The Woman Who Washed Jesus Feet With Her Hair?

Mary Magdalene Washes Jesus’ Feet with Her Tears, Wipes Them with Her Hair, and Anoints Them with Perfume

There was a woman in the city who was a sinner; and when she learned that he was sitting at meat in the Pharisee’s house, she brought an alabaster cruse of ointment, and standing behind him at his feet, weeping, she began to wet his feet with her tears, wipe them with the hair of her head, kiss his feet, and anoint them with the ointment.″ ASV translation of Luke 7:37-38 An illustration of the Virgin Mary drying Jesus’ feet with the hair on her head after she had bathed them with tears and before she anointed them with oil.Simon, a Pharisee by the name of Jesus, is seated next to him.Several other visitors are gathered around a banquet table, chatting about the situation.Palm trees and a few buildings may be seen through an open window in the backdrop.

Keywords

Saint, water, perfume, oil, Mary, tears, meal, banquet, wash, Simon, Mary Magdalene, anoint, Mary of Magdala, Pharisee, the Magdalene, the penitent, washes, washes, washes,

Source

Rev. Dr. Richard Gilmour, D.D., R.I.P. New York (New York (NY): Benziger Brothers, 1904): Bible History: Containing the Most Remarkable Events of the Old and New Testaments, with a Compendium of Church History. 156

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The Woman at Jesus’ Feet in Luke 7:36-50

An incident described in Luke’s gospel occurs while Jesus is at dinner with a Pharisee, during which a woman approaches and cleanses the soles of his feet with tears and ointment. The Pharisee is outraged, and Jesus reacts by recounting a parable and then uttering words of forgiveness to the lady who has been arrested (Luke 7:36-50).

A Question of Sources

Mark also has a narrative of a lady anointing Jesus with perfume.She, on the other hand, does not anoint his feet, but rather his head.The time of the events is also substantially different: in Mark, this narrative takes place just before Jesus’ death, but in Luke, it takes place much earlier in his ministry.As opposed to the tale in Luke, the story in Mark is about dedication and a prophetic knowledge of Jesus’ mission.

  • Matthew parallels Mark; the episode is set in the same historical period as Mark, and all of the crucial elements are the same as they were in Mark.
  • The book of John is a weird mash-up of facts from the books of Luke and Mark.
  • I agree with Mark that this occurrence takes place just before the passion begins.

According to John, this tale is not about Jesus forgiving a wicked woman, but rather about a woman who is prophetically anointing Jesus ″for the day of his burial.″ This is also in agreement with Mark (John 12:7; compare with Mark 14:8, and Matthew 26:12).However, John agrees with Luke that the woman anoints Jesus’ feet rather than his head, and that this is a mistake.I believe that the parallels between John and the synoptic tradition give some of the more persuasive evidence that John may be familiar with the synoptic tradition.

Is Luke Misogynistic?

Do you think it’s possible that Luke has stolen what may have been a prophecy by an inspirational woman and twisted it into a narrative about a rebellious woman being forgiven?Is it possible that Luke has stripped this lady of her leadership position, reducing her to the status of a deviant in need of forgiveness?Can we infer that Luke has a prejudice against women from this?Many academics feel that this is the case.

  • The tale becomes significantly different when the ointment is removed, as we see in Mark, which is considered to be one of Luke’s most important sources.
  • Only the narrative of a sinful woman, who comes to Jesus, sobbing and washing his feet with her tears, is left to tell.
  • It’s a curiously erotic deed, to say the least.

Consider Jesus reclining with his feet outstretched, as if he were eating a meal in the manner of the day.Imagining a lady delicately resting exactly next to Jesus’ feet, her tears and hair gently cleaning the soles of his feet I, for one, would be worried, just as Simon, his pharisaic host, would undoubtedly be!Unlike the anointing accounts in Mark and Matthew, Luke’s narrative is a complete departure from the others.From the standpoint of source criticism, the ointment is the only item that hints that it could be connected in some way.Without the ointment, I believe we would have no difficulty in arguing that this is not the same tale as the one contained in Mark, and that Luke is drawing on a different tradition – maybe the ″Q″ tradition or the so-called ″L.″ In my opinion, Luke had a separate narrative about a sinful woman washing Jesus’ feet with her hair — a version that does not include ointment.I believe this is the case.

  1. His observation of a superficial resemblance between the account of the woman anointing Jesus with oil in Mark led him to conclude that the two stories should be combined.
  2. He included the ointment from the Markan tale into this one as well.
  3. Following his use of that detail from the account in Mark, it would have been redundant for him to repeat the event in his narrative in the week leading up to the passion, therefore he eliminated the Markan version from his narrative after removing the crucial aspect of ointment from it.

Is Luke exonerated of the claim that he is a sexist as a result of this?Assuming that my reconstruction is right, Luke is not so much changing the prophetic sign act of the strong woman in Mark as he is selecting one account over another in terms of the forgiveness of sinners.Having said that, I believe that we are not fully appreciating the complexity of the term ″sinners″ in the Lukan corpus at this point in time.Being a pardoned sinner in the eyes of the Lord is no little thing in Luke.

The Gospel of Luke has the following statement by Jesus: ″I tell you, there will be more delight in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine good folks who do not require repentance″ (Luke 15.7, 10).The book of Acts, which is the successor to the Gospel of Luke, is perhaps the greatest example.There, Paul/Saul is a vengeful sinner who opposes the new Christ movement with everything he has in him, but after being forgiven, this same guy becomes one of the book’s primary heroes.As a result, in Luke, being a repentant sinner is not a relegation.

It is a great honor and something to be admired.

Simon and Hospitality

The lady appears and falls on her knees at Jesus’ feet, sobbing.Simon, the host of the dinner party, is distressed, and as I previously stated, this is understandable.It occurs to him that ″this man knows what kind of lady this particular individual is – how can he just sit there and tolerate this indecent display?!?″ he wonders.As a result, Jesus narrates a parable.

  • Two people receive varied levels of forgiveness.
  • The person who has been forgiven a great deal or the one who has been forgiven a little is more loved.
  • Simon responds correctly to Jesus, who has been forgiven a great deal.

