When Jesus Died On The Cross

4 Phenomenal Events that Happened when Jesus Died (Session 12 – Matthew 27:41-52)

“They nailed him on a cross” (John 19:1). He wasn’t the first person to die on a crucifixion; it’s believed that by the time of Christ, the Romans had crucified 30,000 individuals in Palestine alone, according to historical records. He would not be the first to do so. To the contrary, Jesus was the only One who could and did suffer on a cross for the sins of a lost world, “the righteous for the wicked, so he may bring you to God” (Romans 3:25). (1 Pet. 3:18). In order to demonstrate the one-of-a-kindness of Jesus’ death, Matthew narrates four extraordinary incidents that occurred immediately after Jesus died.

According to John MacArthur, these incidents serve as God’s own commentary on the crucifixion.

The Darkness

As a result, “from noon till three o’clock in the afternoon, darkness fell over the entire area” (Mark 15:25), and Jesus was crucified at 9 a.m. (Mark 15:25). (Matt. 27:45). The relevance of this: Darkness is commonly used as a symbol of judgment in the Old Testament (see Amos 5:18; 8:9). Remember that the ninth plague of the exodus event was a three-day period of darkness over the country of Egypt, a darkness that could be felt by the people of Israel (Ex. 10:21-22). Next the plague of darkness, the firstborn sons were killed in the following year (Ex.

  1. Death was preceded by a period of darkness.
  2. What is the importance of this?
  3. The presence of darkness as a manifestation of divine judgment draws attention to the substitutionary aspect of Christ’s sacrifice.
  4. 3:13; 2 Cor.
  5. 2:24).

The Curtain

This is what happened: “From top to bottom, the curtain of the sanctuary was ripped in half” (Matt. 27:51). The relevance of this: Some Bible scholars believe that this was the curtain that divided the court of the Jews from the court of the Gentiles in the time of Jesus. According to Ephesians 2:14, where Paul claims that Christ has knocked down the dividing wall between Jews and Gentiles, this would make sense in light of the passage. Other Bible scholars, on the other hand, think that this was the curtain that separated the holy of holies from the other portions of the temple in Jerusalem.

Worshipers were never permitted to enter the holy of holies; only the high priest was permitted to do so once a year (Lev.

16). This act of ripping down the temple curtain symbolizes how Christ has made the way to God open for everyone who believes in him. The fact that the curtain was torn from top to bottom indicates that this was the result of divine intervention rather than human effort (see Heb. 9:12; 10:19-20).

The Earthquake

What happened was as follows: “The earth trembled, and the rocks split” (Matt.27:51). The significance:Earthquakes were regular in Palestine, albeit this one was unlike any other that had occurred previously. The timing of the incident, as well as the events that followed, imply that it was a supernatural occurrence. Earthquakes were frequently associated with supernatural revelation or a one-of-a-kind act of God in the Bible. Moses reported that “the entire mountain trembled fiercely” when God came to him on Mount Sinai to deliver him His law (Ex.

Warren Wiersbe draws a connection between the earthquake that occurred during Jesus’ execution and the Sinai event, arguing that the earthquake at Calvary represented the fulfillment of the demands of the law in Christ.

Because of the earthquake, according to Stuart Weber, it symbolized “the magnitude of the ‘earth-shaking’ upheaval that had just taken place with the tearing of the iron curtain.” (From the Holman New Testament Commentary)

The Dead Raised

This is what happened: “Many bodies of saints who had fallen asleep were revived from their tombs,” according to the account (Matt. 27:52). The significance: It is believed that the earthquake was the catalyst for the opening of the tombs in this location. The miracle consisted of the resurrection of a large number of saints from the dead. These would have been saints from the Old Testament. This evidence of Jesus’ victory over death is shown through these resurrections. Their resurrection serves as a foretaste of what will occur at the end of time, namely the last resurrection of which Paul writes in 1 Thessalonians 4:16: “the dead in Christ shall rise from the grave” (see also 1 Cor.

As a result, they represent the hope that all believers have as a result of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Mike Livingstone works as a content editor for the Explore the Bible products offered by Lifeway.

Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 27:45-54 – New International Version

45From midday till three o’clock in the afternoon, darkness B)”>(B) descended upon the entire country. “Eli, Eli, lemasabachthani?,” Jesus called out in a loud voice at about 3 p.m., about three hours after the resurrection. (which translates as “My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?”) C)”>(C) Some of those there remarked, “He’s summoning Elijah,” as they realized what was happening. 48 As soon as they saw the sponge, one of them dashed to get it. He filled it with wine vinegar, D)”>(D)placed it on a stick, and gave it to Jesus as a cup of drinking water.

  • “Let’s see if Elijah shows up to save him.” 50And when Jesus cried out in a loud voice for the third time, he surrendered his spirit.
  • The ground trembled, and the rocks cracked.
  • Many pious persons who had died were brought back to life by the power of the Holy Spirit.
  • “Surely he was the Son of God!” they shouted as the centurion and those with him, who were guarding I)”>(I)Jesus, witnessed the earthquake and all that had taken place around them.
  • New International Version (NIV)Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 byBiblica, Inc.®Used with permission.

