What Does It Mean Jesus Wept?

Jesus wept – why did Jesus weep?

Answer to the question It is implied that Jesus cried in two places in the Gospels and one place in the Epistles (Hebrews 5:7).In the Gospels, our Lord grieved when He saw the plight of mankind, and both of these occurrences reflect our Lord’s (loving) human character, His compassion for humanity, and the life He promises to those who trust in Him.When Jesus grieved, He demonstrated all of these characteristics.Our Lord’s companion Lazarus died and was raised from the dead in John 11:1–45.Lazarus was the brother of Mary and Martha and a friend of our Lord.When Jesus met with the sisters and others to lament Lazarus’s death, He wept (John 11:35), as did the disciples.

The fact that Jesus did not mourn at Lazarus’ death was due to the fact that He knew Lazarus would be revived and eventually spend eternity with Him in heaven.Nonetheless, when confronted with the crying and tears of Mary, Martha, and the other mourners, He couldn’t help but cry out in response (John 11:33).The original wording suggests that our Lord cried ″quiet tears″ or tears of sympathy for His friends, according to the translation (Romans 12:15).

  1. It seems likely that if Jesus had been present when Lazarus was dying, His compassion would have moved Him to intervene and heal His buddy (John 11:14–15).
  2. However, saving a death may be seen by some to be a ″chance situation″ or a ″small″ miracle, and now was not a moment to entertain any doubts about what had happened.
  3. As a result, Lazarus remained in death’s grave for four days until Jesus publicly raised him from the dead.
  1. It was the Father’s desire for these witnesses to understand that Jesus was the Son of God, that Jesus had been sent by the Father, and that Jesus and the Father had the same intentions in everything (John 11:4, 40–42).
  2. Only the one true God could have done such an incredible and stunning miracle, and it was through this miracle that the Father and the Son were glorified, and many people came to believe in them (John 11:4, 45).
  3. When we read in Luke 19:41–44, the Lord is on His final journey to Jerusalem, just before He was crucified at the demand of His own followers, the same ones He came to save.
  4. In an earlier statement, the Lord declared, ″O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that murders prophets and stones those who are sent to her!

What a number of times I want to gather your children together, much in the same way that a hen collects her brood beneath her wings, but you would not let it″ (Luke 13:34).As our Lord neared Jerusalem and contemplated the plight of all those victims who had perished, ″He beheld the city and cried over it,″ the Bible says (Luke 19:41).We know that Jesus grieved because the term ″wept″ is the same word used to describe the tears of Mary and the others in John 11:33, which means that he was distraught for the future of the city.

  • In AD 70, more than 1,000,000 citizens of Jerusalem perished in one of the most brutal sieges in recorded history, which took place less than 40 years after the events of Apocalypse.
  • Our Lord cried in two distinct ways in these two separate circumstances because the everlasting results were completely different in each instance.
  • Because they trusted in the Lord Jesus Christ, Martha, Mary, and Lazarus were granted eternal life; however, the majority of the people in Jerusalem did not believe and were consequently denied life.
  1. For Christians today, the same is true: ″Jesus replied to her, ‘I am both resurrection and life; he who believes in Me will live, even though he dies’″ (John 11:25).
  2. Questions regarding John can be found here.
  3. Jesus cried – what caused Jesus to cry?
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Why It’s So Important That ″Jesus Wept″

In the Bible, some of the most profound ideas are found in brief books, chapters, and even single phrases.The study of these texts may be both educational and spiritually uplifting for the individual.It is in John 11:35 that a great deal of vital spiritual knowledge and a great deal about Jesus Christ is included in a very small verse, which is regarded to be the shortest verse in the English language.″Jesus sobbed.″ The fact that He was God incarnate, but had characteristics of human nature, and that He was very concerned about the people He came to redeem, are revealed.By acknowledging that even the Lord Jesus wept, experienced grief, and felt the weight of loss, Christians are given permission to be sorrowful when a loved one dies away, despite the fact that believers who die go to be with the Lord and will be physically resurrected one day when Jesus returns.There will be tears shed by those who have been left behind, but Jesus knows and is there to bring consolation and hope.

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What Does it Mean that ‘Jesus Wept’?

Simply put, when He walked to the grave of Lazarus, He wept tears, and that is the clear interpretation of this passage.Some of the most profound implications of this passage concern the multifaceted character of Jesus Christ.Because Jesus is God the Son, He is one with God and even took part in the creation of the universe with the Father and the Holy Spirit, proving that He is one with God.As stated in the Book of John: ″In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.″ (John 1:1) (John 1:1).Jesus was aware of the will of God, and that Lazarus would be brought back to life as a result.He did not shed a tear because He was unsure of His capacity to perform this miracle or because He feared Lazarus would remain dead, as some have said.

Jesus cried because He was experiencing and comprehending the same emotions as the people in His immediate vicinity.In spite of the fact that he was clothed in flesh and vulnerable to human flaws, the Lord Jesus led a sinless life, triumphing over sin, suffering, and even death itself.He wept in front of a grave, despite the fact that he had lived an ideal life.

  1. It demonstrates to individuals that it is OK to mourn, to process intense emotions and traumatic experiences, and to cry at this time.
  2. A number of Christians are reluctant to express their feelings, or they incorrectly assume that since there are passages that make comments such as ″Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will repeat, rejoice,″ (Philippians 4:4) that it is wicked, improper, and inappropriate for them to mourn.
  3. They put on a happy front when they should be feeling downhearted.
  1. Some people refuse to allow themselves to grieve due to a sense of false superiority.
  2. The fact that Jesus was prepared to cry illustrates that this ill-conceived pride is not suitable.
  3. As Paul stated, ″Have this mentality among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, while he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be grasped, but emptied himself by taking the form of a servant, and was born in the image of mankind.″ In addition, having been discovered in human form, he humbled himself by becoming submissive to the point of death, even death on a cross″ (Philippians 2:5-8).
  4. Jesus was humble to the extent of losing His glory and descending down from Heaven, and He was even humble enough to weep with those who were mourning His death.

What Is the Context of Around John 11:35?