After that, Jesus goes on the offensive.″Do you notice this woman?″ he inquires of Simon when speaking with him.When I arrived at your home, you didn’t provide me with any water for my feet, but she has bathed and dried my feet with her tears and her hair, respectively.″You didn’t give me a kiss, but she hasn’t stopped kissing my feet since the moment I walked through the door″ (7:44-45).Some have stated that Simon had treated Jesus in a terribly unwelcoming manner due to a lack of hospitality on his part.The argument argues that it was customary for hosts to wash their visitors’ feet and greet them with a kiss, and that Simon sinned against Jesus by failing to do so in this instance.

  1. This type of interpretation, in my opinion, obscures the peculiarity of the story’s premise.
  2. According to John Nolland, ″to offer water for guests to wash their feet after travel is widely proven…
  3. but it is not stated in Jewish literature as a standard supply for guests.″ This implies that such conduct was not expected, and hence Luke is not highlighting that Simon had failed in his role as host, but rather that the woman’s acts were a little out of character.

The lady, who had (probably) never met Jesus, had a stronger connection to him than Simon, who had met him previously.She ″understood″ what Jesus was trying to communicate.In her, there was a deep drama that was playing out.Simon was preoccupied with concerns about decorum that he failed to notice the sacred drama occurring in front of him.

Simon and Forgiveness

″Her sins, which were numerous, have been forgiven; as a result, she has demonstrated tremendous love,″ Jesus says at the conclusion of his talk with Simon.″However, the one who is forgiven little, also loves little″ (Luke 7:47).According to the clear conclusion, the lady is the one who has received a great deal of forgiveness, whereas Simon has received very little forgiveness.I don’t believe it is appropriate to interpret Jesus’ words as sarcastic.

  • So there is no reason to believe that Jesus is implying that Simon’s crimes are not really ″little,″ that his forgiveness is insufficient, or that his faults are not truly ″minor.″ There are many who believe that Simon was just as horrible a sinner as the lady, but that he did not acknowledge his fault until after the woman had done so.
  • For the most part, this meant that he was similar to the Pharisee in Luke 18:11-14, who professed his own righteousness but did not return to his home ″justified,″ as did the contrite tax collector.
  • Simon does not have a strong resemblance to the Pharisee in that tale.

Simon does not trumpet his own righteousness, and he is simply questioned by Jesus since he was not excessive in his hospitality in the manner of the woman, as was the case with the woman.In a sense, Jesus was being irrational in his reaction to Simon, which adds to the jarring nature of the event (and interesting).

The Woman and Forgiveness

″Your sins have been forgiven you,″ Jesus replies to the lady as he turns to face her.Some at the table are worried by Jesus’ assertion that he has the authority to pardon sins.It appears that they (and the majority of readers) are not paying attention to the grammar, though.Rather than the present tense, this sentence is made in the perfect tense.

  • The perfect tense is used to talk about something that happened in the past but has immediate consequences in the present.
  • This implies that the forgiveness of which Jesus speaks has already occurred in the case of this particular woman.
  • She has already been absolved of her sins.

The other grammatical feature that is frequently overlooked is the fact that this remark is written in the passive tense.The passive voice is a means of expressing something without identifying the person who is doing the activity in question.Although the phrase ″you have been forgiven,″ it does not specify who is performing the forgiving in the first place.This may be remedied by using the phrase ″by XXX.″ ″You have been pardoned by God,″ and ″you have been forgiven by me,″ are two different things.As it is, no mention is made of the agent who is doing the forgiving, however it appears to me that Jesus is proclaiming that the lady has been forgiven by God in this instance.Jesus doesn’t respond to those in the peanut gallery who are upset about his conduct and instead continues speaking to the lady, telling her, ″Your faith has saved you; depart in peace.″ Furthermore, the phrase ″being rescued″ is written in the perfect tense, implying that whatever it alludes to has already occurred.

  1. Jesus is reassuring the lady (and us) that she has already gained redemption and forgiveness via his death and resurrection.
  2. In this section of the account, Jesus’ healing of the paralytic (Luke 5:17-26; see also Matthew 9:1-8; and Mark 2:1-12) has more in common with the story of Jesus’ anointing with oil than he does with the story of Jesus’ anointing with oil (Mark 14:3-9, Matthew 26:6-13, and John 12:1-8).
  3. John Nolland is the author of this work.

1-9:20.Luke 1-9:20.Bible Commentary, Volume 5A, Dallas, Texas: Word Books, 1989; page 357 of the same title.″Your sins have been forgiven you,″ Jesus tells the paralytic in Luke 5:23.

This is also written in the present perfect tense.This is in stark contrast to what we find in both Mark and Matthew, where Jesus forgives the paralyzed in the present tense of the language.

Meaning of Mary washing the feet of Jesus

What is the significance of Mary washing the feet of Jesus before his crucifixion?Question: This foot washing is mentioned in the book of John, chapter 12, and the passages in question may be found there.Examine the first few verses of this chapter to see if there is anything we can gather from them that may help us respond to your question.The opening verse of John 12 informs us that Jesus visits to the Bethany house of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus less than a week before his final Passover with his followers.

  • The arrival of Jesus at Bethany (which is approximately one to two miles from Jerusalem) around sundown on a Wednesday is documented in detail in a precise timeline of his last days on earth.
  • The real date was March 29th, 30 A.D.
  • on the calendar.

He will be betrayed and arrested at the end of the day on Tuesday, April 4th, which is the following Tuesday.His crucifixion will take place the next day, on April 5th.Martha prepared Jesus’ dinner, according to the second verse of the chapter.Martha was a person who was always on the go and involved.She would devote herself so completely to her service that she would occasionally lose sight of the fact that something far more vital demanded her attention (Luke 10:38 – 42).Afterwards, Mary (Martha’s sister) took a whole pint (some translations read one pound) of a very expensive perfume made of pure nard, put it on Jesus’ feet, and rubbed the soles with her hair…

  1. (See also John 12:3).
  2. Christ washing the feet of the apostles Dirck van Baburen, c.
  3. 1616, is a Dutch painter.

Spikenard oil is a rare and expensive rose-red colored oil derived from the intensely scented dried roots and oily stems of the spikenard plant.It is extremely valuable and expensive.The plant is native to India.Approximately speaking, this ointment cost the equivalent of $50 U.S., which was the typical salary of a laborer for nearly a whole year in the first century A.D.

In John 12, verses 4 to 6, we are told that Judas (who would later betray Christ) protested loudly to Jesus that Mary should have utilized the money she had received to distribute to the needy instead of purchasing spikenard for herself.Judas was pretending to be concerned about the plight of the impoverished in Israel, which appeared admirable on the surface.Due to his background as a thief (verse 6) who was in possession of the group’s ″money bag″ (which was most likely meant to assist the poor), he desired the oil to be converted BACK into currency so that he could take it from the bag.Jesus responds to Judas’ petty objection by ordering him to leave Mary alone (John 12:7 – 8), which he promptly does!