New International Version (NIV) All rights are retained around the world. The New International Version (NIV) Reverse Interlinear Bible provides translations from English to Hebrew and from English to Greek. Zondervan has copyright protection till the year 2019.

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What was the reason for Jesus’ death? From a historical standpoint, the solution appears to be obvious on the face of it. The Jewish leaders conspired against him, Judas betrayed him, Herod and Pilate tried him, and the Roman troops killed him on the order of the Emperor. His death was the result of the actions of a number of persons and organizations. ‘Wicked men put him to death by nailing him on the cross,’ says the gospel writer Luke (Acts 2:23). However, there is another point of view to consider.

In order to get to the essence of the question of why Jesus died, we must consider the situation from God’s perspective.

1. Jesus Died to Bring Us Near to God

For the first time in history, Christ died for sins, the righteous for the unjust, and thereby brought you closer to God. (See 1 Peter 3:18) The fact that Jesus died for the purpose of reconciling us to God means that we were a long distance from God previous to his death. As far as this is concerned, the apostles Paul and Peter agree: “You who were formerly a long distance off have been brought close through the blood of Christ” (Eph. 2:13). Our sin has to be dealt with in order for us to be brought closer to God: “Christ died for our sins” (1 Pet.

  1. When it comes to human disobedience and the repercussions of such disobedience, the Bible does not mince words.
  2. 7:11), while Paul writes in Romans 6:23 that “the wages of sin is death.” All people are guilty before God; our transgressions separate us from him, whose nature is characterized by pure holiness and unfailing justification.
  3. “Christ died for sins, the righteous for the unjust,” the Bible says, in order to bring us closer to God (1 Pet.
  4. If “the unjust” are all of us, then “the righteous” are none other than Jesus Christ.
  5. 5:21)—our sin—in order for us to experience compassion.
  6. Examples include Jesus paying the price for our salvation by “giving his life as a ransom in the place of many” (Luke 23:43).
  7. Jesus made us right with God by taking on our sins on his own body (1 Pet.

“Through the shedding of his blood, God offered Christ as a sacrifice of atonement,” according to Romans 3:25, so extinguishing God’s anger against our sinfulness.

Paul reminds us that Jesus’ death on the cross in our place was of the utmost significance and was carried out in line with the Scriptures (1 Cor.

In this way, his death satisfies the requirements of the old covenant offerings, including those for sin, Passover lamb, and the scapegoat on the Day of Atonement.

53:5).

The truth is that God sent his Son out of love, and the Son chose to lay down his life of his own volition: “God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself” (2 Cor.

As a result, all three persons of the Trinity are completely involved in our redemption: “Christ offered himself to God via the everlasting Spirit” (Christ offered himself to God through the eternal Spirit) (Heb.

9:14). According to Graham Cole, the Father is the architect of the atonement, the Son is the executor, and the Spirit is the applier of the atonement.

2. Jesus Died to Reveal God’s Character

It is not the case that we were completely ignorant of God before to Christ’s death. His providential care for the world indicates his affection for it. Furthermore, his promises to Abraham demonstrate his compassion for the entire world. However, it is at the cross that we witness the culmination of his agreements with Israel, as well as the last and dramatic demonstration of his love and justice. As stated in two passages from the book of Romans, God “demonstrates his own love for us in this: Christ died for us even while we were still sinners” (Rom.

  • God’s love for us is established beyond any reasonable question by Christ’s death.
  • would likewise generously give us all things” no matter what life throws our way (Rom.
  • Jesus also died in order to illustrate the justice of God: “God offered Christ as a sacrifice of atonement.
  • Our Lord’s death on the cross demonstrates not only his love, but also the severity with which he regards our sin.
  • He forgives us because he loves us.
  • We sense God’s love, but we also see the severity with which he views our sin when we look to the cross.

Boasting in the Cross

There are a plethora of different reasons why Jesus died. These include the conquest of evil, the establishment of the new covenant, and the setting of an example of self-sacrificial love for us. However, there are two key reasons for this: to bring us closer to God and to display God’s nature. What would have happened to us if God had not sent his Son to die in our place? We would be “darkened in our perception of God and estranged from the life of God” if the cross were not present (Eph. 4:18).

I’m inclined to develop another phrase: “Jesus’ death is for all time, not simply for the holiday of Easter.” According to Leon Morris, the cross “dominates the New Testament” in terms of its significance.

The cross of our Lord Jesus Christ is our only thing to boast about, and I pray that everyone of us would join Paul in declaring, “I will never boast about anything save the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Gal.

Crucifixion of Jesus – Bible Story

Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John are the four New Testament writings that contain the story of Jesus’ death on the cross; they are known as the Gospels. This Bible tale serves as a succinct summation of the salvation message of Jesus Christ. “From that time on, Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests, and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life,” according to Matthew, who wrote, “from that time on, Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests, and the teachers of the law, and As a result, Jesus saw that his death would be necessary as a sacrifice for the sins of mankind.