One of the most essential tales of Jesus Christ’s life is contained inside the confines of this tiny verse.He had acquaintances in the town of Bethany, which was located outside of Jerusalem in what is now known as the West Bank area at the time.The members of this family were two sisters, Mary and Martha, as well as their brother, Lazarus.They request that Jesus come to them immediately since Lazarus is ailing at the beginning of the chapter.It was unknown to the sisters that Jesus would have to wait in order to fulfill the Scriptures and predictions regarding the Messiah.The three days had passed by by the time Jesus came to find his companion dead.

He addresses the sisters, who both state that they felt Jesus had the ability to cure him and that their belief in Him as the Messiah had not been shaken.It is recorded in the Bible that He grieved when he observed Mary’s sorrow and when the sisters approached Him and volunteered to take Him to the corpse.That the Messiah is weeping in this image vividly illustrates how he is at the same time both completely God and completely man.

  1. He had complete control over bringing His companion back to life, and he was confident that He would do it in the near future.
  2. But He was struck by the anguish of people He loved, and He shed tears with them as they grieved.
  3. According to the Book of Isaiah, the Messiah would be a man of sorrows and affliction.
  1. ″Unquestionably, he has endured our griefs and carried our sorrows″ (Isaiah 53:4a).
  2. The anguish of others weighed heavily on Jesus’ shoulders.
  3. Despite the fact that He knew everything was going to change for the better, He wept and lamented alongside others because He was acutely aware that they would not be able to comprehend the miracle that was about to take place.

Is This Really the Shortest Verse in the Bible?

In many languages, but not all, this verse is the shortest verse available.In certain languages, the grammatical structure necessitates the use of an additional word in order for it to be correct.Because of the wide range of language patterns found around the world, there are other sentences that are shorter in length in other languages.Job 3:2 is the shortest passage in the Hebrew Bible and is found in the book of Job.In English, it reads, ″And Job said,″ in part due to the Hebrew tradition of deleting vowels from the beginning of sentences.The following are some examples of translations of John 11:35: Christ shed tears in English; he cried in German; he weinte in French; he sobbed in Spanish; he grieved in Arab.

Christ shed tears in English, German, French, Spanish, and Arabic.It is written in both Greek and Korean, and it is written in both languages.However, the length of the poem varies depending on the language spoken, but the significance and meaning of the verse remain constant across the world.

  1. All of these versions speak to Jesus Christ weeping at the tomb of His companion Lazarus, and they are all correct.
  2. Photograph courtesy of Unsplash/Ben White

How Can We Know That God Understands Our Pain?

God is almighty, and He is aware of everything, including the feelings of His creation.In truth, humans were created with the ability to feel because God has the ability to feel.So God made man in his own image, in the image of God, and he created him both male and female.″ ″Then God said: ″Let us make man in our image, after our likeness″ (Genesis 1:26a, 27).He created humans with feelings, and He understands what they are going through.In the Bible, God is described as loving: ″For God so loved the world, that he gave his one and only Son, that whomever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life″ (John 3:16).He is also said to be sad in the passage.

As an example, God’s anguish may be seen in his words to the nation of Israel, spoken via the prophet Jeremiah: ″My joy has gone; grief has fallen upon me; my heart is sick within me….I weep, and a sense of bewilderment has seized hold of me″ (Jeremiah 8:18a, 21b).Him desiring to see all people rescued, He is distressed by the fact that some individuals reject ultimate redemption and turn away from His love.

  1. For a variety of reasons, Christians can be certain that God understands the anguish of His creation in the final analysis.
  2. These things were given to him by the Creator, who also made and experiences them.
  3. His Spirit is with people who are now in grief, and He will comfort them.
  1. ″The Lord is near to the brokenhearted, and he saves the crushed in spirit,″ says the Scripture (Psalm 34:18).
  2. Jesus goes out to individuals who are destitute, in pain, and suffering because He himself has suffered a similar loss in his life.
  3. It is hinted that by the time he reaches adulthood, he has lost his stepfather Joseph.
  4. John the Baptist, his cousin and a prophet, was assassinated.

Lazarus was a dear friend, and Jesus was saddened by his death.He sobbed, and He knows why others weep, because He has been there.When you are in grief, call out to Him and ask for solace, and He will reply to your prayers.

Sources

  • Leroy Brownlow is the author of this work. When you lose a loved one, Jesus wept because he trusted the Good Shepherd. Brownlow Publishing Company, Fort Worth, Texas, 1969. Reno, Omokri, and Omokri, Reno. What caused Jesus to weep. RevMedia, Inc., in the United States of America, 2015. A.W. Tozer’s Jesus Our Man in Glory: 12 Messages from the Book of Hebrews is available online. Moody Publishers, Chicago, 1987. Moody Publishers, Chicago, 1987. Photograph courtesy of Pexels/Daniel Reche Bethany Verrett is a writer and editor who works as a freelancer. She is the author of the faith and lifestyle blog graceandgrowing.com, in which she muses on the Lord, life, culture, and ministry, among other things. Part of a wider resource collection that includes popular Bible verse phrases and quotations, this item can be found here. With this website, we hope to offer you with easy-to-read articles that address your concerns regarding the meaning, origin, and history of certain passages in the context of Scripture. It is our goal that they may assist you in a better understanding of the meaning and purpose of God’s Word in respect to your current life situation and circumstances. Do unto others what you would have them do unto you
  • the truth will set you free.
  • Take care of your heart
  • show love to one another
  • the Meek Are Bless
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What Does Jesus Wept Mean?

Asked by: Miss Sibyl Tromp III Score: 4.5/5 (5 votes) “Jesus wept” is a phrase well-known for being the shortest verse within the King James Version of the Bible, in addition to many different variations. It is just not the shortest within the authentic languages. It is discovered within the Gospel of John, chapter 11, verse 35.

Why do we are saying Jesus wept?

It is frequently employed as an expletive in the novels written by its originator, Stephen King. In his writing manual, he explained that while he was in grade school, he was required to remember a passage from the Bible, and he chose ″Jesus cried″ because of its short length.

What did Frank imply by Jesus Wept?

The now-iconic remark, ″Jesus cried,″ is spoken by Frank just before the shackles really start pulling him towards the things. In specifically, it alludes to Jesus’ compassion to Lazarus’ family and their sadness over the death of a cherished member of their extended family unit.

How many instances does the Bible say Jesus wept?

There are three instances in which Jesus cried in the Bible (John 11:35; Luke 19:41; Hebrews 5:7-9). Each is nearing the end of his or her life, and each indicates what is most important to our kind God. The phrase ″struck by the sensation of our infirmities″ is accurate (Hebrews 4:15).