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He also says that what she did was a really excellent thing, which is also true.In this first of three documented meals that Christ attended during the same week, Martha (John 12:2) served or ″ministered″ to Christ’s physical needs, as reported in John 12.Her service was both admirable and deserving of praise.

The meaning of Mary washing Jesus’ feet with her hair has been debated for centuries.In comparison to her sister, Martha, she was more ″spiritually observant.″ Aside from that, she was more interested in what Jesus had to say, and she made it a point to sit at His feet so that she could hear every word He spoke while in her presence (Luke 10:39).By purchasing costly spikenard, anointing His feet with it, and cleaning them with her hair, Mary demonstrated a loyal and compassionate humility to one whom she profoundly and sincerely adored and cherished.

Her deeds are memorialized in the Bible on purpose to serve as a reminder to people of all ages about what she did.In an interesting turn of events, Jesus would tie a towel around his waist and wash the feet of EVERY one of his followers, including Judas, who would betray him, on Passover night, less than a week later.Our heavenly Father sets a high value on humility and love, both of which are essential characteristics of a true Christian’s character and behavior.

Was it Martha’s sister Mary or Mary Magdalene who washed Jesus’ feet with her tears and dried them with her hair?

It takes a little of detective effort to piece together the facts about the numerous Marys referenced in the gospel accounts.The scenario you cite is particularly perplexing since there are four separate narratives with differing specifics in each of the four gospels, making it difficult to follow the narrative.A lady who is not identified is mentioned in both Mark and Matthew as anointing Jesus’ head with either nard or ointment.An anonymous woman ″who was a sinner,″ according to Luke, washed Jesus’ feet with her tears, anointed them with ointment, and dried them with her hair before he was crucified.

  • To further complicate matters, John mentions Mary of Bethany, allegedly Martha’s sister, anointing his feet with nard and cleaning them with her hair, which further adds to the confusion.
  • Only in the gospel of John is the woman referred to as ″Mary of Bethany.″ Having said that, none of the narratives indicate that Mary Magdalene was involved in any way.
  • If there was a real occurrence involving a lady anointing Jesus in a very lavish manner, we will never be able to determine who it was that performed such a love gesture for Jesus.

Perhaps it was Mary, Martha’s sister, or perhaps it was another lady whose identity will remain a mystery to us for the rest of our lives.

Bible Gateway passage: Luke 7:36-50 – New International Version

New International Version(NIV) Version

Jesus Anointed by a Sinful WomanA)″>(A)B)″>(B)

36 When one of the Pharisees invited Jesus to have supper with him, Jesus went to the Pharisee’s house and sat down at the table with his disciples.A lady from that town, who led a wicked life, discovered that Jesus was eating at the Pharisee’s house and went there with an alabaster jar filled with perfume.When she stood behind him, crying, she began to soak his feet with her tears as she stood behind him at his feet.Afterwards, she cleaned their faces with her hair, kissed them, and sprayed them with perfume.

  • Upon witnessing this, the Pharisee who had invited him thought to himself, ″If this guy were a prophetC)″>(C), he would know who is touching him and what type of woman she is—that she is a sinner.″ 40 ″Simon, I have something to tell you,″ Jesus said when he responded.
  • ″Tell me, teacher,″ he demanded emphatically.
  • 41 ″A specific moneylender had a debt to two persons who owed him money.

One owed him five hundred denarii, while the other owed him fifty centimeters.42 Because none of them had the financial means to pay him back, he forgave both of their debts.″Which of them will be more in love with him now?″ 43 Simon responded, ″I presume the one who had the larger loan canceled.″ 44 Simon replied, ″ ″You have made an accurate assessment,″ Jesus responded.He then looked toward the woman and asked Simon, ″Do you see this woman?″ 44 Simon nodded.The door opened and I walked into your home.However, she soaked my feet with her tears and wiped them with her hair, despite the fact that you did not provide me with any water for my feet,D)″>(D).

  1. 45 You did not give me a kiss,E)″>(E), but this woman has not stopped kissing my feet since the moment I walked through the door.
  2. 46 Despite the fact that you did not apply oil on my head, F)″>(F), she has sprayed perfume on my feet.
  3. 49 Because of her deep affection, I can assure you that her numerous misdeeds have been pardoned.

″However, whomever has been forgiven little loves little,″ says the author.48 Jesus then told her, ″Your sins are forgiven.″G)″> ″Your sins are forgiven″ (G) 49 ″Who is this person who even forgives sins?″ the other guests began to speculate among themselves.50 In response, Jesus responded to the lady, ″Your faith has saved you;H)″>(H) go in peace.”I)″>(I) Read the entire chapter.

Footnotes

Luke 7:41 (NIV) A denarius was the standard daily salary for a day worker in ancient Rome (see Matt. 20:2).

dropdown New International Version (NIV)Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.NIV Reverse Interlinear Bible: English to Hebrew and English to Greek. Copyright © 2019 by Zondervan.

A Sinful Woman Washes the Feet of Jesus

Clip Art derived from www.missionbibleclass.org to be used with the Bible lesson ″Sinful lady″ at www.missionbibleclass.org Gospel Light has licensed original clip art from ″The Complete Bible Story Clip Art Book″ for use on this page.Permission has been granted to use.″ data-image-caption=″″ data-medium-file=″ data-large-file=″ src=″ alt=″5 Sinful Woman″ data-large-file=″ src=″ alt=″5 Sinful Woman″ a width of 300 pixels and a height of 226 pixels data-recalc-dims=″1″ data-lazy-src=″ srcset=″ data-lazy-src=″ data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAAAAAP/yH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAIBRAA7″> Bible Reference: Luke 7:36-50 The following is the suggested emphasis: Jesus has the ability to pardon our sins.….….….….….….

Story Overview:

Simon, a Pharisee, extended an invitation to Jesus to dine with him at his home.Simon did not extend to Jesus the ordinary acts of hospitality that were customary at the time, such as kissing him on the cheek and washing his feet, as was expected.During the supper, a sinful woman entered Simon’s home and bathed Jesus’ feet with her tears and dried them with her hair, according to the gospels.She repented of her misdeeds, and Jesus accepted her repentance and forgiveness.

