When Jesus Went To Hell?

1 Peter 3:18-20: Did Jesus Preach in Hell?

Note: I modified this essay from one that I first published on my own blog.The Dividing Line recently had a phone call from a listener who inquired as to whether Jesus had dropped into hell between his crucifixion and resurrection.Peter 3:18-20 is a passage that is frequently quoted in support of this assertion.Is that, however, what the verse says?Is there any scriptural foundation for the notion that Jesus preached to souls in hell, as some have suggested?

I’ll acknowledge right away that this is not the most straightforward passage of Scripture to understand.However, the complexity of the task does not prevent us from attempting it.After all, even the most difficult passages of Scripture are inspired by God.I’ve done my best here to make sense of the paragraph in the context of the letter and the context of Peter’s audience, and I hope you find it useful.Let’s start with what is written in the passage: 18 As a result, Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, in order that he might reconcile us to God, being put to death in the flesh but raised to life in the spirit, 19 in which he went and preached to the spirits in prison, 20 because they had previously refused to obey, when God’s patience waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared, in which only a few, namely, eight persons, were brought safely through There are several passages in this text that tend to support the concept that Jesus traveled to the underworld to preach to the souls of the dead during those three days when his corpse was resting in the tomb.

  1. According to the text, Christ was put to death in the spirit and raised to life in the spirit, suggesting that he was still spiritually active
  2. it also indicates that he went in the spirit to preach to spirits ″in prison.″ This can only be an allusion to hell because we would scarcely consider heaven and the presence of God to be a prison.
  3. That this ″prison″ is hell is further supported by the fact that the spirits in this ″prison″ are those who were rebellious during the days of Noah, according to the Bible. God’s patience was put to the test as a result of their disobedience.
  • Because of this, a wide variety of hypotheses regarding Jesus’ ministry in hell have been floated across the world. The notion of Jesus announcing triumph over death to Satan and the lost is one example. Another is the image of Jesus speaking to condemned souls awaiting judgment in the lake of fire (Revelation 20:15), giving them one final opportunity to repent. These hypotheses, on the other hand, have several shortcomings: The book of Revelation 20 describes what will happen to people whose names are not recorded in the Book of Life (Revelation 22). They eventually wind themselves in Hades, and after that, in the lake of burning lava. There is no mention of a second chance in the New Testament, and there is no indication that Jesus went to hell when he died, according to the Bible. In fact, he promised the thief who was hanging next to him on the cross, ″Today, you will be with me in Paradise″ (Luke 23:43). What does any of this have to do with Noah? It shows that Jesus anticipated his soul to be in Paradise, i.e., paradise (see Revelation 2:7) on that particular day, rather than in hell. What is Noah’s contribution to the discussion? Were those who were disobedient in Noah’s day the only ones to hear Jesus preach? The number of souls in hell is far more than this. Why didn’t Jesus preach to every single person on the planet?

What is the message of 1 Peter 3:18-20 if it is not the message that Jesus preached while in hell? Where did Jesus preach ″in the spirit,″ to whom, and why did he do so?

Examining 1 Peter 3:18-20

To make sense of any seemingly difficult piece, the first thing we look for is the context in which it has been written.In this particular instance, we return to verse 13.While suffering for their beliefs, individuals who are in Christ must keep doing good even if they are persecuted as a result of their actions.The fact that you’ve been penalized for doing something wrong is not a huge concern.That is referred to as justice.

The opposite is true when you do good and are punished, particularly when the good you are doing is what God has instructed you to do.In God’s view, this is desirable behavior.Human justice is not always just, and it frequently falls short of the standards set by God.There are several nations where the preaching of the gospel, as well as the expressing of specific biblical points of view, is prohibited by law.Societies will regard persons who adhere to biblical standards of speech and behaviour that are at odds with cultural norms with contempt and contempt.

The Bible urges Christians to be firm in their views and to do what is right, even if it means facing social or legal consequences as a result.When it comes to verse 18, Peter backs up his claim by referring to Christ, who is the greatest example of someone who has been unfairly punished by a human authority.That penalty, on the other hand, resulted in our reconciliation with God.

In other words, God utilized an immoral and corrupt worldly system to bring about the salvation of godless and corrupt people, even if it was unfair.There are a couple of possible translations for the conclusion of verse 18 and the beginning of verse 19 in the Bible.On one hand, the Greek provides a typical men…de construction, which students of Greek understand as meaning ″on the other hand, this…but on the other…″ Here, it’s thanattheis men sarki, zopoitheis de pneumati: on the one hand, having been put to death in the body, but on the other hand, having been raised to life in the spirit, as the Greek phrase goes.Alternatively, you may interpret ″in the spirit″ as ″by the spirit″ (or even ″by the Spirit,″ which would imply that the Holy Spirit is involved).

Although I believe that if you interpret it ″by the spirit/Spirit,″ you will need to translate the previous males sentence as ″having been put to death by the flesh,″ which is what I believe you should do.If this were not the case, the parallel (″on the one hand…on the other″) would not be as effective.I guess you could say ″by the flesh,″ in reference to the Jewish and Roman authority, but that would be an unusual usage of the word ″flesh,″ and you would have to provide some sort of justification for that use of the word.

  1. Biblically speaking, the concept of being ″in the body″ as opposed to being ″in the spirit″ is significantly more prevalent.
  2. It has the potential to contrast our fallen nature in Adam with our regenerated nature in Jesus Christ (e.g., Romans 8:8-9).
  3. The term ″mortal existence″ can also apply to one’s physical existence as opposed to one’s soul or spiritual existence (e.g., 2 Corinthians 10:3; Galatians 2:20; Philippians 1:22-24; 1 John 4:2).
  4. I assume Peter is referring to the phrase in this later sense in this context.
  5. Jesus’ physical body was put to death, yet he remained spiritually alive and continued to live on in the afterlife.
  6. Verse 19 begins with the preposition ″in which″ (en h in Greek), which may alternatively be rendered as ″by which, by whom, in which, or in whom.″ Verse 19 continues with the preposition ″in which″ (en h in Greek).