  • During the height of Jesus’ career and miracles, a large number of Jews came to believe that he was the Messiah and the Son of God.
  • Roman soldiers apprehended Jesus with the assistance of Judas Iscariot, and he was placed on trial for claiming to be the Jewish king, which he denied.
  • When it came to the penalty for Jesus, the Roman ruler Pontius Pilate was apprehensive about the idea.
  • Jesus was turned over to be beaten and whipped after Pilate washed his hands in front of a mob to demonstrate that he was not accepting responsibility for the slaughter that had taken place.

In addition to being forced to carry his cross along the walk to the hill where he would be killed, Jesus was also beaten with whips and whipping cords. The site of Jesus’ crucifixion is known as Calvary, which is derived from the Latin phrase meaning “a place of skull.”

Jesus on the Cross

Crowds had assembled to grieve and witness the death of Jesus. In addition to being nailed on the cross between two criminals, Jesus’ sides were wounded by a sword. After being mocked for a while, one of the convicts approached him and requested Jesus to remember him. Jesus answered by saying, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” “Forgive them, because they do not know what they are doing,” Jesus said as he raised his eyes to the heavens. When Jesus took his last breath, he said the following: “Father, I entrust my spirit into your capable hands.

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The Last Words of Jesus Christ on the Cross

1. According to Matthew 27:46, at around the ninth hour, Jesus cried out, “My God, my God, why have you deserted me?” 2. 2. “Father, please forgive them since they are completely unaware of what they are doing” (Luke 23:34). 3. I swear to you that from this day forward, you’ll be with me in paradise (Luke 23:43). 4. “Dear Lady, please accept this as your son!” “Here is your mother!” says the other. When Jesus saw His mother standing near the cross with the Apostle John, He committed the care of His mother to John’s care, saying, “I trust you to look after her.” (See also John 19:26–27.) 5.

  1. In this instance, Jesus was responding to the Messianic prophesy from Psalm 69:21, which stated, “They put gall in my food and vinegar in my thirst.” 6.
  2. ” (See John 19:30.) The mission that His Father had given Him to carry out, which included teaching the Gospel, performing miracles, and bringing His people back together, was successfully completed.
  3. 7.
  4. (Matthew 23:46) Jesus freely laid down his life for us.
  5. This was a terrible and difficult assignment, yet Jesus volunteered to take on the challenge.
  6. In the hands of those who crucified him, Jesus was not helpless; he was the only one who had the authority to put an end to his life.
  7. (Revelation 13:8).

It is still a heinous crime against humanity.

Death was visited upon the creator of life by nefarious men (Acts 2:23).

The death of Jesus was distinguished by extraordinary occurrences.

When Jesus took his last breath, the ground shook, the temple curtain broke in half from top to bottom, and the graves of saints were opened, their bodies being lifted from the grave.

The sin of mankind would necessitate the offering of a sacrifice.

The complete Bible account of the crucifixion can be found in the Scriptures listed below.

Read the entire narrative of Jesus’ crucifixion in the scriptural text below, as well as articles, videos, and audio sermons that are related to this moving story. Image courtesy of Getty Images/mbolina

5 Miraculous Things that Happened when Jesus Died on the Cross

It’s a good Friday. It was a watershed moment in history. Jesus died on the cross for our sins. This is for you. As well as me. There was no other way for the door to be opened for us to have a connection with God other than via the forgiveness of our own sin, which was accomplished by Christ’s sacrifice on our behalf. And it was a day of marvels, to say the least. During Jesus’ death on the cross, the following five miraculous events occurred: – “Darkness descended across the entire land.” 27:25 (Matthew 27:25) From 12 p.m.

  1. on Saturday, the sky were overcast.
  2. This was a really realistic depiction of the physical and spiritual darkness that may result from a lack of faith in Christ.
  3. – The Temple curtain, which protected the entrance to the Holy of Holies, the real dwelling place of God among the people, was ripped in half from top to bottom at the same time that Jesus took his final breath.
  4. Because of the sheer immensity of the veil, it would have been impossible for any person to separate it into two pieces.
  5. The ultimate sacrifice was made by Jesus, and as a result, the curtain, or division, was no longer required.
  6. Matt.
  7. A massive earthquake struck the region at the very moment Christ died on the cross.

The entire world cried out for the Savior’s death on the cross.

– Graves were opened, and the saints emerged, and following the resurrection, they appeared to a large number of people.

When Jesus died, the dead rose from their graves.

He reminds us once more that Christ’s final victory over death was a victorious one.

His victory over sin and death is unassailable!

As more people became aware of who Jesus truly was, the truth was exposed to them, and they could no longer deny it, ‘When the centurion and his companions, who were guarding Jesus, saw the earthquake and everything that had transpired, they were startled and said, ‘Surely he was the Son of God!” reads Matthew 27:54.

  1. The Truth had the ability to transform people’s lives.
  2. To provide new beginnings, fresh starts, forgiveness, and a sense of purpose.
  3. 10:9) That is all there is to it.
  4. The most compelling narrative that has ever been told This is an incredible sacrifice.
  5. Love that is extravagant.
  6. 2 Corinthians 9:15 Debbie McDaniel is a writer, a pastor’s wife, and the mother of three extraordinary children (and a lot of pets).

