What Happened When Jesus Went To Hell?

Did Jesus go to hell between His death and resurrection?

One popular belief is that Jesus spent the period between his death on the cross and his resurrection in hell.This is contrary to biblical evidence.A provision in the Apostles’ Creed has added to the complexity of the situation (which is not part of the Bible).According to the belief, ″He plunged into hell.″.

Is it true that Jesus went to the location of pain and torment known as ″hell″ on the cross?First, let’s take a look at the scriptures that have been cited to support the notion that Jesus did really enter hell following His death on the cross.According to Ephesians 4:8-10, ″Therefore, it states that when he ascended to the highest point, he commanded an army of prisoners and bestowed gifts on mankind.’He ascended,’ what else could it possibly mean except that he had also sunk into the lower parts of the earth?This descendant is the one who likewise soared far above all the heavens in order to be able to fill all things with his glory.″ These verses are a direct quotation from Psalm 68:18.The source of the disagreement is the location of Jesus’ descent from the cross.

Is it more likely that He descended to hell or to the earth?The English Standard Version (ESV) includes a literal translation, ″the lowest parts, the earth,″ to help clarify this contrast.According to the scripture, Jesus descended to the world (at His Incarnation).The scripture does not imply that Jesus went to hell on the cross.Another verse is Psalm 16:10-11, which reads as follows: ″You will not abandon my soul to Sheol, nor will you allow your holy one to be corrupted, because you love me.

  • You reveal to me the road that I should take in life.″ It has been suggested that this text refers to Jesus’ entrance into hell (Sheol) prior to His resurrection.
  • A big part of this interpretation might be attributed to the King James Version, which refers to Sheol as ″hell″ in this particular text.
  • The Hebrew term sheol, on the other hand, refers to the grave as a whole, rather than a specific location inside the afterlife.
  • Similarly to Jonah’s journey to the belly of the whale, Jesus declares in Matthew 12:40 that He will travel ″to the very center of the earth.″ However, in this instance, Jesus was referring to death or the grave rather than a specific destination in the afterlife.
  • To assert that this has anything to do with Jesus going to hell is to take the parallel too far.
  • The verse 1 Peter 3:18-20 is a last passage that is frequently used in this discussion: Because Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God, having been killed in the flesh but made alive in the spirit, in which he went and proclaimed to the spirits in prison, because they had previously refused to obey, while God’s patience waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared, in which a few, that is, eight persons were brought safely through water.″ Some believe that Jesus is speaking to human beings in hell after His death on the cross, and that this is the case.

Others believe it relates to Christ’s spirit appearing during the days of Noah to warn Noah and his family of coming judgment and to give redemption to Noah and his family, like in the story of Noah and his family.Rather than referring to Satan, it is more likely that Christ is announcing His triumph over the evil spirits that are imprisoned in the abyss (see Luke 8:31; Jude 1:6; Revelation 9:11).The words of Jesus Himself refute the notion that Jesus was crucified and sent into hell.″It is completed!″ Jesus said as he hung on the cross (John 19:30).His agony had come to an end, and he no longer needed to make any more sacrifices in order to be saved.

  1. Just before His death, Jesus also prayed to the Father, saying ″Father, into your hands I submit my spirit″ (Luke 23:46).
  2. Instead of going to hell, His spirit was taken to the Father when He died.
  3. Furthermore, while on the cross, Jesus promised the thief that they would be reunited in paradise today (Luke 23:43).
  4. This would not have been possible if Jesus had not spent three days in hell prior to his resurrection.

Despite the fact that the sentence ″He fell into hell″ in the Apostles’ Creed was well-intentioned, it has become so contentious that some denominations consider it optional or even delete that piece of the creed altogether.Despite the fact that Jesus’ corpse was in the grave for three days, He did not perish in hell.Truths that are related: What happened to Jesus during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection?Was Jesus a sinless being?What are some of the reasons why I should believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ?

What is it about the actuality of Jesus’ physical resurrection that is so important to the Christian faith?What is the significance of the ascension of Jesus Christ?Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

Christ’s Descent into Hell

Many individuals have taught throughout church history that Jesus’ spirit fell into hell following His death on the cross, and this has been a popular belief for centuries.Most of those who have taught that Jesus’ spirit went to hell after His death have done so on the basis of Ephesians 4:8–10 and 1 Peter 3:18–20, and they have claimed that He went there to pronounce judgment on sinners and/or to rescue the saints of the Old Testament.In today’s world, many members of the heretical Word of Faith organization believe that the crucifixion was inadequate to atone for our sins and that Jesus additionally had to endure three days of pain and torture in hell.In order to be faithful to all of the Scriptures, we must, nevertheless, reject that Jesus’ spirit was expelled to Hell when He died.

The first time Jesus spoke to a repentant thief on the cross, he assured him that he would be with Christ in Paradise on the same day of their crucifixion (Luke 23:39–43).Second, nowhere in Ephesians 4:8–10 does it indicate that Jesus fell into hell; Paul is referring exclusively to the fact that Christ entered into death.Third, 1 Peter 3:18–20 most certainly refers to the Son of God speaking to the people of Noah’s day by the power of the Holy Spirit, according to the context.Finally, on the cross, Jesus brought His atoning work to a close.The concept of propitiation, or the turning aside of the Lord’s anger, is exclusively mentioned in the New Testament in connection with Jesus’ death on the cross (Rom.3:25; Heb.

2:17; 9:1–10:18; 1 John 2:2; 4:10; 5:6–11).More to the point, our Savior’s final words from the cross were, ″It is finished″ (John 19:30).When He died, He considered His mission accomplished.Although Jesus’ spirit was never sent into hell, on the cross He bore the entire brunt of God’s wrath, which is poured out in hell.In fact, the scourgings of the guards, the nails driven into the palms of Christ’s hands, and the severe bodily suffering Jesus endured were all manifestations of God’s anger.

  • But the most extreme suffering Christ faced was spiritual in nature: the hopelessness of being cast out of His Father’s presence and the agony of facing God’s wrath for the sins of His people were the most painful experiences Christ went through (Mark 15:34).
  • ″After explaining what Christ endured in the sight of men, the Creed appropriately adds the invisible and incomprehensible judgment which he endured before God, to teach us that not only was the body of Christ given up as the price of redemption, but that there was a greater and more excellent price — that he bore in his soul the tortures of a condemned and ruined man,″ writes John Calvin (Institutes 2.16.10).

