What Does The Name Of Jesus Mean

What is the meaning of the name Jesus? What does the name Jesus mean?

QuestionAnswer If there was ever a name that was densely filled with meaning, it would be the nameJesus. “The name above every name” (Philippians 2:9–10) has been given to Jesus, according to the Scriptures, “so that at the name of Jesus every knee will bow—in heaven, on earth, and under the earth” (CSB). What is it about our Lord’s name that is so powerful? What is the significance of the name Jesus? The nameJesus, given to Joseph and Mary by the angels (Matthew 1:21; Luke 1:31), is derived from the Hebrew words for “Yahweh saves” and “Yahweh is salvation.” The name Yeshua is a transliteration of the Hebrew and Aramaic names.

Nevertheless, when the nameYeshua is translated from Hebrew intoKoine Greek, the original language of the New Testament, the name becomesIsous.

As a result, the names Yeshua and, in turn, Joshua and Jesusmean “Yahweh rescues” or “the Lord is salvation.” In first-century Judea, the nameJesus was highly popular among the people.

In spite of its widespread use, the nameJesusis of exceptional significance.

  1. In the same way that Yeshua/Joshua led his people to victory over the Canaanites in the Old Testament, Yeshua/Jesus led His people to victory over sin and their spiritual enemies in the New Testament.
  2. God sent Jesus to save us from our sins (John 3:17).
  3. However, the commonness of Jesus’ name serves to emphasize His humanity and humility at the same time.
  4. ‘He was, from one angle, ‘just another Joshua,’ and yet, in another sense, he was the true Joshua—the one who would live up to and embody the meaning of this name in ways that no other could,” writes theLexham Survey of Theology of the nameJesus.
  5. The person of Christ Jesus possesses great power and authority, and, of course, the person is denoted by his or her given name.
  6. Believers arebaptizedin the name of Jesus: “Peter replied, ‘Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins.
  7. Healing and miracles were performed in the name of Jesus: “By faith in the name of Jesus, this man whom you see and know was made strong.
  8. Jesus teaches believers topray in His name; that is, to pray, in His authority, the type of prayer that He would pray: “And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
  9. In every way, Jesus lives up to His name.
  10. It assures us that God’s gracious intention is to save us.
  11. In the Bible, when people spoke or acted in the name of Jesus, they did so as the Lord’s representatives with His authority.

(2 Thessalonians 1:12). Return to: Questions about Jesus Christ What is the meaning of the nameJesus? What is the significance of the name Jesus?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

What Does the Name ‘Jesus’ Mean?

The name Jesus literally translates as “Savior.” It is the same name as Joshua, who appears in the Old Testament of the Bible. The crown of glory has been granted to our Lord because “He rescues His people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21). For sinners who are feeling the weight of the world, the name Jesus is a source of great encouragement. Considering he is already known as the King of kings and the Lord of lords, it is possible that he may have legally adopted a more prestigious title. He, on the other hand, does not do so.

In his own words, theSon of God is satisfied to refer to himself as Savior.

Where the Name Jesus Came From: Hebrew and Greek Origins

Eastern Bible Dictionary states that the name Jesus is a Greek variant of the Hebrew name Joshua, which was originally Hoshea (which means “salvation” in Hebrew) (Numbers 13:8,Numbers 13:16). This form was modified by Moses to Jehoshua (Numbers 13:16; 1 Chronicles 7:27), which is also known as Joshua. Then, following Israel’s exile in Babylon, it adopted the form Jeshua, which is derived from which we obtain the Greek name Jesus. It was given to our Lord to serve as a reminder of the purpose of his mission, which was to rescue mankind (Matthew 1:21).

The Importance of Jesus’ Title as Christ

Before and after the biblical Jesus, there have been a slew of persons with the name Jesus. However, only this Jesus is referred to as Jesus Christ or Christ Jesus, not the other Jesuses. The term Christ serves to further emphasize his exclusive identity and purpose. According to Easton’s Bible Dictionary, the term “Christ” refers to the anointed one. The Greek term “anointed” refers to the Hebrew word “Messiah,” which is the title given to Jesus by the Romans. This term appears 514 times in the New Testament, all of which are associated with Jesus.

Jesus’ given name includes the terms Christ, Anointed/Messiah, which is significant because of the Old Testament prophecies regarding the coming Messiah.

The Meaning of Jesus’ Name as Savior

As previously established, the name Jesus refers to a rescuer. This is the unique role He has. He frees his people from the penalty of sin by washing them clean in His own atoning blood on the cross. He delivers people from the tyranny of sin by instilling the sanctifying Spirit in the hearts of believers. When He removes them out of this world and places them in His presence, He saves them from the presence of sin. The Lord will save people from all of the consequences of their sins when He returns to earth in a gorgeous form at the end of time.