Join Debbie Webb McDaniel on Fresh Day Ahead’s Facebook page, Debbie Webb McDaniel, each morning for daily encouragement in living strong, free, and hope-filled lives. You may also find her on Twitter and Instagram.

When Did Jesus Die? The Year, Day & Time

There has been much speculation concerning the day and year of Christ’s crucifixion and death, owing to the absence of clear day-to-day linkage in the stories of the four Gospels. We know that Jesus died on Preparation Day because it is mentioned in each of the four Gospel narratives. But was it a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday when that happened? In addition, what hour did Jesus die? There has even been discussion over the year in which he passed away. To figure out the day of Jesus’ death on the cross, we must piece together the evidence from his four Gospels and our understanding of his historical period and cultural context.

Cultural Information to Keep in Mind

1. The gospel writers were more concerned with depicting Jesus as a person than they were with the precise chronology of his appearance. Dates have become increasingly important in today’s environment in order to provide proper news coverage. However, the Gospel authors were more concerned with the events themselves than they were with the precise date of the occurrences. They were attempting to introduce Jesus to a variety of audiences rather than providing a thorough biography. It was the day before the Sabbath that was designated as the Day of Preparation.

This is the day on which Jews prepared meals and completed all of the tasks that were prohibited from being completed on the Sabbath but that still needed to be completed.

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What the Gospels Say about Jesus’ Burial

The Gospel of Matthew contains the most detailed account of Jesus’ death and burial (Matthew 27:31-62). In this tale, we learn about Joseph, a wealthy man from Arimathea “who had himself become a follower of Jesus,” according to one piece (Matthew 27:57 b). In Matthew 27:58-61, it is said that Joseph approached Pilate and begged for permission to bury Jesus’ body. “The next day, the day after Preparation Day, the chief priests and the Pharisees went to Pilate,” we are told in Matthew 27:62. Joseph followed out this plan on Preparation Day.

In the Jewish calendar, it was Preparation Day (i.e., the day before the Sabbath).” (Matthew 15:42 a.) … Consequently, Joseph purchased some linen material, brought the corpse down from the casket, wrapped it in the linen, and buried it in a tomb dug into the rock.

Jesus died on the Day of Preparation, as confirmed by Luke and John: “Then he carried it down, wrapped it in linen fabric, and buried it in a tomb cut into the rock, in which no one had yet been lain.” As it happened, it was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was about to begin” (Luke 23:54).

As it happened, they placed Jesus there since it was the Jewish day of Preparation and because the tomb was close by (John 19:42).

What Day Did Jesus Die? Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday?

Over the years, academics have developed a variety of hypotheses about what occurred during the days of the week preceding up to Jesus’ death on the cross. These versions each offer a different day for Christ’s death, such as Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday.

  • Wednesday The fact that Jesus was crucified on a Wednesday permits for Him to have been buried for three full days and nights
  • Nevertheless, this also means that He resurrected on the fourth day. Furthermore, the Triumphal Entry would have taken place on Saturday, the day of Sabbath rest
  • Instead, it took place on Thursday. With a Thursday crucifixion, the Triumphal Entry is moved to Sunday, which makes more sense and removes the necessity for a “quiet day” (a day during thePassion Weekwhen no events were recorded). On the other hand, we know that the Pharisees hurried to put Jesus in the tomb on The Day of Preparation (John 19:34-42), which is Friday, and before the Sabbath began at nightfall (the Jews timed days from the beginning of the nightfall to the beginning of the nightfall). Upon closer examination of the facts, we find that Friday is the most consistent with the Gospel narratives and the historical context. According to the New Testament, Jesus rose from the grave on the third day—not necessarily after three complete, literal days—and was buried on the third day (e.g.,Matthew 16:21
  • Acts 10:40). As previously stated, Jesus had to be hustled inside the tomb on the day of preparation because of the crowds. In contrast to a Friday crucifixion, which would demand a “quiet day” (most likely Wednesday), this day gives the Sanhedrin the opportunity to make plans for Jesus’s arrest and following trials. As a result, the day is just “quiet” since we haven’t documented anything significant

What Time Did Jesus Die?

According to Matthew Henry’s interpretation, Jesus was nailed to the crucifixion between the third and sixth hours, which corresponds between nine and twelve o’clock in the morning. After then, he died shortly after the ninth hour, which was sometime between three and four o’clock in the afternoon. Commensurate with the aforementioned practice, the Jews throughout the time of Christ measured days from dusk to nightfall. The Matthew 27:46 KJV, which is the “ninth hour,” can be translated into the Matthew 27:46 NIV, which is the “three o’clock in the afternoon,” according to Bible experts.

