoxious tone: ″What do you want with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God?Please, for the love of God, refrain from tormenting me!″ (He had been yelling at him, ″Unclean spirit, come out of the guy!″ for several minutes.) ″Can you tell me your name?″ he inquired.

″Legion is my given name,″ he responded.″There are quite a few of us.″ Mark 5:1-20, Matthew 8:28-34 are examples of biblical passages.Readings from the Catholic Church for Today Monday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, Year 1 Monday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, Year 2 Wednesday of the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year 1 Wednesday of the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year 2 Wednesday of the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year 1 Wednesday of the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year 2 The Morning Prayer for today is

Today’s Bible Verse of the Day Reflections

This short passage comes after a very dramatic story.A young guy, who lives out among the graves, is entirely possessed by several demons.The demons identify themselves as “Legion” stating that there are many of them.

It’s evident from the account that this man is crazy, out of his mind, and entirely under the grip of these demons.As the tale carries on, Jesus addresses the demons, rebukes them, and casts them out, sending them into a herd of swine.The swine go running down a slope and drown in the lake.Afterwards, the man is fully altered as he sits there interacting with others.One interesting thing to note in this story is that, when the townspeople came out and saw this man sitting there “in his right mind,” they are shocked and are “seized with fear.” They do not know what to think about this situation.Why is that?

Perhaps there are a number of reasons.Let’s look at one of them.This young man was so dysfunctional, being possessed by a legion of demons, that the townspeople had written him off.They gave up on him and most likely wanted nothing to do with him.They were afraid of him.But when they see this man completely transformed, sitting there looking normal and rational, the people don’t know what to think.

  1. They are shocked.
  2. And their shock takes on a form of fear in that they are afraid of what they do not understand.
  3. This reveals something interesting to us.
  4. It reveals that, if we fail to understand the power of God, we will actually find ourselves fearful of His power when confronted by it.
  5. The townspeople should have been filled with great joy and excitement at the total transformation of this man.
  6. However, instead of great joy and excitement, they were fearful.

They were fearful because they did not understand God’s almighty power.Reflect, today, upon the power and glory of God.He desires to do great things and to bring total transformation to your life.He desires to cast out the evil one lurking within our world, bringing instead His mercy and peace.As you reflect upon God’s power, allow yourself to more clearly understand Him.

If you understand Him, you will be more fully ready to rejoice in His good works.Prayer: Lord, I rejoice in Your almighty power.I rejoice in Your greatness and glory.Help me to see the many ways that You are at work in our world and in the lives of those around me.As I see Your transforming power at work, fill my heart with gratitude for all that You do.

  1. Jesus, I trust in You.
  2. Amen.

Bible Verse of the Day in Pictures

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Where did the “Legion” of demons go after the swine died?

Where did the demons go after the pigs died?Q.After Jesus threw the ″Legion″ of demons into the swine, what happened to them?

As I explore in more detail in the piece linked below, it is most plausible that these demons would have traversed the world searching for other entities to take up residence with them after that.Although the Bible does not provide us with as much information as we would want about how these things function, it does provide us with unambiguous cautions about the dangers of opening ourselves up to demonic influences, and we must heed those warnings.When Jesus drove out demons, why didn’t he destroy them like he should have?The Rev.Dr.Christopher R.

Smith is an ordained clergyman, author, and biblical scholar who lives in the United States.For the past twenty-five years, he has been involved in parish and student ministry.He worked as a consulting editor for the International Bible Society (now Biblica) on The Books of the Bible, an edition of the New International Version (NIV) that presents the biblical books according to their natural literary outlines, rather than chapters and verses, as opposed to the traditional chapter and verse format.His Understanding the Books of the Bible study guide series is based on this structure, as is his Understanding the Books of the Bible blog.He also worked as a consultant for Tyndale House on the Immerse Bible, a version of the New Living Translation (NLT) that presents the Scriptures in their natural literary forms, without the use of chapters and verses or section titles, as well as other projects.Harvard University awarded him a Bachelor of Arts in English and American Literature and Language in addition to a Master of Arts in Theological Studies from Gordon-Conwell.

  1. He received his Ph.D.
  2. in the History of Christian Life and Thought, with a minor concentration in Biblical Studies, from Boston College, which is affiliated with Andover Newton Theological School.
  3. View all of Christopher R Smith’s blog entries.

Jesus and the Legion of Demons (Mark 5:1-13)

The Trinity is the subject of this series.This theory is explored through brief expositions of several texts from throughout the Gospel of Mark, demonstrating how the Trinity is both an explicitly taught truth and an implicitly assumed assumption in Scripture.Jesus and his followers have successfully completed their treacherous journey across the Sea of Galilee.