Why did Jesus wept over Jerusalem?

​Jesus cried over the town and the temple of Jerusalem as a consequence of that they had stopped to fulfill the purpose for which they had been supposed.People had converted the temple, which served as God’s residence, into a market, where they had overreached in terms of trade.Whatever its status as the capital of Zion or David’s kingdom, Jerusalem had failed to serve as a model of holiness.There were 22 related questions identified.

What does the lament over Jerusalem imply?

Jesus’ lamentation for Jerusalem is a conundrum…. Despite the fact that Jesus refused to be rushed, he declared that he would leave as soon as possible since it may not be appropriate for a prophet to be executed outside of the city of Jerusalem. In relation to his own forecast, and probably even purpose, that he would be slain in Jerusalem, this was said.

What is the which means of Psalms 39?

Because it attempts to return to language with ″the transience and problems of life,″ according to Brueggemann and Bellinger, ″Psalm 39 articulates hope and sorrow at the same time.″ Other Christian students consider the psalm as a metaphor for at least one’s own sins, particularly the section when ″he″ consults with the ″parts of his body″ (Christians).

Does Jesus weep with us?

Jesus mourned at the same time that He called His friends and each and every one of us into consideration. He is with us in our sadness and demonstrates to us a resurrection that transcends beyond the tomb to provide fresh life to this world in which we live—because we take the time to think about it.

Why did Jesus wait 4 days Lazarus?

Because by the time Jesus received word of Lazarus’s sickness, Lazarus had already been rendered useless and buried!…. Whatever transpired, it appears that Jesus arrived at Bethany at the appropriate moment. It had been four days since Lazarus had been laid to rest, and if there was ever a good moment to perform the miracle of raising Lazarus from the dead, it was right now.

What’s the final phrase within the Bible?

Genesis is the first book of the Bible, and the opening words of the book are ″In the beginning, God created the heavens and the world.″ Genesis is divided into three sections. According to the Bible, the final book is Revelation, and the closing words are ″The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be upon you all.″ Amen.”

Does God weep?

Even before God became a human being, it is obvious throughout the Old Testament that God is grieved, and even weeps, at the crushing blows that His people have suffered at the hands of their enemies.The Bible’s Psalm 34:18 assures us that ″the Lord is near to those who are brokenhearted.″ How are you able to remain in close proximity to someone who is grieving without feeling their anguish as well?

What are the 2 shortest verses within the Bible?

The Bible’s top ten shortest verses are listed below.

  1. John 11:35 King James Version Jesus sobbed
  2. 1 Thessalonians 5:16 King James Version Luke 17:32 (KJV) says, ″Rejoice forevermore.″ Keep in mind Lot’s spouse
  3. 1 Thessalonians 5:17 King James Version 1 Thessalonians 5:20 (KJV) says to pray without stopping. Exodus 20:13 King James Version says, ″Do not despise prophesyings.″ Exodus 20:15 (KJV) states that you must not kill. .
  4. Deuteronomy 5:17 King James Version

How lengthy was Lazarus useless earlier than Jesus got here?

According to the narrative, Jesus had a special affection for Lazarus and his sisters, and when Lazarus died as a result of illness, Jesus mourned and was ″greatly troubled.″ However, even though Lazarus had been entombed for four days by the time Jesus arrived in Bethany, he was miraculously resurrected from the dead by Jesus and came from the tomb with his burial clothes in tow.

Why did Jesus return Lazarus?

Some persons in Jerusalem felt it necessary to assassinate Jesus. Lazarus, Jesus told His followers, was a complete waste of time. He promised him that He will bring him back to life again. This miracle would aid the disciples in their understanding that He was the Messiah.

Why did Jesus increase Lazarus from the grave?

Jesus was moved to tears by their anguish, and he grieved alongside them. In the aftermath of this unbelievable miracle of raising Lazarus from the dead, many people came to believe that Jesus was the Son of God. Jesus revealed that He has the ability to triumph over death. It is critical in our Christian faith that we take into account the possibility of the resurrection of the dead.

Does God giggle?

The Book of Psalms contains three passages in which God is said to laugh (Psalm 2:4, 37:13, and 59:8). … As God watches their demise unfold, he laughs and declares, ″A little that a virtuous man possesses is better than the wealth of many evil.″ Psalm 59:8 is the final passage in which we learn that God laughs.

What was heard due to his reverent submission?

A plea and petition were offered up by Jesus throughout his earthly life, accompanied by impassioned screams and tears, to the one who may deliver him from death, and he was heard because of His respectful submission, according to the New International Version of Hebrews 5:7. Wow.

Is psalm 39 a lament?

When studying Psalms 38 and 39, it is important to remember that they are a lament that is followed by gratitude in Psalm 40:2-11. … Despite the fact that the poet of Ps 39 did not specifically plead to be freed from death, the psalmist was saved from death, which is why he wishes to sing a ″new song″ in 40:4.

How is fleeting my life?

″Show me, O LORD, the end of my life and the diversity of my days; help me to comprehend how brief my existence is.″ Men are simply ghosts who go backward and forth in time: they bustle about, but only in vain; they amass fortune, but they have no idea who will inherit it.

What is the which means of Handbreadth?

Items ranging in size from around 21/2 to 4 inches, based mostly on the breadth of a hand, are considered to be small.

What do you imply by lament?

To express explicit grief, grieving, or remorse about, sometimes demonstratively: grieve… should express regret for the mistake, lament for the outcome… ― Author Jane Austen 2: to express great regret He expressed regret about his decision not to attend varsity. lament.

How are laments used within the New Testament?

The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the role and performance of lament in the New Testament. As a result, lament has a dual function in the New Testament: it points to Jesus as the beginning of the fulfillment of lament’s cries, and it points forward to the conclusion of God’s reign, which is ensured by Jesus’ resurrection.

What are the shortest scriptures within the Bible?

″Jesus Wept,″ a passage from the Gospel of John, chapter 11, verse 35, was uncovered. With only nine letters, it is the shortest poem in the English language.

What is the small verse within the Bible?