This phrase’s interpretation is dependent on how you interpret the chapter and what precisely Jesus did spiritually in response to the ″spirits in prison″ who were rebellious during the period when Noah was constructing the Ark, I believe.So, what exactly does Noah have to do with all of this?The account of Noah, the Ark, and the Flood may be found in Genesis chapters 6, 7, and 8, respectively.As previously said, mankind was becoming increasingly rebellious, to the point that ″sons of God″ were taking brides from ″daughters of men.″ In the next chapters, mankind continues to grow progressively rebellious.

  1. ″The Lord saw that the evil of man was vast in the world,″ says the first verse of Genesis 6:5.
  2. Even the intents in their hearts were always terrible, as was their behavior.
  3. As a result, God had a plan to wipe humanity off the face of the world.
  4. Noah was the only man who walked with God.

God decreed that Noah and his family (including Noah’s wife, as well as his three sons and their wives) would be spared.He instructed Noah to construct an Ark, which would be a very big boat that would hold his family as well as two of every kind (not species–there is a distinction) of creature on Earth.Birds, animals, and ″creeping things,″ each with a male and a female, were among the creatures on display.He also had to ensure that there was enough food for all of the Ark’s residents.God’s intention was for it to rain nonstop for forty days and forty nights.When the rains came, Noah brought his family and friends inside the Ark to protect them.

While everyone within the Ark was spared from the flood waves, the rest of humanity perished in the floodwaters.When the people were eating and drinking and getting married at this time, Jesus informs us that the flood came swiftly and swept them away (Luke 17:27).If Noah attempted to warn them, it would be consistent with the Lord’s expectation that his followers would preach the gospel and warn people in their immediate vicinity of the imminent punishment of God.Clearly, the wicked of Noah’s day chose to disregard him and carry on with their lives till the end of the world.

As a result, Peter uses Noah as an example of someone who, in spite of opposition from people around him, followed God and was blessed by God as a result of his faithfulness.Noah’s fidelity is not mentioned in the Genesis story, but Peter argues that Noah was subjected to suffering as a result of his loyalty.Even more challenging to accept is the notion that Noah could have completed an enormous construction project entirely on the basis of his trust in what God had taught him without being ridiculed by anyone in his immediate vicinity of the construction site.But he persevered because he believed his labor would result in salvation for others.Noah exemplifies Christ-like behavior in this way, to put it another way.

  • The usage of Noah as an example explains why Peter uses the story; but, what about Jesus’ preaching ″in the spirit″ to those who perished during Noah’s time?
  • What caused this to occur?
  • What caused that to happen?
  • The first chapter, I believe, has the key to comprehending this.
  • Peter claims that his readers’ confidence in Christ, as well as their inexpressible delight at having found salvation through him, demonstrate their love for him and for him alone.
  • 10 The prophets who prophesied of the grace that was to be yours examined and inquired diligently, 11 asking as to which person or period the Spirit of Christ in them was referring to when he foresaw the sufferings of Christ and the consequent glory.

Twelve months later, it was made clear to them that they were not serving themselves but you in the things that have now been declared to you via those who were sent by the Holy Spirit from heaven to preach the good news to you, things into which angels yearn to gaze.When the prophets foretold Christ’s sufferings and grandeur, Peter claims that the Spirit of Christ was present in their hearts.They were curious as to when it would take place, but that knowledge was withheld from them.They were aware that these promises were made to a future generation of people.

  1. That thought, that the prophets spoke via the Spirit of Christ, is, I believe, at the core of what Peter says in 3:19, which I believe is a reference to the Old Testament.
  2. He is claiming that it was the Holy Spirit who preached to the souls who are now languishing in Hades, a spiritual ″prison,″ as a result of their disobedience.
  3. To summarize with the use of a paraphrase: Even though Christ died on the physical plane, he was still alive spiritually, and it was the same Spirit of Christ who spoke through Noah to the people who had refused to listen to Noah’s God-given message.
  4. Others who were faithful to Noah were rescued, while those who mocked and harassed him are now imprisoned in the underworld’s prison, Hades, awaiting final judgment.
  5. Given the context of the paragraph and the language Peter employs elsewhere in the letter, I believe this is the most logical interpretation of the passage.

It is also compatible with what the Bible teaches about death, Hades, and the judgment of unbelievers, all of which are mentioned in the Bible (see Matthew 25:31-46; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; Revelation 20:11-15).1 Peter 3:18-20 are some key phrases to remember.Hades Hell is a fictional character created by the author of the novel Hades Hell.In Hell, Jesus is preaching.

Where in the Bible does it speak of Jesus going to hell/hades after His death?

It is not mentioned anywhere in the Bible that Jesus would be sent to hell or Hades after His death. Is it a part of the Episcopalian creed, or something else? I’m perplexed by this. Are you able to assist me? Thank you for taking the time to read this.

Bible Answer:

Jesus’ spirit was said to have gone to heaven or paradise following His death, according to the Scriptures.We know this because Jesus informs the thief who was hanging next to Him on the crucifixion that he would be in paradise with Him the very next day: ″Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,″ Jesus said to the thief hanging next to Him on the cross.Luke 23:43 (NIV) (NASB) In addition, 1 Peter 3:18-19 informs us that Jesus went into hell and proclaimed triumph over the spirits, who are fallen spirits, bad angels, and also known as demons, as well as over the powers of darkness.Christ died for our sins once and for all, the righteous for the unjust, in order that He could reconcile us to God, having been put to death in the flesh but raised to life in the spirit; in which He also went and made proclamation to the spirits who were imprisoned at the time of His death…1 Peter 3:18-19 (New International Version) (NASB) Take note of the fact that these spirits are imprisoned.

Abyss is the name of the prison in Luke 8:31, while eternal shackles are the name of the prison in Jude 6.

Christ Declared Victory Over The Satanic Hosts

Some people believe that Christ proclaimed triumph over the demons in the abyss, while others believe otherwise.One reason is that they believe Jesus presented a salvation message to the fallen angels, despite the fact that 1 Peter 3:18-19 does not state this.The Greek word for proclamation in verse 18 is not the same as the Greek word for ″good news″ or ″the gospel,″ as some translations have it.The term for this in Greek is evangelion.The Greek term for proclamation is kerusso, which literally translates as ″to herald″ or ″to perform the duties of a herald.″ It is a popular term in the New Testament that conveys the sense of ″announcing one’s presence.″ In this particular instance, Jesus announced His achievement on the cross.

