How Many Times Did Jesus Predict His Death

How many times did Jesus predict His death?

QuestionAnswer Jesus’ death was the ultimate sacrifice that satisfied the debt of sin owed by all mankind (Hebrews 9:28). The ultimate goal of His ministry was for him to die on the cross. According to the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke), Jesus foretold His own death at least three times, while the book of John has many more prophecies. The first time Jesus prophesied His death is recorded in Matthew 16:21–23, Mark 8:31–32, and Luke 9:21–22, with Matthew 16:21–23 being the most accurate.

“Get behind me, Satan!” Christ said as Peter began to criticize Jesus in an impulsive manner.

God’s plan to preserve the world necessitated such a sacrifice.

This occurred immediately after the Transfiguration, when Peter, James, and John were privileged to witness Christ in His glorious splendor for the first time.

  • They were under the impression that His reign was only around the corner.
  • The third time Jesus foretold His death is described in Matthew 20:17–19, Mark 10:32–34, and Luke 18:31–34, among other places.
  • It was the second time that the disciples were unable to comprehend what Jesus was saying because the message was concealed from them.
  • The Gospel of John contains a few additional prophecies about Jesus’ death, albeit they are a little more subtle in nature.
  • Despite the fact that it was not an explicit prediction like the other three, Jesus’ words plainly pointed to His impending death and burial on the cross.
  • Finally, in John 14:25, Jesus spoke of delivering the Holy Spirit to those who were absent from him, a reference to both his death and the future of the Christian church.

In order for them to believe when His death and the events that followed occurred, Jesus gave them prophecies regarding His death and the events that followed (John 14:29). Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) I’m curious how many times Jesus foretold His own death.

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How many times did Jesus predict His death?

‘To seek and to save the lost,’ Jesus said when he arrived on earth (Luke 19:10). Because of His death and resurrection (see 1 Corinthians 15:3–7, John 3:16–18, 36, and Ephesians 2:1–10), He provided redemption for all who put their belief in Him. In spite of the fact that His life was replete with magnificent miracles and teachings, they would have been meaningless without the work of Jesus’ death on the cross for the forgiveness of our sins and the resurrection that demonstrated this fact. Jesus’ death was the necessary sacrifice for our sins, and it was the result of that death.

Given the gravity of His death, Jesus prepared His people for it by expressing to them on several occasions that He would die and then be raised from the dead.

As a result, “from that point on, Jesus started to demonstrate to his followers that he would have to travel to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, chief priests, and scribes, as well as be slain and risen on the third day” (Matthew 16:21; see also Mark 8:31–32, Luke 9:21–22).

  1. “”Get behind me, Satan!” shouted Butturn to Peter, who turned to face him.
  2. Because you are not focusing your thoughts on the things of God, but rather on the things of man ” (Matthew 16:23).
  3. After the Transfiguration and after He had healed the demon-possessed boy, Jesus foretold His own death for the second time in Matthew 24.
  4. It was important that no one knew because he was instructing his followers, telling them that ‘The Son of Man is going to be handed into the hands of mankind, and they are going to murder Him’.
  5. Luke goes on to say that His followers were unable to comprehend Him and that the significance of His words was obscured from them.
  6. There are numerous instances in which Jesus used metaphors to refer to His death and resurrection, such as the Last Supper.
  7. “For just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish,” Jesus says, “so will the son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth” (Matthew 12:40; cf.
  8. Matthew and Luke both record Jesus making this comparison between His death and resurrection and Jonah’s time in the belly of a fish.
  9. By foretelling His death to His disciples, Jesus ensured that they recognized both His Godhead and the reason of His coming to this world, which was especially important given Jewish expectations that the Messiah would arrive as a conqueror who would liberate them from Roman oppression.
  10. Romans 5:12–21 describes Jesus as the perfect, once-and-for-all sacrifice, whose worth is so high that His death was sufficient to pay the penalty for all of our sins.
  11. What was the purpose of the temple veil?

Is it true that Jesus rose from the dead? Was Jesus Christ truly raised from the dead? What is the High Priestly Prayer of Jesus? What is the significance of the ascension of Jesus Christ? Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

Jesus predicts his death – Wikipedia

An early Christian catacomb artwork depicting Jesus and his disciples, dating from before the third century. It is said many times in the Synoptic Gospels (the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke) that Jesus foretold his own death, with the first two occurrences leading up to the ultimate prediction of his crucifixion on the third occasion. The Gospel of Matthew has a prophesy that Jesus would be crucified in Jerusalem before he and his followers arrive there.

