How Did Jesus Fulfill The Feasts?

How the Jewish Feasts were Fulfilled

The seven yearly feasts were observed throughout a period of seven months (Deuteronomy 16, Leviticus 23), at specific periods established by God for each feast.They foretell the predetermined periods when God’s work of redemption via His Son, Jesus, will be completed, and they will influence both Jesus and all who trust in him.The Jewish holiday of Passover The phrase ″passover″ should be interpreted in the sense of ″hovering over,″ i.e., to guard or convey anything important.God’s presence hovered over His people, shielding them from harm’s way.The tribe of Israel was rescued from physical servitude that would have resulted in death in Egypt and placed in a position of lifetime devotion to God.In the same way, the believer in Christ is released from spiritual slavery (bondage to sin) that leads to death and is transformed into a life of service to Christ that leads to eternal life.

Our Passover is represented by Jesus, the Lamb of God.1 Corinthians 5:7-8, 1 Corinthians 5:9, ″Purge out the old leaven, so that you may be a new lump, as if you had never been leavened before.Due to the fact that even Christ our Passover was offered as a sacrifice on our behalf, let us keep the feast not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but rather with the unleavened bread of sincerity and honesty.″ The Feast of Unleavened Bread is observed every year on the first day of the month of Unleavened Bread.This was a continuation of the celebration of Passover in the previous week.

Yeast (also known as leaven) aids in the fermentation process, and the Bible uses yeast as an example of sin (1 Corinthians 5:6,7).We can seek forgiveness for our sins via the prayer of Christ, who serves as our intercessor.Only because ″Christ our Passover has been slaughtered for us″ is it possible to participate in this feast.Similarly, the Passover and the feast without leaven demonstrate fundamentals for the believer: just as there were seven days of eating bread without yeast, so there should be seven days of living a whole life without from sin for believers.Sinful yeast must be eliminated from our lives before the sacrifice of Christ can be considered effective.

  • The Feast of the Firstfruits is celebrated every year on the first of September.
  • This was a foreshadowing of the resurrection of Jesus.
  • The event took place on the third day after Passover; Jesus resurrected from the dead on the third day as well (Matthew 16:21).
  • ″But now Christ has been raised from the dead, and has become the firstfruits of those who have asleep,″ says 1 Corinthians 15:20.
  • No one was authorized to consume bread, parched corn, or green ears of corn until the sheaf of the firstfruits had been brought to the Lord in accordance with the law.
  • As a result, there could be no harvesting of the crop until God had gathered the firstfruits from the tomb in the Garden of Gethsemane (1 Corinthians 15:23).
  1. The Feast of Weeks (also known as Pentecost or Harvest) is celebrated on the first day of the week.
  2. This event took place at the start of wheat harvesting, seven weeks after the Feast of the Firstfruits, and was a celebration of the crop (Leviticus 23:15-16).
  3. Pentecost is the name given to this event in the New Testament (the Greek word ‘pente’ means fifty).
  4. This festival marked the imparting of the Law, which took place 50 days after the Sabbath following the Passover and took place on the 50th day of the next month.
  5. According to Acts 2, a fresh insight was given to the people on the day of Pentecost following Jesus’ resurrection, and the gospel preached by the apostles included an open invitation to all people to join a covenant relationship with God by baptism into Christ.
  • ″Then Peter said unto them, ″Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sins, and ye will receive the gift of the Holy Ghost,″ according to Acts 2:38.
  • The Festival of the Trumpets Although not exactly four months after Pentecost, the Feast of Trumpets was a day of rest marked by trumpet blasts and sacrifices, during which the nation was brought before God for the first time in history.
  • This was a foreshadowing of the moment when the Lord descended from heaven on the sound of the trumpet call of God.
  • This was achieved in the year 70AD.
  • 1 Thessalonians 4:16 is a biblical passage.
  • ″For the Lord himself will come down from heaven with a cry, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God,″ says the Bible.
  • ″ The Bible says in 1 Corinthians 15:52, ″Within a split second, in the blink of an eye, at the final trump, because the trumpet shall sound.″ The Day of Atonement is a day of repentance and forgiveness.
  • On this day, the priests gave offerings of atonement for themselves as well as for the rest of the congregation.
  • The scapegoat’s sacrifice served as a symbol of Christ’s death and resurrection, as well as the atonement made as a result, and it looked forward to the work of redemption completed by Christ.
  • Hebrews 9:7,11, and other passages ‘However, he entered into the second tabernacle alone once a year, not without blood, which he offered for himself and for the sins of the people: But Christ having come as a high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is, not of this building;’ Hebrews 9:24-26, et cetera ″For Christ has not entered into the holy places constructed with human hands, which are mere representations of the truth; rather, he has entered into heaven itself, where he is now appearing in the presence of God for us: Furthermore, he should give himself frequently, as the high priest enters the holy place every year with the blood of others; because otherwise, he would have suffered frequently from the beginning of the world; but now, at the end of the world, he has appeared to wipe away sin by offering himself.″ The Feast of Tabernacles is celebrated every year on the first day of the first month of the Hebrew calendar (or Booths) The feast of tabernacles remembered their forty-year wandering in the desert, but it also foretold the time when they were granted a 40-year repentance period before the fall of Jerusalem.
  • This celebration is in stark contrast to the Day of Atonement, when the Israelites were instructed to torment themselves, and they are instructed to celebrate during this festival.
  • This third great celebration, which took place at the end of the harvest season, foreshadowed the day when the redeemed rejoiced in the presence of God (Revelation 7:9-17).