Coram Deo

The sin against an infinite entity necessitates the imposition of an endless punishment in hell.The endless torment that impenitent sinners would never be able to exhaust even after an eternity in hell was experienced and expended by Jesus in a matter of hours.As the Son of God, He has the ability to do this since He is an infinite entity in his divinity as the Son of God.However, as the Heidelberg Catechism declares, it does guarantee us that we have been entirely liberated from the pain and torture of hell by faith in Jesus Christ (Q&A 44).

Did Jesus Descend to Hell Between His Death and Resurrection?

We know from Jesus’ response to the thief that when someone dies, they are instantly brought into the presence of the Father.″Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,″ says Jesus in Luke 23:42.″Truly I tell to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.″ This remark also informs us that Jesus died and was resurrected by His Father.We don’t know much more than that regarding Jesus’ whereabouts throughout those three days.

It’s important not to read too much into a parable or narrative, as this might lead to confusion.″What occurred after Jesus died?″ by Randy Alcorn is the subject of the following passage.

Did Jesus Descend to Hell? Bible Verses for this Theory

1 Peter 3:18-20 is the scripture of Scripture most frequently cited by people who believe in the existence of hell.In order to bring us to God, Christ had to die in our place in order to be raised from the dead in the spirit, after having been put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit; through which He also went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who had once been disobedient, while the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight people were brought safely through the water.″ ″In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,″ they say, referring to the verses in question.According to legend, Jesus descended into Hell and preached to the souls of the damned.But why is this so?

There is no indication in the Bible that a lost soul who has died receives a second opportunity at redemption.Is it possible that Jesus went to hell just to punish the lost souls even more?However, there is another reading of this verse that is more logical.Here’s where you can get your FREE Holy Week Guide.You may have daily words of encouragement emailed to your inbox.

Interpreting the Scripture

Jesus was crucified in the body, yet he was raised to life by the Holy Spirit after his death.The term ″brought alive″ is a passive verb, which means that someone other than Jesus was responsible for bringing Jesus back to life.Either Jesus was brought back to life by the Spirit, or He was brought back to life by His spirit.Regardless of the outcome, the Spirit must have had a role.

The chapter then goes on to tell us who these souls in prison are: they are those who did not listen to Noah (who was preaching repentance to the world in the power of the Holy Spirit under the direction of God at the time of his imprisonment).As a result, the same Spirit who raised Jesus as a testament ″in order that He may bring us to God″ also spoke to those souls who are now in jail in Noah’s day; and they are in prison because they did not listen to the preaching when it was being given to them at the time.However, just eight persons heeded the warning and were saved—″brought safely through the floodwaters″ The term ″jail″ is used in a metaphorical sense.It is said in Luke 16:26 that lost spirits are withdrawn and restrained, and this is supported by the Bible: Furthermore, a wide gap has been established between us and you, in order that anyone who seek to pass over from here into you will not be able to do so, and that none who wish to cross over from there will be able to do so.″ Jesus did not go to hell for those three days, according to the Bible, which is not mentioned anywhere else.In actuality, virtually little is said about what transpired during the event.Most people believe Jesus’ physical body stayed in the tomb, just as ours will remain in the grave once we die.

In Colossians 1:18, Paul writes that He was taken up to be with the Father, and three days later the Spirit resurrected His body (in the same manner that our bodies will be raised—as the first-born from the dead, as well).The distinction is that God did not allow Jesus’ body to degrade like other people’s bodies did.

Other Bible Verses about Jesus’ Descent to Hell

Other Bible scriptures, such as Romans 10:6-7, Ephesians 4:8-9, and Acts 2:27, that are used to support the belief that Jesus went to hell between his crucifixion and resurrection have caused consternation among believers.However, as discussed in this ZondervanAcademic.com article, these verses are frequently taken out of context and given meaning that is not intended by the author.The Apostle’s Creed was later amended to include the phrase ″and he fell into hell.″ During his video, Did Jesus Descend into Hell Before He Was Resurrected?, Garrett Kell addressed this question.Adapted from ″What occurred after Jesus died?″ by Randy Alcorn, Eternal Perspective Ministries, 39085 Pioneer Blvd., Suite 206, Sandy, OR 97055, 503-668-5200, CC BY-SA 2.0.

What happened when jesus went to hell

Why did Jesus descend to hell the dead?

According to the traditional view, Christ descended into hell as a victorious king in order to declare to the saints who had died before him that he had triumphed over sin, death, and the devil.

What happened 3 days after Jesus was crucified?

Following the first two days, he will restore us, and on the third day, he will bring us to life so that we may live before him.″

What happen to Jesus after 40 days of rising from the dead?

DR. N.G.: DEAR N.G.: Jesus appeared to His followers on a number of occasions over a period of 40 days following His resurrection, after which He miraculously ascended into the presence of God, according to the Bible. ″He was snatched up before their own eyes, and a cloud concealed him from their sight,″ according to the Bible (Acts 1:9).

When was hell invented?

The view of hell offered by St.Augustine set the tone for official teaching for the next 1,500 years to come.However, it was Augustine of Hippo and his book, City of God, which was published in A.D.426 and set the tone for official teaching for the following 1,500 years.

Augustine was born in Hippo and died in Rome.He maintained that Hell did not exist to rehabilitate or discourage sinners, but rather to punish them.

How long did Jesus stay in hell?

Christ states that he was dead on the third day (Greek egenomen nekros v, Latin fui mortuus) of the three days of his life.

Where is Hell located?

Tartarus, sometimes known as Tartaros (Greek o, deep place), is a character from classical Greek mythology who exists under Heaven, Earth, and Pontus. As a region of agony and sorrow, it might be described as a dark and foreboding cavern or pit, which is located within Hades (the entire underworld), with Tartarus serving as the hellish component of the cavern.

Who did Jesus raise from the dead?

It is only in the Gospel of John (John 11: 1–44) that Jesus performs a miracle, in which he raises Lazarus of Bethany from the dead, four days after his entombment. This miracle is the only one recorded in the New Testament.

See also:  When Did Jesus Died

How was Jesus resurrected?