Psalm 37:5 (KJV) ″Commit your path to the Lord, and put your trust in Him as well, and He will bring it to fruition.″ Psalm 56:3 (KJV) ″Whenever I am terrified, I will put my faith in You,″ I said. ″For ″whoever calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved,″ according to Romans 10:13. 3:23 (Romans 3:23) The Bible says, ″For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.″

The Deep Meaning of ‘Jesus Wept’

According to John 11, Jesus cried, and his tears revealed God’s concern for him.But what, exactly, does Jesus’ crying have to do with our conception of God?The following post was written by John Mark Hicks, author of Anchors for the Soul and instructor of the Anchors for the Soul Video Course, both of which are now accessible with free digital access on the Anchors for the Soul website.Watch John Mark Hicks lecture on the topic of ″Jesus Weeps″ (from the video course) or read his blog article, which follows.This video is part of John Mark’s Anchors for the Soul Video Course, which comprises a total of ten films on suffering, all of which are available here.Angry.

Agitated.Sad.When Jesus came face to face with the tremendous anguish that some of his closest friends were suffering, he experienced all of those feelings.

  1. When he faced the truth of his friend’s death, he was overcome with these emotions in his heart.
  2. Jesus was overcome with rage when he saw Mary crying and the men and women who had accompanied her.
  3. He roused himself and demanded to know where they had put the body of the Lord Jesus Christ.
  1. ″Come and have a look,″ they said.
  2. Then Jesus broke down and sobbed.
  3. As a result, the individuals in attendance exclaimed, ″Look at how much he cared for him!″ However, some of them were dissatisfied.
  4. ″Couldn’t this guy, who cured a blind man, also have prevented Lazarus from succumbing to his injuries?″ — The Gospel of John 11:33–37 (my translation)

The Death of Lazarus

As the narrative begins, ″Lazarus is unwell,″ which is a metaphor for death.The sisters, Mary and Martha, summon Jesus to their home because they are confident that Jesus can heal their brother.They have every reason to trust that Jesus will return swiftly because Lazarus is a beloved friend whom Jesus has come to care for.They are almost like family to me.In contrast to what one might assume and what Mary and Martha had hoped, Jesus takes several days to reach Lazarus’s side and comes four days after the death of his brother.

His delay is deliberate.

It appears that Lazarus’s death may have a bigger significance than previously thought.If Jesus had arrived sooner to treat the ill person, he would only have served to further establish his image as a healer in the community.Mary and Martha send for him since he already has a good reputation in the community.Jesus want for them to be able to perceive something more; he wishes for his disciples to believe in something greater as well.But, believe it or not, It’s not that they don’t think Jesus is a miracle worker; they already do.He wants people to believe in something far deeper and more profound; something that, in reality, bursts through the chains of misery and ushers in a new day of hope and possibility.

When Jesus arrives in Bethany, Martha is the first to go out to greet him.She expresses what Jesus has previously spoken about with his followers in his parables.He could have saved Lazarus’ life if he had come sooner, according to Martha.

  1. All of us are asking the same questions: why didn’t you come sooner, why didn’t you heal, and why weren’t you there when I needed you?
  2. When Jesus says, ″I am the resurrection and the life,″ we realize what a deep truth he wants his followers and Martha to understand.
  3. ″Martha,″ Jesus inquires, ″do you believe what I’m telling you?″ Do you really believe this, Disciples?
  1. Do you think this is true, church?
  2. This explains why Jesus did not rush to cure Lazarus after his death.
  3. He had cured the blind, the lame, and the ill throughout his life.
  4. He had even exorcised demons from his body.

Healings of this nature, no matter how miraculous, do not pose a threat to life.

Death still reigns, and death still enslaves. But Jesus is the “resurrection and the life.”

He is the great liberator who frees us from the bonds of death and allows us to live liberate lives. He provides life to the dead and defeats death. This is the bigger truth; this is the truth that God will proclaim when the light of resurrection and life shines into the tomb of Lazarus for the first time. Do you think this is true, church?

Why?

″If only you had been here, Lazarus would not have died,″ Mary says after being retrieved by Martha.She shares the same emotion as the disciples and her sister: ″If only you had been here, Lazarus would not have died.″ For the third time, Jesus is aware of the trepidation, if not an outright complaint.Perhaps there is more to it than what is indicated.It is a state of confusion, perplexity, and disillusionment.She says, ″Why didn’t you come?I can hear it in your voice,″ and we can hear it in her voice.

″How come you weren’t here to help my brother and your buddy heal?″ This was also the sentiment of several onlookers: ″Couldn’t this man who cured a blind man also have prevented Lazarus from dying?″ they wondered.The ″why″ questions continue to plague us.The disciples were perplexed by it, Martha expressed her displeasure with it, Mary confronted Jesus with it, and onlookers showed their displeasure with it.

  1. It is an excellent question.
  2. Jesus does not disregard it, nor does he chastise them for their astonishment at what has happened.
  3. Instead, Jesus directs their attention to the reality that will be revealed shortly: ″I am the resurrection and the life.″
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Church, do you believe it?

And then something like this occurred…Jesus was overcome with rage when he saw Mary crying and the men and women who had accompanied her.He roused himself and demanded to know where they had put the body of the Lord Jesus Christ.″Come and have a look,″ they said.Then Jesus broke down and sobbed.As a result, the individuals in attendance exclaimed, ″Look at how much he cared for him!″ However, some of them were dissatisfied.

″Couldn’t this guy, who cured a blind man, also have prevented Lazarus from succumbing to his injuries?″ Angry.Agitated.Sad.

  1. Jesus is aware of Mary’s anguish, and he hears the cries of the people who have gathered around her.
  2. Jesus joins a community that is in mourning.
  3. He enters a funeral home, where mourning relatives and friends have gathered to express their sorrow.
  1. They are sobbing, and their anguish is evident and audible.
  2. What is Jesus’ answer to this situation?

Jesus Is Angry

Jesus’ spirit is terribly unsettled at the moment. The Greek phrase embrimaomai is a powerful expression.

It describes the snorting of a horse in battle…

The Bible says that Jesus gave personal rebukes to anyone who disobeyed him (Mark 14:5).(Matthew 9:30; Mark 1:43).The word is more about rage than it is about compassion.It is not sentimentality that is important, but rather emotional annoyance.Jesus is on the edge of erupting in fury; he is agitated and emotionally distressed.Despite the mourning of Lazarus’s family and friends, he is not irritated by it.