The ingathering of loyal ones marked the culmination of the process that began with the waving of the first solitary sheaf (which represented the Lord Jesus Christ) on the first day of the week after the Passover celebration.

How did Jesus fulfill the meanings of the Jewish feasts?

Answer to the question The manner in which Jesus observed the Jewish feasts is a fascinating subject of investigation.The Jewish prophet Amos reports in the Hebrew Scriptures that God said that He would do nothing until He first revealed it to His servants, the prophets, and that God would do nothing unless He first revealed it to them (Amos 3:7).Throughout the Bible, from the Old Covenant to the New, from Genesis to Revelation, God paints a picture after image of His complete purpose for mankind, and one of the most shocking prophetic sights is presented for us in Leviticus 23, which contains the Jewish feasts.A literal translation of the Hebrew term for ″feasts″ (moadim) is ″designated times.″ For each of these seven feasts, God has meticulously planned and organized the timing and sequence of events in order to reveal to us a unique tale.The seven yearly feasts of Israel were celebrated throughout the course of seven months of the Jewish calendar, at predetermined dates specified by God himself.Observant Jews continue to commemorate them to this very day.

However, for those who have placed their trust in Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, and who are both Jews and non-Jews, these particular days serve as a reminder of God’s work of redemption through His Son.Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks are the first four of the seven feasts that take place in the springtime (Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks), and they have all already been fulfilled by Christ in the New Testament.It is during the fall that the final three festivals (Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) are celebrated, with all three occurring within a fifteen-day period.Many Bible scholars and commentators feel that Jesus has not yet fulfilled the prophecies of these fall feasts.

The ″glad hope″ (Titus 2:13) for all followers of Jesus Christ, on the other hand, is that their expectations will very certainly be met.The four spring feasts, which were literally fulfilled on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s first coming, are believed to be similarly fulfilled literally in connection with the Lord’s second coming, which will take place on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s second coming.In a nutshell, the prophetic importance of each of Israel’s seven Levitical feasts can be summarized as follows: In Leviticus 23:5, the Messiah was identified as our Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7), whose blood would be spilt in our place to atone for our sins.Jesus was crucified at the period when the Jewish holiday of Passover was observed (Mark 14:12).God declared Christ to be a ″blemishless and perfect lamb″ (1 Peter 1:19) because His life was absolutely devoid of sin and defects (Hebrews 4:15).