Timing of Jesus Death in Mark, Luke, and John

  • The Gospel of Mark 15: 33:34, 37 “At midday, darkness descended across the entire region, lasting until three o’clock in the afternoon. Also, about three o’clock in the afternoon, Jesus said, “Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?” in an obnoxiously loud voice. (which translates as ‘My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?’). “Jesus breathed his last with a piercing scream.”
  • Matthew 23:44-46 ” It was now around midday, and darkness descended upon the entire region until three o’clock in the afternoon since the sun had ceased shining. And the temple’s curtain was split in two by the earthquake. I put my spirit into your hands,’ Jesus said with a resounding voice, calling out to the Father. At the moment he stated this, he exhaled his final breath.” (See also John 19:14-16.) “It was approximately midday on the day of Passover preparations, and it was the day of Passover preparations. ‘Your king has arrived,’ Pilate said to the Jews. They, on the other hand, cried out, “Take him away!” Take him away from me! ‘Put him to death!’ ‘Do you want me to crucify your king?’ Pilate was the one who inquired. ‘We do not have a monarch other than Caesar,’ the leading priests responded. Eventually, Pilate gave him over to them, and they crucified him.”
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What Year Did Jesus Die?

During this video, Doug Bookman, a New Testament professor at Shepherds Theological Seminary, shows why biblical academics have reached an agreement about the year Jesus died. “It all boils down to this. Pilate served as prefect of Judea and Samaria from 26 A.D. to 36 A.D., according to the evidence we have. So that’s our view out the window. The following question is: On what day of the week did Passover occur during the year that Jesus died? In the opinion of the majority, it occurred on Thursday or Friday.

Given all of this, the vast majority of researchers will agree that it leads to one of two conclusions: ” Theory 1: Jesus died about the year 30 A.D.

“At this point, the argument becomes pretty technical,” says Bookman of the situation.

I am convinced that the year 33 A.D.

3 Significant Events Shortly After Jesus’ Death

Matthew 27:51-54, Matthew 27:51-54 As a result of this, the temple’s curtain was split in half, from top to bottom. The ground trembled, the rocks cracked, and the tombs burst into flames. Many pious persons who had died were brought back to life by the power of the Holy Spirit. They emerged from the graves following Jesus’ resurrection and proceeded to the holy city, where they appeared to a large number of people. They were startled and cried, “Surely he was the Son of God!” when the centurion and others with him who were guarding Jesus witnessed the earthquake and everything that had transpired.

  • The temple curtain had been ripped in half.
  • We know from the laws of the Old Testament that entering God’s presence was a severe matter.
  • The fact that this curtain was destroyed represented the completion of Jesus Christ’s accomplished work on the cross, which eliminated the barrier between sinful humans and holy God by becoming the ultimate High Priest and the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of all people.
  • 2.
  • John Gill’s remark on the event states that “this was a demonstration of Christ’s authority over death and the tomb.” When Jesus rose from the dead on the third day after his death, he demonstrated that he had destroyed both the power of death and the permanence of the grave.
  • In addition to its grandiose claims, this event is noteworthy because it is a narrative predicting Christ’s second coming to collect the remainder of his people.
  • 3.

Jesus is brought back to life from the dead. This text in Matthew glosses over such a remarkable occurrence, but Christ’s resurrection is told in greater detail in Matthew 28, which is the gospel of Matthew (as well as inMark 16,Luke 24, andJohn 20). Photograph courtesy of Joshua Earle via Unsplash.

6 Facts Surrounding the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ

The crucifixion of Jesus Christ was the most horrible, agonizing, and shameful method of lethal punishment ever utilized in the ancient world, and it remains so to this day. Binding the victim’s hands and feet together with nails, and nailing the victim’s hands and feet together with nails, was this form of execution.

Crucifixion Definition and Facts

  • The word “crucifixion” (pronounced krü-se-fik-shen) derives from the Latin crucifixio, orcrucifixus, which literally translates as “attached on a cross. ” Crucification was a cruel type of torture and death in the ancient world that entailed tying someone to a tree or a wooden post with ropes or nails, and then hanging them from the tree or post. Preceding the actual crucifixion, convicts were subjected to torture including floggings, beatings, burning, racking, mutilation, and verbal abuse directed at the victim’s family. Crucifixion in the Roman tradition involved driving stakes into a person’s hands and feet before tying him or her to a wooden cross. The crucifixion was the method of execution employed by Jesus Christ.

History of Crucifixion

Although the crucifixion was considered to be one of the most shameful and painful ways of death in ancient times, it was also considered to be one of the most dreaded means of execution in ancient times. Extant records of crucifixions date back to prehistoric times, with the Persians most likely being the first to record them, before spreading to the Assyrians, Scythian, Carthaginian, Germanic, Celtic, and British cultures. Crucifixion, as a form of capital punishment, was reserved largely for traitors, captive armies, slaves, and the most heinous of offenders, among others.

Forms of Crucifixion

Although the crucifixion was considered to be one of the most shameful and painful ways of dying in ancient history, it was also considered to be one of the most dreaded means of execution in ancient history. Extant records of crucifixions date back to prehistoric times, with the Persians most likely being the first to record them, before spreading to the Assyrians, Scythian, Carthaginian, Germanic, Celtic, and British cultures. Historically, crucifixion as a form of death execution was reserved exclusively for traitors, captivity armies, slaves, and the most heinous offenders.

  • There are several types of cruxes: the simplex (one upright stake)
  • The commissa (a capital T-shaped structure)
  • The decussata (an X-shaped cross)
  • And the immissa (the well-known lower case t-shaped structure of Jesus’ crucifixion).