Jesus himself will be moved to tears.The actuality of death, on the other hand, is more likely to make him enraged.Whatever the case may be, Jesus is enraged by the current condition.

  1. Death has made Jesus very upset!
  2. In the instance of Lazarus, Jesus is irritated by what death brings, enraged by the way death governs people, and he understands that he was the one who opened the door for this suffering.
  3. Death is deserving of our rage.
  1. It has a disrupting effect.
  2. It is destructive.
  3. It divides into two halves.
  4. According to the song ″Every death is a question mark,″ by Andrew Peterson.

In the face of death, anger is a natural and holy emotion.

Jesus Is Agitated

″Jesus roused himself,″ to put it another way.He was in a state of disarray.Using the same terminology as in John 5:7, an angel stirs (troubles) the waters describes how he does so.That term can also be used to denote disturbed hearts (John 13:21; 14:27).Jesus is propelled to action by his rage, which does not remain dormant.Jesus is agitated, but he is also determined.

He returns his attention to his goal.He inquires as to where Lazarus has been put to rest.Jesus has roused himself to action, and he is ready to confront the truth of death and take action as a result.

  1. Perhaps an analogy will be of assistance…
  2. One of my friends was observing how various individuals were enjoying ocean waves when she realized that some people were turning their backs to the waves and being flattened by them.
  3. Others were completely engulfed by the waves and were completely thrown to the ground by them.
  1. Another group of people approached the surf at an angle, their bodies slightly bent and their feet firmly planted, and they leaned into the crashing waves.
  2. They were able to absorb the onslaught of the waves and remain upright because of their stance.
  3. Jesus’ response to the call to action was to lean into the wave of death and confront its truth; he then responded.
  4. Jesus took action because he was enraged and irritated.

″Can you tell me where you buried him?″ he inquired.He wanted to go to the tomb and see it for himself.

And Jesus Is Sad

″Jesus roused himself,″ as the expression goes.He was in a state of confusion.An angel stirs (troubles) the waters in John 5:7, using the same terminology as in John 5:4.Those who have troubled hearts may also use this term (John 13:21; 14:27).Instead of being passive, Jesus’ rage propels him to action and salvation for others.Despite his distress, Jesus is unwavering in his purpose.

It is now that he concentrates on his task.He inquires as to the location of Lazarus’s body on the ground.In response, Jesus has roused himself to action; he is resolved to confront the truth of death and take appropriate action.

  1. Isn’t it possible to make an analogy?
  2. Some people were flattened by waves when they turned their backs on them, as a buddy observed when observing how various people loved surf waves.
  3. Some people were completely engulfed by the waves, with their bodies being thrown on the sand.
  1. Others stood at an angle to the waves, their bodies slightly bowed and their feet firmly planted, and they leaned into the pounding surf.
  2. These two were able to maintain their balance and remain upright because of this position.
  3. Jesus’ response to the call to action was to lean into the wave of death and confront its truth.
  4. Jesus responded in a rage and agitation.

Then he inquired as to ″where you’ve laid him.″ Seeing the burial for himself was something he was looking forward to.

The hope of the resurrection does not eliminate grief.

It does not rule out the possibility of grieving. Jesus grieved as he contemplated the possibility of reviving Lazarus from the dead. But he continued to weep, for Lazarus, for the family, for mankind, and even for himself, since he was experiencing the agony of death himself at the time.

Then, Jesus Acts

He is the one who brings Lazarus from the grave.Jesus could have cured Lazarus before he died, but Lazarus’ death serves the greater glory of God by bringing him to a close.It exposes Jesus as the ″resurrection and the life,″ as the Bible states.It gives testimony to the truth that life has entered the world, and that this life will finally triumph over death and free the creation from its shackles to death.″Do you believe what I’m saying?″ Jesus inquires.Death, on the other hand, is with us until that last resurrection day arrives.

Death and upheaval engulf our lives, and we are at times perplexed as to how to respond, especially in light of the fact that we also have a tremendous hope.

Jesus shows the way: anger, agitation, and sadness.

We have the right to exhibit righteous rage against humanity’s greatest adversary, death.Our anger might be directed at ourselves, the person who has died, or even towards God at some points in our lives.We bemoan and ponder the question, ″Why?″ That’s all right; Jesus was enraged as well.We can face the fact of death with a commitment to continue living despite its presence in our lives.Let us lean into our loss, walk through it, and go forward into the light.Being ″stirred″ to action is beneficial, and feeling some agitation under the shadow of death is beneficial as well.

The truth of death and the way it impacts mankind may cause us to sob, and we should express our sorrow.Tears are beneficial because they are purifying.Allow them to run their course.

And… we believe: Jesus is the resurrection and the life!

Do you believe in the church? Yes, we have faith. Death will not be victorious!

John Mark Hicks, author of this post, teaches a video course on suffering and grief, which is available for free. Gain free digital access to this course for you and your entire group here.

Subscribe to HIM Publications here to have blogs like this one delivered directly to your email on a regular basis.

What does Jesus wept mean?

Jesus sobbed (interjection). The expression of irritated incredulity. The phrase ″Jesus wept″ has an etymology of ″Jesus wept″ (John 11:35 in the King James Version of the Bible). On Wikipedia, you may read about Jesus weeping.

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Jesus sobbed.While not the shortest verse in the original languages, the line ″Jesus cried″ is well-known for being the shortest verse in both the King James Version of the Bible and many other translations, as well as in many other versions.It may be found in the Gospel of John, chapter 11, verse 35 of the New Testament.Rober Estienne put verse breaks – also known as versification – into the Bible’s text for the first time in 1551, with the goal of making the verses simpler to read and memorize.

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Jesus sobbed. Jesus sobbed! The most straightforward interpretation is that He wept.

How to pronounce Jesus wept?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology is a system of numbers that was developed by the Chaldeans. According to Chaldean Numerology, Jesus weeping has the numerical value of 5
  2. Pythagorean Numerology is a system of numbers that was developed by Pythagorean philosopher Pythagorean numerology
  3. In Pythagorean Numerology, the numerical value of Jesus’ tears is 3
  4. in Christian numerology, the numerical value of Jesus’ tears is 3.