Gospel of Mark

Jesus prophesies his death three times in the Gospel of Mark, which is often considered to be the earliest Gospel, having been written about the year 70. In addition, scholars point out that this Gospel has words in which Jesus appears to anticipate his own death, and they speculate that these verses represent the previous traditions that were available to the author/ Some academics, such as Walter Schmithals, believe that the author’s redactional formulation is the most likely explanation, while Schmithals acknowledges that there are “vexxing issues” about the sayings.

  1. During this time period, other researchers examine similar arguments and provide a different point of view, concluding that these sayings are historical.
  2. During the first prediction, the scene takes place somewhere nearCaesarea Philippi, right following Peter’s proclamation of Jesus as Messiah.
  3. When Peter raises his voice in opposition, Jesus responds as follows: “Satan, get out of my way!
  4. (Matthew 8:31–33.)

Gospel of Matthew

A passage from the Gospel of Matthew (16:21–28) describes this incident, stating that Jesus “began to show his followers that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be murdered.” This occurred on a number of occasions, according to the text. The passage in the Gospel of Luke 9:22–27 is condensed, with the interaction between Jesus and Peter being omitted. Each time Jesus predicts his own arrest and death, the disciples demonstrate their incomprehension un some manner or another, and Jesus takes use of the situation to teach them something new.

He addressed them as follows: “In the end, the Son of Man will be betrayed and fall into the hands of the wicked.

The crucifixion is especially mentioned in the third prediction in Matthew 20:17–19: As Jesus was making his way up to Jerusalem, he stopped and addressed the twelve disciples individually, saying, “On our way to Jerusalem, the Son of Man will be betrayed to the chief priests and teachers of the law, according to the Scriptures.

He shall be resurrected on the third day of his existence!” According to Matthew, the fourth prediction is contained in Matthew 26:1–2, right before the conspiracy against Jesus by the religious Jewish leaders: “As you know, the Passover is two days away — and the Son of Man will be delivered up to be crucified.” According to experts, the hypotheticalQ source, which is commonly thought to be a collection of sayings of Jesus that was used by the authors of the Gospels of Luke and Matthew in addition to the Gospel of Mark, does not contain any prophesies about the death of Jesus.

Gospel of John

When Jesus delivered these words to Nicodemus during their discussion in the Gospel of John, Jesus was pointing Nicodemus towards his death. In the same way that Moses hoisted up the serpent in the desert, the Son of Man must be lifted up in the same way. Jesus was implying that something akin to what happened to Moses in Numbers 21:4-9 would happen to him. In that passage, Moses lifted a bronze figure of a snake up on a pole. Throughout Chapters 12 to 17, this gospel also cites various instances in which Jesus prepared his followers for his departure, which the gospel refers to as his “glorification.” These instances include the following: “The hour has arrived for the Son of Man to be exalted,” Jesus responded to their question.

Comparison of Synoptic Gospel predictions

Each of the Synoptic Gospels refers to Jesus as having foretold His death and resurrection within three days more than once. The following table provides a summary of the concordances found:

Matthew Mark Luke
Matthew 16:21-23: From that time Jesus began to show to His disciples that He must go to Jerusalem, and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised the third day. Then Peter took Him aside and began to rebuke Him, saying, “Far be it from You, Lord; this shall not happen to You!” But He turned and said to Peter, “Get behind Me, Satan! You are an offense to Me, for you are not mindful of the things of God, but the things of men.” Mark 8:31-33: And He began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. He spoke this word openly. Then Peter took Him aside and began to rebuke Him. But when He had turned around and looked at His disciples, He rebuked Peter, saying, “Get behind Me, Satan! For you are not mindful of the things of God, but the things of men.” Luke 9:21-22: And He strictly warned and commanded them to tell this to no one, saying, “The Son of Man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised the third day.”
Matthew 17:22-23: Now while they were staying in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is about to be betrayed into the hands of men, and they will kill Him, and the third day He will be raised up.” And they were exceedingly sorrowful. Mark 9:30-32: Then they departed from there and passed through Galilee, and He did not want anyone to know it. For He taught His disciples and said to them, “The Son of Man is being betrayed into the hands of men, and they will kill Him. And after He is killed, He will rise the third day.” But they did not understand this saying, and were afraid to ask Him. Luke 9:43-45: But while everyone marveled at all the things which Jesus did, He said to His disciples, “Let these words sink down into your ears, for the Son of Man is about to be betrayed into the hands of men.” But they did not understand this saying, and it was hidden from them so that they did not perceive it; and they were afraid to ask Him about this saying.
Matthew 20:17-19: Now Jesus, going up to Jerusalem, took the twelve disciples aside on the road and said to them, “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be betrayed to the chief priests and to the scribes; and they will condemn Him to death, and deliver Him to the Gentiles to mock and to scourge and to crucify. And the third day He will rise again.” Mark 10:32-34: Now they were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was going before them; and they were amazed. And as they followed they were afraid. Then He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them the things that would happen to Him: “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be betrayed to the chief priests and to the scribes; and they will condemn Him to death and deliver Him to the Gentiles; and they will mock Him, andscourge Him, and spit on Him, and kill Him. And the third day He will rise again Luke 18:31-34: Then He took the twelve aside and said to them, “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of Man will be accomplished. For He will be delivered to the Gentiles and will be mocked and insulted and spit upon. They will scourge Him and kill Him. And the third day He will rise again.” But they understood none of these things; this saying was hidden from them, and they did not know the things which were spoken.
Matthew 26:32But after I have risen, I will go ahead of you into Galilee.”
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Interestingly, according to the Daily Mass Readings offered by the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church, the prediction made by Jesus in Mark 9:32 has one of its primary sources in theWisdom of Solomon: 12 For this reason, we should be on the lookout for the righteous, for he is not waiting for us, and he is pure in contrast to our deeds: He reproves and condemns us for breaking the law, and he objects to the shame we have brought upon ourselves by transgressing the laws of our education.