Background Study:

The Pharisees were a legalistic sect that frequently felt that they belonged to an elite society.When it came to following the Old Testament Law and the various unwritten customs, they were quite rigid.Many of the Pharisees Jesus encountered were hypocrites in the manner they adhered to the religious regulations, as Jesus discovered (Luke 7:30).Simon was a Pharisee who invited Jesus to his home for a lunch, which he graciously accepted.

  • In verse 49, we learn that there were additional visitors in addition to Jesus.
  • The account continues to reveal that Simon did not treat Jesus like a distinguished visitor from the beginning (verses 44-47).
  • Simon should have offered Jesus water to wash his feet, as would have been expected according to common courtesy at the time.

Occasionally, servants would wash the feet of guests.Simon should have kissed his guest on the cheek and anointed his head with oil before welcoming him.Simon did none of those things for Jesus, despite the fact that he had invited Jesus to stay at his house as a guest.It seems unlikely that individuals would have sat at a table on chairs to consume a meal in the first century.In this scenario, a low table or mat would be put on the floor and surrounded by low sofas or pillows.It would have been standard practice to recline on the cushions rather than sit on them.

  1. One could sit on one elbow and eat with the other hand if one wanted to.
  2. The legs and feet would be oriented toward the exterior so that people could sit close together without their feet getting in the way or getting in the way of the meal being served.
  3. The lady was able to come up behind Jesus and wash his feet as he continued to eat as a result of this arrangement.

The alabaster jar would have been circular with a long neck, as seen in the illustration.Normally, perfumed ointment would have been applied to the top of her husband’s head, but she did it gently and modestly by anointing his feet.It would have been unthinkable for a lady to come into contact with a Pharisee.Besides being a woman, this individual was also widely recognized for living a wicked lifestyle.

She was most likely a prostitute, according to the evidence.In Simon’s opinion, this made the situation even more shameful.If Jesus had been concerned about his reputation in the same way that the Pharisees were, he would have refused to allow this woman to get close to him.This woman was very important to him, and the fact that he not only allowed it but also stood up for her shows how much he cared about her.

It wasn’t enough to simply follow the Old Testament Law to the letter.Jesus understood that he had a responsibility to love others.In his treatment of this woman, he demonstrated genuine concern and affection.

It’s likely that the woman had previously heard Jesus preaching.Her heart appeared to be tender, and she expressed a desire to leave the sinful life she had been leading.Simon didn’t give a damn about the lady in question.

He appeared to be only concerned with the scandal that was taking place.Read the story carefully and you will see that Simon did not say anything out loud at first (verse 39).(verse 39).Jesus read his mind.Jesus showed compassion towards the woman by deflecting the attention off of her and putting it on Simon.In front of this important man and other important guests Jesus shows this woman that she was important because of her repentant heart.

Only God can forgive sin.Jesus showed his deity by forgiving the woman.top

Way to Introduce the Story:

Bring a thick towel and a basin of warm water to class with you.Wash the soles of the children’s feet.As you’re doing this, think about how people used to go about in sandals when they were outside.Talk about the dirty or muddy streets where animals used to stroll about on them.

  • Before they ate, they always cleansed their hands and their feet with soap and water.
  • After all, who wants to dine in the presence of someone’s smelly feet?
  • People sat on cushions surrounding low tables, which meant that you were often sitting extremely near to other people’s feet.

In the unlikely event if I asked you to my home for dinner, the very first thing I would do is kiss you on the cheek.You could then either wash your feet yourself or have a servant do it for you, or if you were a really important visitor, I would even wash your feet for you personally.In the event that you were hot and sweaty, I would offer you some fragrant ointment to apply to your head.In today’s tale, Jesus was invited to a lunch at the home of a close friend.Let’s find out what exactly happened here.top

The Story:

I’m not sure who the Pharisees were.Pharisees were devout folks who enjoyed following a large number of regulations.They complied with all of the requirements of the Old Testament Law.Not only that, but they also complied with all of the regulations that other religious people had imposed on them.

  • The Pharisees were so preoccupied with following the laws that they forgot to think about God.
  • They believed that all of the laws were more essential than God himself.
  • They believed that rules were more essential than individuals, as did they.

They were not fond of anyone who did not follow the rules in the same way that they did.Simon, a Pharisee, was introduced to Jesus.Simon requested Jesus to come to his home and eat with him.When Jesus arrived at Simon’s house, he was not greeted with a kiss by Simon.Despite Jesus’ request, Simon did not provide water for him to wash his feet.When Jesus asked for fragrant oil to put on his head, Simon did not offer it.

  1. Jesus, on the other hand, chose to relax on the cushion.
  2. Simon was dining with a number of other extremely prominent visitors as well.
  3. Simon’s residence was visited by someone else.

Simon, on the other hand, had not invited her.The individual who walked through the door was not someone who enjoyed following rules, like Simon.This was a woman who had a history of terrible behavior.Everyone was well aware that this was an immoral lady.

What made you believe she was there?Simon did not get a visit from the wicked lady.She was well aware that Simon would not assist her.She expressed regret for the wrongs that she had committed.

She was well aware that Jesus was able to forgive her of her sins.In the midst of everyone’s meal, the lady approached and knelt on the floor in front of Jesus.She felt so guilty for her mistakes that she broke down and sobbed in front of the group.

Her tears were used to wash the feet of Jesus when she saw that they had not been cleansed previously.She did not have a towel, so she dried the soles of Jesus’ feet with her long hair.Her next move was to take her jar of perfume and place it on Jesus’s feet.

Simon couldn’t believe what he was witnessing at the time!″How dare this woman come into my house!″ he thought to himself.How could Jesus allow her to even get close to him, let alone wash his feet?Didn’t Jesus understand the importance of following the rules?″Jesus can’t possibly be a genuine teacher.″ Simon, on the other hand, did not speak a word aloud.These were thoughts he had alone to himself at the time.

Jesus had the ability to read Simon’s thoughts.He made the decision to tell Simon a story.″Once upon a time, Simon,″ Jesus explained, ″two men borrowed money.One borrowed 500 denarii, while the other borrowed fifty denarii (denarii are a type of currency).

  • After some time had passed, the lender informed the guys that they were not required to repay him.
  • They were free to retain the money.
  • Which of the gentlemen, do you believe, had the greatest affection for the money lender?
  • ″The man who owes the most money would be the happiest,″ Simon explains.
  • ″He would be madly in love with the lender.″ The woman’s situation was similar to that of the man who owed 500 denarii.