  • As the first Passover commemorated the Hebrews’ liberation from Egyptian slavery, so the death of Christ commemorates our liberation from the bonds of sin that bind us (Romans 8:2).
  • In the Bible, leaven is a symbol of sin, therefore unleavened bread (Leviticus 23:6) pointed to the Messiah’s blameless life (as leaven represents sin), thereby making Him the ideal sacrifice for our sins.
  • During the first few days of this feast, Jesus’ corpse lay in the tomb, like a kernel of wheat sown in the ground, waiting to be harvested and harvested as the bread of life.
  • 3) First Fruits (Leviticus 23:10) – Alluding to the Messiah’s resurrection as the first fruits of the righteous, this verse refers to the resurrection of the Messiah.
  • Jesus was raised on this same day, which is one of the reasons why the apostle Paul refers to him in 1 Corinthians 15:20 as the ″first fruits from the dead,″ which means ″first fruits from the dead.″ 4) The Feast of Weeks, also known as Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16), occurred fifty days after the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and foreshadowed the great harvest of souls and the gift of the Holy Spirit for both Jews and Gentiles who would be brought into the kingdom of God during the Church Age.
  • 5) The Feast of Weeks, also known as Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16), occurred fifty days after the beginning of the (see Acts 2).
  1. The Church was officially created on this day when God poured forth His Holy Spirit and 3,000 Jews reacted to Peter’s wonderful sermon and his first proclamation of the gospel, marking the official beginning of the Church.
  2. (Leviticus 23:24) The Feast of Trumpets is the first of the fall feasts.
  3. Many think that this day heralds the beginning of the Rapture of the Church, when the Messiah Jesus will appear in the sky as He prepares to take His wife, the Church, to live with Him forever.
  4. The sounding of a loud trumpet is always connected with the Rapture in the Bible, and for good reason (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 and 1 Corinthians 15:52).
  5. 6) The Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:27) — Many think that this passage prophetically relates to the day of Jesus’ Second Coming, when He will return to the world.
  • As a result of their decision to ″look upon Him whom they have wounded,″ repent of their sins, and receive Him as the Messiah on that day, the Jewish remnant will experience the Day of Atonement (Zechariah 12:10 and Romans 11:1-6, 25-36).
  • (Leviticus 23:34) – Many academics think that this feast day is a reference to the Lord’s promise that He will once again ″tabernacle″ with His people when He comes to reign over all of the earth when He returns to reign over all of the globe (Micah 4:1-7).
  • Should Christians observe the Levitical feast days of Israel on this day in particular?
  • A Christian’s decision to observe or not observe the Jewish feast days would be a question of personal conscience for each individual Christian.
  • The Bible says in Colossians 2:16-17, ″Therefore, do not allow anybody to judge you by what you eat or drink, or by your participation in a religious holiday, a New Moon celebration, or a Sabbath day.″ ″These are only a shadow of what was to come; the actuality, on the other hand, is found in Christ.″ Even while Christians are not obligated to attend Jewish feast days in the same manner that an Old Testament Jew was, we should refrain from criticizing another believer who chooses to or does not choose to honor these particular days and feasts (Romans 14:5).
  • While it is not essential for Christians to observe the Jewish feast days, it is useful to get familiar with their traditions.
  • It is possible that celebrating these days will be good if it leads to a deeper knowledge and respect for Christ’s death and resurrection, as well as the future promise of His coming.
  • Those of us who are Christians who choose to observe these holy days should place Christ at the center of the celebration, as He is the One who came to fulfill the prophetic importance of each one of these days.
  • Return to the main page of Jewish Questions.
  • What role did Jesus play in the fulfillment of the meanings of the Jewish feasts?
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The Seven Feasts of Israel are Fulfilled in Jesus

INTRODUCTION The most complete account of how the Israelites were instructed by God to celebrate seven feasts over a period of seven months can be found in Leviticus 23, which is the longest book in the Bible.MOADIM is the Hebrew word for feasts and is properly translated as ″assigned times.″ The first four feasts were celebrated in the spring, and the latter three were celebrated in the fall.All of the feasts have numerous levels of significance and applicability.They were tied to the agricultural cycle and historical events, and their purpose was to serve as a reminder to the Hebrews of the LORD’s blessings on them.While these honors were significant, they pale in comparison to the main purpose of the feasts.As a result, don’t let anybody cast judgment on you when it comes to food and drink, or when it comes to a holiday, a new moon, or a Sabbath.