During the night, there was a violent thunderstorm.It was so awful that the guys accompanying him were afraid for their lives.Because they were frantic, they roused Jesus from his sleep, most likely because they were irritated that He was sleeping as they urgently bailed water from the boat.The wind and the seas were rebuked by Jesus, revealing His dominion, jurisdiction, and authority over the forces of nature.In spite of the fact that He had taken on a human nature through the process of incarnation, Jesus preserved all the characteristics of His divine nature and continued to sustain all things in creation while living as a man in His own creation (cf.Col 1; Heb 1).

1 They traveled over the water to the kingdom of the Gerasenes on the other side of the sea.And as soon as he stepped out of the boat, there appeared out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit, who lived among the tombs; and no one could bind him any longer, not even with a chain; for he had been bound many times with fetters and chains, but the chains he wrenched apart and the fetters he shattered, and no one had the strength to bring him under control.He was constantly wailing and beating himself with stones in the graves and on the slopes, at all hours of the day and night (Mark 5:1-5).When they arrive at their destination on the eastern bank of the lake, Mark tells us all about the unusual man they encounter.Mark is known for including greater detail than the other Gospel writers, and he draws a bleak picture of Jesus’ death in this passage.The man appears to be insane, maybe possessed by a demon.

  1. He lives in a cave in the hills along the road, where he is surrounded by nature.
  2. He wounds himself, yells at inconvenient intervals, and roams around freely, most likely terrifying the residents of the neighborhood.
  3. They tried all they could to pacify him, but it didn’t work.
  4. Obviously, this is Gentile territory, and no Pharisaical school of interpretation instructor would dare to venture here.
  5. 2 The Messiah, on the other hand, left.
  6. He was opposed to the racist and exclusivist attitudes that had infected so many Jewish people in His day, including himself.

Then, when he saw Jesus approaching from a distance, he went to him and prostrated himself before him, yelling out in a loud voice, ″What do you have to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God?Please, by the grace of God, refrain from tormenting me.″ Due to the fact that he had told him, ″Come out of the guy, you evil spirit!″ (See Mark 5:6-8.)

The Demons Worship Jesus as God

The demoniac may have seen Jesus from a long distance, maybe as the fleet approached.In response, he rushed to Jesus and worshipped or showed homage to Him (v) It is evident that the different English translations are divided on whether this was conscious worship of Christ as God or just reverence for an inferior to a superior in the context of the passage.A dictionary can only take you so far; the most important thing to remember is context.

There is a compelling case to be made for the purposeful worship of Christ as God in this context.Because the devils instantly acknowledge Jesus as the ″Son of the Most High God,″ we may conclude that this is most likely planned worship.It is probable that the guy approached Jesus and His little party with the intent of attacking them, but instead bowed down in reverence when he discovered who Christ was.3 Who is doing the rituals?The devils are present.This individual definitely does not have control of his faculties; he does not appear to be his own person.

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Darkness has total command of him, and he is entirely under their power.For what other reason would this man want to live alone in caverns, scream incoherently, slash himself at irregular intervals, and threaten the surrounding community?

The Demons See a Distinction Between Jesus and the Father

They do not consider Jesus to be the most excellent creation of God (i.e.the Arians).It is also important to note that they do not see Him as identical to the Father (i.e., the Modalists); rather, they recognize a functional differentiation between divine beings.

He is not the Father; rather, He is referred to as ″the Son of the Most High.″ 4 Despite their failure to provide an explanation for their awareness of this distinction, the demons are unambiguously aware that it exists.

The Demons Beg Christ for Mercy

The term has two meanings in this situation, and the context is important.For example, ″Tyler, promise this series will be over one day!″ might be interpreted as commanding someone sincerely to perform a task.Alternatively, it might indicate to implore someone.

The context, I believe, makes it plain that the devils are pleading with Jesus for compassion (cf.NASB, NKJV, NET, NLT).5 More than that, they mention God’s name in order to make their request more powerful (for example, ″I’m imploring you, in God’s name, please don’t torture me!″).It is important to note that they did not invoke Christ’s name (which they are aware of); instead, they used the name of God.What is the reason behind their begging?Because Jesus had specifically instructed them to leave the poor guy alone.

They are completely incapable of disobedience, or even the illusion of revolting against authority.Instead, they scream and plead for compassion on His behalf.″Irrefutable proof that Jesus is the Son of God and the inaugurator of the kingdom of God comes from those whose wicked dominion is under attack,″ writes the author.6 What does God have to do with their incarceration and suffering?It’s most likely a last-ditch attempt to get the case postponed (cf.Mt 8:29).