He declared himself victorious over Satan and his demons’ domain.Furthermore, Jesus did not need to go to hell, as some are presently teaching, in order to atone for His sins.This verse cannot be used to support that doctrine since it does not mention anything to that effect, and no other scriptures support that point of view.Although he died on the cross for the sins of the world, Jesus was innocent.He was the ideal lamb of God, bearing the punishment for our crimes (1 Peter 2:24).

Scripture says that Jesus was……tested in all respects as we are, yet without sin (Hebrews 4:15).Hebrews 4:15 is a verse that states that (NASB) It is revealed in 1 Peter 3:18-19 that Jesus declared victory over the devils on the cross.

For further information, please listen to the sermon ″Christ’s Victory Over Everything.″

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Why Christ Announced Victory

When did Jesus pay a visit to the demons that were imprisoned?As stated in 1 Peter 3:19, ″in which likewise He went and made proclamation to the spirits who were now in prison.″ Two things may be deduced from this.First, Christ appeared to the devils in the form of His spirit.The term ″spirit″ does not relate to the Holy Spirit, but rather to the spirit of Christ himself (1 Peter 3:18-19).Second, Christ’s visit took place within the time period following His death and resurrection.

As a result, He declared triumph after His death, indicating that His sacrifice had resulted in victory (Hebrews 2:14-15).In order to render helpless him who wielded the power of death, i.e.the devil, and to release people who had been subject to servitude throughout their lives because of their fear of death, He Himself partakes of flesh and blood in the same way that the children do.Hebrews 2:14-15 (New International Version) (NASB) As a result, He vanquished Satan, death, and sin, and then, following His triumphant proclamation, His bodily, mortal body was resurrected and transformed into an immortal being.According to the Episcopalian Creed, Jesus descended into hell, III.

OF THE GOING DOWN OF CHRIST INTO HELL As Christ died for us and was buried, it is equally reasonable to assume that He descended into Hell for our sins.Articles of Religious Belief (Thirty-Nine Articles) Additionally, ″He descended to the dead,″ according to the Apostles’ Creed.

Conclusion:

Jesus, the spotless God-man, made it possible for us to be forgiven of our sins by dying on the cross. After His death on the cross, He descended into hell, ascended into paradise, was raised, and forty days later returned to heaven, where He will remain until His return at the end of time.

Suggested Links:

God’s Anguish – a discourse on grief Christ’s Complete and Total Victory Over Everything Did Jesus’ physical body and spiritual spirit perish? Is it possible that Jesus descended into hell? Is it possible that Satan pulled Jesus into hell and tormented him?

Where in the Bible does Jesus go to hell and take the keys of death?

Question: Where in the Bible does it say that Jesus went to hell and took the keys of death with him?In Acts 1:9, we are told that Jesus was ″taken up, and a cloud received him, and he was no longer visible to them.″ Eph.4:9-10 says, ″….he also descended first into the lower portions of the earth….he who descended is likewise the same as he who ascended…″ Before ascending into heaven, Christ descended into hell.In Acts 2:31, it is verified once more that Jesus was condemned to hell: ″….spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in pit, nor his flesh saw decay.″ One of the reasons why Jesus went to hell was because he had to suffer the same suffering as mortal man had to.As stated in 1 Peter 4:16, ″….for this reason was the gospel proclaimed also to those who are dead, that they may not be judged according to men in the flesh, but could live according to God.″ He also went to give salvation to all of the righteous individuals who died before his death on the cross.

According to 1 Corinthians 15:26, ″death is the final enemy that must be vanquished.″ Jesus went to hell, yet he was raised from the dead, thereby defeating death.Because Jesus overcame death, he now has the keys of death, as stated in Rev.1:18: ″I am he that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen; and I have the keys of hell and death in my possession.″

Did Jesus go to hell between His death and resurrection?

Answer to the question Currently, there is a considerable degree of uncertainty around this subject.According to the Apostles’ Creed, which declares, ″He descended into hell,″ the belief that Jesus went to hell after His death on the cross is essentially derived from this verse.The Bible contains several passages in which Jesus is described as going to ″hell,″ depending on how the passages are interpreted.Prior to delving into this topic, it is critical to grasp what the Bible has to say regarding the realm of the dead.Sheol is the word used in the Hebrew Scriptures to represent the realm of the dead.

In the English translation, sheol means ″hell.″ For the most part, it refers to ″the place of the dead″ or ″the place of departed souls or spirits.″ The Greek word for sheol in the New Testament is hades, which means ″the place of the dead″ and also means ″the place of the living.″ Sheol/hades, according to other passages in the New Testament, is a transitory realm where souls are held while they await the final resurrection and judgment.The book of Revelation 20:11–15 makes a clear contrast between the lake of fire and the pit of hades.The lake of fire serves as a permanent and ultimate repository for the souls of the dead.As a result, Hades is just a temporary residence.Many people refer to both hades and the lake of fire as ″hell,″ which can lead to a lot of misunderstanding.

After His death, Jesus did not go to a realm of agony, but He did travel to a region known as hades.As described in Matthew 11:23–18, Luke 10:15–16:23, and Acts 2:27–31, sheol/hades was a realm divided into two divisions—a region of blessing and a place of condemnation.In the Bible, both the abodes of the saved and the abodes of the lost are commonly referred to as ″hades.″ In Luke 16:22, the home of the rescued is referred to as ″Abraham’s bosom″ (KJV) or ″Abraham’s side″ (NIV), while in Luke 23:43, it is referred to as ″paradise.″ In Luke 16:23, the dwelling of the unsaved is referred to as ″hell″ (in the King James Version) or ″Hades″ (in the New International Version).

The abodes of the rescued and the abodes of the lost are divided by a ″huge gap″ (or abyss in Hebrew) (Luke 16:26).In the event of Jesus’ death, he was taken to the blessed side of sheol and, from there, He was taken with the believers to heaven (Ephesians 4:8–10).The aspect of sheol/hades that deals with judgment has remained constant.All of the unbelieving dead are deposited there, where they will await their final judgment in the future.Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell?According to Ephesians 4:8–10 and 1 Peter 3:18–20, the answer is yes.