These are only a foreshadowing of what is to come, but the substance belongs to the Lord Jesus Christ.2 Corinthians 2:16-17 (ESV) The days that the Israelites observed on a regular basis were shadows or prophetic types that pointed to what their Messiah had done or would do in the future.To put it another way, every single feast was really about one of the major works that Jesus would carry out during his lifetime.When the Israelites observed the feasts, they were, in a sense, staging plays in which Jesus was the central character.

The book of Leviticus 23 serves as a powerful prophetic summary of God’s plan to redeem all of creation.PASSOVER The LORD’s Passover is celebrated on the fourteenth day of the first month, at twilight, on the fourteenth day of the month.Leviticus 23:5 is a verse from the book of Leviticus.The celebration of Passover (Hebrew: Pesach) began on the 14th of Nisan.The feast was to commemorate the time when the Israelites were passed over by the wrath of the LORD as He moved through Egypt, slaying the firstborn of each family.

  • The LORD passed over each home where the blood of a sacrificed lamb had been applied to the lintel and doorposts, and the LORD passed over each home where the blood of a sacrificed lamb had been applied to the doorposts (Ex.
  • 12:1-28).
  • Even before the first Passover took place, Moses decreed that the day would be kept as a memorial and a feast in honor of the Jewish people (Ex.
  • 12:14).
  • Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey on the tenth day of Nisan, the month of Nisan.
  • This occurred on the very same day that the Israelites were to select their unblemished lambs, which would be sacrificed by the entire congregation four days later, on the very same day (Ex.
  1. 12:3-6).
  2. Like the unblemished lambs, Jesus was presented to Israel as being perfect (i.e.
  3. sinless) before being sacrificed on the 14th day of Nisan or the beginning of Passover (John 19:14).
  4. (John 19:14).
  5. The Passover lambs died at twilight (Ex.
  • 12:6; Lev.
  • 23:5) as did Jesus (e.g.
  • Matt.
  • 27:45-50).
  • (e.g.
  • Matt.
  • 27:45-50).
  • Of course Jesus is the ultimate Passover lamb which the others were only pointing to.
  • Jesus was truly the lamb without defect (1 Peter 1:19) as He knew no sin (2 Cor.
  • 5:21).
  • (2 Cor.
  • 5:21).

Jesus was the lamb who takes sin away from the world (John 1:29).(John 1:29).Paul even identified Christ as the Passover lamb that had been sacrificed (1 Cor.5:7).

  • (1 Cor.
  • 5:7).
  • whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith.
  • This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins.

Romans 3:25 The blood of Jesus is applied to those who have faith in Him.This allows the sin of the saved person to be covered by the righteousness of Christ so that God may pass over.This is the true Passover that the first one in Egypt and the reenactments on the feast day were only looking to.

UNLEAVENED BREAD And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the Feast of Unleavened Bread to the Lord; for seven days you shall eat unleavened bread.On the first day you shall have a holy convocation; you shall not do any ordinary work.But you shall present a food offering to the Lord for seven days.On the seventh day is a holy convocation; you shall not do any ordinary work.” Leviticus 23:6 The feast of Unleavened Bread begins on the 15th of Nisan and lasts for seven days.

The first and last days of the seven day feast are identified as holy convocations or high Sabbaths.The feast looked to recall how the Israelites were not able to add yeast to their bread as they fled from Egypt (Ex.12:33-34).

  • (Ex.
  • 12:33-34).
  • The prohibition against eating leavened bread during the feast was so severe that all of it had to be removed from the Israelites’ homes.
  • If any person did eat leavened bread then he or she was cut off from Israel (e.g.
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Ex.12:15).(e.g.Ex.12:15).