She has been involved in a number of wrongdoings.Therefore, she was really grateful to Jesus for forgiving her.″Simon, you invited me to your house, but you did not kiss my face, wash my feet, or apply oil to my head, as you should have done.″ Jesus continued.This woman has kissed and scrubbed the soles of my feet.

  • ″After that, she rubbed oil on them.″ ″I forgive you of all of the sins you have committed,″ he said to the woman.
  • ″At this point, you can depart in peace.″ Do you have any ideas about what happened after that?
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Ways to Tell the Story:

It is possible to tell this narrative in a number of different ways.Never stray from the facts provided in the Bible, but rather use drama, visual aids, voice inflection, student involvement and/or emotion to help youngsters connect to its significance.Visual aids and story-telling techniques may be found by clicking here.To download these graphics as well as the accompanying slideshow, please visit this page.

  • Make your selections.
  • Because every teacher is different, only the visuals that are most relevant to the way YOU are teaching the tale in THIS session should be used.
  • To avoid being confused, delete any pictures that cover other topics or elements you do not want to emphasize in this lesson.

Review Questions:

  1. What was the name of the Pharisee who welcomed Jesus to his home to lunch with him and his family? I’m curious, Simon, who was it that washed Jesus’ feet at Simon the Pharisee’s house? A lady who has sinned
  2. What method did the lady use to wash Jesus’ feet? Why did the wicked woman wash Jesus’ feet with her tears and dry them with her hair? What was she thinking? Simon had neglected to wash them. In addition, she expresses gratitude to Jesus for forgiving her sins.

Song Suggestions:

  • I’ve Got Peace Like a River Song, and I’ve Got Peace Like a River Song
  • For further possibilities, please see the Song Page on this website.

Learning Activities and Crafts:

(How can I select the most appropriate learning activities for my particular teaching situation?) Activities: Mixing perfume, spices, or vanilla essence with washable paint is a fun craft project (like tempera paint). Make prints of the footprints by spreading a small coating of the paint on the soles of children’s feet and printing them.

On this website, you may find teaching ideas that can be used to any class by visiting the Teaching Ideas page. Please click here to download ″Sinful Woman″ in A4 format. To print ″Sinful Woman″ in letter size, please click here (USA) top

Other Online Resources:

  • A coloring page with worksheets (from the California curriculum)
  • Coloring page from the book There are several activities for teaching children about forgiveness (as well as downloads) available at How to manufacture your own perfume at home (will keep up to a month). Instructions may be found at

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A Scandalous Gospel: The Woman Who Washed Jesus’ Feet With Her Tears

NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: In celebration of International Women’s Day (March 8), Women’s History Month in the United States, and the upcoming Lenten season, we will be presenting devotions written by women on the women that Jesus tended to throughout his earthly ministry.The title of this series will be ″The Women Jesus Fell in Love With.″ Until Passion Week, we will publish the devotions on Mondays and Thursdays.Thank you for your patience.We hope you will come back each week to discover how Jesus loves all of us, especially women, and to learn more about him.

  • This is the second installment of the trilogy.
  • You may read the rest of the entries here.
  • Note from the author: The text from Luke 7:36-50 (ESV) is highlighted.

She lived at a period in which males were reported to have expressed gratitude to God on a daily basis for not having been born female.Look, it’s a woman from the city.Not only that, but she had embraced an unmentionable vice for such a long period of time that it had become a part of her personality.Who was a wretched sinner.Alternatively, ″prostitute″ might be spoken in whispered tones.When they saw she was approaching, they moved gently to avoid her.

  1. Take a left at the crosswalk.
  2. Keep your gaze away from the screen.
  3. There will be no greeting.

Keep your distance since her entryway is the gateway to hell (Proverbs 7:27; 9:18), and her uncleanness is contagious, so stay away.Simon the Pharisee was familiar with her.Everyone was aware of her, therefore Simon concluded Jesus was acting in ignorance, reasoning that such an act could not be construed as informed assent.Because she is a sinner, if this man were a prophet, he would have understood exactly who and what kind of lady he was dealing with.

Despite this, she had undergone a transformation.Her presence at anyone’s home, let alone the home of a Pharisee, was obvious to a lady of her stature and sensibility.What drew this type of women to this location?But she arrived nevertheless, despite the finger-pointing and gossip, as well as the possibility of being booted out.

She came for Jesus, and she came prepared to receive Him as her Lord and Savior.As soon as she saw that he was reclining at the table at the Pharisee’s home, she brought an alabaster jar of ointment to the table.What led her to learn about Jesus?

Did she overhear neighbors discussing whether or not he was the Messiah (Luke 2:38; 4:21), as the Bible suggests?Did she overhear someone mention that he cured the sick and demon-possessed (6:18) in the marketplace?Did he teach, ″Your Father is compassionate,″ to the people at the end of chapter 6?

She must have been aware that he was ″a friend of tax collectors and sinners″ (7:34), because there is no other explanation for her rash decision.Standing behind him at his feet, she began to wet his feet with her tears and wipe them with the hair from her head.She kissed his feet and anointed them with the ointment as she stood behind him.Scandalous.What gives her the right to touch the Holy One?Her acts served as a subtle protest to the wrong teachings of the time she was living in.

No, God’s kingdom is not for the arrogant; rather, it is for the humble in heart (6:20).It is intended for folks who are grieving (6:21).It is intended for tax collectors and sinners alike (15:1-2).For the sake of the handicapped, the blind, and the lame (14:21).

  • The return of the prodigal (15:11-32).
  • The prostitution ringleader (7:50).
  • She, on the other hand, did not appear to contradict incorrect doctrine.
  • She simply desired to be in love with Jesus.
  • And the members of her body that had before been offered up to sin as instruments of unrighteousness were now being offered up to him in his service, which she desired (Romans 6:13).

After walking and teaching among the people on filthy streets, he arrived at Simon’s house and found that Simon had neither assigned a servant to wash Jesus’ feet, nor had he provided him with water to wash his own feet.Simon welcomed Jesus into his home, but he did not welcome him into his heart, and he did not extend the most fundamental act of hospitality.″He who is forgiven little, loves little,″ the proverb says.Here was this who and what type of lady, leaning over Jesus’ filthy feet, washing them with her tears and tenderly wiping his feet with her hair, in stark contrast to the previous scene.