17 See whether his words are correct, and see what happens to him at the end of the story.

Let us examine him with despitefulness and torture in order to determine his humility and demonstrate his endurance.

—Wisdom 2:12, 17-20 (Book of Wisdom) (KJV translation)

Historical context

Jesus delivered prophecies regarding the coming of the “Son of Man.” There are five different meanings for this Hebrew term, depending on the context in which it is used: all mankind (humanity as a whole), human being (man as opposed to God), personal pronoun (“I,” “myself”), sinner (an unjust person as opposed to a just person), and the messiah (Jesus Christ) (the awaited king). He also foretold that the Son of Man will be turned over/betrayed to a group of people, including the elders, chief priests, scribes, and teachers of the law.

According to John 18, Jesus was brought before the two chief priests in power at the time, Annas and Caiaphas.

Gentile is a Hebrew term that refers to non-Jewish people. Although crucifixion is not permitted as a form of punishment in Judaism, ancient Roman law did permit the crucifixion of certain individuals, such as slaves and pirates, under certain conditions.

See also

  • The life and times of Jesus
  • In the Gospel of John, Jesus anticipates his betrayal. The life of Jesus as depicted in the New Testament

Notes

  1. According to Witherington (2001), p. 31: “St Mark’s Gospel and the Christian Faithby Michael Keene 2002ISBN0-7487-6775-4pages 24-25
  2. “The Temptations of Jesus in Mark’s Gospelby Susan R. Garrett 1996ISBN0-8028-4259-6pages 74-75
  3. “St Mark’s Gospel and the Christian Faithby Michael Keene 2002ISBN0-7487-6775-4pages 24-25.” ‘between 66 and 70, with a strong likelihood of being closer to the latter’
  4. Hooker (1991), p. 8: In Walter Schmithals’ The Theology of the First Christians (Westminster John Knox Press, 1997), page 22, he writes, “the Gospel is commonly dated between AD 65 and 75.” Licona, Michael, et al., eds (2021). “Did Jesus foretell his death and vindication/resurrection?” the question asks. Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus.8: 47–66.doi: 10.1163/174551909X12607965419595.:CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. The Gospel of Mark: meaning and message.’ Matthew for Everyone: Chapters 16-28by Tom Wright 2004ISBN0-664-22787-2page 9
  6. Mercer Dictionary of the Bibleby Watson E. Mills and Roger Aubrey Bullard 1998ISBN0-86554-373-9page 550
  7. “Bible Gateway passage: Mark 9:30–32 – New Revised Standard Version”
  8. John 3:14
  9. Numbers 21:4–9
  10. Matthew 20:17 Leland Ryken, Jim Wilhoit, Tremper Longman, Colin Duriez, Douglas Penney, and Daniel G. Reid collaborated on a dictionary of biblical imagery. 1998ISBN0-8308-1451-5page 269
  11. ISBN0-8308-1451-5
  12. Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 26:32 – New International Version”.Bible Gateway. John 12:23–24
  13. Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 26:32 – New International Version. “Daily Mass Readings – 23 September 2018 – Sunday”.catholiewtn.com. Retrieved 2019-04-27
  14. “Daily Mass Readings – 23 September 2018 – Sunday”.catholiewtn.com. It was archived from the original on November 21, 2018
  15. “The 1611 King James Bible, Chapter 12, verses 12 to 20”.kingjamesbibleonline.org. Archived from the original on November 21, 2018. On June 28, 2012, the original version of this article was archived. Son of Man, according to the Jewish Encyclopedia In contrast to and separate from non-human relationships, this rendition for the Hebrew word “ben adam” is used to mankind in general
  16. It expresses also the greater, boundless connotations of humanity as opposed to confined (e.g., national) forms and elements of human life. It is possible that the New Testament language “bar nasha” was intended to be read simply as a substitute for a personal pronoun or as stressing the human attributes of people to whom it was used since it is a translation of the Aramaic phrase “bar nasha.” “Sons of men,” or “children of men,” indicates also those who defame and do evil in contrast to the righteous, which is Israel (Ps. lvii. 5, lviii. 2)
  17. “sons of men” or “children of men” designates also those who do evil in contrast to the righteous, which is Israel (Ps. lvii. 5, lviii. 2)