  • It is His responsibility and pleasure to extend mercy.
  • (See also John 3:17).
  • It has frequently been beneficial to them.
  • It has relieved their burdened consciences and brought relief to their aching hearts, and they are grateful.

A common sensation for many people is described in the Song of Solomon when it says: “Your name is oil poured forth” (Song of Solomon 1:3). The individual who places his or her faith on “Jesus” rather than in nebulous notions of God’s kindness and goodness will be happy.

Why Do Christians Pray “In Jesus’ Name”?

Take a look at this video to hear Don Whitney, professor of biblical spirituality at Southern Seminary, discuss why Christians frequently finish prayers with the phrase “in Jesus’ name.” The act of praying in Jesus’ name signifies that we are come in the righteousness of Christ, rather than our own righteousness. Our prayers aren’t worthy of being heard by God, but Jesus’ prayer is, and we come in his name.” In addition, it implies that we are coming in and asking the kinds of questions that we imagine Jesus would ask if he were in our position.

“Because of Jesus, God hears our prayers.” You can listen to the remainder of the interview here.

What Does it Mean to Take the Name of Jesus in Vain?

The third commandment of the Ten Commandments states that one should not use God’s name in vain (Exodus 20:7). The phrase “in vain” refers to something that is “empty, idle, insincere, or frivolous.” As a result, to take God’s name in vain implies to speak it in a way that is empty, idle, insincere, or frivolous in its intent. And one of the most apparent methods of accomplishing this is by the use of profanity in one’s speech. We’ve all heard the name of Jesus used as a punctuation mark to emphasize a point.

“Therefore, God also has highly exalted Him and given Him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, and of those on earth, and of those under the earth, and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.” Philippians 2:9-11 reminds us that “God also has highly exalted Him and given Him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should The name of Jesus carries great weight.

God desires that His people – His followers – never use His name in jest, but rather that they reverence it instead.

Research Source:

Dr. Walter C. Kaiser Jr., of Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, has written a book on Jesus in the Old Testament. Based on the book The Gospel of Matthew by J.C. Ryle (Chapter 1). Photograph courtesy of Thinkstock/Eskemar

What the Name “Jesus” Means for Believers

God’s Son is known by the human nameJesus (Greek: Isous). This was not a choice made by Joseph and Mary; rather, it was an order from on high (Matt. 1:21; Luke 1:31). That is not to argue that the name “Jesus” was unique, because there were other males with the same name (Col. 4:11). Until the beginning of the second century AD, it was a prevalent given name among Jewish people. 1As a result, people referred to him as “Jesus of Nazareth” in order to distinguish him from other people who shared the same name.

  • Why did God, through angels, decree that this name be given to his incarnate Son in the first place?
  • Historically, “Jesus” was the Greek form of “Joshua” (HebrewYehoshu’a), as evidenced by the usage of the name “Jesus” in the Septuagint and the New Testament for the famous Israelite leader Joshua, the son of Nun, in both the Old and New Testaments.
  • 13:16 ESV) after Joshua’s parents named him “Oshea” or “Hoshea” (ESV).
  • 14:6–9).
  • 1:1–2; 24:29), and he led Israel into the Promised Land in accordance with God’s promise to Abraham (Josh.

21:43–45; 23:14; 24:29). As a symbol of the Christians’ eternal rest in their beautiful inheritance, the kingdom of God, the country of Canaan was used in Hebrews 4 and 11 to represent their eternal rest in the kingdom of God. 6

The Origins of the Name “Jesus”

The names “Jesus” and “Joshua” are derived from Hebrew origins that signify “the Lord is salvation,” according to etymology. God’s name is associated with salvation in the Scriptures, which convey the message that the Lord, and only the Lord, rescues his people from evil via his sovereign mercy. 8Normally, we should proceed with caution when deducing the meaning of words from their etymology rather than from their usage, but the Scriptures plainly teach, “Thou shalt call his name Jesus: for he shall redeem his people from their sins” (Matt.

  • As a result, according to John of Damascus, the name “Jesus” refers to the fact that he is the Savior.
  • He will save himself, as the Greek word “he shall save” (autos) emphasizes: he and he alone will accomplish this task.
  • 29).
  • As a result, the name “Jesus” identifies Christ as God’s human servant who is the only one who can save people and bring them into their eternal inheritance.
  • 43:11; cf.
  • 14
See also:  What Would Black Jesus Do?