‘The Son of Man must be thrown into the hands of sinners, be crucified, and on the third day be risen again,’ he told you while he was still with you in Galilee (Luke 24:5–7). They then returned to Jesus’ apostles and other members of the community to inform them that Jesus had been raised from the dead.

Is Jesus a God?

The first Christians believed that Jesus was a human person who had been transformed into Deity – a god – a divine entity via the work of the Holy Spirit.Later, they came to the conclusion that Jesus was born of a union between God and a human because the Holy Spirit descended upon Mary and that is how she conceived Jesus, meaning that Jesus literally had God as his father from the beginning of his life.

Why is 40 days after death?

Christianity’s founding fathers held that Jesus was a human person who was elevated to the status of God, and hence to the status of a divine entity.Later, they came to the conclusion that Jesus was born of a union between God and a human because the Holy Spirit descended upon Mary and that is how she conceived Jesus, meaning that Jesus literally had God as his father from the beginning of the story.

What day did Jesus die and rise again?

Following the contrast between the synoptic date of Jesus’ last Passover, on the one hand, and John’s subsequent ″Jewish Passover,″ on the other, recent astronomical research proposes Jesus’ Last Supper occurred on Wednesday, 1 April AD 33 and the crucifixion occurred on Friday, 3 April AD 33 and the Resurrection occurred on Sunday, 4 April AD 33.

Who did Jesus appear to during the 40 days?

Cleopas and an unidentified disciple on the walk to Emmaus, Peter (as recounted by the other apostles), and the eleven surviving disciples at a meeting with others are all shown in Luke.

Is hell a place on Earth?

Thousands of years ago, the Bible detailed a region named Hell located deep inside the earth’s core that corresponds closely to what science is currently uncovering. YES! It’s true, there’s a place called Hell. There are millions of lost and tormented souls howling and burning in the depths of this planet at this very time, with no hope in sight!

Who created God?

Defence of religion advocates argue that the question is inappropriate: As a result, we ask: ″If everything had a creator, then who created God?″ Given the fact that only created things have a creator, it would be incorrect to put God in with his creations. God has shown himself to us in the Bible as having existed from the beginning of time.

Who is the king of hell?

Asmodeus (Dungeons & Dragons), a fictional character from Dungeons & Dragons who holds the title ″King of Hell″ Simon Luttrell, 1st Earl of Carhampton, who was nicknamed ″King of Hell″ Crowley (Supernatural), a fictional character from Supernatural, who held the title ″King of Hell″ Asmodeus (Supernatural), a fictional character from Supernatural, who held the title ″King of Hell″

Did Jesus go to hell between His death and resurrection?

Answer to the question Currently, there is a considerable degree of uncertainty around this subject.According to the Apostles’ Creed, which declares, ″He descended into hell,″ the belief that Jesus went to hell after His death on the cross is essentially derived from this verse.The Bible contains several passages in which Jesus is described as going to ″hell,″ depending on how the passages are interpreted.Prior to delving into this topic, it is critical to grasp what the Bible has to say regarding the realm of the dead.

Sheol is the word used in the Hebrew Scriptures to represent the realm of the dead.In the English translation, sheol means ″hell.″ For the most part, it refers to ″the place of the dead″ or ″the place of departed souls or spirits.″ The Greek word for sheol in the New Testament is hades, which means ″the place of the dead″ and also means ″the place of the living.″ Sheol/hades, according to other passages in the New Testament, is a transitory realm where souls are held while they await the final resurrection and judgment.The book of Revelation 20:11–15 makes a clear contrast between the lake of fire and the pit of hades.The lake of fire serves as a permanent and ultimate repository for the souls of the dead.As a result, Hades is just a temporary residence.Many people refer to both hades and the lake of fire as ″hell,″ which can lead to a lot of misunderstanding.

After His death, Jesus did not go to a realm of agony, but He did travel to a region known as hades.As described in Matthew 11:23–18, Luke 10:15–16:23, and Acts 2:27–31, sheol/hades was a realm divided into two divisions—a region of blessing and a place of condemnation.In the Bible, both the abodes of the saved and the abodes of the lost are commonly referred to as ″hades.″ In Luke 16:22, the home of the rescued is referred to as ″Abraham’s bosom″ (KJV) or ″Abraham’s side″ (NIV), while in Luke 23:43, it is referred to as ″paradise.″ In Luke 16:23, the dwelling of the unsaved is referred to as ″hell″ (in the King James Version) or ″Hades″ (in the New International Version).The abodes of the rescued and the abodes of the lost are divided by a ″huge gap″ (or abyss in Hebrew) (Luke 16:26).In the event of Jesus’ death, he was taken to the blessed side of sheol and, from there, He was taken with the believers to heaven (Ephesians 4:8–10).

  • The aspect of sheol/hades that deals with judgment has remained constant.
  • All of the unbelieving dead are deposited there, where they will await their final judgment in the future.
  • Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell?
  • According to Ephesians 4:8–10 and 1 Peter 3:18–20, the answer is yes.
  • Some of the misunderstanding has originated from texts such as Psalm 16:10–11, which is translated as follows in the King James Version: ″For thou wilt not abandon my soul to the depths of hell; nor wilt thou allow thine Holy One to be corrupted….
  • Thou wilt teach me the way to eternal life.″ In this passage, the word ″hell″ is not a proper translation.

The term ″the grave″ or ″sheol″ would be a more accurate translation.″Today you will be with me in paradise,″ Jesus said to the thief who stood behind Him in Luke 23:43; He did not say, ″Today you will be with me in hell.″ Although Jesus’ physical corpse remained in the tomb, his soul/spirit was taken to dwell with the blessed in sheol/hell.As a result, in various editions of the Bible, translators are not consistent or accurate in their rendering of the Hebrew and Greek terminology for the afterlife, hell, and the afterlife after death.Some believe that Jesus went to ″hell,″ or the suffering side of sheol/hades, in order to be tormented much more severely for our crimes than he already had been.This is a profoundly unbiblical notion to have.

  1. It was the death of Jesus on the cross that was adequate to secure our redemption and save us from our sin.
  2. It was His spilt blood that was the means by which we were cleansed from sin (1 John 1:7–9).
  3. As He hung there on the cross, He took on Himself the sins of the entire human race and bore them upon Himself.
  4. His sacrifice for us was sin: ″God caused him who had no sin to be sin for us, in order that through him we could become the righteousness of God″ (2 Corinthians 5:21).