  18. Messiah, according to the Jewish Encyclopedia The Messiah is referred to as “the Son of Man,” and he is described as an angelic being with a human countenance who sits beside the Ancient of Days (xlvi. 1), or, as it is expressed in ch. xxxix. 7, “under the wings of the Lord of spirits.” He is also described as having a human countenance who sits beside the Ancient of Days (xlvi. 1), and as occupying a seat in heaven beside the Ancient of Days It is possible to conclude from the Assumptio Mosis (c. 4 B.C.) that the preexistent Messiah is the one who is referred to (x. 2), based on the identification of the Son of Man = Messiah with Enoch = Mearon in Enoch lxxii. 14, that it is the preexistent Messiah who is referred to (x. 2), because it is stated that, at the end of the last tribulation, when God’s dominion over The Sanhedrin is a chapter in the Jewish Encyclopedia. In a letter to the Jewish people, Antiochus V. also sent his greetings to the gerusia. This gerusia, which sat at the head of the people, was the body that was later referred to as the “sanhedrin” (the council of elders). It is currently impossible to ascertain the date and manner of its creation. In Josephus’s writings, the council is known as either the “elders” or the “councilors,” and its members are referred to as either the “elders” or the “councilors,” whose number was probably the same as that of the members of the Sanhedrin in the stone hall, namely, seventy-one or seventy-two
  19. Jewish Encyclopedia: Priests and Levites In addition to the “head priest” (“kohen ha-rosh”), the “kohen mishnch,” who occupies the second position (II Kings xxv. 18 et al. ), is mentioned. Scribe in the Jewish Encyclopedia Their organization began with Ezra, who was their leader, and ended with Simeon the Just
  20. A group of instructors whose responsibility it was to expound the Law to the public
  21. Education in the Jewish Encyclopedia The guys who are thus engaged are referred to as V05p043011.jpg or V05p043012.jpg, which is a Hebrew term that means “expounders of the Torah.” For the first time in Jewish history, a formalized group of educators has come together. The Prophets had been replaced by the priests, who in turn had been replaced by the scribes, also known as “the wise” people (comp. B. B. 12a, V05p043013.jpg). The latter are referred to as “teachers” in Daniel xiii. 3
  22. “those who are wise shall shine as the brightness of the heavens
  23. And they who convert many to righteousness, as the stars for ever and ever,” says the prophet. The second phrase is addressed to the instructors, according to the Talmud
  24. USCCB John 18:19-24 The high priest confronted Jesus with a series of questions. Then Annas had him bound and sent to Caiaphas, the high priest
  25. The Cambridge history of Judaism, Volume 2, Cambridge University Press, 1989, p. 193.ISBN978-0-521-24377-3
  26. Crucifixion is a topic covered in the Jewish Encyclopedia. In the Jewish penal code, crucifixion is not mentioned
  27. The “hanging on a tree” of criminals, which is mentioned in Deuteronomy xxiii. 22, was used only after lapidation, according to Sanh. vi. 4 and Sifre, ii. 221, edited by Friedmann in Vienna in 1864
  28. Robinson, John C., “The Death Penalty in the New Testament,” in The New Testament, p. xii (June 2002). “Crucifixion in the Roman World: The Use of Nails at the Time of Christ” is a paper published in the Journal of the History of Religions. 2nd edition of Studia Antiqua
  29. Joseph Zias (1998). “The Evidence for the Crucifixion in Antiquity.” Obtainable on March 10, 2018

References

The level of craftsmanship with which The Gospel According to Matthewwas written never ceases to astound me. This isn’t simply some haphazard attempt by a lone individual to document the events of his life. No, Matthew wasn’t a shady writer in the traditional sense. Mattew put together a masterpiece that, like any genuinely great narrative, instills perspective and inspires understanding while constantly directing us to the true Christ. He was inspired by the Holy Spirit and learned from Jesus’ brilliance by actually walking with Him and learning from His teaching.