  • Following the application of priceless ointment to his feet, her devotion poured in reverent kisses to his feet.
  • Simon was considered superior to Mary in every manner, but Jesus saw what was in their hearts (Luke 2:35).
  • ″Do you happen to see this woman?″ I came inside your home; you didn’t provide me with any water for my feet, but she wet my feet with her tears and cleaned them with her hair when I entered.
  • You didn’t give me a kiss, but she hasn’t stopped kissing my feet since the moment I walked through the door.

My feet have been slathered in ointment, despite the fact that you did not anoint my head with oil.What could possibly elicit such extravagant displays of affection and adoration from this woman?Forgiveness comes at a high price.Simon had something to say to Jesus, and Jesus wanted to share it with him.″There was a moneylender who had two debtors.″ One owed five hundred denarii, whereas the other owed fifty denarii, and so on.When they were unable to pay, he cancelled the debts of both of them.

″Which of them will be more in love with him now?″ She was, without a doubt, the debtor who owing five hundred denarii.Her transgressions against God were numerous, yet God himself bore the burden and discharged her debts.However, her misdeeds were neither justified nor downplayed; rather, hallelujah!– they were absolved and forgotten.Every single one of them.

  1. ″Consequently, I declare that her offenses, which are numerous, have been forgiven – because she loved greatly.″ And her love was the beautiful flower that bloomed from the seed of heavenly forgiveness that she had sown in her heart.
  2. She loved a lot because she had been loved a lot before (1 John 4:19).
  3. Then he told her, ″Your crimes have been forgiven.″ Later on, people present at the meal with him began to speculate among themselves, ″Who is he, and who even forgives sins?″ they wondered.

Clearly, this was not a serious inquiry.Most likely, they were making fun of Jesus’ implied claim to be the moneylender, or God himself, in his teachings.He had come to eliminate their obligations, but they had rejected him and had greatly miscalculated the amount of debt they owed to him.

Please accept my thanks, but no thanks; they could pay for it themselves.They didn’t require a Savior since they already had one.The self-righteous who prayed, ″God, thank you that I am not like this wicked lady,″ could not find justification in Christ’s sacrifice.

″God be compassionate to me, a sinner!″ she cried out, and God responded by providing justification.(See Luke 18:9-14 for further information.) In response, Christ told the woman, ″Your faith has saved you; depart in peace.″ The Pharisees were more scandalized by Jesus’ comments than they were by this woman’s background.His statements, on the other hand, were accurate.It was God’s kingdom that she was seeking, as well as people like her, via God’s mercy.

  • Us.
  • Continue reading about ″The Women Jesus Loved″ in our ″The Women Jesus Loved″ series.

Luke 7:38 As she stood behind Him at His feet weeping, she began to wet His feet with her tears and wipe them with her hair. Then she kissed His feet and anointed them with the perfume.

New International Version (New International Version) During the time she remained behind him at his feet sobbing, she began to soak the soles of his shoes with her tears.Afterwards, she cleaned their faces with her hair, kissed them, and sprayed them with perfume.New Living Translation (New Living Translation) Her tears streamed down her face as she knelt behind him at his feet.Her tears landed on his feet, and she swept them away with her hair to keep him from crying.

  • After that, she continued to kiss his feet and apply perfume on them.
  • Version standardized in English standing behind him at his feet, she began to wet his feet with tears and wipe them with the hair of her head, kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment while he was still crying.
  • Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) In the midst of her grief, as she stood behind Him at His feet, she began to moisten the soles of His shoes and wipe them with her hair.

Afterwards, she kissed His feet and anointed them with a perfume she had brought.The Literal Bible of the Bereans Her tears fell on His feet, and she began to wipe them with the hairs of her head as she kissed and anointed His feet with the fragrant oil after standing behind Him at His feet sobbing.The King James Version of the Bible And she stood at his feet behind him, sobbing, and started to wash his feet with tears, wiping them with the hairs from her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment she had brought with her.New Queen Elizabeth I knelt at His feet behind Him, sobbing, and she started to wash His feet with her tears, wiping them with the hair of her head; then she kissed His feet and anointed them with the fragrant oil.King James Version The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.kneeling behind Him at His feet, she started to clean His feet with the hair of her head, and then she kissed His feet and anointed them with perfume as she stood behind Him at His feet, sobbing As she stood behind Him at His feet, crying, she proceeded to wet His feet with her tears and continued to wipe them with the hair of her head, kissing His feet and anointing them with the perfume.

  1. NASB 1995 NASB 1977 (National Association of School Boards) kneeling behind Him at His feet, she proceeded to wet His feet with her tears, wiping them with the hair of her head as she kissed His feet and anointed them with perfume as she stood there crying.
  2. The Bible with an amplification system standing behind Him at His feet, she started to wet His feet with her tears, wiping them with the hair of her head, kissing His feet and anointing them with perfume as she stood behind Him at His feet.
  3. The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.

She stood behind him at his feet, sobbing, and proceeded to wash his feet with her tears while he stood there.She gently washed the soles of his feet with her hair before kissing them and spritzing them with perfume.Holman Her tears began to fall at His feet, and she stood behind Him at His feet, crying, and began to wash His feet with her tears.She kissed His feet and anointed them with the fragrant oil as she cleaned them with the hair of her head.

The American Standard Version is the version used in the United States.standing behind him at his feet, she proceeded to wet his feet with her tears, wiping them with the hair of her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment while she stood there crying.The Aramaic Bible translated into plain English Her tears streamed down her face as she stood behind him at his feet, and she began washing his feet with tears from her eyes and wiped them with the hair from her head.Her hands were on the soles of his feet, caressing them and anointing them with oil.

Version in the Present Tense of the English Language Then she arrived and took a position behind Jesus.With tears streaming down her face, she began washing his feet with her tears and wiping his feet with her hair.Afterwards, the woman kissed his feet and sprayed them with perfume.

The Bible of Douay-Rheims And from behind him, at his feet, she proceeded to wash his feet with tears, wiping them with the hairs of her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment she had brought with her.Translation of the Good News Mary stood behind Jesus, by his feet, sobbing and soaking his feet with her tears as she stood there.Afterwards, she wiped his feet with her hair and kissed them before spritzing them with perfume.