Hope in His Name

When people are casual about their faults, the word “Jesus” serves as a sobering reminder. After all, how can they accept this “Savior” if they do not think that they are sinners in need of salvation? Perkins reminded us that we must believe and experience the offense caused by our sins against God before we can embrace the Savior as our Savior. In order to welcome Jesus, we must understand that we would perish eternally if we do not accept him, because lost people are the only ones whom Jesus came to redeem (Matt.

15 To those who believe in Jesus, a wonderful promise is contained inside the word “Jesus.” “Since God, who cannot lie, decreed from heaven that His Son revealed in the flesh be given this name Jesus, which means ‘Savior,’ I know for certain and have the certainty that He entirely and perfectly rescues me, body and soul,” Caspar Olevianus wrote.

He who carries the glorious name of Jesus is a man of integrity. He will follow through on what He has promised.” 16Notes:

  1. Kittel, Gerhard, Geoffrey W. Bromiley, and Gerhard Friedrich edited Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, which was published in 10 volumes. 3:285
  2. Matt. 26:71
  3. Mark 1:24
  4. 14:67
  5. Luke 4:34
  6. 18:37
  7. 24:19
  8. John 1:45
  9. 18:5, 7
  10. 19:19
  11. Acts 2:22
  12. 6:14
  13. 10:38
  14. 22:8
  15. 26:9
  16. Cf. Matt. 21:11
  17. Acts 3:6
  18. 4:10
  19. 4:10 Since then, the Hebrew nameYehoshua has been reduced toYeshua, which has been transliterated into Greek as IsouorIsous (Ezra 2:2
  20. Neh. 8:17). When translated into Latin, it becameJesus (pronounced Yay-soos)
  21. Ex. 17:9-10
  22. 1 Kings 16:34
  23. And other passages in the LXX. As previously stated, this is the same name as the prophet “Hosea” (Hebrew, Hoshe’a)
  24. It’s possible that the name “Jesus” also references to another Joshua, son of Josedech, who served with Zerubbabel as high priest and prophesied the future Priest-King by serving the returning exiles (Hag. 1:1, 13, 14
  25. 2:2, 4
  26. Zech. 3:1-10
  27. 6:11-13). V.O.S., Reformed Dogmatics, 3:8
  28. Vos, Reformed Dogmatics, 3:6, among others. It is derived from “the LORD” (YHWHor its abbreviated form,Yah) and a word that means “rescue, save” (yasha’), which is the name of a biblical character. Consider the name “Elisha” (Elisha’), which means “God is salvation.”
  29. Perkins,An Exposition of the Symbol, 5:98
  30. Exodus 14:13, 30
  31. 15:2
  32. 1 Sam. 17:47
  33. 2 Chron. 20:17
  34. Ps. 3:8
  35. Lam. 3:26
  36. Jonah 2:9
  37. John of Damascus,An accurate Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 3.2, in NPNF, 9.2:46
  38. Morris and Morris,The Gospel according to Matthew, 29-30
  39. The Three Forms of It should be noted that Perkins was not dismissing the other members of the Trinity, but rather highlighted that God saves via the Son and that the Holy Spirit saves through putting into practice the work of the Son (99). 3:7
  40. Herman Witsius, Sacred Dissertations on the Apostles’ Creed, trans. Donald Fraser, 2 vols. (1823
  41. Rept., Grand Rapids, MI: Reformation Heritage Books, 2010), 9.12 (1:237)
  42. Perkins,An Exposition of the Symbol, inWorks, 5:100
  43. Olevianus,An Exposition of the Apostles’ Creed, 54
  44. Vos,Reformed Dogmatics, An allusion to Scripture that Olevianus made is left out of the text.

Adapted fromReformed Systematic Theology: Volume 2: Man and Christby Joel R. Beeke and Paul M. Smalley (Reformed Systematic Theology: Volume 2) Joel R. Beeke (PhD, Westminster Theological Seminary) is the author of more than one hundred books in various genres. Besides serving as the president and professor of systematic theology and homiletics at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary, he also serves as a pastor at the Heritage Reformed Congregation in Grand Rapids, Michigan, as the editor of the journalBanner of Sovereign Grace Truth, as the editorial director of Reformation Heritage Books, as the president of Inheritance Publishers, and as vice president of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society.

Professor Joel Beeke is assisted by Paul M.

He previously worked as a pastor in the Baptist General Conference in the midwestern United States, where he spent the preceding twelve years.

Related Articles

Crossway is a Christian ministry that exists solely for the purpose of proclaiming the gospel through the publication of gospel-centered and Bible-centered content. Crossway is a non-profit Christian ministry that exists solely for the purpose of publishing gospel-centered and Bible-centered content. Visit crossway.org/about to learn more or to make a donation right away.

Why “Jesus’ name”?