When we appreciate Christ’s anguish in the garden of Gethsemane, we may better understand the cup of sin that will be poured out on Him at the cross.As Jesus was on the verge of death, He said, ″It is completed″ (John 19:30).We were able to put an end to his agony in our place.His soul/spirit was sent to Hades (the place of the dead).Jesus did not go to ″hell″ or to the suffering side of hades; rather, He went to ″Abraham’s side,″ or the good side of hades, as the Bible says.

Jesus’ agony came to an end at the time of His death.The debt owed for sin was satisfied.He then anticipated the resurrection of His body and His ascension into glory, both of which would occur at the same time.Is it true that Jesus went to hell?No.Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell?

Yes.Return to the previous page: Questions concerning the deity of Jesus Christ Is it possible that Jesus spent time in hell between His death and resurrection?

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When Jesus Stormed the Gates of Hell: The Forgotten Events of Holy Saturday –

Good Friday is well-known for its significance: it is the day on which we commemorate Jesus’ death on the cross in order to atone for our sins.The same is true of Easter Sunday, when everyone understands that we are commemorating his resurrection from the grave in victory over death.What about Holy Saturday, on the other hand?While his followers waited for him, Jesus was engaged in some of the most dramatic and crucial labor of his messianic mission – work that brought him all the way to the depths of the underworld.

What’s going on?Is it true that Jesus went to hell?In the old Apostles’ Creed, it’s right there: ″…was crucified, died, and was buried; he went into hell; on the third day, he arose from the dead…″ (It appears in the Athanasian Creed as well.) There are two things that you must be aware of in order to fully comprehend what is going on here: First and foremost, when most people hear the word ″hell,″ they think of the hell of the damned, which is the place of eternal retribution for those who die without believing in Jesus Christ as their Savior.However, for people who are not witnessing the vision of God, the phrase ″hell″ can occasionally refer to the ″realm of the dead,″ which is a larger definition of the term.This larger definition clearly includes the Hell of the Damned, but it may also refer to other regions, such as the underworld.

Purgatory, for example, is a part of the greater world of the dead, but it is distinct from the inferno of the damned in that it is a place of punishment.For the second time, there was at least one additional section of the realm of the dead that no longer exists today, a location known as ″the limbo of the patriarchs,″ which existed before to the arrival of Christ.If a person died in God’s friendship before Christ, they would not be punished in the Hell of the Damned, but they would also not be able to enter the Kingdom of Heaven since Christ had not yet made it possible to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.Instead, they were sent to a section of the underworld where they were spared the sufferings of the damned.It was to the inhabitants of this location that Christ paid a visit when he ″descended into hell,″ as the Bible says.

  • For example, according to the Catechism, ″Jesus did not descend into hell in order to deliver the wicked or to demolish the hell of damnation, but in order to release the just who had gone before him.″ (CCC 633) (CCC 633) (CCC 633) Following his death on the cross, Christ descended into the realm of the dead to declare to them that he had won their salvation and to lead them into paradise as the first arrivals.
  • Individuals such as Adam and Eve, St.
  • John the Baptist, and his foster-father Joseph have traditionally been placed in this category.
  • One of the most exquisite descriptions of this very crucial, yet often overlooked, aspect of Christ’s mission comes from an old sermon for Holy Saturday: ″He has gone to search for our original parent, as though for a misplaced sheep.″ He has come to release Adam and Eve from their captivity because he is both God and the son of Eve, and he has done so because he has a strong desire to visit people who live in darkness and under the shadow of death.
  • The Lord approached them with the cross in his hands, the weapon that had brought him victory over his enemies.
  • Adam, the first man he had made, smashed his breast in panic at the sight of him and shouted out to everyone, ‘My Lord be with you all,’ in response to his appearance.

Christ responded, ‘And with your spirit,’ he said.In the process, he grasped him by the hand and lifted him to his feet, saying, ‘Awake, O sleeper, and rise from the dead, and Christ will give you light!’I did not create you to be a prisoner in hell; rise from the dead, because I am the resurrection and the life of the dead!’″ says the Lord.You may read the entire sermon in its entirety by clicking here.Make Holy Saturday more than merely a transitional day between Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

  1. Instead, think of Christ’s tremendous rescue mission in the realm of the dead, and then give thanks to God for it!

Comments

Good Friday is well-known for its significance: it is the day on which we commemorate Jesus’ death on the cross in order to atone for our sins.The same is true of Easter Sunday, when everyone understands that we are commemorating his resurrection from the grave in victory over death.What about Holy Saturday, on the other hand?While his followers waited for him, Jesus was engaged in some of the most dramatic and crucial labor of his messianic mission – work that brought him all the way to the depths of the underworld.

What’s going on?Is it true that Jesus went to hell?In the old Apostles’ Creed, it’s right there: ″…was crucified, died, and was buried; he went into hell; on the third day, he arose from the dead…″ (It appears in the Athanasian Creed as well.) There are two things that you must be aware of in order to fully comprehend what is going on here: First and foremost, when most people hear the word ″hell,″ they think of the hell of the damned, which is the place of eternal retribution for those who die without believing in Jesus Christ as their Savior.However, for people who are not witnessing the vision of God, the phrase ″hell″ can occasionally refer to the ″realm of the dead,″ which is a larger definition of the term.This larger definition clearly includes the Hell of the Damned, but it may also refer to other regions, such as the underworld.

Purgatory, for example, is a part of the greater world of the dead, but it is distinct from the inferno of the damned in that it is a place of punishment.For the second time, there was at least one additional section of the realm of the dead that no longer exists today, a location known as ″the limbo of the patriarchs,″ which existed before to the arrival of Christ.If a person died in God’s friendship before Christ, they would not be punished in the Hell of the Damned, but they would also not be able to enter the Kingdom of Heaven since Christ had not yet made it possible to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.Instead, they were sent to a section of the underworld where they were spared the sufferings of the damned.It was to the inhabitants of this location that Christ paid a visit when he ″descended into hell,″ as the Bible says.