  1. Recall that Jesus died only hours before sunset on Nisan 14.
  2. He would have been buried on the 15th of Nisan and thus on the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.
  3. While the burial of Jesus clearly fulfilled this feast, it is not immediately obvious as to how.
  4. The answer lies in that Scripture often uses leaven as a picture of sin and its corrupting nature.
  5. Jesus Himself used leaven in this sense on a few occasions including Mark 8:15: And he cautioned them, saying, “Watch out; beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and the leaven of Herod.” The apostle Paul also used leaven in this sense as part of his teachings.
  6. For example, 1 Corinthians 5:6: Your boasting is not good.

Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump?The burial of Jesus then signified Messiah’s sinless life and thereby Him being the perfect sacrifice.It may even be fair to conclude that the buried body of Jesus was likened to a kernel of wheat planted in the ground that would soon burst forth as the bread of life (John 6:35-51).(John 6:35-51).Even the Matzo bread used by Jews in celebrating Passover today is filled with piercings and wounds (Is.

53:5).(Is.53:5).FIRSTFRUITS And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the people of Israel and say to them, When you come into the land that I give you and reap its harvest, you shall bring the sheaf of the firstfruits of your harvest to the priest, and he shall wave the sheaf before the Lord, so that you may be accepted.On the day after the Sabbath the priest shall wave it.

  • Leviticus 23:9-11 The feast of Firstfruits is on the 17th of Nisan.
  • On this day the harvest was celebrated by waving a sheaf of the first ripened grain before the LORD.
  • Jesus rose from the dead on the third day and therefore on the feast of Firstfruits.
  • His resurrection was like a wave offering before the Father that signaled that there would be many more to follow (Rom.
  • 8:23).
  • (Rom.
  1. 8:23).
  2. Paul verifies this in 1 Corinthians 15:20: But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.
  3. WEEKS OR PENTECOST “You shall count seven full weeks from the day after the Sabbath, from the day that you brought the sheaf of the wave offering.
  4. You shall count fifty days to the day after the seventh Sabbath.
  • Then you shall present a grain offering of new grain to the Lord.
  • Leviticus 23:15-16 On the 6th of Sivan Shavuot or the Feast of Weeks or Pentecost (Greek for fifty) was to be observed.
  • It was a common Jewish belief that Weeks was commemorated in order to celebrate the day that the LORD gave Moses the Law on Mt.
  • Sinai and the subsequent birth of Israel as a nation (Ex.
  • 19).

(Ex.19).Moses brought the people out to meet God and they saw that Mt.Sinai was wrapped in smoke because the LORD had descended upon it in fire (Ex.

19:17-18).(Ex.19:17-18).Another holy nation, the Church (1 Pet.2:9) (i.e.

  • the Body of Christ) was born on Pentecost when the Father sent the Holy Spirit in Jesus’ name (John 14:26) to indwell His people (Acts 2).
  • (Acts 2).
  • Jesus appeared over a period of forty days after His resurrection (Acts 1:3).
  1. (Acts 1:3).
  2. Before Jesus ascended, He told the apostles not to leave Jerusalem, but to wait for what the Father had promised.
  3. For ten days the apostles were waiting for something to happen.
  4. The wait was necessary because the Holy Spirit had to come on the specified day.
  5. Fifty days after Messiah’s resurrection on Firstfruits, God once again descended upon His people with fire (Acts 2:3).
  6. (Acts 2:3).

It is even possible that the two loaves of bread that were to be brought before the LORD (Lev.23:17) represented both Jew and Gentile.SUMMER The first four feasts in the spring and the last three in the fall were respectively celebrated in clusters.The long season between the two clusters of feasts apparently represents the period between the two advents of Messiah.Paul explains that this is a time in which Israel is partially hardened until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in (Rom.

  1. 11:25).
  2. (Rom.
  3. 11:25).
  4. When this period ends the prophetic clock on Israel will resume and thus the beginning of the fall feasts.
  5. Because the last three feasts have not been fulfilled, only speculation is provided on how they will be.