Matthew’s Gospel points us in the right way in this regard.

Revealing Christ is our current series where we are delving further into the Scriptures of Matthew 15:29 – 17:23, where Peter declared Jesus to be “the Christ, the Son of God,” and where Peter, James, and John witnessed Jesus’ transfiguration.

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3 Times Jesus Foretold His DeathResurrection

It is in Matthew 16:21 (ESV) that we find the first prophecy, which states: “From that point on, Jesus started to teach his followers that He must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things from the elder and chief priest and scribes, and be crucified, and on the third day be risen.” (Matthew 16:21, English Standard Version) Matthew distinguishes this section from the others by beginning it with the words “From that time.” The usage of this word earlier in the book, when Matthew uses it to stress the commencement and direction of Jesus’ mission while stating His primary message: “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand,” may bring this phrase back to your memory (Matthew 4:17 ESV).

  1. In the same way, Matthew used the word in this passage to call our attention to the direction in which Jesus’ ministry is now heading.
  2. “You are the Christ, the Son of God,” Peter responded when Jesus went further and asked who the disciples believed He was (Matthew 16:16 ESV).
  3. This prophecy of His own death and resurrection aimed to let people recognize Him as Christ in the proper light, for to confess Him as Christ while denying Him the cross would be to have incorrect expectations of what He was capable of.
  4. I promise you that this will never happen to you” (Matthew 16:22 ESV).

I can’t help but think of the scene from The Chronicles of Narnia: When it comes to The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, In the middle of the night, Susan and Lucy are strolling with Aslan through the woods, gripping his mane and falling in love with him, only to realize that they are actually travelling with him to the Stone Table.

  • Of course, the news that Jesus imparted would be devastating to Peter and the rest of the disciples.
  • There is good news beyond Jesus’ death, although it appears to have escaped Peter’s awareness, and that good news is that Jesus will be risen from the grave on the third day.
  • Death, on the other hand, having been overcome, shows Him to be the genuine and better King; the suffering Servant promised by the prophet Isaiah.
  • Not only do we read the recorded interaction between Jesus and His followers, but as we read the tale, our gaze is drawn to the cross and the resurrection of Jesus Christ as well.
  • In Matthew 17, Jesus foreshadowed the events leading up to His own death and resurrection for the second time.
  • Matthew, on the other hand, goes on to describe two further events in which Jesus disclosed these truths to His followers.

A few of the disciples had just witnessed Jesus’ transfiguration and heard the voice of the Father saying, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; listen to Him.” In this second instance, the disciples had actually just witnessed Jesus’ transfiguration and heard the Father say, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; listen to Him” (Matt.

At the very least, Jesus’ motivation to live and die in complete surrender to His Father’s will, knowing that His Father’s goals and mission are the best shows itself in this prophecy when considered in its context.

You will notice that there was no reply this time; there was simply distress, and because Matthew’s account moves on to a different scenario directly after this paragraph, we should feel the weight of this essential pause at the end of this verse in Matthew 17:22-23 (ESV): In Galilee, while they were assembling, Jesus appeared to them and told them, “The Son of Man is going to be put into the hands of mankind, and they will murder him, and he will be risen on the third day.” And they were in a great deal of anguish.

Third and last point: Jesus’ prophecies about His own death and resurrection add to the dramatic tension of this most ultimate of redemption stories.

Let’s get ready.” After that, the Son of Man will be handed up to the chief priests and scribes, who will condemn him to death and hand him over to the Gentiles to be ridiculed, flogged, and crucified, after which he will be resurrected on the third day.” Jesus and His followers had embarked on a journey to the city of Jerusalem from Galilee.

  1. Jesus had not informed them when or where His death and resurrection would take place; all He had told them was that it was coming, that it was essential, and that He was fully committed to the mission.
  2. By the time they arrived at their final objective of Jerusalem, which they were well on their way there, the time for these occurrences would have come.
  3. To some extent, this proof of His foresight speaks volumes about His divinity, and Matthew is surely conveying this point for his audience with this storyline.
  4. The betrayal and execution of Jesus would be gruesome, with beatings, blood, and a crucifixion among the many horrors that would befall him.