Who was Jesus, and what is his significance in history? The Bible has a number of fascinating allusions, such as:

  • The Bible says that “to everyone who welcomed him, to all who believed in his name, he granted the right to become children of God.” “And this is his command: to believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ, and to love one another as he has loved us.” (John 1:12, New International Version)”And this is his command: to believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ, and to love one another as he has loved us.” (1 John 3:23, New International Version)

Most dictionaries will interpret Jesus’ name (which was presumably more correctly rendered as “Joshua” than “Jesus”) as “God is salvation,” which appears to be a more accurate translation. Using the term “God is salvation” implies that God is in a state of complete passiveness. It essentially tells a person that “you must rely on God in order to be saved.” God and yourself will both be incredibly passive as a result of your actions! Ben Swett, on the other hand, offers a significantly more thrilling translation of the name “Jesus.” When I first read about it on this page, I was interested by it.

  • I checked up the verses in Young’s Analytical Concordance to the Scriptures. Joshua is a Hebrew word that meaning “Yah rescues.” Joshua is pronounced as Yahshua, which is pronounced as Yah + shuah. Yah is an abbreviation for Yahweh, and shuah is derived from the Hebrew word yeshuah, which means “to save, to save alive, to save.”

With another way of saying it, the most suitable translation for Jesus’ name is “God saves.” The inference changes quickly as a result, as Ben pointed out on his website. Believing in Jesus’ name is trusting that God actively cares about and is actively engaged in the process of saving wayward souls from hell. Consider the other scenario: someone who believes in the presence of God but does not believe that God is particularly concerned about them. Someone who does not understand a fundamental component of God and the nature of Divine love will have less motivation to become involved in rescue efforts himself/herself.

  1. However, he is losing out on the entire splendor and majesty that comes with the realization that God Himself is reaching out to the lost.
  2. In combination, you will be more likely to be accepted into God’s network/kingdom/family of individuals who are concerned about others and actively seek out and save the lost if you accomplish all of these things.
  3. And, if you have a strong belief in God’s good intentions, you will become more like God (and, not coincidentally, Jesus as well): someone who is willing to care for and save others.
  4. (And then goes on to save other people, too!) The power of the name of Jesus!
  5. But hold on a minute, there’s more!
  6. Jesus is the personification of God’s deliverance.
  7. He saved, forgave, healed, and brought back to life.

Everything about Him, including His name, his actions, and his presence, has the same meaning, action, and outcome that everything else in the universe does.

We become a part of Jesus and a part of God, and we bring others with us, who in turn bring others.

As we follow the evolution of this saving grace, this vortex of multidimensional salvation, we will be able to say more about it (healing, incorporating, drawing closer, empowering, joy-producing, bringing others in, and then more and more).

If we believe that “all things were formed through him, and without him, there was not a thing made that was made,” we might go even farther (John 1:3).

According to what I’ve said above, Jesus and His Name represent the process of bringing everything to perfection.

Not only is God “the author and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), but he is also the creator and perfecter of the cosmos. This is spelled out three times in the book of Revelation, which is rather fascinating.

  • “I am the Alpha and the Omega, who is and who was and who is to come.” “I am the Alpha and the Omega.” (Rev 1:8) – the beginning, the process, and the perfect conclusion
  • “I am the beginning and the end, the beginning and the end of all things. I will offer freely from the source of life’s water to those who are thirsty. I will accept no price for this gift.” (Revelation 21:6) Rescue and life-giving qualities are reiterated in the words of Jesus: “I am the Alpha and Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.” (Revelation 22:13)

The Beginning, the Process of Perfecting, and the Perfect Ending are all described in detail. Our healing and being healed are drawn together in a joyful partnership by the Name of Jesus Christ. Name that perfectly expresses God’s character, passion, and love for us. From beginning to finish, this is the Name that saves, rescues, delivers, resurrects, and provides life. The all-powerful Person who started everything, redeems it, elevates it, perfects it, and brings it to a close. Enter, Lord Jesus, come into my heart!

What does the name “Jesus” mean?

It is clear from the Bible that the value of names—particularly the names of God—is highly emphasized. The majority of the names employed in Scripture convey an important aspect of the personalities of the characters they refer to. It’s only logical to presume that Jesus’ given name has some significance to the universe. Right? Let’s have a look at this.

The origin of the name Jesus

Whenever we say “Jesus,” we’re actually speaking about ananglicized version of the Greek nameIsous, which correlates to the Hebrew nameYeshua, which is an abbreviated form of the full nameYehoshua. Yehoshua is composed of two distinct pieces. The prefix “Yeho” is a shortened form of the Tetragrammaton, which is the four-letter name of God in Hebrew language (YHWH). This prefix can be found in a variety of Hebrew names, including:

  • Jehoshaphat (YHWH has judged)
  • Jehoiachin (YHWH has established)
  • Jehonathan (YHWH has given)
  • Jehoshaphat (YHWH has judged)
  • Jehoshaphat (YHWH has given)

The second half of the name is derived from the Hebrew word “yasha,” which means “rescue,” “deliver,” or “save,” among other things. The fact that Yahweh will save is communicated via the name of Jesus!