The International Standard Version (ISO) is a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized and knelt at his feet on the other side of him.With her tears streaming down her cheeks, she proceeded to wash his feet and dry them with her hair.Afterwards, she kissed his feet repeatedly, anointing them with perfume on a regular basis.Standard Version in its literal sense …after standing behind Him, beside His feet, sobbing, she proceeded to wet His feet with the tears, wiping them with the hairs of her head, kissing them, and anointing them with the ointment she had brought with her.The New American Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.

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In the background, she sobbed and proceeded to wash his feet with her tears as she stood at his feet.Afterwards, she kissed them and anointed them with the ointment after wiping them down with her hair.NET Bible is an abbreviation for Networked Information Technology.As she stood behind him at his feet, sobbing, she began to soak his feet with her tears as she stood behind him at his feet.

  • It was her hair that she used to wash them down, kissed them, and then anointed them with the fragrant oil.
  • Revised Standard Version (New Revised Standard Version) With tears in her eyes, she stepped behind him at his feet and began to bathe his feet with her tears, then drying them with her hair.
  • She then proceeded to kiss his feet and anoint them with the ointment like she had before.
  • The New Heart English Bible is a translation of the New Heart Bible.
  • She began to soak his feet with her tears as she stood behind him at his feet, wiping them with the hair of her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment as she stood there.

Weymouth The New Testament is a collection of writings that were written during the years of ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad she drenched His feet with her tears while standing near to His feet and wiping the tears away with her hair, all the while gently kissing His feet and pouring the perfume over them as she stood behind Him close to His feet sobbing.The English Bible for the Whole World She began to soak his feet with her tears as she stood behind him at his feet, wiping them with the hair of her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment as she stood there.Young’s Literal Translation of the Text …after standing behind him, beside his feet, sobbing, she proceeded to wet his feet with tears, washing them with the hairs of her head, kissing them, and anointing them with the ointment she had brought with her.

  • Translations in addition to the above.
  • Context Jesus is anointed by a sinful woman…
  • A wicked lady from that town came to Jesus’ table with an alabaster jar of perfume when she learnt that He was dining there.
  • When she reached His feet, she proceeded to wet His feet with tears and wipe them with her hair as she stood behind Him, at His feet wailing.

Afterwards, she rubbed the scent into Hisfeet and kissed them again.The Pharisee who had invited Jesus noticed this and thought to himself, ″If this guy were a prophet, He would know who this lady is and what type of woman is touching Him—for she is a sinner!″ References to Other Sources Luke 7:37 (NIV) In response to news that Jesus was dining there, a wicked woman from that town arrived with a perfumed alabaster jar.Luke 7:39 (NIV) If this guy were a prophet, he would know who this lady is and what sort of woman is touching Him—because she is a sinner!″If this man were a prophet, he would know who this woman is and what kind of woman is touching Him—because she is a sinner!″ Luke 7:44 (NIV) Afterwards, when He turned to face the lady, he asked Simon, ″Do you see this woman?″ If you had given Me water for My feet when I arrived at your home, she would have wet them with her tears and wiped them with her hair, but you did not.John 11:2 (KJV) In order to anoint the Lord with perfume and clean His feet with her hair, Mary, whose brother Lazarus was ailing, was assigned this task.The Scriptures are a treasure trove.

And she stood at his feet behind him, sobbing, and started to wash his feet with tears, wiping them with the hairs from her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment she had brought with her.weeping.Luke 6:21 (KJV) You who are hungry right now will be blessed because you will be satisfied.You who mourn now will be blessed, for you will laugh afterwards.22:62 (Luke 22:62) Peter then walked outside and sobbed furiously.

  1. It came to happen, when the angel of the LORD said these words to all of Israel, that the people raised their voices and grieved…
  2. wash Luke 7:44 (NIV) And he turned to face the woman and asked, ″Do you see this woman?″ Simon replied, ″Yes.″ After entering thy house, thou gavest me no water for my feet; but she hath bathed my feet with tears and wiped them with the hairs of her head after I had entered the house.
  3. Genesis 18:4 (NASB) Allow a little water to be brought to you, I beg you, and wash your feet before you retire to the shade of the tree: Jesus’ words in John 13:4,5 He gets up from his dinner and takes off his clothes, then wraps himself in a towel and puts on his belt…

as well as anointed Luke 7:45 and 46 However, since the time I walked inside the house, this woman has not stopped kissing my feet……………………..Ecclesiastes 9:8 (Ecclesiastes 9:8) Let thy clothing to always be white, and allow thy head to never be without ointment.Song of Solomon 1:3 is a verse from the Song of Solomon.

Because of the fragrance of thy wonderful ointments, thy name is like ointment poured forth, and the virgins adore thee as a result of this.(38) And took a position at his feet behind him.While a feast of the sort described above was taking place, it was customary in the East to leave the court-yard of the house open, and there was nothing to prevent someone who had not been invited from entering even the guest-chamber.

It is possible, in fact, that the feast was intentionally made available to anyone who wanted to attend.When we read the narrative, we must keep in mind where our Lord is in the story.To wet his feet and cleanse them with tears.- The woman’s soul may have been a muddled mess of many distinct feelings.Shame, penitence, thankfulness, joy, and love all find natural release in the same place.

  • It should be emphasized that the phrase ″wash″ implies a ″shower″ of tears, which is correct.
  • However, it should be observed that, although the tenses used for this and the ″wiping″ indicate a one-time event, the tenses used for the kissing and anointing convey the concept of a continuous process.
  • The deed, the sobbing, and the aroma of the ointment, all drew attention, without a doubt.
  • Verse 38 – ″I am the Lord’s servant.″ And she stood at his feet behind him, sobbing, and started to wash his feet with tears, wiping them with the hairs from her head, kissing his feet, and anointing them with the ointment she had brought with her.
  1. This revealing oneself to the miserable Master had, no doubt, been a long-held goal of hers for a number of days before she finally did it.
  2. She had, without a doubt, been one of his listeners for some time before that morning, when she most likely took the decision to contact him.
  3. He was a fantastic public teacher, and his movements were well-known throughout the city when he lived there.
  4. She had been informed that he would be attending a banquet in the home of wealthy Pharisee Simon.
  5. In the courtyard, she reasoned, it would be easier for her to get close to him without being seen by anyone else than it would be in a crowded marketplace or synagogue; so she entered the courtyard with others and made her way into the guest-chamber, where she was unnoticed by the others who were also there.