  • For example, according to the Catechism, ″Jesus did not descend into hell in order to deliver the wicked or to demolish the hell of damnation, but in order to release the just who had gone before him.″ (CCC 633) (CCC 633) (CCC 633) Following his death on the cross, Christ descended into the realm of the dead to declare to them that he had won their salvation and to lead them into paradise as the first arrivals.
  • Individuals such as Adam and Eve, St.
  • John the Baptist, and his foster-father Joseph have traditionally been placed in this category.
  • One of the most exquisite descriptions of this very crucial, yet often overlooked, aspect of Christ’s mission comes from an old sermon for Holy Saturday: ″He has gone to search for our original parent, as though for a misplaced sheep.″ He has come to release Adam and Eve from their captivity because he is both God and the son of Eve, and he has done so because he has a strong desire to visit people who live in darkness and under the shadow of death.
  • The Lord approached them with the cross in his hands, the weapon that had brought him victory over his enemies.
  • Adam, the first man he had made, smashed his breast in panic at the sight of him and shouted out to everyone, ‘My Lord be with you all,’ in response to his appearance.

Christ responded, ‘And with your spirit,’ he said.In the process, he grasped him by the hand and lifted him to his feet, saying, ‘Awake, O sleeper, and rise from the dead, and Christ will give you light!’I did not create you to be a prisoner in hell; rise from the dead, because I am the resurrection and the life of the dead!’″ says the Lord.You may read the entire sermon in its entirety by clicking here.Make Holy Saturday more than merely a transitional day between Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

  1. Instead, think of Christ’s tremendous rescue mission in the realm of the dead, and then give thanks to God for it!
See also:  What Did Jesus Say About Other Religions

Did Jesus Actually Descend into Hell?

In the Christian church, there has always been a hot button issue that comes up every so often.This issue is concerned with the question of whether or not Jesus went to hell.There are schools of thinking that believe He did and schools of thought that believe He did not.Scripture does not provide a straightforward response to this topic; nevertheless, with more study, a more complete understanding can be gained.

In some parts of the world, Christianity has always been viewed with suspicion, and this is no exception.Kings, emperors, and other rulers have called councils to debate and resolve concerns and contingencies in order to counteract this trend.The outcome of these conferences was a collection of creeds that served as expressions of religious belief.These creeds were developed with the help of biblical texts and theologians of the day, among other sources.The Nicene Creed and the Apostles’ Creed are the two most well-known creeds in the Christian church, and they are both written in Latin.Both creeds express similar ideas, however the Apostles’ Creed contains the phrase ″he fell into hell,″ whereas the Creed of the Holy Spirit does not contain this phrase.

The image is courtesy of Getty Images/Kesu01.

Where Did The Idea of Jesus Descending to Hell Originate? And Did Jesus Descend to Hell?

The Apostles’ Creed is an enlarged form of the Old Roman Creed, which was in use as early as the second century and was adopted by the Church of Rome.The grounds for the formation of the Apostles’ Creed are not well understood by academics.Historically, early church leaders believed the credo was penned by the apostles themselves, although we don’t know for sure.That Jesus had gone into hell is thought to have been added later, about AD 390, to the Bible.

This would have occurred at the same time as a bishop by the name of Apollinarius was giving a lecture.The implication of his statement was that because Jesus was not entirely human, he could not be an effective sacrifice for the sins of humanity.During the Council of Constantinople in 381 AD, this dogma was formally rejected and condemned.There are a variety of explanations for why this line is not included in the Nicene Creed.It was during the Council of Nicaea in AD 325 that the Nicene Creed was formulated.In response to the teachings of a man named Arius, Emperor Constantine convened a council of church leaders to draft a formal declaration of faith.

Constantine desired for the Christian church to have a declaration of faith that would unify all of the denominations under one roof.This would have occurred prior to the inclusion of the phrase in the Apostle’s Creed.Apart from the establishment of these creeds, there are scripture passages that are held up as proof that Jesus was crucified and afterwards resurrected.The biblical passage 1 Peter 18-22 is commonly used as supporting evidence by academics.Together with Ephesians 4:9, this passage contributes to the development of the idea that Jesus may have gone into hell following his death on the cross.

Understanding the Language and Meaning  of the Apostles Creed

It is vitally crucial to be able to comprehend the language of a paper.A person must be familiar with the language and understand the meaning of the terms in that language.When there is a miscommunication, the entire meaning of a document or statement might be altered.Christians and researchers today must recognize that writings from the early church were written in a variety of languages that can be difficult to decipher and interpret.

When it comes to translating Hebrew or Greek into English, we must proceed with caution.Hell is referred to as Sheol in the Hebrew Bible, which means ″hell″ in English.This term literally means ″hell,″ but it refers to the current version of Hell.The concept of individuals who have died in their sin and are lost will be ushered into this region instantly upon death is what the phrase Sheol refers to.The New Testament has a reference to hell written in the Greek language.Because the Apostle’s Creed was originally written in Greek, we shall devote a significant amount of time to this language.

The ″abode of the dead″ is difficult to translate from Greek to English because it is described by only two words.″Gehenna″ is the Greek name for the location of hell, and it means ″hell.″ This term refers to a place of final punishment or a physical location.This term does not appear in the Apostles’ Creed.The phrase ″he descended into Hell″ is included in the Apostles’ Creed, and it is written in the Greek language as ″Hades.″ The Greek term for death, Hades, alludes to the condition of being dead.It is possible to interpret it as ″descended to those underneath.″ It does not allude to the location we know as hell as we know it now; rather, it refers to the physical condition of being dead.

  • Kenneth West, a theological researcher, describes this in the following remark concerning 1 Peter 3:18-22.
  • We know that our Lord as the man Christ Jesus was taken to a place of the dead known in the Old Testament as ‘Sheol,’ and known in the New Testament as ″hell,″ with ″hell″ being the translation of the Greek word for ″death,″ ″hell,″ and ″hellfire″ being the translation of the Greek word for ″hellfire.″ The phrases of the Apostles Creed have been reinterpreted by modern churches to imply something else.
  • This is a transformation that has occurred as time has progressed.
  • Words in the English language began to have distinct meanings from their older equivalents during the time of the Renaissance period.
  • More specifically, the term ″hell″ came to refer to the location where Satan resides.
  • This was not what hell was like in the biblical languages, according to the Bible.

Many churches nowadays do not say the Apostle’s Creed, which is a sad state of affairs.The ones who still do so often do so without including this statement.Photo courtesy of Aaron Burden via Unsplash.

Did Jesus Descend to Hell?