Jesus: the dramatic significance of a common name

It’s important to note that Yeshua is an extremely common given name. It wouldn’t be much different if He had been born in the twenty-first century in Philadelphia under the name John Smith. Let us pause for a minute to reflect on the importance of giving Jesus such a common name. Joseph’s dream in which an angel of the Lord encourages him to accept Mary as his wife has the following instruction: “Name the infant Jesus,” says the angel. “For the simple reason that her husband Joseph was obedient to the law while also not wanting to expose her to public humiliation, he had in mind to divorce her secretly.

See also:  How Long Did Mary Live After The Death Of Jesus?

‘She will give birth to a son, and you are to name him Jesus, because he will rescue his people from their sins,’ says the angel.” (Matthew 1:19–21; Mark 1:19–21; Luke 1:19–21; Luke 1:19–21) Why such a common name would be selected for history’s most distinctive and significant character begs the question.

Perhaps this isn’t the case.

He then goes on to describe his attitude in more detail: “Who, despite the fact that he was created in the image of God, did not consider his equality with God something to be exploited for his own gain; rather, he reduced himself to nothingness by adopting the very nature of a servant and being made in the image of man.

On top of that, He died a criminal’s death in order to free us from the bonds of sin that had bound us.

Looking to uncover more intriguing information about Jesus?

Look no further. Check check the post “Who is Jesus?” for further information. There has been a problem with the system. Please try again or get in touch with the website’s administration. It is necessary to comply with the GooglePrivacy Policy and Terms of Service in order to use this website.

What Does the Name Jesus Mean?

I am a worship pastor, and I like learning about the history of Christian music, which I have done for years. Thousands upon thousands of songs have been written about our religion, and particularly about Jesus, our Savior and the Son of God whom we adore, over the course of history. There are a number of these songs that are about the name of Jesus himself. Our songs proclaim that the name of Jesus has power, that He is the Name above all names, that the name of Jesus is a beautiful name, a powerful name, and the only name that is powerful enough to free us from our sins.

But what is it about the name of Jesus that is so significant, you might wonder.

The name Jesus literally translates as “God is Salvation.”

You Are to Give Him the Name Jesus

It is written in Luke 1 that the angel Gabriel appeared to Mary and told her that she would become pregnant with a child who would be known as “the Son of the Most High” and that “the Son of the Most High” would “rule over the family of Jacob forever.” There was no doubt in anyone’s mind that this was a reference to the long-anticipated Messiah. Because of this heavenly pronouncement, the prophets’ 400-year period of quiet was finally ended, and the prophets’ words were finally being carried out, bringing the prophets’ words to fruition.

Gabriel tells Mary in Luke 1:31, “Behold, you will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to name him Jesus.” The name Jesus is given to Jesus by the angel Gabriel.

“She will give birth to a Son, and you shall call Him Jesus, because He will rescue His people from their sins,” Matthew 1:21 says of the birth of Jesus.

A Reminder of Joshua

Actually, the name Jesus is an English translation of a Greek translation of a Hebrew given name. Confusing? Once you understand how we got there, it’s not that bad. The way it works is as follows: In His day, Jesus would have been recognized and addressed by the Hebrew name Yeshua, which means “salvation.” YESHU’A is also the Hebrew name of Joshua, who was the leader of Israel following the death of Moses and was responsible for leading the people into the promised land in the Old Testament.

If this is the case, why isn’t Jesus simply referred to as Joshua?

The name Joshua is directly translated into English from the Hebrew, but the name Jesus is additionally translated into English from the Greek.

In Greek, the word Yeshu’a is rendered as Lesous, and it is this name that we interpret as Jesus in English.

Similarly to how Joshua saved his people by bringing them into the promised land, Jesus will save His people by guiding them into the kingdom of God.

The letter Y becomes the letter J

To take the linguistic issue even further, the letter J does not exist in either the Hebrew or Greek alphabets, which explains why neither Jesus nor Joshua were given names that began with the letter J. It was many hundred years ago that the English letter J was incorrectly pronounced as the letter Y, which explains how names such as Yeshu’a became Joshua. The two of them sounded very similar at one point in their careers. The spelling of the letter J did not change when the sound of the letter altered.

Was Jesus an Uncommon Name?