Bible Story Summary of Christ’s Crucifixion

Several biblical passages, including Matthew 27:27-56, Mark 15:21-38, Luke 23:26-49, and John 19:16-37 (all from the New International Version), describe Jesus Christ’s death on the Roman crucifixion. Christians believe that Christ’s death served as the perfect atonement for the sins of all humanity, which has resulted in the crucifix, also known as the cross, becoming one of the most recognized symbols of Christianity. As recounted in the Bible’s account of Jesus’ execution, the Jewish high council, known as the Sanhedrin, convicted Jesus of blasphemy and determined that he should be put to death.

  1. Jesus was brought before Pontius Pilate, the Roman ruler, who determined that he was innocent.
  2. Jesus was ordered to be executed by the Sanhedrin; thus, Pilate, fearing the Jews, handed Jesus over to one of his centurions to carry out the death sentence.
  3. On his head was a crown of thorns, which he refused to take off.
  4. Jesus was given a concoction of vinegar, gall, and myrrh, but he turned down the offer.

A cross was erected on which Jesus was crucified between two criminals, and stakes were hammered through his wrists and ankles to secure him to the structure. “The King of the Jews,” according to the inscription on the wall over his head.

Timeline of Jesus’ Death by Crucifixion

From roughly 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., Jesus hung on the cross for approximately six hours. People were passing by yelling obscenities and scoffing as soldiers cast lots for Jesus’ garments during this time. When Jesus ascended to the cross, he addressed his mother Mary and the disciple John. “My God, my God, why have You left Me?” he screamed out to his father as well. At that point, the entire landscape was enveloped in darkness. Soon after, as Jesus took his final excruciating breath, an earthquake struck the Earth, tearing the temple curtain in two from top to bottom, shattering it.

The tombs were opened, and the bodies of many holy individuals who had died were brought back to life by the might of God.” In order to demonstrate mercy, it was customary for Roman troops to break the criminal’s legs, so speeding up the process of execution.

Rather than shattering his legs, they punctured his side with a knife.

Good Friday – Remembering the Crucifixion

Christians celebrate the passion, or suffering, and death of Jesus Christ on the cross on Good Friday, the Friday before Easter, which is observed on the Friday before Easter. Many Christians spend this day in fasting, prayer, repentance, and contemplation of Christ’s anguish on the cross, among other things.

Sources

  • Crucifixion. The Lexham Bible Dictionary (p. 368)
  • The Crucifixion (p. 368)
  • The Lexham Bible Dictionary (p. 368)

7 Clues Tell Us *Precisely* When Jesus Died (the Year, Month, Day, and Hour Revealed)

When it comes to the killing of Jesus, how detailed can we be? Is it possible to pinpoint the precise date? We are in the midst of our yearly commemoration of Jesus’ death and resurrection, which began on Easter Sunday. All of us are aware that something like this occurred in Jerusalem during the first century. That distinguishes Jesus from mythological pagan deities, who were said to have lived in places and at times that no one could pinpoint precisely. When it comes to the killing of Jesus, how detailed can we be?

We have the ability to do so.

Clue1: The High Priesthood of Caiaphas

According to the gospels, Jesus was executed at the behest of Caiaphas, a high priest from the first century who was known for his ruthlessness (Matthew 26:3-4,John 11:49-53). Based on previous accounts, we know that he served as high priest from 18 to 36 A.D., which places Jesus’ death at that time period. However, we may be a little more particular. There’s a lot more.

Clue2: The Governorship of Pontius Pilate

All four gospels agree that Jesus was killed on Pontius Pilate’s orders, according to the New Testament (Matthew 27:24-26,Mark 15:15,Luke 23:24,John 19:15-16). Due to information from other sources, we know when he served as governor of Judea — from A.D. 26 to 36 — and hence can restrict the time period down by several years. Nevertheless, how are we going to narrow the scope to a single day and year?

Clue3: After “the Fifteenth Year of Tiberius Caesar”

The beginning of John the Baptist’s ministry is specified in the Gospel of Luke as follows: In the fifteenth year of Tiberius Caesar’s reign.the word of God came to John the son of Zechariah in the desert, where he remained for forty days. This specifies a certain year, namely A.D. 29. Because all four gospels represent Christ’s ministry beginning after that of John the Baptist (Matthew 3, Mark 1, Luke 3, and John 1), we may trim a few more years off our estimated time frame for his birth.

The death of Christ has to take place within a seven-year time span: between A.D. 29 and A.D. 36.

Clue4: Crucified on a Friday

There is unanimous agreement among the four gospels that Jesus was crucified on a Friday (Matthew 27:62, Mark 15:42, Luke 23:54, and John 19:42), immediately before a Sabbath, which was just before the first day of the week (Luke 23:54; John 19:42). (Matthew 28:1,Mark 16:2,Luke 24:1,John 20:1). Due to the fact that Friday was designated as “the day of preparation,” we know it was a Friday. This means that it was the day on which Jews made the preparations they required for the Sabbath, as they were not permitted to work on that day.