Some of the misunderstanding has originated from texts such as Psalm 16:10–11, which is translated as follows in the King James Version: ″For thou wilt not abandon my soul to the depths of hell; nor wilt thou allow thine Holy One to be corrupted….Thou wilt teach me the way to eternal life.″ In this passage, the word ″hell″ is not a proper translation.The term ″the grave″ or ″sheol″ would be a more accurate translation.″Today you will be with me in paradise,″ Jesus said to the thief who stood behind Him in Luke 23:43; He did not say, ″Today you will be with me in hell.″ Although Jesus’ physical corpse remained in the tomb, his soul/spirit was taken to dwell with the blessed in sheol/hell.

  1. As a result, in various editions of the Bible, translators are not consistent or accurate in their rendering of the Hebrew and Greek terminology for the afterlife, hell, and the afterlife after death.
  2. Some believe that Jesus went to ″hell,″ or the suffering side of sheol/hades, in order to be tormented much more severely for our crimes than he already had been.
  3. This is a profoundly unbiblical notion to have.
  4. It was the death of Jesus on the cross that was adequate to secure our redemption and save us from our sin.
  5. It was His spilt blood that was the means by which we were cleansed from sin (1 John 1:7–9).
  6. As He hung there on the cross, He took on Himself the sins of the entire human race and bore them upon Himself.

His sacrifice for us was sin: ″God caused him who had no sin to be sin for us, in order that through him we could become the righteousness of God″ (2 Corinthians 5:21).When we appreciate Christ’s anguish in the garden of Gethsemane, we may better understand the cup of sin that will be poured out on Him at the cross.As Jesus was on the verge of death, He said, ″It is completed″ (John 19:30).We were able to put an end to his agony in our place.

  1. His soul/spirit was sent to Hades (the place of the dead).
  2. Jesus did not go to ″hell″ or to the suffering side of hades; rather, He went to ″Abraham’s side,″ or the good side of hades, as the Bible says.
  3. Jesus’ agony came to an end at the time of His death.
  4. The debt owed for sin was satisfied.

He then anticipated the resurrection of His body and His ascension into glory, both of which would occur at the same time.Is it true that Jesus went to hell?No.Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell?Yes.Return to the previous page: Questions concerning the deity of Jesus Christ Is it possible that Jesus spent time in hell between His death and resurrection?

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Article: When Jesus Went to Hell

There was a period when no one could enter the kingdom of God.Because of what Jesus achieved on the cross, believers have the opportunity to enter heaven.It is only because of his sacrifice/shedding of blood that it is possible.However, things weren’t always like this.Prior to Jesus’ death on the cross, Old Testament believers were unable to enter the kingdom of God when they died.

This was due to the fact that the Messiah had not yet atoned for their sins.They had to wait, since they needed to be washed and made perfect first.They were taken to a location in the middle of the earth after they died as Old Testament believers.It was divided into two sections: ″Paradise″ and ″Hades.″ The Old Testament Believers gathered at this place to wait for the Messiah to rescue them via His sacrificial blood shed on the cross.Once the Messiah died on the cross, believers were able to go to heaven when they died because they were no longer barred from entering heaven since they had been ″cleansed by the blood of the Lamb,″ as the Bible states.

This information comes from the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus in Luke 16:19-31, which is found in the Bible.In Revelation 9:1-2, we are given a look into what is referred to as the ″Bottomless Pit,″ which is no metaphor but rather a real reality.And it’s a little creepy, too!

In the Bottomless Pit, every direction is up!

If you are unfamiliar with the narrative, please take a time to read it through.People who died before the crucifixion because they had confidence in a coming Messiah were taken to ″Paradise,″ which is the place where the saved go after they die.According to the Bible, they were in ″comfort.″ Good thing, because some of them had to remain there for hundreds of years, hoping and praying for the Messiah to come and save them!Those who did not accept Christ as their Savior were sent into the ″Bottomless Pit″ on the other side, known as ″Hades,″ where they suffered ″agony,″ ″torment,″ and ″flame.″ This is not good!All of them will be condemned and hurled into hell, along with the devil and his angels, at the conclusion of the age.

Hell is going to make Hades look like a weenie roast in comparison.Christians today, following the cross, travel directly to heaven since their sins have been permanently paid for by Jesus’ spilt blood over 2000 years ago, allowing them to avoid the tormenting flames of both Hades and Hell.The Lord has given me the desire to be absent from the body and at home with Him.″ 2 Corinthians 5:8 However, there was another wonderful time period that occurred immediately following Jesus’ death on the cross and before He went to heaven.He had to redeem those who were still in Paradise, waiting to be admitted to heaven!He ″descended″ to the good side of the Bottomless Pit, into Paradise, and brought all of the Old Testament Believers with Him to heaven as a result of His sacrifice.

So what does the phrase ″He ascended″ signify if not that He also sank into the lower regions of the earth?″ says the author.4:9 (Eph.4:9 (Eph.

4:9 (Eph.Think about it: all of the Old Testament saints, from Adam and Eve to Isaiah and Daniel, are gathered together in one place.They were all gathered in one large chamber, with every direction pointing upward.The longest delay was about 4000 years, according to some!And then, at long last, Jesus appears!There would have been an earthquake in the ground had so many ecstatic Believers let out a thunderous exclamation of joy at the same time.

Jesus had come to redeem that which had belonged to Him previously.Some of those journeying from Paradise in the earth’s center to heaven above the earth’s surface, as if to demonstrate that God has a sense of humour, decided to stop over on the planet’s surface!The graves were opened, and many corpses of saints who had fallen asleep were resurrected; and after His resurrection, they came out of the tombs and appeared to a large number of people in the holy city.Jesus said in Matthew 27:52-53, Amazingly, several of the OT Saints came to a halt on the surface of the planet as they went through its crust.

  1. Can you fathom what that would be like?
  2. Some of them might have been deceased for only a few days at the most.
  3. There is a possibility that some people perished 3000 years ago.
  4. Nonetheless, they were out there, walking around the planet and talking to people.
  5. Consider the ramifications of that exchange.
  6. ″Hey, Zechariah, I thought you were dead!″ says Jew1.