Today, the name Jesus stands out to us as a name that is unique in most civilizations, and it is a name that we admire. When we hear the name Jesus, we immediately think of the historical figure Jesus of Nazareth. A sign that says “Jesus Saves” or “Trust in Jesus” leaves no room for dispute as to which Jesus is being referred to by that sign. This, however, was not always the case. It’s important to remember that while Jesus was not a rare name in the first century, he was a reasonably common name that did not stick out as much as it does now.

As the only Jews among my coworkers for the kingdom of God, they have been a great source of consolation to me.”

The Name Jesus Truly Makes Him One of Us

It was regarded too holy and sacred to be pronounced for centuries before the birth of Christ, and the vowel sounds were left out of the actual name of God that was revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai. Considering that one of the ten commandments prohibits using the name of the Lord in vain, abstaining from using it altogether was seen to be a smart approach to avoid breaching that commandment. As a result of this process, we have the consonants YHWH, which has been transliterated as Yahweh or as Jehovah (due to the whole English ‘Y’ to ‘J’ thing).

  • Because it is a holy and sacred name, faithful Jews will not write the word God, but will instead write it as G-d, for the same reason: it is a holy and sacred name that should not be treated lightly.
  • The name Jesus, on the other hand, is not like that.
  • Because of Jesus, we have a wonderful High Priest who is able to relate to us on a personal level in every aspect.
  • Because of Jesus, we have a Savior who was tempted in the same way that we are yet did not sin against us.
  • As a result of the beautiful name of Jesus, the unutterable is now utterable, the unknown is now known, and we may finally live the complete, forgiven life that God planned for us.
  • He serves as the worship pastor at Calvary Longmont in Colorado, and on his weekends, he and his family go hiking and exploring in the Rocky Mountains.
  • This page is part of ourNames of GodSeries, which features the most frequently encountered names and titles of God recorded in the Bible.
  • This is our prayer for you: that you would meditate on these truths and find hope as you rest in the promise of God’s presence, no matter what circumstances you are facing.
  • In the Bible, the term Elohim means “God.” The Lamb of God: What Does It Mean?
  • What Is the Meaning of Messiah?
  • – Significance and Understanding What does the name El Shaddai mean?

“The Lord Will Provide,” says Jehovah Jireh. God’s given name What Is the Meaning of Yeshua? Jesus’s given name in the Bible “The Lord is My Banner,” says Jehovah Nissi, the name of God. Son of Man – This is the name that Jesus chose for himself. Photograph courtesy of Thinkstock/BrianAJackson

What does the name “Jesus” mean?

Saint Paul states in his epistle to the Philippians, “Every knee should bow at the name of Jesus, in heaven as well as on earth as well as in subterranean space” (2:10). Christians have long held the belief that the name of Jesus is a strong one, although many are unaware of the significance of the name’s significance. What is the significance of the name? What was the source of the problem? In the first place, the name “Jesus” is one that was divinely bestowed to Mary by the heavenly word of Gabriel: “Behold, you will conceive in your womb and have a son, and you shall name him Jesus” (Behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall name him Jesus) (Luke 1:31).

  1. More information may be found at: Baby Jesus figurines are available.
  2. “Joshua” is a name that is closely connected to this one.
  3. In the words of some ancient sources, “The Greek name is associated with verbiasthai, which means “to cure,” thus it is not unexpected that some of the Greek Fathers associated the term Jesus with the same origin.
  4. The name “Jesus” denotes that the very name of God is present in the person of his Son, who was born as a human being for the purpose of bringing about the universal and final redemption from sin.

Jesus: Name Meaning, Popularity and Info on BabyNames.com

In most cases, the name Jesus is a male given name of Greek origin that translates as “God Is Salvation.” Messiah (Yeshua) is a Greek version of the Hebrew name Yeshua, which is also the source of our current name Joshua. In Spanish-speaking nations, it is most frequently used as a given name for boys. In English, it is pronounced GEE-zus, and in Spanish, it is pronounced Hey-ZOOS.

People who like the nameJesusalso like:

Manuel,Joshua,Jose,Harold,David,Daniel,Jacob,Aurora,Jennifer,Sofia,Debra,Lena,Paula,Zanna

Names that sound likeJesus:

Ja,Jace,Jack,Jackie,Jacques,Jake,Jay,Jess,Jesse,Jessie,Jock,Joe,Joey,Joie,Jose,Josh,Joshua,Joshwa,Josiah,Josie,Josue,Joy,Joyce,Juji,Jessica,Jo,Jacey,Jui,Jag,Jase

Stats for the NameJesus

To listen to the song on iTunes, click the button. American Jesus is a bad example of religion. Tom Waits’ song “Chocolate Jesus” Bobbie Bare performs Drop Kick Me Jesus (Through The Goalposts Of Life). The Indigo Girls are calling out to Jesus. Morrissey’s song, “I’ve Forgiven Jesus,” is an example of forgiveness. Jesus is the King, and the Queen is Jesus. The Velvet Underground’s song “Jesus” Garnet Rogers performs a duet with Jesus and Elvis. The ministry of Jesus built my hotrod. Jesus Christ is a completely new creation.