  1. According to the Jewish Encyclopedia: Friday is referred to as ‘Ereb Shabbat’ since it is the day before Shabbat (The Eve of Sabbath).
  2. In Josephus’ Antiquitiesxvi.
  3. The day is referred to as “Yoma da-‘Arubta” in Yer.
  4. 1 of the Jewish calendar (Day of Preparation).
  5. 29 and 36, despite the fact that six days of the week were eliminated.

Clue5: A Friday at Passover

It is also agreed upon by the gospel writers that Jesus was crucified in connection with the yearly festival of Passover (Matthew 26:2,Mark 14:1,Luke 22:1,John 18:39). We get into a slight snag here since the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke characterize the Last Supper on Holy Thursday as a Passover feast (Matthew 26:19,Mark 14:14,Luke 22:15). That would imply that Good Friday occurred the day after Passover was observed. On the other hand, while recounting the morning of Good Friday, John makes it clear that the Jewish rulers had not yet eaten the Passover meal.

  • It was still early in the morning.
  • As a result, Pilate walked out to meet them.
  • There are a variety of options for dealing with this situation.
  • Another possibility is that Jesus simply moved the date of the Passover celebration for him and his disciples forward a few days.
  • In the event that he announces, “We’re celebrating Passover today,” and it happens to be a day earlier than most people are used to, they would just accept it.
  • No matter what Jesus’ movement did, we may use John’s remark about the kidnappers of Jesus to determine what the Jewish authorities or mainstream Judaism were like in those days: They were beginning their Passover celebrations on Friday evening, which is what we would call Friday.

Because of this, we can reduce the range of probable dates down to only a handful. The following is a comprehensive list of the days between A.D. 29 and 36 on which Passover began in the evening:

  • Monday, April 18, the year 29
  • Friday, April 7, the year 30
  • Tuesday, March 27, the year 31
  • Monday, April 14, the year 32
  • Friday, April 3, the year 33
  • Wednesday, March 24, the year 34
  • Tuesday, April 12, the year 35
  • And Saturday, March 31, the year 36
See also:  What Does The Blood Of Jesus Do For Us?

As you can see, there are just two candidates remaining on the table: Jesus was crucified on either April 7th, A.D. 30 or April 3rd, A.D. 33, depending on the source. Which one was it, exactly? The year A.D. 33 is generally accepted as the date. There are a significant number of people that support the A.D. 30 date in today’s world. Do the gospels provide us the option of choosing between the two?

Clue6: John’s Three Passovers

During Jesus’ career, the Gospel of John mentions three separate Passovers: the first, the second, and the third.

  • Jesus’ first public appearance was during the Passover Seder, which was described in John 2:13, towards the beginning of his career. 2nd Passover: This event is mentioned in John 6:4 and takes place in the midst of Jesus’ career. Passover3: This is mentioned in John 11:55 (and has been referenced several times thereafter), and it occurs near the conclusion of Jesus’ career.

That implies that Jesus’ ministry had to have lasted at least a couple of years longer than that. An in-depth examination would disclose that it lasted around three and a half years; yet, even if we believe that it began immediately before Passover1, the inclusion of two additional Passovers demonstrates that it lasted at the very least more than two years. That indicates the A.D. 30 deadline has passed. A ministry of at least two years cannot be accommodated in the period available between the fifteenth year of Tiberius Caesar (A.D.

The numbers don’t add up in this case.

Is it possible to be any more specific?

Clue7: “The Ninth Hour”

Jesus died about “the ninth hour,” according to the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke (Matthew 27:45-50,Mark 15:34-37,Luke 23:44-46). The “ninth hour” is what we would regard to as 3:00 p.m. in our modern day. This permits us to narrow down the time of Jesus’ death to a very particular point in history: approximately 3:00 p.m. on Friday, April 3, A.D. 33, on the third day of the first month of the first century. Of course, there are a slew of thorough counter-arguments that I haven’t had time to address in this article.

This is the exact moment it occurred.

What Now?

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The original version of this item published on April 10, 2013, at the Register.

Why did Jesus have to die on the cross?

Ultimately, God is the source of all life; He is light, and there is absolutely no darkness in Him.

In 1 John 1:5, the Bible says Satan is God’s polar opposite, whose domain is comprised of darkness and sin. God made it crystal plain from the beginning that sin will result in death. (Genesis 2:17; Romans 6:23; Revelation 21:5)

Sin separates us from God

When Satan, via his cunning, managed to trick Eve and, in turn, Adam into disobeying God, sin entered their nature. This sin, like a curtain, stood between them and God, isolating them from the source of their being. They were spiritually dead in their trespasses and sins, to put it another way. Paul writes in Ephesians 2:10 that As a result of sin entering the planet, which had been cursed, the physical death of all living beings had become inevitable. The sin that crept into Adam and Eve’s essence was handed on to all of their children and grandchildren.

  1. In following this disposition, such as when we are tempted, we will commit sin on our own behalf.
  2. Unfortunately, individuals were exceedingly weak, and not a single person was ever able to keep themselves completely free of sin.
  3. In other words, everyone was guilty, and Satan might use this as a letter of accusation against them, pleading with them to commit suicide.
  4. Anyone who crossed that curtain would perish instantaneously, for no sin could be tolerated in the face of the Almighty.