However, there is enough Biblical evidence to allow for solid educated guesses.Because the first four feasts were fulfilled on the same days they were celebrated, this pattern is likely to continue.15 ‘You shall also count for yourselves from the day after the sabbath, from the day when you brought in the sheaf of the wave offering; there shall be seven complete sabbaths.16 You shall count fifty days to the day after the seventh sabbath; then you shall present a new grain offering to the Lord.DAY OF ATONEMENT And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, “Now on the tenth day of this seventh month is the Day of Atonement.

  1. It shall be for you a time of holy convocation, and you shall afflict yourselves and present a food offering to the Lord.
  2. And you shall not do any work on that very day, for it is a Day of Atonement, to make atonement for you before the Lord your God.
  3. Leviticus 23:26-28 Yom Kippur or the Day of Atonement is observed on the 10th of Tishri and is the most holy day among the Israelites.

This is the last of the high holy days and also the last opportunity during the year for sins to be confessed and atoned for.By fasting and refraining from work the people played out what it would be like to receive the death sentence for a day.All that could be done was to throw oneself at the mercy of the court and seek the forgiveness of God based on His merit alone.The Second Coming of Messiah fits the fulfillment of the Day of Atonement best.

On this day the final remnant of the Jews will look upon Him whom they have pierced and weep bitterly (Zech.12:10).(Zech.

  1. 12:10).
  2. The Jewish people will then come to experience true atonement by throwing themselves at the mercy of Jesus their Messiah.
  3. Finally, all of Israel will be saved (Rom.
  4. 11:26).
  1. (Rom.
  2. 11:26).
  3. Jesus required that the Jewish nation say of Him, “blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord” before they would see Him again (Matt.
  4. 23:39).
  1. (Matt.
  2. 23:39).
  3. At last this requirement will be fulfilled and Jesus will return to Earth (Zech.
  4. 14:4).
  5. (Zech.
  1. 14:4).
  2. TABERNACLES And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the people of Israel, saying, On the fifteenth day of this seventh month and for seven days is the Feast of Booths to the Lord… You shall dwell in booths for seven days.
  3. All native Israelites shall dwell in booths, Leviticus 23:33-34; 42 Sukkot or the Feast of Tabernacles was to be observed on the 15th of Tishri.
  4. The feast memorialized the Israelites living in tabernacles when the LORD brought them out of Egypt (Lev.
  5. 23:43).
  • (Lev.
  • 23:43).
  • The Feast of Tabernacles will be fulfilled by the Millennium or Messianic age.
  • This is a glorious period when Satan is bound and God in the person of Jesus will tabernacle with His people (e.g.
  • Is.
  • 24:21-23; Zech.
  • 14:9; Rev.

20:1-7).(e.g.Is.24:21-23; Zech.

14:9; Rev.20:1-7).Jesus literally tabernacles with man by being the divine word and taking on flesh.And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.

  1. John 1:14 The Greek σκηvόω is translated as dwelt here.
  2. However, it literally means to abide in a tabernacle.
  3. It is for this reason that Jesus may have even been born of the Feast of Tabernacles.
  4. On the first day of the feast, branches of olive, wild olive, myrtle, palm and other leafy trees were gathered to make the booths (Neh.
  5. 8:15).
  6. (Neh.
  1. 8:15).
  2. Saints coming out of the tribulation to enter the Millennium are described as holding palms in their hand (Rev.
  3. 7:9-17).
  4. (Rev.
  5. 7:9-17).
  6. Zechariah 14 describes events that will take place during the Millennium or Messianic age.
  1. Only one feast is mentioned as being celebrated: tabernacles.
  2. During the Messianic age there will still be unbelievers on earth and they will be forced to celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles or Messiah will allow no rain to fall on their land (Zech.
  3. 14:17-18).
  4. (Zech.