She stood behind him, listening intently to the sweet words of forgiveness and reconciliation, the pleading invitation to all heavy-laden, sin-burdened souls to come to him for peace, which she had been listening to with such eagerness in the previous days; and, in the manner of slaves with their masters, she wiped the tear-wet feet with her long hair, which she had evidently loosed for this loving pleading; and, as she stood behind him, listening intently to the sweet words The ointment’s aroma was what first attracted the host’s attention to this sight of sadness and genuine penitence in the first place.Commentaries that run in parallel.Greek is a language spoken in Greece (kai) ConjunctionStrong’s 2532 is as follows: And, moreover, specifically, she took a stand.Active – Nominative Feminine – Aorist Participle – Verb – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – Aorist Participle – A SingularStrong’s 2476 is as follows: A shortened version of the fundamental stao stah’-o; to stand, which is employed in a variety of contexts.behind Him (opis) is a Greek word that means ″he who is.″ AdverbStrong’s 3694 is as follows: After, thereafter; behind, afterwards; back, rearward Taking the same form as opisthen, but with the addition of an enclitic of direction; to the rear, ie, Aback adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbi (para) Preposition Strong’s number 3844: The preposition comes from; the preposition comes beside, in the presence of; the preposition comes alongside of Genitive Masculine Personal/ Possessive Pronoun His (autou)Personal/ Possessive Pronoun 3rd Person Pronoun SingularStrong’s 846: He, she, it, they, them, the same, and so forth.The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.

feet The word podas is an accusative masculine noun.It’s the foot, according to PluralStrong’s 4228.’Foot’ is a fundamental term.

cry out in agony (klaiousa) Verb – Present Participle Active – Nominative Feminine Verb – Present Participle Active – Nominative Feminine ‘2799’ by SingularStrong means to grieve, weep for someone, mourn, or lament.Indeterminate affection; to sob, i.e.scream out loud.She began by saying rxato (rxato) is an abbreviation for rxato.The Aorist Indicative Form of the Verb Strong’s 756: To begin, in the middle – third person singular.To begin, the middle voice of archo will be used.

in order to wetv (brechein) Present Infinitive Verb – Present Infinitive Verb ActiveStrong’s 1026 is as follows: Rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain.To moisten is a fundamental verb.It is his (autou)Personal / Possessive Pronoun – Genitive Masculine 3rd Person SingularStrong’s 846: he or she; it is they; they are the same; they are the same.

  1. The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.
  2. feet In the Strong’s 4228, the foot is used as an accusative masculine plural noun.
  3. ‘Foot’ is a fundamental term.
  4. with the help of (tous) Strong’s 3588:the, the definite article, is an accusative masculine plural form.
  5. This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the.
  • Article – Dative Neuter PluralStrong’s 3588:the, which is the definite article in English.
  • This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the.
  • tears (dakrysin)Noun – Dative Neuter PluralStrong’s 1144: a tear (dakrysin).
  • Alternatively spelled dakruon dak’-roo-on; of uncertain affinity; a sigh.
  • and (kai)ConjunctionStrong’s 2532: and, even more importantly, specifically.
  • swiping a clean slate (exemassen) The verb is in the third person and is imperfect indicative.
  1. SingularStrong’s 1591: To wipe (off), wipe (off) thoroughly is an idiomatic expression.
  2. Massaomai is made by kneading the ek and the base of the massaomai, which means to wipe dry.
  3. with the help of (tais) Article – Dative Feminine (Dative Feminine) PluralStrong’s 3588:the, the definite article, is a definite article.

This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the.Her hair was a mess.Noun – Dative Feminine PluralStrong’s 2359: Noun – Dative Feminine Plural Hair is a term used to describe the appearance of a person’s hair (of the head or of animals).Hair, trichos, and other genitive cases of uncertain derivation; trichos, etc.

Then there’s (kai)ConjunctionStrong’s 2532: and, even more importantly, specifically.She kissed him on the cheek The verb is in the third person and is imperfect indicative.SingularStrong’s 2705 is to kiss someone with affection.From kata and Phileo, a sincere kiss is exchanged.Genitive Masculine Personal/ Possessive Pronoun His (autou)Personal/ Possessive Pronoun 3rd Person Pronoun SingularStrong’s 846: He, she, it, they, them, the same, and so forth.The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.

a pair of feet (podas) In the Strong’s 4228, the foot is used as an accusative masculine plural noun.’Foot’ is a fundamental term.and as well as (kai) ConjunctionStrong’s 2532 is as follows: And, in addition, specifically.a person who has been anointed (leiphen) Indicative Imperative Form of the Verb 3rd Person Pronoun – Active SingularStrong’s 218 is as follows: Anointing can be done for a variety of reasons, including festivals, tribute, therapeutic purposes, and anointing the dead.To lubricate.in conjunction with the (t) Article – Dative Neuter SingularStrong’s 3588: Dative Neuter SingularStrong’s 3588: The article is capitalized like the definite article.

This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; the.perfume.(myr); and the definite article Noun – Dative Neuter SingularStrong’s 3464: Noun – Dative Neuter Singular Anointing oil, anointing ointment ‘Myrrh,’ which is a perfumed oil, is most likely of foreign origin.Return to the previous page Drops of Anointing Oil Dry Eyes Feet Flask Hair Hairs Head House Anointing Oil Jesus Kissed and Kissed and Learned About Notorious Ointment Sinner Standing Stood Table Tears Wash Washed Weeping Wet Wipe Wiped Wiping Pharisee’s Poured Sinner Standing Stood Table Continue to Next Page Drops of Anointing Oil Dry Eyes Feet Flask Hair Hairs Head House Anointing Oil Jesus Kissed and Kissed and Learned About Notorious Ointment Sinner Standing Stood Table Tears Wash Washed Weeping Wet Wipe Wiped Wiping Pharisee’s Poured Sinner Standing Stood Table Links Luke 7:38 NIVLuke 7:38 NLTLuke 7:38 ESVLuke 7:38 NASBLuke 7:38 KJVLuke 7:38 NIVLuke 7:38 NLTLuke 7:38 ESVLuke 7:38 NASBLuke 7:38 KJVLuke 7:38 NIVLuke 7:38 NLTLuke 7:38 NLTLuke 7:38 NLTL BibleApps.com Luke 7:38 Biblia Paralela (Parallel Bible) Chinese Version of Luke 7:38 French translation of Luke 7:38 Jesus Christ’s words in Luke 7:38 Catholic Bible Gospels of the New Testament: Luke 7:38 (NIV) She is standing behind him, sobbing at his feet (Luke Lu Lk)

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