‘Yes, I did die, but I had to wait for the spilt blood of Jesus to cover my sins before I could enter the kingdom of heaven,’ says Jew 2.And you won’t believe who’s going to be in paradise with them.besides, who isn’t?″ Okay, so that final sentence was a little bit of a guess on my part.That some Jews living at the time of Christ witnessed the resurrection of persons who had died hundreds or thousands of years earlier and were waiting for the Messiah in Paradise is beyond comprehension to this day.

  1. And, as if this study couldn’t get much weirder, the Bottomless Pit will also play a part in the next Tribulation era, which makes this study even crazier.
  2. According to reports, all of the demons imprisoned during the flood, even the most evil ones, will be released back into the world.
  3. (Revelation 9:2) There are two points of view regarding those monsters.
  4. First and foremost, even if it is not yet the endless inferno in which they would eventually find themselves, Hades would not be a pleasant place to be.
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In addition to dealing with the horrifying scorching flames in the absence of water, those unfortunate souls will also have to cope with the ugly demons who will torture them at all hours of the day and night.Second, if you do not make it to the Rapture, your greatest nightmare will begin and continue indefinitely.You may as well be in the pit of hell.It will be so excruciatingly painful that you will consider it preferable to be crushed by rocks and/or die!The mountains and the rocks responded by saying, ‘Fall on us and conceal us from the presence of Him who sits on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb’″; Rev.6:16.

As the Bible says: ″And in those days, mankind shall seek death and shall not find it; they shall desire for death, and death shall run from them.″ 9:6 (Revelation 9:6) There is no hope for those who willfully stand in opposition to God and reject His kindness.But His love is so strong that the Bible teaches us that He is not willing for anybody to die because of His love.Yea!″But the Lord is not sluggish in fulfilling His promise, as some regard it as being slow, but He is patient with you, not desiring that any should perish but that all should come to repentance.″ 2 Pet 3:9 (New International Version) And, thank God, He takes no joy in the death of sinners who have turned their backs on Him.

For the Lord GOD says, ″I take no joy in the death of anybody.″ Ezek 18:32 (Ezekiel 18:32) To be able to turn to Him today and know that we may look ahead with enthusiasm rather than dread is a huge blessing and comfort.We should be grateful.Our future is brighter than anything we could ever anticipate!It says, ″Those which the eye has not seen, and which the ear has not heard, as well as things which have not entered the heart of man, are all that God has prepared for those who love him.″ 1 Corinthians 2:9 That’s really fantastic!Heaven will be far superior to anything we could ever imagine in our minds.

  • I can picture a slew of A-Plus circumstances that may exist in paradise, but it’s far superior than anything I could conceive!
  • What an honor it is to be alive on this planet and be aware of that fact!
  • Shalom!
  • Bill Perkins is an American businessman and philanthropist.
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Did Jesus Actually Descend into Hell?

In the Christian church, there has always been a hot button issue that comes up every so often.This issue is concerned with the question of whether or not Jesus went to hell.There are schools of thinking that believe He did and schools of thought that believe He did not.Scripture does not provide a straightforward response to this topic; nevertheless, with more study, a more complete understanding can be gained.

In some parts of the world, Christianity has always been viewed with suspicion, and this is no exception.Kings, emperors, and other rulers have called councils to debate and resolve concerns and contingencies in order to counteract this trend.The outcome of these conferences was a collection of creeds that served as expressions of religious belief.These creeds were developed with the help of biblical texts and theologians of the day, among other sources.The Nicene Creed and the Apostles’ Creed are the two most well-known creeds in the Christian church, and they are both written in Latin.

Both creeds express similar ideas, however the Apostles’ Creed contains the phrase ″he fell into hell,″ whereas the Creed of the Holy Spirit does not contain this phrase.The image is courtesy of Getty Images/Kesu01.

Where Did The Idea of Jesus Descending to Hell Originate? And Did Jesus Descend to Hell?

The Apostles’ Creed is an enlarged form of the Old Roman Creed, which was in use as early as the second century and was adopted by the Church of Rome.The grounds for the formation of the Apostles’ Creed are not well understood by academics.Historically, early church leaders believed the credo was penned by the apostles themselves, although we don’t know for sure.That Jesus had gone into hell is thought to have been added later, about AD 390, to the Bible.

This would have occurred at the same time as a bishop by the name of Apollinarius was giving a lecture.The implication of his statement was that because Jesus was not entirely human, he could not be an effective sacrifice for the sins of humanity.During the Council of Constantinople in 381 AD, this dogma was formally rejected and condemned.There are a variety of explanations for why this line is not included in the Nicene Creed.It was during the Council of Nicaea in AD 325 that the Nicene Creed was formulated.

In response to the teachings of a man named Arius, Emperor Constantine convened a council of church leaders to draft a formal declaration of faith.Constantine desired for the Christian church to have a declaration of faith that would unify all of the denominations under one roof.This would have occurred prior to the inclusion of the phrase in the Apostle’s Creed.Apart from the establishment of these creeds, there are scripture passages that are held up as proof that Jesus was crucified and afterwards resurrected.The biblical passage 1 Peter 18-22 is commonly used as supporting evidence by academics.Together with Ephesians 4:9, this passage contributes to the development of the idea that Jesus may have gone into hell following his death on the cross.

Understanding the Language and Meaning  of the Apostles Creed

It is vitally crucial to be able to comprehend the language of a paper.A person must be familiar with the language and understand the meaning of the terms in that language.When there is a miscommunication, the entire meaning of a document or statement might be altered.Christians and researchers today must recognize that writings from the early church were written in a variety of languages that can be difficult to decipher and interpret.

When it comes to translating Hebrew or Greek into English, we must proceed with caution.Hell is referred to as Sheol in the Hebrew Bible, which means ″hell″ in English.This term literally means ″hell,″ but it refers to the current version of Hell.The concept of individuals who have died in their sin and are lost will be ushered into this region instantly upon death is what the phrase Sheol refers to.The New Testament has a reference to hell written in the Greek language.