The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke provide accounts of the events that occurred soon after Jesus’ death.Each report provides a vivid and understandable explanation of the events that took place.The Bible tells us that Jesus cried out and surrendered His spirit in Matthew 27:50-53.Then the curtain of the sanctuary came crashing down, and the ground shook violently.

The tombs of the saints were revealed when the rocks were divided.Afterwards, the curtain of the Temple was ripped in two from top to bottom, as recorded in Mark 15:38.The Bible writes in Luke 23:44-45, ″It was now around midday, and darkness fell over the entire area until three o’clock, for the sun’s light had vanished.″ There was a rift in the sanctuary’s curtain that ran down the middle.″ Among the three, Matthew’s narrative is the most vivid and detailed.Daniel, Elijah, and Zechariah all foretold of an earthquake and a period of darkness, which he describes in detail in his narrative of the event.Even more significantly, Matthew informs us that the curtain has been ripped in two.It is referenced in all three narratives, which demonstrates the significance of this event in human history.

The curtain signified the distinction between the clean and the impure.Located in the Temple, it was suspended above and above the entrance to the Holy of Holies.This location was so sacred that no one other than the high priest was allowed to enter.Aaron was permitted to enter and put the blood on the atonement seat on the Day of Atonement, according to Exodus 26, and he did so.The Israelites were not permitted to enter the presence of the Lord at their leisure.

  • This says a great deal about the ripping of the curtain, doesn’t it?
  • Is it possible that Jesus went to hell?
  • Because of Jesus’ death and resurrection, we no longer had to go through rituals or make sacrifices in order to enter God’s presence, as we had done in the past.
  • It had been decided to make the ultimate sacrifice.
  • Everything predicted by the prophets of the Old Testament had come to pass.
  • Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Tanya Sid

Why Do Some People Think Jesus Descended into Hell?

The concept that Jesus went into hell is still held by many Christians today, although many have called this belief into doubt.Some people are unable to comprehend this notion for whatever reason.According to Fr.Sev Kuupuo, the reason Jesus did descend to hell and the goal of His descent were as follows: ″Jesus descended to Hell in order to release souls who had been imprisoned.″ The mission of Jesus’ ascension into Hell was to bring about the release of the holy people of the Old Testament.

Others believe that Jesus Christ went to Hell in order to endure the whole severity of suffering, which is the full impact of human sin, in order to provide a total atonement for the sins of humanity.″ It is claimed that the fulfillment of Jesus’ atonement for our sins could not take place unless Jesus entered the area of punishment known as Hell.He had to save the holy people of the Old Testament who were waiting for Him in Abraham’s bosom as well as the rest of the world.In support of this idea, R.C.Sproul states that, ″He travels to hell to free those spirits who have been imprisoned from the beginning of time.″ ″His mission in hell is one of victory, releasing Old Testament saints,″ says the author.In conclusion, those who believe that Jesus descended into hell believe that He did so in order to save souls and to fulfill the sacrifice for our sins on the cross.It is not a notion that He traveled to that location and stayed for a time.

Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Tomertu

Why Do Some People Believe Jesus Did Not Descend into Hell?

Many different reasons are used by those who profess their opinion that Jesus did not descend into hell in order to support their position.The most widely held belief is that Jesus was God manifested in human form.He is the one who created the area we know as hell.He expelled Satan from heaven and sentenced him to an eternity in hell.

After all, if God created hell and decided its purpose, how could he possibly visit it?Wasn’t Jesus a holy figure who had no business being in this place?This has been investigated by others, and they have come to their own conclusions based on what they have discovered.They have comprehended the significance of this sentence.In fact, Jesus did descend to hell, which is defined as the abode of the dead, not as the region of perpetual torment, in the Greek language.

How Should Christians Respond to This?

There are numerous possible responses to this topic, and each answer will be shaped by the individual’s viewpoint.The fact that Christians do not live in Greek culture makes it difficult for them to understand what is meant by this remark.They are unable to communicate in Greek.We just do not understand what some terms in Greek mean.

Our answer should be to devote the necessary time to studying the Scriptures.Investigate the Biblical languages in greater depth.Inquire of your pastor or a fellow believer in Christ about anything.This will assist you in comprehending and processing something that is genuinely beyond the grasp of our human minds.According to John Jones of the First Presbyterian Church, ″no confessional declaration should be confirmed unless the affirmer understands what the statement entails.″ According to its appropriate interpretation, the Apostles’ Creed expresses a fundamental theological truth.″ It has been suggested that the Apostles Creed contains a sentence that is problematic among certain Christians.The key to comprehending this statement is to be familiar with the meaning of the terms.

Before taking a position on anything, we must first conduct thorough research.When it came to atonement, Jesus was the ultimate sacrifice.He was executed by hanging on a cross.He did really die and pass into the realm of the dead.The brilliance of this is that he did not remain in that location.

  • He climbed to his feet once again and will return.

Sources:

Millard J.Erickson’s ″Introducing Christian Doctrine″ was published in 1992 by Baker Publishing Group in Grand Rapids, Michigan.″The Veil Was Torn in Two,″ by Daniel M.Guertner, is available online.

Having a strong desire for God.The 19th of April, 2019.(Retrieved on March 4, 2020) .Kenneth S.Wuest’s Word Studies in the Greek New Testament is available online.Wm.

B.Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1973.Credit for the image: Getty Images/nu1983 Homeschooling her two children while also serving with her husband as he pastors a rural church in West Virginia is what Ashley Hooker does in her spare time.She is also a freelance writer who writes on faith.Currently, she works as a contributing author for the Journey Christian magazine in the United States.

  • When Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey wreaked havoc on the United States, she traveled to Mississippi and Texas with the North Carolina Baptist Men’s Missionary Society.
  • For many years, she participated on numerous committees in her local church, with a particular emphasis on evangelism.
  • She also traveled to West Virginia and Vermont to share the Gospel with others.
  • Her desire is to spend her time writing and spreading the love of Christ to everyone she comes into contact with.
See also:  When Jesus Was A Boy Story?

Theology Thursday: Where Did Jesus Go When He Died?

Dr.Valerie J.De La Torre contributed to this article.When it comes to Jesus Christ, who is the second member in the Trinity, the second article of the Apostles’ Creed is a broader grouping of assertions that are centered on him.