Forgiveness through sacrifice

God, in His patience, provided the people with a second chance: they might obtain forgiveness by offering an animal that was free of blemishes. Only once a year was it possible for the high priest to enter the Holiest of Holies, bringing the blood of the sacrifice, in order to receive atonement on behalf of the congregation. The debt of sin could be settled only by the shedding of the blood of an innocent sacrifice, according to the Bible. (See Leviticus 17:11 and Hebrews 9:22 for examples.) Blood from animals, on the other hand, was unable to remove the main source of the problem, which was sin in human nature.

Even the high priest couldn’t assist them since he was a sinner himself, and the sacrifice was intended for his own benefit as well as the benefit of the people.

His deepest desire was to be in connection with others and to save them from themselves.

However, despite the fact that there have been virtuous, God-fearing people throughout history, none of them were without fault, and none of them were able to “bridge the gap” that exists between God and humans.

As a result, God sent His own Son to complete the greatest endeavor ever accomplished in human history. According to the Scriptures (Ezekiel 22:30; Isaiah 41:28; Isaiah 60:16; Isaiah 63:5, John 3:16-17),

Jesus: a human being in every sense of the word

However, even though He had been revealed as the Son of God, Jesus freely “emptied Himself” and took on the nature of a human being in every meaning of the term, sharing the same human nature as the rest of us. This implied that Jesus was subjected to the same temptations as we are. However, Jesus was also born of God’s Spirit, and this Spirit remained with Him throughout His life, providing Him with the power to complete the mission He was sent to do. According to the Bible (Luke 1:30-35; Philippians 2:5-8; Isaiah 61:1-3) “And when He was found in human form, He humbled Himself and became submissive to the point of death, even death on the cross,” the Bible says.

  1. While still a man, Jesus had to learn obedience since He possessed His own self-will, also known as sin in the flesh, and was tempted by Satan in the wilderness.
  2. Consequently, He had never sinned and was thus without sin.
  3. He was misunderstood by practically all of His contemporaries, however, since the victory over sin was taking place in His inner character, which was concealed from the eyes of the world.
  4. The pure, righteous, and faultless Man died as a criminal, sentenced to death for offenses he had done but had not acknowledged.

Atonement – and a way to follow

Because Jesus was blameless, the only human being in all of history who was fully pure and without sin, he was the only one who could “stand in the gap,” the only one on whom Satan had no claim because Jesus was faultless. In the end, he was the only one who had not merited death, whether it was physical or psychological. However, in order to accomplish the mission for which He had come to earth, Jesus deliberately gave Himself. In order to be the ultimate, faultless sacrifice, Christ was crucified.

  1. He took the punishment for all of our crimes and died on the cross, the just for the unjust, for us.
  2. 5:10; 2 Corinthians 5:21; 1 Peter 3:18) Not only did He die a bodily death, but He also endured a spiritual death as He hung on the cross, separating Him from the Father.
  3. Despite the fact that Jesus’ death on the cross on Calvary is unquestionably one of the most monumental and profound events in human history, it is essentially only a portion of the Christian tale.
  4. This way, the sin that was present in His flesh was condemned, and He “put it to death,” “crucifying” the lusts and desires that were present in Him.
  5. (See also Hebrews 2:18 and Hebrews 4:16) At the moment of His death on the cross, Jesus said, “It is completed!” As at that moment, every single speck of the sin He had inherited in His human nature had been crucified with Him, and His mission on earth had come to a close.
  6. The obligation had been paid in full, and the path back to the Father was now unobstructed.
  7. In fact, he did not remain in the tomb, but was raised from the dead in a glorified body that included the entire richness of God’s own divine nature.

He ascended to heaven forty days later, where He is now seated at the right hand of His Father, as He has done since then. 2:5-11; Colossians 2:9; Philippians 2:5-11)

Jesus’ brothers!

So, how did Jesus’ crucifixion and sacrifice differ from the sacrifices and forgiveness that were offered under the Law of Moses? What is the mechanism by which Jesus’ death on the cross removes the sin from our flesh? Why do we continue to be tempted? This is due to the fact that forgiveness alone was not the final objective of Jesus’ life, and it is therefore not the ultimate goal of a Christian. In reality, forgiving someone is merely the beginning of the process. “If anyone want to come after Me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily, and follow Me,” Jesus stated emphatically in the Gospel of Matthew.

Jesus’ mission was not only to atone for people’s sins, but also to teach them how to live better lives.

We may not be able to follow Him to the cross on Calvary, but we may pick up our cross on a regular basis!

Also in the flesh, we crucify the flesh with its lusts and wants, we put to death the “deeds of the body” by God’s Spirit, and we stop from sin.

The death of Jesus on the crucifixion of Calvary was the conclusion of His magnificent labour of love for us humans (see 1 Peter 4:1-2; Galatians 5:24; Romans 8:13; 1 Corinthians 12:12-14; Hebrews 2:11; 2 Peter 1:2-4).

Death was defeated by Jesus as a result of his death over sin.

May His sacrifice not be in vain, and may He have a large number of disciples who are not ashamed to refer to themselves as His brothers!

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