Because the Apostle’s Creed was originally written in Greek, we shall devote a significant amount of time to this language.The ″abode of the dead″ is difficult to translate from Greek to English because it is described by only two words.″Gehenna″ is the Greek name for the location of hell, and it means ″hell.″ This term refers to a place of final punishment or a physical location.This term does not appear in the Apostles’ Creed.The phrase ″he descended into Hell″ is included in the Apostles’ Creed, and it is written in the Greek language as ″Hades.″ The Greek term for death, Hades, alludes to the condition of being dead.It is possible to interpret it as ″descended to those underneath.″ It does not allude to the location we know as hell as we know it now; rather, it refers to the physical condition of being dead.

Kenneth West, a theological researcher, describes this in the following remark concerning 1 Peter 3:18-22.We know that our Lord as the man Christ Jesus was taken to a place of the dead known in the Old Testament as ‘Sheol,’ and known in the New Testament as ″hell,″ with ″hell″ being the translation of the Greek word for ″death,″ ″hell,″ and ″hellfire″ being the translation of the Greek word for ″hellfire.″ The phrases of the Apostles Creed have been reinterpreted by modern churches to imply something else.This is a transformation that has occurred as time has progressed.Words in the English language began to have distinct meanings from their older equivalents during the time of the Renaissance period.More specifically, the term ″hell″ came to refer to the location where Satan resides.This was not what hell was like in the biblical languages, according to the Bible.

Many churches nowadays do not say the Apostle’s Creed, which is a sad state of affairs.The ones who still do so often do so without including this statement.Photo courtesy of Aaron Burden via Unsplash.

Did Jesus Descend to Hell?

The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke provide accounts of the events that occurred soon after Jesus’ death.Each report provides a vivid and understandable explanation of the events that took place.The Bible tells us that Jesus cried out and surrendered His spirit in Matthew 27:50-53.Then the curtain of the sanctuary came crashing down, and the ground shook violently.

The tombs of the saints were revealed when the rocks were divided.Afterwards, the curtain of the Temple was ripped in two from top to bottom, as recorded in Mark 15:38.The Bible writes in Luke 23:44-45, ″It was now around midday, and darkness fell over the entire area until three o’clock, for the sun’s light had vanished.″ There was a rift in the sanctuary’s curtain that ran down the middle.″ Among the three, Matthew’s narrative is the most vivid and detailed.Daniel, Elijah, and Zechariah all foretold of an earthquake and a period of darkness, which he describes in detail in his narrative of the event.Even more significantly, Matthew informs us that the curtain has been ripped in two.

It is referenced in all three narratives, which demonstrates the significance of this event in human history.The curtain signified the distinction between the clean and the impure.Located in the Temple, it was suspended above and above the entrance to the Holy of Holies.This location was so sacred that no one other than the high priest was allowed to enter.Aaron was permitted to enter and put the blood on the atonement seat on the Day of Atonement, according to Exodus 26, and he did so.The Israelites were not permitted to enter the presence of the Lord at their leisure.

This says a great deal about the ripping of the curtain, doesn’t it?Is it possible that Jesus went to hell?Because of Jesus’ death and resurrection, we no longer had to go through rituals or make sacrifices in order to enter God’s presence, as we had done in the past.It had been decided to make the ultimate sacrifice.Everything predicted by the prophets of the Old Testament had come to pass.Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Tanya Sid

Why Do Some People Think Jesus Descended into Hell?

The concept that Jesus went into hell is still held by many Christians today, although many have called this belief into doubt.Some people are unable to comprehend this notion for whatever reason.According to Fr.Sev Kuupuo, the reason Jesus did descend to hell and the goal of His descent were as follows: ″Jesus descended to Hell in order to release souls who had been imprisoned.″ The mission of Jesus’ ascension into Hell was to bring about the release of the holy people of the Old Testament.

Others believe that Jesus Christ went to Hell in order to endure the whole severity of suffering, which is the full impact of human sin, in order to provide a total atonement for the sins of humanity.″ It is claimed that the fulfillment of Jesus’ atonement for our sins could not take place unless Jesus entered the area of punishment known as Hell.He had to save the holy people of the Old Testament who were waiting for Him in Abraham’s bosom as well as the rest of the world.In support of this idea, R.C.Sproul states that, ″He travels to hell to free those spirits who have been imprisoned from the beginning of time.″ ″His mission in hell is one of victory, releasing Old Testament saints,″ says the author.In conclusion, those who believe that Jesus descended into hell believe that He did so in order to save souls and to fulfill the sacrifice for our sins on the cross.

It is not a notion that He traveled to that location and stayed for a time.Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Tomertu

Why Do Some People Believe Jesus Did Not Descend into Hell?

Many different reasons are used by those who profess their opinion that Jesus did not descend into hell in order to support their position.The most widely held belief is that Jesus was God manifested in human form.He is the one who created the area we know as hell.He expelled Satan from heaven and sentenced him to an eternity in hell.

After all, if God created hell and decided its purpose, how could he possibly visit it?Wasn’t Jesus a holy figure who had no business being in this place?This has been investigated by others, and they have come to their own conclusions based on what they have discovered.They have comprehended the significance of this sentence.In fact, Jesus did descend to hell, which is defined as the abode of the dead, not as the region of perpetual torment, in the Greek language.

How Should Christians Respond to This?

There are numerous possible responses to this topic, and each answer will be shaped by the individual’s viewpoint.The fact that Christians do not live in Greek culture makes it difficult for them to understand what is meant by this remark.They are unable to communicate in Greek.We just do not understand what some terms in Greek mean.

Our answer should be to devote the necessary time to studying the Scriptures.Investigate the Biblical languages in greater depth.Inquire of your pastor or a fellow believer in Christ about anything.This will assist you in comprehending and processing something that is genuinely beyond the grasp of our human minds.According to John Jones of the First Presbyterian Church, ″no confessional declaration should be confirmed unless the affirmer understands what the statement entails.″ According to its appropriate interpretation, the Apostles’ Creed expresses a fundamental theological truth.″ It has been suggested that the Apostles Creed contains a sentence that is problematic among certain Christians.