This section reveals Christ’s birth, suffering, death, burial, resurrection, and ascension, as well as his predicted return to judge all of mankind (Matthew 25:31-46).In order to understand the short word that proclaims that Jesus ″descended into hell,″ we must first understand what it means.Over the years, theologians and laypeople have debated the meaning of these few words and the implications they hold.We discover early references to Christ experiencing human mortality, whether viewed literally or symbolically, which makes it a fascinating factor to consider (Acts.2:27-31; Romans 10:7; Colossians 1:18; I Peter 3:19, 4:6; Ephesians 4:9).So, what exactly happened to Jesus when he passed away?

Did Jesus Go to Hell?

The location referred to as ″hell″ in this creedal declaration was formerly referred to in the Bible as Gehenna, which means ″the land of the dead″ in Greek.It is seen as a region of perpetual torment for individuals who are rejected at the final judgment….The Hebrew name Sheol is used to describe the location in the Old Testament, and it alludes to the grave — a place far removed from God’s presence where the virtuous and the wicked both stay — in the Old Testament.As a result, the issue must be raised as to whether this is the location where Jesus was taken after his death.

A common early interpretation of Jesus’ journey into this ‘underworld’ location across interpretative camps was that he emancipated those who had previously been bound by the bonds of mortality.According to a subsequent interpretation, this site of descent represents Christ’s victory over the Kingdom of Satan, which was accomplished in death.Afterwards, the Creed declares Christ’s victory in rising to new life and ascending to the heavenly realm, where he now rests in eternal triumph at the right hand of God the Father.That is, the promise of the approaching judgment at Christ’s return, in which the final victory over death and evil will be revealed, is supported by this second viewpoint.According to Augustine, one of the early Christian writers, Jesus did not preach to those who died before his coming, nor did he make salvation available to those who died before his advent.Although a later medieval opinion argued once more that only Christians of the pre-Christian time were in fact recipients and beneficiaries of Christ’s preaching in Hades, as intimated in Matthew 27:52 and again in Hebrews 12:23, this position was rebutted by a later medieval view.

Then there’s John Calvin, who regarded this term as a portrayal of Christ’s inward suffering as someone who had endured complete and total separation from God.In other words, the anguish of the crucifixion alone was a vicarious suffering of what it could be like to be separated from God in hell.

Resolution in the Context

When spoken as part of one’s baptismal vows in ancient times, this credo was intended to draw attention to the Trinitarian nature of the ceremony, and we must examine this fact.This was seen as a profoundly symbolic and representational experience of dying and rising, which it was.The old life was now dead, and the new life was now being physically performed in the same way that Jesus’ death and dying, as well as his resurrection from this real grave experience, had been modeled.It seemed like life had triumphed over death all over again.

As a result of this baptism, we see the same saved life that Jesus lived, closing the gap between us and God, or what we know in the vernacular as ‘hell,’ and ushering in a new era of peace and prosperity.When considering this essential portion of the Apostles’ Creed, let us also take into consideration an updated version of the phrase which states: ″he descended to the grave.″ In the following creedal statement, the emphasis is on Christ’s resurrection on the third day, which points to the larger picture of this creedal declaration as a whole, and leaves no mistake as to its goal.So, Jesus’ experience of the grave was real, just as it will be true for us, but much more so will be our experience of the resurrection, which will last throughout eternity.As a result, we can argue that Jesus came from the highest reaches of heaven only to descend to the lowest depths of hell on our behalf, ensuring that this would never become our permanent home.Do you want to know more?View all of the articles from Theology Thursday and check back each week for a fresh post.

Check out our website to learn more about the College of Theology and the degree programs offered by Grand Canyon University, or fill out the form on this page to receive more information.These are the author’s own views and opinions, and they do not necessarily reflect those of Grand Canyon University.The views and ideas stated in this article do not necessarily reflect those of the university.Any sources that were quoted were up to date at the time of publication.

How Early Church Leaders Downplayed Mary Magdalene’s Influence by Calling Her a Whore

She was Mary of Magdala, one of Jesus of Nazareth’s early disciples, and she was one of the most famous women in the world.It is said that she journeyed with him, witnessed his Crucifixion, and was one of those who were informed of his Resurrection, all according to the Scriptures.Everybody, from early church officials and historians to authors and filmmakers, has contributed to the revision and expansion of the tale of Mary Magdalene throughout history.On the one hand, they downplayed her significance by stating she was a prostitute, a wrecked woman who repented and was rescued by Christ’s teachings.

On the other hand, they emphasized her value by claiming she was a prostitute, a ruined woman who repented and was saved by Christ’s teachings.Mary Magdalene, on the other hand, is represented in several early Christian scriptures as more than just a mere follower; she is also depicted as Jesus’ close companion—which some have taken to suggest his wife.Which begs the question: is there any truth to either of these tales?What exactly do we know about Mary Magdalene, the lady who is considered to be the most intriguing woman in the Bible?WATCH: Jesus: A Biography on the HISTORY Vault

What the Bible Says About Mary Magdalene

However, only the Gospel of Luke discussed Mary Magdalene’s role in Jesus’ life and ministry, listing her among ″some women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities″ (Luke 8:1–3).All four canonical gospels of the New Testament (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) noted Mary Magdalene’s presence at Jesus’ Crucifixion, but only the Gospel of Luke discussed her role in his life and ministry.According to Luke, when Jesus drove out seven devils from her, Mary joined a group of women who went with him and his twelve disciples/apostles, ″proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God.″ They were ″proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God.″ However, although Magdalene is not a surname, it is associated with the city of Magdala, which is located in Galilee, in the northernmost area of ancient Palestine, and from whence Mary hailed (now northern Israel).In the words of Robert Cargill, an associate professor of classical and religious studies at the University of Iowa who is also the editor of the Biblical Archaeology Review, ″Mary Magdalene was one of Jesus’ early supporters.″ ″She was mentioned in the Gospels, which indicates that she was significant.