14:17-18).The importance of observing the feast during the Messianic age among even non-believers is striking.The fulfilled feast is so connected with the Messianic age that the two are virtually indistinguishable.While this connection may seem tenuous to those new to studying it, the position is an ancient one rooted in the early church.For example, the third century church father Methodius of Olympus wrote: The resurrection, which is the true Feast of the Tabernacles…on the first day of the resurrection, which is the day of judgment, celebrate with Christ the millennium of rest, which is called the seventh day, even the true Sabbath.Then again from thence I after the rest of the Feast of Tabernacles, come into the heavens, not continuing to remain in tabernacles… CONCLUSION Our God is truly amazing in the way that He has ordered events to unfold according to His sovereign purposes.

  1. The Feasts of Israel may have been celebrated by the Israelites for certain reasons.
  2. However, even in Leviticus God said that the feasts were appointed of the LORD and that they were His (Lev.
  3. 23:2).
  4. (Lev.
  5. 23:2).
  6. Their true nature was never limited to what the Israelites had gone through or needed from God, rather they were about the glorious things God would accomplish as the Son.

Truly, the substance belongs to Christ.The ninth hour was at 3 P.M.The decline of the sun in the sky constituted the twilight period.Likely barley as it was the first to ripen.Methodius, Banquet of the Ten Virgins, Ch.5.

How Did Jesus Fufill The Jewish Feasts?

YAHUWshuwaH used His resurrection as a lamb on Sunday after completing the Passover lamb for three days and having been with the Father for three days to sprinkle His blood on the mercy seat in heaven on the night of the Sunday’s arrival in heaven with the Father, His resurrection as a lamb on Sunday after completing the Passover lamb for three days and having been with the Father for three days to sprinkle His blood on the mercy seat in heaven

What Feast Did Jesus Celebrate?

During the Hanukkah season, according to John Chapter 10, when Jesus is honored in a particular way, Jesus indicates that he was in Jerusalem at the time.

How Did Jesus Fulfill The Feasts?

Following his death on the cross, Christ offers his spotless body as a sacrifice, and by rising from the dead, Christ fulfills the Feast of Firstfruits. By doing so, he brings about the resurrection of those who are ″asleep″ in the grave.

What Are The Seven Feasts Of The Lord?

  1. The Pesach Birthing Feast marks the beginning of the holiday season around the Passover seder.
  2. We were planning a seven-day feast of unleavened bread
  3. these are the first fruits that we would be able to enjoy.
  4. Ta avuot, also known as Passover, is observed at the end of each month and throughout the year
  5. ″’Drumming the Trumpets on the Feast of Rosh HaShanah’ (Rosh Hashanah).
  6. It is World Judaism Day (Yom Kippur), the day on which remorse for sin fills our minds.
  7. a flock of fruit from the cannes osautical (Feast of Tabernacles)
  8. a flock of fruit from the cannes osautical (Feast of Tabernacles)
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What Does The New Testament Say About The Feasts?

Several chapters, including Exodus 23, Numbers 28-29, and Deuteronomy 16, are devoted to the commemoration of the Lord’s feasts. A major concentration of Deuteronomy 16 and Numbers 28-29 is on the Pilgrims’ journeys, whereas Leviticus 23 is mostly concerned with feast days (Hui 1990:144).

What Is Unleavened Bread In The New Testament?

They were made with milk or flour as the primary component as well as water, which was lacking in the yeast version of the recipe. Traditionally, ancient breads in the Near East were baked over an open fire over hot coals or on a grill. Hebrew ma* bread is still made without the use of yeast and can be found baked.

Is The Passover The Same As The Feast Of Unleavened Bread?

On the first and final days of Passover in Israel, the first and last days of Passover were commemorated as legal holidays and as holy days during events such as food meals, prayer services, and absences from work; the remainder of the week is referred to as the ″Weekdays ch″ period (Weekdays).

When Was The First Feast Of Unleavened Bread?

On the first and final days of Passover in Israel, the first and last days of Passover were commemorated as legal holidays and as holy days during events such as food meals, prayer services, and absences from work; the remainder of the week is referred to as the ″Weekdays ch″ holiday (Weekdays).

What Are The 7 Feasts?

The festivals of Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, Pentecost, Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Booths, sometimes known as Tabernacles, are enumerated in Leviticus 23 in the order in which they occur during the year.