  1. All fallen angels, as well as Satan, will spend eternally in the Lake of Fire (cf.
  2. Rev 20:10-14; 2 Pet 2:4; Jude 6).
  3. These fallen angels, who are terrified as they stand in the sight of the incarnate Son, plead for time to pass.
  4. They are well aware that their time has not yet come.
  5. By invoking God’s name (which means the One who determined their inevitable everlasting agony later on), they ask Jesus to leave them alone for the time being, and he agrees.
  6. The fact that the demon’s punishment had been pronounced by God (2 Peter 2:4; Jude 6) is particularly noteworthy, since the demons appear to ascribe God’s power to Jesus is also noteworthy.

Their greatest concern is not that Yahweh would torment them, but that God the Son, who is God the Son, will torture them!Afterwards, Jesus inquired of him, ″What is your name?″ ″My name is Legion, and we are a large group,″ he explained.Furthermore, he pleaded with him earnestly not to deport them from the nation.A large herd of pigs was now feasting on the hillside, and they asked him to send them there, saying, ″Send us to the swine, let us enter them.″ As a result, he granted them permission to go.And the unclean spirits came out and entered the herd of pigs, which fled down the steep slope into the sea, where they perished.

The herd numbered around two thousand animals (Mark 5:9-13).The guy begged Jesus (o)7 again and over again not to expel them from the region, and Jesus obliged him every time.This is incredible; it is apparent that the devils are at the mercy of Jesus.Their desperate search for a fresh solution leads them to Jesus’ barnyard, where they pray that he will allow them to enter the pigs.It is difficult to imagine a more pitiful image of full and utter dominance.

  1. The kingdom of God has arrived upon you, as Jesus stated elsewhere: ″If I drive out demons by the finger of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you″ (Lk 11:20).
  2. First and foremost, they needed to obtain Jesus’ approval ( ) before they could proceed.
  3. 8 Indeed, the devils were His prisoners in a very literal way.

Conclusion

The demons:

  1. They worship Christ as God
  2. they acknowledge that there is a functional separation between Jesus and the Father
  3. they ask Jesus for compassion, which implies that they acknowledge that He is their superior
  4. and they beseech Jesus for forgiveness.
  5. They use God’s name in order to amplify their pitiful cries for a delay in the execution of their punishment, and in doing so, they demonstrate their ability to discriminate between Father and Son.
  6. They acknowledge that Jesus has the ability to torment them, and they plead for compassion from this fate. They think Jesus will carry out God’s punishment of eternal torture against them
  7. they keep pleading with Him, time and time again, to save them from being expelled. This demonstrates that they are aware of Christ’s ability to accomplish this.
  8. Finally, having exhausted all other choices, they request Jesus for permission to enter a herd of pigs, which He graciously permits them to do so

Those who reject the teaching of the Trinity will have to deal with a mountain of evidence on their hands. It is not possible to accomplish this.

Notes

1 See Stephen J.Wellum, God the Son Incarnate: The Doctrine of Christ (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016), especially pages 353-465, for a fascinating examination of classical Christology in opposition to numerous evangelical kenotic ideas common today.2 RCHL Lenski suggests that this is truly Jewish land (Interpretation of St.

Mark’s Gospel, pp.201-212) in his book Interpretation of St.Mark’s Gospel.He contends that this neatly resolves the moral quandary surrounding the slaughter of a herd of pigs.That is, because these Jews were keeping pigs (which are considered filthy and prohibited animals), they deserved to have their unauthorized herd exterminated by the authorities.This is a highly unusual interpretation that belongs to a small proportion of people.

It is far more plausible that this is a Gentile community located in a Gentile neighborhood.Mk 5:20 says that Jesus also instructed the man to inform everyone in the 10 towns (known as the Decapolis) about what He had done for him.In particular, see (1) David M.May, ″Decapolis,″ Lexham Bible Dictionary (Bellingham, WA: Lexham, 2016), and (2) R.E.Ciampa, ″Decapolis,″ Dictionary of the New Testament: Background, ed.Craig Evans and Stanley Porter (Downer’s Grove, IL: IVP, 2000), both of which are available online.

  1. 3 Despite the fact that Mark Strauss implies this, he continues to feel that the sense is not adoration, but prostration.
  2. ‘The word employed here (o) does not always imply ‘worship’ (as in the KJV and NKJV), but it may also mean ‘bow down to, do reverence to, fall prostrate before,’ according to the NASB.
  3. ″ Because Jesus exhibits perfect control over the devils throughout this drama, the phrase ‘fell on his face’ appears to be a figurative expression.
  4. ″Despite his haste to confront Jesus, the demoniac instead collapses in a heap of surrender in front of him,″ the Bible says (Mark, in ZECNT, 217).
  5. 4 Of course, this verse must be tempered by the countless instances in which Jesus refers to Himself and the Father as ″one″ with the Father.
  6. 5 Several translations render this as ″adjure″ (for example, the Revised Standard Version and the English Standard Version), which can have either meaning (for example, Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., s.v.