There would be no such thing as a half-hearted belief. You’d have to be completely convinced that Jesus is who He claims to be, that His is the only path to genuine life, and that it’s definitely worth it to push through the muck and gloom in order to see the beauty.

Moving Forward Together

When we get to this third section at Redemption Church, as we continue our journey through Matthew, we will be officially kicking off Lent as a community of believers. We don’t normally do much in the way of Lent observance around here, but just as Advent is tied to Christmas, Lent is tied to the Passion of Christ and the celebration of the Resurrection. A period of preparation is underway, and we will be encouraging you to walk through that season intentionally; knowing that at the end of the road lies a bloody cross and our Saviour, who rose from the dead and is God with us.

As we come to see Jesus as the Christ, the Messiah, and the Savior, may we also recognize that in order for any of this to be real, He had to take the route of the cross.

May we purposefully prepare ourselves to answer the call for His glory and our delight, as we discover that there is abundant grace and restoration for all of us as we lean into the brokenness and muck that lies before us.

Predictions of His Death

Matthew 16:21-23 L 21 From that time Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem andsuffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised. L 22 And Peter took him and began to rebuke him, saying, “God forbid, Lord! This shall never happen to you.”23 But he turned and said to Peter,”Get behind me, Satan! You are a hindrance to me; for you are not on the side of God, but of men.” Mark 8:31-33 L 31 And he began to teach them thatthe Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. L L 32 And he said this plainly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him.L L 33 But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter, and said,”Get behind me, Satan! For you are not on the side of God, but of men.” Luke 9:21-22 L 21 But he charged and commanded them to tell this to no one,22 saying,”The Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.”
Matthew 17:22-23 L L L L L 22 As they were gathering in Galilee, Jesus said to them,”The Son of man is to be delivered into the hands of men, 23and they will kill him, and he will be raised on the third day.”And they were greatly distressed. Mark 9:30-32 L 30 They went on from there and passed through Galilee. And he would not have any one know it;31 for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them,”The Son of man will be delivered into the hands of men, and they will kill him; and when he is killed, after three days he will rise.” 32 But they did not understand the saying, and they were afraid to ask him. Luke 9:43-45 L 43 And all were astonished at the majesty of God. But while they were all marveling at everything he did, he said to his disciples,44″Let these words sink into your ears; for the Son of man is to be delivered into the hands of men.” L L 45 But they did not understand this saying, and it was concealed from them, that they should not perceive it; and they were afraid to ask him about this saying.
Matthew 20:17-19 L 17 And as Jesus was going up to Jerusalem, he took the twelve disciples aside, and on the way he said to them,L L L L L 18″Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem; and the Son of man will be delivered to the chief priests and scribes, and they will condemn him to death, 19and deliver him to the Gentiles to be mocked and scourged and crucified, and he will be raised on the third day.” Mark 10:32-34 L 32 And they were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; and they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. And taking the twelve again, he began to tell them what was to happen to him,33 saying,”Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem; and the Son of man will be delivered to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death, and deliver him to the Gentiles; 34and they will mock him, and spit upon him, and scourge him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise.” Luke 18:31-34 L L L L L L L L L L 31 And taking the twelve, he said to them,”Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and everything that is written of the Son of man by the prophets will be accomplished. 32For he will be delivered to the Gentiles, and will be mocked and shamefully treated and spit upon; 33they will scourge him and kill him, and on the third day he will rise.” 34 But they understood none of these things; this saying was hid from them, and they did not grasp what was said.

PREDICTIONS BASED ON THE GOSPEL OF JOSHUA L 28 – John 8:27-30 – Then he went on to say, “When you have lifted up the Son of Man, then you will know that I am he, and that I do nothing on my own power but speak in accordance with what the Father has taught me.” He is with me; he hasn’t abandoned me because I always do what pleases him.” 29 And he who sent me is always at my side. 30 As he talked, many people put their faith in him. L 7 L 12 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 L 7 “Leave her alone, and allow her to keep it until the day of my burial,” Jesus instructed.

  1. L John 12:23 L John 23:23 And Jesus said, “The hour has arrived for the Son of Man to be exalted,” he said.
  2. 27 Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you; not the peace that the world provides, but the peace that I give to you is mine.
  3. ‘I go away, and then I shall come to you,’ I said to you, and you heard me say it.
  4. 29 And now that I’ve informed you before it happens, you’ll be more likely to trust me when it does happen.