The key to comprehending this statement is to be familiar with the meaning of the terms.Before taking a position on anything, we must first conduct thorough research.When it came to atonement, Jesus was the ultimate sacrifice.He was executed by hanging on a cross.He did really die and pass into the realm of the dead.The brilliance of this is that he did not remain in that location.

He climbed to his feet once again and will return.

See also:  Where Was Jesus Crucified At

Sources:

Millard J.Erickson’s ″Introducing Christian Doctrine″ was published in 1992 by Baker Publishing Group in Grand Rapids, Michigan.″The Veil Was Torn in Two,″ by Daniel M.Guertner, is available online.

Having a strong desire for God.The 19th of April, 2019.(Retrieved on March 4, 2020) .Kenneth S.Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament is available online.

Wm.B.Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1973.Credit for the image: Getty Images/nu1983 Homeschooling her two children while also serving with her husband as he pastors a rural church in West Virginia is what Ashley Hooker does in her spare time.She is also a freelance writer who writes on faith.Currently, she works as a contributing author for the Journey Christian magazine in the United States.

When Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey wreaked havoc on the United States, she traveled to Mississippi and Texas with the North Carolina Baptist Men’s Missionary Society.For many years, she participated on numerous committees in her local church, with a particular emphasis on evangelism.She also traveled to West Virginia and Vermont to share the Gospel with others.Her desire is to spend her time writing and spreading the love of Christ to everyone she comes into contact with.

Did Jesus go to hell between His death and resurrection?

One popular belief is that Jesus spent the period between his death on the cross and his resurrection in hell.This is contrary to biblical evidence.A provision in the Apostles’ Creed has added to the complexity of the situation (which is not part of the Bible).According to the belief, ″He plunged into hell.″.

Is it true that Jesus went to the location of pain and torment known as ″hell″ on the cross?First, let’s take a look at the scriptures that have been cited to support the notion that Jesus did really enter hell following His death on the cross.According to Ephesians 4:8-10, ″Therefore, it states that when he ascended to the highest point, he commanded an army of prisoners and bestowed gifts on mankind.’He ascended,’ what else could it possibly mean except that he had also sunk into the lower parts of the earth?This descendant is the one who likewise soared far above all the heavens in order to be able to fill all things with his glory.″ These verses are a direct quotation from Psalm 68:18.

The source of the disagreement is the location of Jesus’ descent from the cross.Is it more likely that He descended to hell or to the earth?The English Standard Version (ESV) includes a literal translation, ″the lowest parts, the earth,″ to help clarify this contrast.According to the scripture, Jesus descended to the world (at His Incarnation).The scripture does not imply that Jesus went to hell on the cross.Another verse is Psalm 16:10-11, which reads as follows: ″You will not abandon my soul to Sheol, nor will you allow your holy one to be corrupted, because you love me.

You reveal to me the road that I should take in life.″ It has been suggested that this text refers to Jesus’ entrance into hell (Sheol) prior to His resurrection.A big part of this interpretation might be attributed to the King James Version, which refers to Sheol as ″hell″ in this particular text.The Hebrew term sheol, on the other hand, refers to the grave as a whole, rather than a specific location inside the afterlife.Similarly to Jonah’s journey to the belly of the whale, Jesus declares in Matthew 12:40 that He will travel ″to the very center of the earth.″ However, in this instance, Jesus was referring to death or the grave rather than a specific destination in the afterlife.To assert that this has anything to do with Jesus going to hell is to take the parallel too far.The verse 1 Peter 3:18-20 is a last passage that is frequently used in this discussion: Because Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God, having been killed in the flesh but made alive in the spirit, in which he went and proclaimed to the spirits in prison, because they had previously refused to obey, while God’s patience waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared, in which a few, that is, eight persons were brought safely through water.″ Some believe that Jesus is speaking to human beings in hell after His death on the cross, and that this is the case.

Others believe it relates to Christ’s spirit appearing during the days of Noah to warn Noah and his family of coming judgment and to give redemption to Noah and his family, like in the story of Noah and his family.Rather than referring to Satan, it is more likely that Christ is announcing His triumph over the evil spirits that are imprisoned in the abyss (see Luke 8:31; Jude 1:6; Revelation 9:11).The words of Jesus Himself refute the notion that Jesus was crucified and sent into hell.″It is completed!″ Jesus said as he hung on the cross (John 19:30).

His agony had come to an end, and he no longer needed to make any more sacrifices in order to be saved.Just before His death, Jesus also prayed to the Father, saying ″Father, into your hands I submit my spirit″ (Luke 23:46).Instead of going to hell, His spirit was taken to the Father when He died.Furthermore, while on the cross, Jesus promised the thief that they would be reunited in paradise today (Luke 23:43).This would not have been possible if Jesus had not spent three days in hell prior to his resurrection.Despite the fact that the sentence ″He fell into hell″ in the Apostles’ Creed was well-intentioned, it has become so contentious that some denominations consider it optional or even delete that piece of the creed altogether.

  1. Despite the fact that Jesus’ corpse was in the grave for three days, He did not perish in hell.
  2. Truths that are related: What happened to Jesus during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection?
  3. Was Jesus a sinless being?
  4. What are some of the reasons why I should believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ?
  1. What is it about the actuality of Jesus’ physical resurrection that is so important to the Christian faith?
  2. What is the significance of the ascension of Jesus Christ?
  3. Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

When Jesus Stormed the Gates of Hell: The Forgotten Events of Holy Saturday –

Good Friday is well-known for its significance: it is the day on which we commemorate Jesus’ death on the cross in order to atone for our sins.The same is true of Easter Sunday, when everyone understands that we are commemorating his resurrection from the grave in victory over death.What about Holy Saturday, on the other hand?While his followers waited for him, Jesus was engaged in some of the most dramatic and crucial labor of his messianic mission – work that brought him all the way to the depths of the underworld.

What’s going on?Is it true that Jesus went to hell?In the old Apostles’ Creed, it’s right there: ″…was crucified, died, and was buried; he went into hell; on the third day, he arose from the dead…″ (It appears in the Athanasian Creed as well.) There are two things that you must be aware of in order to fully comprehend what is going on here: First and foremost, when most people hear the word ″hell,″ they think of the hell of the damned, which is the place of eternal retribution for those who die without believing in Jesus Christ as their Savior.However, for people who are not witnessing the vision of God, the phrase ″hell″ can occasionally refer to the ″realm of the dead,″ which is a larger definition of the term.