There were hundreds, if not thousands, of followers of Jesus, but we don’t know the names of the majority of them, according to what we know.As a result, the fact that she has been identified is significant.″ Mary Magdalene had an important role in the tale of the Resurrection, which took place after Jesus’ crucifixion, which she observed from the foot of the cross with many other women, and after all of Jesus’ male disciples had fled from the scene.In accordance with the gospels, Mary went to Jesus’ tomb on Easter Sunday, either alone herself (according to the Gospel of John) or in company with several women, and discovered that the tomb was vacant.The ladies are the ones who go to the disciples and inform them what has happened, as Cargill points out.That’s crucial since they were the ones who found that Jesus had resurrected from the dead.According to the Gospel of John, Jesus personally comes to Mary Magdalene after his Resurrection and urges her to inform his followers of his appearance (John 20:1-13).

READ MORE: What Did Jesus Look Like When He Was Alive?

Mary Magdalene as sinner

Because of Mary Magdalene’s obvious significance in the Bible—or maybe because of it—some early Western church leaders attempted to minimize her power by presenting her as a sinner, notably as a prostitute, according to the Bible.In Cargill’s words, ″There are many academics who think that because Jesus empowered women to such a great extent early in his career, it made some of the males who would govern the early church uncomfortable later on.″ In response to this, there were two different reactions.She was to be turned into a prostitute, for example.″ Early church leaders conflated Mary with other women mentioned in the Bible in order to portray her as the original repentant whore.These women included an unnamed woman, identified in the Gospel of Luke as a sinner, who bathes Jesus’ feet with her tears, dries them, and applies ointment to them (Luke 7:37-38), as well as another Mary, Mary of Bethany, who also appears in Luke.

Pope Gregory the Great clarified this confusion in a sermon in 591 A.D., saying, ″We think that the Mary, whom Luke names the wicked woman and whom John calls Mary, is the Mary from whom seven demons were evicted according to Mark.″ ‘By becoming a prostitute, she has diminished in importance.’ It has a negative impact on her in some manner.Look at what she did for a job, and you can see why she couldn’t have been a leader,″ Cargill adds.″Of course, the second option was to advance Mary to the next level.Some believe she was actually Jesus’ wife or friend, rather than his mother.″She had a particular place in the world.″ READ MORE: The Bible Claims That Jesus Was a Real Person.Is there any further evidence?

Mary Magdalene as Jesus’s wife

While some early Christians wanted to downplay Mary’s influence, others sought to emphasize her as a source of inspiration.Several centuries after Jesus’ death, the Gospel of Mary, a document dating from the second century A.D.that was discovered in Egypt in 1896, ranked Mary Magdalene higher in wisdom and influence than Jesus’ male disciples.She was also extensively featured in the so-called Gnostic Gospels, a collection of books thought to have been authored by early Christians as far back as the second century A.D.

but which were not discovered until 1945, near the Egyptian town of Nag Hammadi, and which were written in Greek.According to one of these manuscripts, referred to Mary Magdalene as Jesus’ friend and said that Jesus loved her more than the other disciples.This document is known as the Gospel of Philip.Possibly the most contentious statement in the scripture was that Jesus used to kiss Mary ″frequently on her.″ Damage to the writing rendered the final word illegible, while some scholars have substituted the word ″mouth″ for the unreadable term.In the years after its publication, Dan Brown’s enormously popular mystery The Da Vinci Code has been consumed by tens of millions of readers worldwide.The premise of the novel revolves around the long-held belief that Jesus and Mary Magdalene had children together.

This concept was also at the heart of The Last Temptation of Christ, a novel written by Greek writer Nikos Kazantzakis in 1955 that was subsequently made into a film directed by Martin Scorsese, as well as the cinematic adaptation of the novel.And then there was the discovery of a previously unknown papyrus fragment in 2012 that was considered to be a copy of a second-century narrative in which Jesus refers to Mary Magdalene as ″my wife,″ according to Karen King, a professor at Harvard Divinity School.She ultimately changed her mind after being bombarded with criticism and concluded that the so-called ″Gospel of Jesus’s Wife″ was most likely a fake after defending the document’s validity.

Mary Magdalene as trusted disciple

The Bible, on the other hand, provided no indication that Mary Magdalene was Jesus’ wife.One can’t get a sense of that type of connection from any of the four canonical gospels, despite the fact that they include the women who travel with Jesus and, in some cases, their husbands’ names as well.The depiction of Mary Magdalene as a prostitute endured for decades after Pope Gregory the Great declared it official in his sixth-century sermon, though neither Orthodoxy nor Protestantism embraced it once their respective religions separated from the Catholic Church later in the sixth century.At long last, in 1969, the Church acknowledged that the text of the Bible did not support such interpretation..

Mary Magdalene is now venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran churches, and her feast day is observed on July 22nd in all four of these denominations.According to Cargill’s conclusion, ″Mary appears to have been a disciple of Jesus.″ ″What’s noteworthy is that Jesus had both male and female disciples in his ministry, which was not often the case at the time,″ says the author.He notes that while the prostitute and wife hypotheses have been around for centuries, they are tales and customs that have developed long after the fact: ″Neither of them is anchored in the Bible itself.″ MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: The Evolution of Christian Thought

Three Days in the Tomb

Last spring, my wife and I had the incredible opportunity to travel to the Holy Land with a group of friends.On the last day of our trip to Jerusalem, we woke up early in the morning and proceeded to the Garden Tomb, which was our destination.We were completely alone in the garden, which was a pleasant surprise.Our emotions were overwhelmed with an overwhelming sense of respect.

We looked up at the hill Golgotha, which is known as the ″place of the skull.″ We may envisage the three crosses at that location, as well as the sign ″This is Jesus—the King of the Jews″ over the agonizing figure of the Savior.(See Matthew 27:37 for further information.) ″Are we really worth all of his suffering for us?″ the question arises.After that, we went to the tomb, which had been traditionally the property of Joseph of Arimathaea.Joseph and Nicodemus placed him in this location with the assistance of the ladies.His followers had abandoned him.Everyone left except for Mary Magdalene and the other Mary, who remained behind while the stone was rolled to close the entrance.

(See Matt.27:60–61 for further information.) They were crowded together near to the sepulchre.An alarm clock was then installed at the grave.According to tradition, there was widespread devastation in Jerusalem, with the curtain of the temple being ″torn in two.″ (See Matthew 27:51.) On this continent, though, the devastation was far greater.There were massive earthquakes and volcanic eruptions throughout the planet.

  • Cities were devastated in three hours, with some being buried and others being burned.
  • Mountains arose in the places where cities had previously been.
  • An enormous dense darkness blanketed

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