Despite the fact that he has no authority over me, I do what the Father has told me to do in order for the world to know that I adore the Father. Let us rise and proceed to our destination. Return to the Logosemail home page. Getting Back to the Home Page

The Three Major Passion Predictions in Mark

Three times in Mark 8–10, Jesus predicts his death, and each time the disciples are unable to comprehend or respond correctly. Jesus then instructs them on the meaning of discipleship.

See also:  How Did Jesus Know He Was The Son Of God
Announcement of Jesus’ Death Failure on the Part of the Disciples Jesus Teaches on Discipleship
Jesus will suffer, be rejected, killed, and will rise after three days (8:31) Peter rebukes Jesus (8:32–33) Jesus commands them to deny themselves, take up their cross, and follow him (8:33–9:1)
Jesus will be delivered, killed, and will rise after three days (9:30–31) The disciples do not understand the saying and are afraid to ask him about it (9:32) Jesus teaches that the first must be last and that those who receive children in his name receive him (9:33–50)
Jesus will be delivered, condemned, mocked, flogged, killed, and will rise after three days (10:33–34) James and John ask that they may sit next to Jesus in his glory (10:35–37) Jesus teaches that, to be great, they must become servants; to be first, they must become slaves; and that he came to serve by giving his life as a ransom for many (10:38–45)

Did Jesus Predict His Death and Resurrection?

Craig A. Evans is the author of this piece. While gospel criticism has been around since the beginning of the twentieth century, many critics have argued that Jesus’ prophesies of death and resurrection are vaticinia ex eventu, or predictions that were formed by early Christians. According to Rudolf Bultmann, a form critic from his day, “the prophesies of the Passion and Resurrection. have long been regarded as secondary constructs of the church,” which properly expressed intellectual thinking of the time.

  • It must be acknowledged that these prophecies have been revised in light of the events that befell Jesus at the time of writing.
  • Let us analyze the evidence that Jesus was aware of his impending death by crucifixion.
  • Because of the intimate relationship between Jesus and John, it is logical to believe that when Jesus continued John’s message of repentance and the coming of the kingdom of God, he was well aware of the danger he was in.
  • After addressing John (see Mark 11:27-33), Jesus relates the parable of the Wicked Vineyard Tenants (see Mark 12:1-12), in which he implies that the “son” of the vineyard owner (that is, Jesus) would be slain.
  • “Abba!” Jesus exclaims as he falls to his knees.
  • If you believe in yourself, anything is possible; take this cup away from Me; but not what I will, but what you will” (Mark 14:36, NASB).
  • Why a first-century Christian would fabricate a passage in which Jesus looks to be afraid and hesitant to go to his death is difficult to fathom.

It is difficult to imagine a more jarring contrast with the agonizing synoptic prayer than this.

(John 19:30, New American Standard Bible.) It follows from this that the church tendency to present Jesus in a more dignified and dominating aspect is documented in the Johannine tradition.

Furthermore, according to the Gospels, Jesus instructed his disciples to pick up the cross and follow him (see Mark 8:34).

Is it possible for his disciples to follow him in the face of such a bleak future?

When the time came for him to bear his cross, he was unable to do so; his cross was borne by someone else (see Mark 15:21).

It is possible to find examples of Jewish models of suffering for the sake of righteousness that are beneficial to the people of Israel.

The deaths of the Maccabean martyrs are also commemorated as paving the way for Israel’s salvation, according to Jewish tradition (see 2 Macc 7:32-33).

The expectation of the Resurrection Is it possible that Jesus foresaw his own resurrection?

Following his death, Jesus is highly likely to have moved on to talk of his vindication through resurrection at some point.

There are three considerations that must be taken into consideration: To begin, Jesus, like many Jews of his day, believed in the resurrection of the dead in the coming days (see Dan.

23:11-31; 4 Macc 7:3; 4 Ezra 7:26-42; 2 Bar.

18.1.3-5, 14, 16, 18; Ant.

“When you have a reception, invite the crippled, the lame, and the blind, and you will be blessed, for they do not have the means to repay you; for you will be reimbursed at the resurrection of the righteous,” Jesus advises his dinner party host (Luke 14:13-14, NASB).

The Dead Sea Scrolls include evidence of the similar concept, in which the Messiah and the general resurrection are related (see 4Q521).

Second, according to the Aramaic paraphrase, Jesus’ prediction of his resurrection “after three days” or “on the third day” was very definitely based on Hos 6:2, which is echoed in the Greek text.

Instead of reading: “He will revive us after two days; on the third day he will raise us up that we may live before him” (as the Hebrew does) and “He will raise us up that we may live before him,” the Aramaic reads: “He will give us life in the days of consolations to come; on the day of the resurrection of the dead he will raise us up.” The Hebrew and Greek versions are nearly identical.