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Why Jesus Wept

In the Bible, the shortest verse is John 11:35, which reads, ″Jesus wept.″ In spite of its grammatical simplicity, it is densely packed with incomprehensible intricacy.After chatting with Lazarus’s heartbroken sisters, Martha and Mary, and witnessing all of the mourners, Jesus broke down and sobbed.That appears to be a logical conclusion.Except for the fact that Jesus had traveled to Bethany in order to revive Lazarus from the dead.He knew that in a matter of minutes, all of this sorrow would be replaced by startled delight, followed by tears of laughing, and finally, praise and adoration.As a result, one would expect Jesus to be a confident, cheerful calm in the midst of the storm of sadness.

His heart was ″much distressed″ (John 11:33), and he broke down and sobbed.Why?

1. Compassion for Suffering

One of the reasons is simply the overwhelming compassion that Jesus had for individuals who were in pain.It is accurate to say that Jesus allowed Lazarus to die.In contrast to the centurion’s servant, he did not postpone his arrival and instead spoke healing words from a distance to the centurion’s servant (Matthew 8:13).His justifications were excellent, compassionate, and wonderful.However, this did not imply that Jesus was unconcerned about the misery it caused.″For he does not torment or sorrow the children of mankind out of the goodness of his heart″ (Lamentations 3:33).

The fact that Jesus always selects what would eventually bring the most glory to his Father (John 11:4) — and that this may involve hardship and anguish in some cases, as in Lazarus’s case — does not mean that Jesus takes pleasure in the agony and grief itself.Jesus, on the other hand, is sympathetic (Hebrews 4:15).And, as ″the image of the invisible God″ (Colossians 1:15), we have a glimpse of how the Father feels about the pain and sadness his children are experiencing through Jesus’ presence at Lazarus’ grave.

2. The Calamity of Sin

″Jesus’ tears give us a glimpse of the Father’s anguish for the loss of his children,″ says the narrator.Jesus, like everyone else, cried at the tragedy of sin.The deathblow was about to be delivered by Jesus, who was about to fulfill God’s promise to come into the world to destroy the devil’s works (see 1 John 3:8).(1 Corinthians 15:26).However, God is terribly grieved by sin, and the punishment for sin is death (Romans 6:23).And, ever since the fall of Adam and Eve, he had been subjected to the horrors of sin’s annihilation.

Death had taken practically every human being he had ever produced in his time (all except Elijah and Enoch).It had already taken Lazarus, and it would take him again before it was all said and done.A mixture of angry and yearning tears were shed with Jesus’ grief-filled tears.

3. The Cost of Redemption

One of the other reasons for his mourning was the amount of money he was about to spend to secure not just Lazarus’s short-term resurrection, but also his everlasting life.Everyone was aware of the impending crucifixion, but no one realized how much emotional turmoil Jesus was going through (Luke 12:50).Lazarus’s resurrection would seem and be perceived as a gift of grace by him and everyone else who witnessed and experienced it.But, well, it wasn’t completely free.In order to obtain it, Jesus was going to endure a horrible death on the cross.Moreover, the most horrifying component was not the crucifixion itself, as inconceivable as it would have been by itself.

He was dreaded the wrath of his Father on him.Jesus, who had never experienced sin, was going to become Lazarus’ sin, as well as the sin of everyone else who had or would believe in him, so that through him they would all become the righteousness of God, just as he had become the righteousness of God for them (2 Corinthians 5:21).He was looking forward to the happiness that had been prepared for him (Hebrews 12:2).

  1. However, the truth of what lay in between weighed hard on my mind.

4. The Cause of His Own Death

Jesus’ tears may have been shed because he realized that resurrecting Lazarus would ultimately lead to the religious leaders taking action against him (John 11:45–53), which is a fourth possible explanation.Throughout this tale, most of us are likely to be amazed by Jesus’ tremendous faith that his Father will respond to him.We have such a low level of trust.If Jesus had any doubts that day, it would not have been about whether or whether his Father would respond, but rather about what would happen if his Father did respond.The act of summoning Lazarus from the grave would have required a different type of resolution on the part of Jesus than we may have expected.Giving Lazarus life was a way for Jesus to seal his own death.

″Giving Lazarus life ensured Jesus’ own death,″ says the narrator.Just these few explanations for Jesus’s tears at Lazarus’s grave provide us with a look into God’s perspective on human suffering and death.His justifications for not sparing us from these calamities are just and wonderful.

  1. However, he is filled with sympathy toward them (Psalm 103:13).
  2. He despises the tragedy that sin causes, and he himself has endured more suffering than we will ever be able to comprehend in order to pay the whole price for our everlasting salvation.
  3. ″It is possible to weep through the night, but joy comes with the morning″ (Psalm 30:5).
  1. That morning will bring with it the knowledge that ″death will be no more, nor shall there be sadness or weeping or anguish any longer″ (Revelation 21:4).
See also:  Where Was Jesus Buried In The Bible?

Jesus wept – Wikipedia

In the King James Version of the Bible, the phrase ″Jesus wept″ (Koin Greek: o, romanized: edákrusen ho Isoûs, pronounced) is the shortest verse, and it is also known for being the smallest verse in many other editions of the Bible.In the native languages, it is not the shortest sentence.It may be found in the Gospel of John, chapter 11, verse 35 of the New Testament.Rober Estienne put verse breaks (also known as versification) into the Greek text in 1551 to make it easy for readers to quote and compare the passages with one another.

Context

This line appears in John’s account of the death of Lazarus of Bethany, a follower of Jesus who died in his sleep.Despite the fact that Lazarus’s sisters, Mary and Martha, informed Jesus of their brother’s illness and imminent death, Jesus did not appear until four days after Lazarus’s death.After speaking with the bereaved sisters and witnessing Lazarus’ companions sobbing, Jesus was greatly concerned and touched by the events.Jesus grieved after learning where Lazarus had been put to rest and being invited to come see for himself.He then proceeded to the tomb and instructed the people to remove the stone that had been placed over it.He then prayed openly to his Father and commanded Lazarus to emerge from the tomb, having been resuscitated.

In addition, according to Luke’s narrative, Jesus cried when he approached Jerusalem before his trial and execution, as he anticipated the destruction of the Temple.