This larger definition clearly includes the Hell of the Damned, but it may also refer to other regions, such as the underworld.Purgatory, for example, is a part of the greater world of the dead, but it is distinct from the inferno of the damned in that it is a place of punishment.For the second time, there was at least one additional section of the realm of the dead that no longer exists today, a location known as ″the limbo of the patriarchs,″ which existed before to the arrival of Christ.If a person died in God’s friendship before Christ, they would not be punished in the Hell of the Damned, but they would also not be able to enter the Kingdom of Heaven since Christ had not yet made it possible to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.Instead, they were sent to a section of the underworld where they were spared the sufferings of the damned.It was to the inhabitants of this location that Christ paid a visit when he ″descended into hell,″ as the Bible says.

For example, according to the Catechism, ″Jesus did not descend into hell in order to deliver the wicked or to demolish the hell of damnation, but in order to release the just who had gone before him.″ (CCC 633) (CCC 633) (CCC 633) Following his death on the cross, Christ descended into the realm of the dead to declare to them that he had won their salvation and to lead them into paradise as the first arrivals.Individuals such as Adam and Eve, St.John the Baptist, and his foster-father Joseph have traditionally been placed in this category.One of the most beautiful descriptions of this vitally important, but often overlooked, aspect of Christ’s mission comes from an ancient sermon for Holy Saturday: ″He has gone to search for our first parent, as if for a misplaced sheep.″ He has come to free Adam and Eve from their captivity because he is both God and the son of Eve, and he has done so because he has a strong desire to visit those who live in darkness and under the shadow of death.The Lord approached them with the cross in his hands, the weapon that had brought him victory over his enemies.Adam, the first man he had created, smashed his breast in terror at the sight of him and cried out to everyone, ‘My Lord be with you all,’ in response to his appearance.

Christ responded, ‘And with your spirit,’ he continued.In the process, he took him by the hand and lifted him to his feet, saying, ‘Awake, O sleeper, and rise from the dead, and Christ will give you light!’I did not create you to be a prisoner in hell; rise from the dead, for I am the resurrection and the life of the dead!’″ says the Lord.You can read the full text of the amazing sermon here.

So don’t let Holy Saturday just be the day between Good Friday and Easter Sunday.Rather, contemplate Christ’s dramatic rescue mission in the realm of the dead, and praise God!

Comments

Good Friday is well-known for its significance: it is the day on which we commemorate Jesus’ death on the cross in order to atone for our sins.The same is true of Easter Sunday, when everyone understands that we are commemorating his resurrection from the grave in victory over death.What about Holy Saturday, on the other hand?While his followers waited for him, Jesus was engaged in some of the most dramatic and crucial labor of his messianic mission – work that brought him all the way to the depths of the underworld.

What’s going on?Is it true that Jesus went to hell?In the old Apostles’ Creed, it’s right there: ″…was crucified, died, and was buried; he went into hell; on the third day, he arose from the dead…″ (It appears in the Athanasian Creed as well.) There are two things that you must be aware of in order to fully comprehend what is going on here: First and foremost, when most people hear the word ″hell,″ they think of the hell of the damned, which is the place of eternal retribution for those who die without believing in Jesus Christ as their Savior.However, for people who are not witnessing the vision of God, the phrase ″hell″ can occasionally refer to the ″realm of the dead,″ which is a larger definition of the term.

This larger definition clearly includes the Hell of the Damned, but it may also refer to other regions, such as the underworld.Purgatory, for example, is a part of the greater world of the dead, but it is distinct from the inferno of the damned in that it is a place of punishment.For the second time, there was at least one additional section of the realm of the dead that no longer exists today, a location known as ″the limbo of the patriarchs,″ which existed before to the arrival of Christ.If a person died in God’s friendship before Christ, they would not be punished in the Hell of the Damned, but they would also not be able to enter the Kingdom of Heaven since Christ had not yet made it possible to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.Instead, they were sent to a section of the underworld where they were spared the sufferings of the damned.It was to the inhabitants of this location that Christ paid a visit when he ″descended into hell,″ as the Bible says.

For example, according to the Catechism, ″Jesus did not descend into hell in order to deliver the wicked or to demolish the hell of damnation, but in order to release the just who had gone before him.″ (CCC 633) (CCC 633) (CCC 633) Following his death on the cross, Christ descended into the realm of the dead to declare to them that he had won their salvation and to lead them into paradise as the first arrivals.Individuals such as Adam and Eve, St.John the Baptist, and his foster-father Joseph have traditionally been placed in this category.One of the most beautiful descriptions of this vitally important, but often overlooked, aspect of Christ’s mission comes from an ancient sermon for Holy Saturday: ″He has gone to search for our first parent, as if for a misplaced sheep.″ He has come to free Adam and Eve from their captivity because he is both God and the son of Eve, and he has done so because he has a strong desire to visit those who live in darkness and under the shadow of death.The Lord approached them with the cross in his hands, the weapon that had brought him victory over his enemies.Adam, the first man he had created, smashed his breast in terror at the sight of him and cried out to everyone, ‘My Lord be with you all,’ in response to his appearance.

Christ responded, ‘And with your spirit,’ he continued.In the process, he took him by the hand and lifted him to his feet, saying, ‘Awake, O sleeper, and rise from the dead, and Christ will give you light!’I did not create you to be a prisoner in hell; rise from the dead, for I am the resurrection and the life of the dead!’″ says the Lord.You can read the full text of the amazing sermon here.

So don’t let Holy Saturday just be the day between Good Friday and Easter Sunday.Rather, contemplate Christ’s dramatic rescue mission in the realm of the dead, and praise God!

The Apostles’ Creed (7): He Descended into Hell

The Apostle’s Creed: Part 8 of TGCA’s series on the creed According to the creed, Jesus was crucified on the cross.This alone should be adequate evidence to prove that he passed away.Included information about his ″crucification, death, and burial″ as well as the f

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