  1. It was in this chapter that Jesus expressed faith in being raised up “after three days” (or “on the third day”), that is, “on the day of the resurrection of the dead,” which, given the nearness of God’s kingdom, must undoubtedly be near as well.
  2. As a matter of fact, there is no indication that the disciples completely comprehended Jesus’ reference and odd interpretation, nor that they were comforted in any way by his prediction (s).
  3. Third, there is a long and illustrious heritage of holy Jewish martyrs who, following their brutal and harsh deaths, look forward to being vindicated via resurrection.
  4. “You accursed wretch, you dismiss us from this present life, but the King of the universe will raise us up to an unending renewal of life, since we have died for his commandments,” one of the brothers lashes out at Antiochus (v.
  5. “One cannot help but choose to die at the hands of mankind and to treasure the hope that God provides that one will be resurrected again by him,” says another brother to the dictator.
  6. 14).
  7. If all of the evidence is taken into consideration, it is reasonable to conclude that Jesus anticipated his resurrection, maybe as part of a larger universal resurrection, and that this resurrection would occur very soon after his death.

Bultmann’s The History of the Synoptic Tradition (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1972), we find the phrase “the history of the synoptic tradition.” 2 For the purposes of my argument, I will use the “criterion of embarrassment,” according to which it is presumed that the early church did not generate material that would later become the source of its own humiliation.

  • E.
  • A.
  • Tombs (eds.
  • T.
  • See also my paper ” 4 The Maccabean Martyrs as Saviours of the Jewish People: A Study of the Second and Fourth Maccabees, by J.
  • van Henten, is a good place to start (JSJSup 57; Leiden: Brill, 1997).

W. van Henten and F. Avemarie, is another resource (London and New York: Routledge, 2002). 5 Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 2003), p. 818-24. J. D. G. Dunn, Jesus Remembered (Christianity in the Making 1, Grand Rapids, 2003), p. 818-24. Originally published on March 30, 2016.

Did Jesus Predict His Own Resurrection?

Yes. Jesus foretold the event of the resurrection months before it occurred. In the course of Jesus’ life and teaching, the fact that He would rise from the grave played an important role. The resurrection of Jesus Christ cannot be viewed as a stand-alone occurrence in the life of the Son of God. He made a lot of predictions. Once a person has finished reading the four gospels, he or she will be struck by the fact that Jesus prophesied, over and over again, His betrayal, his death, and resurrection.

Because of this, the Jews responded by asking, ‘What indication do you provide us that you are doing these things?’ he was asked.

When he was risen from the dead, his followers recalled that he had said this, and they trusted the Scriptures and the word of Jesus (John 2:18-22).

The resurrection was to provide as a demonstration that Jesus was, in fact, the one whom He professed to be.

Although an evil and adulterous generation yearns for a sign, it will receive none other than the sign given to Jonah the prophet; for just as Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of the sea monster, so will the Son of Man spend three days and three nights in the heart of the earth, as prophesied by the prophet Micah (Matthew 12:39-40).

  • From that point on, Jesus started to demonstrate to his followers that he would have to go to Jerusalem, suffer many things at the hands of the elders, chief priests, and scribes, be slain, and be raised from the dead on the third day (Matthew 16:21).
  • Jesus also made the incredible assertion that He possessed the authority to perform the miracle of the resurrection on His own.
  • No one can take it away from me, but I must lay it down of my own own.
  • All of Jesus’ prophecies had already been fulfilled.

On the following day, which followed the Day of Preparation, the chief priests and Pharisees got together and addressed Pilate, saying, “Sir, we recall how that liar stated, while he was still alive, “I will rise after three days.” As a result, instruct that the tomb be kept guarded until the third day, lest his followers come in the middle of the night and take Him away, proclaiming to the people that “He has risen from the dead.” As a result, the last deceit will be much worse than the first (Matthew 27:62-64).

As a result, it is undeniable that Jesus foretold His own resurrection before it occurred.

The first time we hear Jesus talk about being risen from the dead was at the start of his ministry, according to the Bible.

When asked for a sign on another occasion, Jesus responded by giving them the sign of Jonah.

In addition, he shared the events of his death and resurrection with his followers in private.

As a result, the religious leaders requested that a guard be stationed at his tomb. Unless he had prophesied that he would rise from the dead, there would be no need for a guard to protect him. As a result, the evidence is unambiguous: Jesus foretold his own resurrection.

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