Text

Translation Text
Biblical Greek ἐδάκρυσεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς. edákrusen ho Iēsoûs.″Jesus shed tears.″
Peshitta ܘܐܵܬ݂ܝܵܢ ܗ̄ܘܲܝ̈ ܕܸܡ̈ܥܵܘܗܝ ܕܝܼܫܘܿܥ. Wʾatiyan hway demʿawhy d-Yushwoʿ.″And the tears of Jesus came.″
Vulgate Et lacrimātus est Iēsus″And Jesus wept.″
Luther Bible Und Jesus gingen die Augen über.″And the eyes of Jesus overcame.″
ASV, Darby Bible, ERV, ESV, HCSB, KJV, NASB, NET, NIV, NJB,NKJV,NLT (pre-2005 version), RSV, Recovery Version, WEB, YLT ″Jesus wept.″
Bible in Basic English ″And Jesus himself was weeping.″
God’s Word ″Jesus cried.″
The Message ″Now Jesus wept.″
New American Bible, Douay–Rheims Bible ″And Jesus wept.″
New Living Translation (2005 Version) ″Then Jesus wept.″
New Revised Standard Version ″Jesus began to weep.″
CJB ″Yeshua cried,″
The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures ″Jesus gave way to tears.″

Interpretation

  • Significant significance has been ascribed to Jesus’s intense emotional response to his companions’ sobbing and his own tears, which includes the following statements: When Christ weeps, it proves that he was a genuine man with actual physiological functions (such as tears, sweat, blood, eating and drinking—take notice, for example, of the emphasis placed on Jesus’ eating during his post-resurrection appearances). His feelings and reactions were genuine
  • Christ was not a figment of his imagination or a ghost (see the heresy of Docetism). During a discussion of the two natures of Jesus, Pope Leo the Great quoted this passage: ″In His humanity, Jesus wept for Lazarus
  • in His divinity, he raised him from the dead.″
  • The sorrow, sympathy, and compassion Jesus felt for all of humanity
  • The rage Jesus experienced in response to the tyranny of death over mankind
  • Although spectators understood Jesus’ tears as a sign that he was in love with Lazarus (verse 36), Witness Lee believed that the Jews’ interpretation was illogical in light of Jesus’ desire to raise Lazarus from the dead. As an alternative, Lee suggested that every individual to whom Jesus spoke in John 11 (his followers as well as Martha, Mary, and the Jews) was blinded by their own preconceptions. Because even those closest to him were unable to realize that he was, as he stated in verse 26, ″the resurrection and the life,″ Jesus’ spirit ″groaned″ as a result. Last but not least, he ″wept in sympathy with their sadness for Lazarus’ death″ at the gravesite.

In history

The tears of Jesus have been identified as one of the relics ascribed to Jesus.

Use as an expletive

In some parts of the English-speaking world, such as the United Kingdom, Ireland (especially Dublin and Belfast), and Australia, the phrase ″Jesus cried″ is a mild profanity that is frequently used when something goes wrong or to convey surprise.It may also be used sarcastically to indicate uncaring indifference to someone else’s perceived terrible circumstances or self-pity, as in the phrase During the state visit of Elizabeth II to West Germany in 1965, broadcaster Richard Dimbleby made the mistake of accidently using the curse live on air.It is frequently employed as an expletive in the works of author Stephen King’s books.In his book On Writing, he explains that when he was in primary school, he was required to memorize a passage from the Bible, and he chose ″Jesus cried″ since it was a simple verse to remember.Others who have used it as an expletive in their works include Neil Gaiman in the Sandman series, Bernard Cornwell in the Sharpe series, David Lodge in Nice Work, Mike Carey in the Hellblazer series and The Devil You Know, Peter F.Hamilton in The Night’s Dawn Trilogy, Mark Haddon in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Dan Simmons in the Hyperion Cantos, Minette Walters in Fox Evil, Eliza Griffiths in the Dr Ruth Gall The use of this phrase can be seen in films and television shows such as Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Get Carter (1971), Razorback (1984), Hellraiser (1987), The Stand (1994), Michael Collins (1996), Dogma (1999), Notes on a Scandal (2006), True Blood (2008), Cranford (2008), The Bank Job (2008), Call the Midwife (2013), Community (2015), The Magnificent Seven (2016 film), The Haunting of Hill House (TV series) (2018), Derry Girls (2018),

See also

  • Dominus Flevit Church
  • Bible chapter and verse statistics (including the smallest verses)
  • Dominus Flevit Church
  • Dominus Flevit Church

References

  1. Job 3:2 is the shortest Bible verse according to the New International Version (NIV). In contrast to the King James Version, which reads ″And Job spake and said,″ the New International Version simply says ″He said.″ Following the Westcott and Hort text, the shortest verse in the Greek New Testament is Luke 20:30 (″and the second,″ ″and the third,″ ″and the fourth,″ and ″and the fifth,″ according to the Westcott and Hort version). Genesis 26:6 is the shortest verse in the whole Pentateuch, and it also has the fewest characters in the original Hebrew. In the original Hebrew, the shortest verse in the Hagiographa, 1 Chronicles 1:25, contains only nine characters.
  2. In John 11:1–45, we read that Jesus is the Son of God. Luke 19:41
  3. ″Jesus Christ as a Human Being Made of Flesh and Blood.″ Bibletools.org.
  4. retrieved on April 16, 2018
  5. The emotional life of Jesus is explored in detail in the book of John. B. B. Warfield was an American author and poet who lived during the early twentieth century.
  6. Observer 2nd section of Chapter 23 of Lee’s Life-Study of John (retrieved by searching for ″wept″ in Life-Study of John) Witness Lee (1985), Life-Study of John, Living Stream Ministry, p. PT272, ISBN 978-0736350402
  7. Lee, Witness (1985), Life-Study of John, Living Stream Ministry, p. PT272, ISBN 978-0736350402
  8. Interview with Joe Nickell, August 2000, in the Joe Nickell Files: The Shroud of Turin Archived 2008-12-23 at the Wayback Machine. Other resources include the Peevish.co.uk dictionary of slang and the Aussie slang website, Dagree.net. Newcomb, Horace (2004). The Encyclopedia of Television (second edition). ISBN 9781579583941. Published by Routledge on page 712. Obtainable on the 31st of March, 2015.