  1. Jesus, You Know Who I Am-Genesis Robbie Williams’ song “Jesus in a Camper Van” is a classic.
  2. King Missile declares that Jesus is “very cool.” Peter, Paul, and Mary were there when Jesus met the woman.
  3. Bush, Jesus, and the Internet Carrie Underwood’s song “Jesus Take the Wheel” In the words of George Michael, Jesus is like a child.
  4. King Missile proclaimed that Jesus was “very cool.” Mrs.
  5. Music by Depeche Mode’s Personal Jesus Bob Dylan describes himself as “the property of Jesus.” When Jesus Left Birmingham, John Mellencamp wrote a song about it.
See also:  How Did Judas Betray Jesus With A Kiss

Understanding the Meaning of Jesus Christ’s Name (in Hebrew)

Every day, a large number of us pronounce the name of Jesus. But have you ever paused and pondered, “What does the name Jesus mean?” you might wonder. We’ll have to go deep into the history of the name and meaning of Jesus Christ in order to fully comprehend them, particularly the name’s Hebrew origins. From there, we’ll discover why the name is distinctive and why it is a wonderful match for Jesus Christ and his mission to rescue humanity, as well as those who believe in Him.

The Definition of Jesus and Its Meaning

The name ‘Jesus’ is derived from the Hebrew names ‘Yeshua’ or ‘Yeshua’. Its origins may be traced back to Semitic roots, and its meaning is ‘to save or deliver.’ In the 2nd century AD, the name Jesus was very prevalent among Jews, and the designation ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ was frequently used to distinguish Him from the rest of the group of followers. When angels appeared to Joseph while he was sleeping, it was God the Father who declared that his Son’s name shall be ‘Jesus.’ There is a verse in Matthew 1:21 that says, “And she shall have a son, and you shalt name him JESUS: because he shall rescue his people from their sins.” In a side note, ‘Jesus’ is the human name that God had given to the Christ who had come to earth.

He used it as a foreshadowing of things to come and as a reminder of His duty while on Earth.

Joshua is a derivation of the term ‘Hoshea,’ which can be found inNumbers 13:16 andNumbers 13:8 in the Old Testament.

After that, there’s the term ‘Christ,’ which, according to the same dictionary, finally means ‘anointed.

The word ‘Messiah’ was given a great deal of significance in the Old Testament because it foreshadowed the events that were to follow (Genesis 3:15,Deuteronomy 18:15-18, and Psalm 22).

The Importance of Jesus’ Name

Christianity adheres fast to the belief that Jesus’ name has power, and as a result, Christians utter His name as they pray. Fortunately, we now understand that the literal meaning of the name Jesus is God’s Son who rescues people from their sins. When the term ‘Jesus’ is defined, it simply means ‘Savior,’ and that is what it is. Both obvious and significant connections may be made between these two works of art. Adding the name ‘Christ’ completes our grasp of who He is and what He stands for, and we may move on.

  1. He differs from other persons who have the name Jesus because the words ‘Jesus’ and ‘Christ’ have a unique meaning on numerous levels, making him a one-of-a-kind individual.
  2. God has given the name ‘Jesus Christ,’ which means Savior and Messiah, in order to fulfill this promise and to signal to the rest of the world that the Savior has arrived.
  3. That is the message that God is sending.
  4. In order to redeem humanity from their sins, Jesus died on the cross for them.
  5. When it comes to faith, salvation, and prayer, the words ‘Jesus Christ’ are also quite powerful.
  6. God says that all you have to do to be saved is trust in Him through Jesus, and you will be protected from all harm.
  7. Believers will cling to the name of Jesus Christ because God himself sent his Son and manifested him in the flesh to demonstrate to the world that God is salvation and that He will carry out His promise, as revealed in the Bible.

Praying in Jesus’ Name

It is a frequent (and appreciated) habit for prayers to conclude with the words ‘in Jesus’ name we pray, amen.’ But what does this entail for the individual and his or her religious beliefs? Everyone uses the same phrase to invoke Jesus’ name in prayer because they think that His name possesses supernatural powers. As a result, it must never be repeated in vain, but solely in order to honor and invoke His presence. One very harsh example may be found in Exodus 20:7, which contains the Ten Commandments.

God has elevated Him and given him a name that is superior to all other names.