″adjure,″ 1,2).Add to that the fact that ″adjure″ is not a term that has a great deal of meaning for most people.It is my opinion that translations that truly take a position on one interpretation or the other do better than others.Taking Tyndale as an example, he went all in on the idea of ″making them swear.″ ″I demand thee in the name of God,″ he said in his translation.6 Strauss & Stratton (Mark, 217).

7 Some versions treat as an adverb in this context (e.g., ″earnestly, passionately;″ RSV, ESV, NASB, NKJV, among others).Another interpretation is that it is a repeat (″again and over,″ as in the KJV, NET, NIV, and NLT).When used with the imperfect (which I see as iterative; for example, ″he kept begging″), I believe it is better to represent the begging as a repeating activity.8 James Edwards, on the other hand, said that the demons did this ″on their own initiative″ (The Gospel According to Mark, in PNTC, 158).

Exorcism of the Gerasene demoniac – Wikipedia

As recorded in the New Testament, the exorcism of the Gerasene demoniac, also known as the Miracle of the (Gadarene) Swine and the exorcism of Legion, was one of the miracles performed by Jesus during his ministry.After exorcising a demon or two out of a man, Jesus casts them into a herd of swine, prompting them to dash down a hill and drown themselves in the nearby lake.It appears in the three Synoptic Gospels, but not in the Gospel of John, which is a significant difference.

All stories depict Jesus casting out demons, who are referred to collectively as ″Legion″ in Mark and Luke’s gospels.As Saints Augustine of Hippo and Thomas Aquinas explained it, the narrative implied that Christians had no obligations toward animals.It has been a source of dispute in debates about Christianity and animal welfare in recent years.

Narratives

Mark

  1. A passage from the Gospel of Mark (Mark 5:1–20) describes Jesus’ journey across the sea to the ″area of Gerasenes,″ where he encounters the people of that name.
  2. Suddenly, a guy who has been ″possessed by a demon″ appears from the caverns and approaches him.
  3. People had attempted to restrain him, but he was too strong to be restrained, even with chains, for he would always manage to get free; he would cry out and cut himself with stones at all hours of the day and night amid the graves and on the hills.
  4. Jesus approaches the guy and commands the demon to come out of him, to which the man responds ″Do you have anything you want to say to me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God?
  5. I beseech you, in the name of God, please do not torture me again!″ When Jesus inquires about the demon’s identity, he is informed that ″my name is Legion, for we are numerous.″ Instead of sending them away, the devils ask Jesus to place them in the pigs on a neighboring hillside, which he agrees to do.
  1. The herd, which numbers around two thousand animals, rushes down the steep bank into the sea and drowns.
  2. Now that the man has been seen and dressed, and has been restored to sanity, he asks to be included among the disciples who are traveling with Jesus, but he is refused and is instructed to remain in the Decapolis region, to tell of the events that have transpired ″the wonderful things that the Lord has done and has shown sympathy for you ″…..
  3. Tom Wright, a theologian, refers to him as ″the first apostle to the gentiles.″

Matthew

  1. This illustration of Jesus exorcising the Gerasene demoniac comes from the Hitda Codex text.
  2. The account is significantly condensed in the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 8:28–34), and the story is told not of one afflicted man, but of two possessed men.
  3. In this account, Jesus does not inquire about the demon’s identity, which is a crucial component of conventional exorcism technique.
  4. In addition, the location is shifted to the land of the ″Gadarenes″ (Gadara), which corresponds to the location of most Bible translations.
  5. The site of the Gospel event is given as ″Gergesenes″ in the King James Version (Matthew 8:28), which corresponds to the contemporary ″Kursi″ (Kheras), which is the most feasible location for the event.

Luke

  1. The Gospel of Luke’s version (Luke 8:26–39) condensed the information while keeping the most of the specifics.
  2. One element that the Lucan gospel has that the other gospel writers do not provide is a mention of the demoniac’s nakedness at the beginning of the story and his later dressing.
  3. The gospel writer records in Luke 8:27 that the demoniac did not have any garments on.
  4. Later on in the poem he mentions that he ″was dressed and in his own thoughts″ (Luke 8:35).
  5. Clothing is an essential prop in the Lucan tale (see Biblical clothing for more information), and it is used to depict the demoniac’s transformation from his animal-like state to his restoration as a human being in this particular scene.
  1. He has been exiled from the human race, which means he is no better off than an animal without clothing at first, but once his exorcism is complete, his humanity

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