External links

  • Oliver, Simon
  • Milbank, John
  • Book of John, Chapter 11
  • King James Bible
  • Oliver, Simon
  • Milbank, John ″The Verse with the Fewest Words.″ Verses from the Bible. Darren Haran, representing the University of Nottingham

Jesus wept – Wikipedia

In the King James Version of the Bible, the phrase ″Jesus wept″ (Koin Greek: o, romanized: edákrusen ho Isoûs, pronounced) is the shortest verse, and it is also known for being the smallest verse in many other editions of the Bible.In the native languages, it is not the shortest sentence.It may be found in the Gospel of John, chapter 11, verse 35 of the New Testament.Rober Estienne put verse breaks (also known as versification) into the Greek text in 1551 to make it easy for readers to quote and compare the passages with one another.

Context

This line appears in John’s account of the death of Lazarus of Bethany, a follower of Jesus who died in his sleep.Despite the fact that Lazarus’s sisters, Mary and Martha, informed Jesus of their brother’s illness and imminent death, Jesus did not appear until four days after Lazarus’s death.After speaking with the bereaved sisters and witnessing Lazarus’ companions sobbing, Jesus was greatly concerned and touched by the events.Jesus grieved after learning where Lazarus had been put to rest and being invited to come see for himself.He then proceeded to the tomb and instructed the people to remove the stone that had been placed over it.He then prayed openly to his Father and commanded Lazarus to emerge from the tomb, having been resuscitated.

In addition, according to Luke’s narrative, Jesus cried when he approached Jerusalem before his trial and execution, as he anticipated the destruction of the Temple.

Text

Translation Text
Biblical Greek ἐδάκρυσεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς. edákrusen ho Iēsoûs.″Jesus shed tears.″
Peshitta ܘܐܵܬ݂ܝܵܢ ܗ̄ܘܲܝ̈ ܕܸܡ̈ܥܵܘܗܝ ܕܝܼܫܘܿܥ. Wʾatiyan hway demʿawhy d-Yushwoʿ.″And the tears of Jesus came.″
Vulgate Et lacrimātus est Iēsus″And Jesus wept.″
Luther Bible Und Jesus gingen die Augen über.″And the eyes of Jesus overcame.″
ASV, Darby Bible, ERV, ESV, HCSB, KJV, NASB, NET, NIV, NJB,NKJV,NLT (pre-2005 version), RSV, Recovery Version, WEB, YLT ″Jesus wept.″
Bible in Basic English ″And Jesus himself was weeping.″
God’s Word ″Jesus cried.″
The Message ″Now Jesus wept.″
New American Bible, Douay–Rheims Bible ″And Jesus wept.″
New Living Translation (2005 Version) ″Then Jesus wept.″
New Revised Standard Version ″Jesus began to weep.″
CJB ″Yeshua cried,″
The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures ″Jesus gave way to tears.″

Interpretation

  • Significant significance has been ascribed to Jesus’s intense emotional response to his companions’ sobbing and his own tears, which includes the following statements: When Christ weeps, it proves that he was a genuine man with actual physiological functions (such as tears, sweat, blood, eating and drinking—take notice, for example, of the emphasis placed on Jesus’ eating during his post-resurrection appearances). His feelings and reactions were genuine
  • Christ was not a figment of his imagination or a ghost (see the heresy of Docetism). During a discussion of the two natures of Jesus, Pope Leo the Great quoted this passage: ″In His humanity, Jesus wept for Lazarus
  • in His divinity, he raised him from the dead.″
  • The sorrow, sympathy, and compassion Jesus felt for all of humanity
  • The rage Jesus experienced in response to the tyranny of death over mankind
  • Although spectators understood Jesus’ tears as a sign that he was in love with Lazarus (verse 36), Witness Lee believed that the Jews’ interpretation was illogical in light of Jesus’ desire to raise Lazarus from the dead. As an alternative, Lee suggested that every individual to whom Jesus spoke in John 11 (his followers as well as Martha, Mary, and the Jews) was blinded by their own preconceptions. Because even those closest to him were unable to realize that he was, as he stated in verse 26, ″the resurrection and the life,″ Jesus’ spirit ″groaned″ as a result. Last but not least, he ″wept in sympathy with their sadness for Lazarus’ death″ at the gravesite.

In history

The tears of Jesus have been identified as one of the relics ascribed to Jesus.

Use as an expletive

In some parts of the English-speaking world, such as the United Kingdom, Ireland (especially Dublin and Belfast), and Australia, the phrase ″Jesus cried″ is a mild profanity that is frequently used when something goes wrong or to convey surprise.It may also be used sarcastically to indicate uncaring indifference to someone else’s perceived terrible circumstances or self-pity, as in the phrase During the state visit of Elizabeth II to West Germany in 1965, broadcaster Richard Dimbleby made the mistake of accidently using the curse live on air.It is frequently employed as an expletive in the works of author Stephen King’s books.In his book On Writing, he explains that when he was in primary school, he was required to memorize a passage from the Bible, and he chose ″Jesus cried″ since it was a simple verse to remember.Others who have used it as an expletive in their works include Neil Gaiman in the Sandman series, Bernard Cornwell in the Sharpe series, David Lodge in Nice Work, Mike Carey in the Hellblazer series and The Devil You Know, Peter F.Hamilton in The Night’s Dawn Trilogy, Mark Haddon in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Dan Simmons in the Hyperion Cantos, Minette Walters in Fox Evil, Eliza Griffiths in the Dr Ruth Gall The use of this phrase can be seen in films and television shows such as Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Get Carter (1971), Razorback (1984), Hellraiser (1987), The Stand (1994), Michael Collins (1996), Dogma (1999), Notes on a Scandal (2006), True Blood (2008), Cranford (2008), The Bank Job (2008), Call the Midwife (2013), Community (2015), The Magnificent Seven (2016 film), The Haunting of Hill House (TV series) (2018), Derry Girls (2018),

See also

  • Dominus Flevit Church
  • Bible chapter and verse statistics (including the smallest verses)
  • Dominus Flevit Church
  • Dominus Flevit Church

References

  1. Job 3:2 is the shortest Bible verse according to the New International Version (NIV). In contrast to the King James Version, which reads ″And Job spake and said,″ the New International Version simply says ″He said.″ Following the Westcott and Hort text, the shortest verse in the Greek New Testament is Luke 20:30 (″and the second,″ ″and the third,″ ″and the fourth,″ and ″and the fifth,″ according to the Westcott and Hort version). Genesis 26:6 is the shortest verse in the whole Pentateuch, and it also has the fewest characters in the original Hebrew. In the original Hebrew, the shortest verse

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