The word ‘Jesus’ appears 987 times in the New Testament alone, which is a significant number.

Angels revealed to Mary and Joseph that the baby’s name would be Jesus in Matthew 1:21, and they chose this name for him.

After further investigation, it was discovered that the term ‘Iesous’ only appeared in three places in the Bible: Hebrews 4:8, Acts 7:45, and Luke 3:29.

Conclusion

The name Jesus may be found in several places, including the Collins English dictionary, HarperCollins publishers, and even word finders and crossword puzzles, among other places. Nonetheless, its deeper meaning goes beyond the characters and the Hebrew roots of the phrase. The Lord Jesus Christ is the Lamb of God who took away the sins of the world in order for us to be saved, and those who call on his name will have eternal life, according to the Bible. During his bodily appearance on our planet, Jesus Christ symbolized God’s salvation in the shape of a human being.

​​​​​​

In the Name of Jesus

What happens if you don’t finish your prayer with the words “In Jesus’ name, Amen?” Will God still answer your plea? What it means to pray in the name of Jesus is revealed in this lesson. This week, I talked on God’s call to Abraham and the growth of God’s missionary call via the nation of Israel, as they were tasked with communicating the truth of God to the cultures in their immediate surroundings. They had been entrusted with the enormous commission. Matthew 28 does not mark the beginning of the great commission.

It was they who played an important part in the great monotheistic religion.

Israel was to be a testament to God’s holiness and glory.

It was referring to something else.

Even the name Jehovah is a conflation of two separate Hebrew words, with pieces of each word used to form the name.

Even if you translate it into multiple languages, it will have a distinct tone.

We think we’re doing something spiritual, yet we wind up doing something superstitious instead of something spiritual.

The use of the phrase “in the name of God” or “in the name of Jesus” has a different meaning than just repeating those words.

“Go into all the world, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit,” the Bible states.

We have presumptively concluded that this indicates that we must include a sentence after both prayer and baptism in order for it to function properly.

When we finish prayer, we almost always add this statement at the end: “In the name of Jesus, Amen.” This is a tradition among Christians.

We anticipate that by doing so, the prayer’s effectiveness will be sealed.

I came up empty-handed.

You should go to your local Bible bookstore and purchase yourself a little pocket rocket, such as one of those compact and palm-sized New Testaments.

Begin with Matthew and work your way all the way through to Revelation.

“Grace and peace to you in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ.” Such a prayer is an example of the type of prayer that may be seen frequently at the beginning and sometimes at the end of Epistles.

The following prayer: “I pray that the eyes of your heart may be opened, that you may comprehend the length, width, and depth of Christ’s love, which is beyond comprehension.” Paul offers a prayer in the location.

Amen.” This is despite the fact that the same text instructs you to pray in Jesus’ name throughout the text of the New Testament.

It’s possible that concluding prayers with such sentence has absolutely no effect on the efficacy of your request.

What does it mean to pray in someone’s name if you don’t mention “in the name of.” when you say it?

The name of someone, in the way that the Bible authors used it, represented what the person stood for, the content of their character, or the authority of the person in question.

That implies that they were to bear witness to His nature and identity.

This is a testimony to God’s name, nature, power, or substance, as well as to his attributes.

We should probably avoid using the term “in the name of Jesus” completely while praying in the name of Jesus since, in most cases, we are not referring to the fact that we are praying in the name of Jesus in the authority of Jesus Christ.

That is the exit for Christians.

Translated, it signifies that the prayer is finished, and we should go back to what we were doing or eat.

It’s similar to when we tell someone to “Stop in the name of the law.” That is what the police officer is saying because he is acting in the position of the law and speaking on behalf of the law.

As soon as he departs from the law, he loses his power, despite the fact that he continues to command “Stop in the name of the law.” It could be preferable for us to begin our prayers with that sentence rather than at the end of them.

It would be preferable if you began your prayers by saying, “God the Father, I come before you not in my own strength, not in my own righteousness, and certainly not in my own capabilities.

I come to you on the basis of Jesus’ merits, not on the basis of my own merits.” Ladies and gentlemen, that is exactly what it means to pray in the name of Jesus.

I believe it is preferable to begin in this manner and, when you reach the conclusion, simply cease praying when you are through.

It is perfectly OK to just remark, “The prayer is ended, let us eat,” or “We’re done, let us continue,” if you are praying in a group and you don’t want to keep others in the dark about what is going on.

Let’s not waste time with meaningless words.

Instead, approach the throne of God in the name of Jesus Christ, claiming his authority. That is, if you are thinking in that manner and have that attitude, it makes no difference what you say at the conclusion of the prayer. God, in accordance with His promise, will hear you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.