What Are The Feast Of The Lord?

All of Israel is welcomed to Jerusalem to celebrate three yearly festivals, including Passover, Shavuot (Pentecost), and the Feast of the Dead, which are all held in the city. Every meal, regardless of the day or the manner in which it is celebrated, constitutes a holy convocation, regardless of the manner in which it is conducted.

What Is Feast Celebration?

In other words, it’s the one day of the year dedicated to honoring, reenacting, commemorating rituals, or anticipating events and seasons. This means that each person and religious, political, or social community derives some satisfaction from their own events.

How did Jesus fulfil the meanings of the Biblical feasts?

Answer: The manner in which Jesus observed the Biblical feasts is a fascinating subject of investigation.The Jewish prophet Amos reports in the Hebrew Scriptures that God said that He would do nothing until He first revealed it to His servants, the prophets, and that God would do nothing unless He first revealed it to them (Amos 3:7).Throughout the Bible, from the Old Covenant to the New, from Genesis to Revelation, God paints a picture after image of His complete purpose for mankind, and one of the most shocking prophetic sights is presented for us in Leviticus 23, which contains the Jewish feasts.A literal translation of the Hebrew term for ″feasts″ (moadim) is ″designated times.″ For each of these seven feasts, God has meticulously planned and organized the timing and sequence of events in order to reveal to us a unique tale.The seven yearly feasts of Israel were celebrated throughout the course of seven months of the Jewish calendar, at predetermined dates specified by God himself.Observant Jews continue to commemorate them to this very day.

However, for those who have placed their trust in Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, and who are both Jews and non-Jews, these particular days serve as a reminder of God’s work of redemption through His Son.Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks are the first four of the seven feasts that take place in the springtime (Passover, Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, and Weeks), and they have all already been fulfilled by Christ in the New Testament.It is during the fall that the final three festivals (Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Tabernacles) are celebrated, with all three occurring within a fifteen-day period.Many Bible scholars and commentators feel that Jesus has not yet fulfilled the prophecies of these fall feasts.

The ″glad hope″ (Titus 2:13) for all followers of Jesus Christ, on the other hand, is that their expectations will very certainly be met.The four spring feasts, which were literally fulfilled on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s first coming, are believed to be similarly fulfilled literally in connection with the Lord’s second coming, which will take place on the actual feast day in connection with Christ’s second coming.In a nutshell, the prophetic importance of each of Israel’s seven Levitical feasts can be summarized as follows: In Leviticus 23:5, the Messiah was identified as our Passover lamb (1 Corinthians 5:7), whose blood would be spilt in our place to atone for our sins.Jesus was crucified on the day of preparation for the Passover at the same hour as the lambs for the Passover dinner were being slaughtered for the meal that evening, marking the beginning of the end of the Jewish year.In the Bible, leaven is a symbol of sin, therefore unleavened bread (Leviticus 23:6) pointed to the Messiah’s blameless life (as leaven represents sin), thereby making Him the ideal sacrifice for our sins.

  • During the first few days of this feast, Jesus’ corpse lay in the tomb, like a kernel of wheat sown in the ground, waiting to be harvested and harvested as the bread of life.
  • 3) First Fruits (Leviticus 23:10) – Alluding to the Messiah’s resurrection as the first fruits of the righteous, this verse refers to the resurrection of the Messiah.
  • Jesus was raised on this same day, which is one of the reasons why the apostle Paul refers to him in 1 Corinthians 15:20 as the ″first fruits from the dead,″ which means ″first fruits from the dead.″ 4) The Feast of Weeks, also known as Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16), occurred fifty days after the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and foreshadowed the great harvest of souls and the gift of the Holy Spirit for both Jews and Gentiles who would be brought into the kingdom of God during the Church Age.
  • 5) The Feast of Weeks, also known as Pentecost (Leviticus 23:16), occurred fifty days after the beginning of the (see Acts 2).
  • The Church was officially created on this day when God poured forth His Holy Spirit and 3,000 Jews reacted to Peter’s wonderful sermon and his first proclamation of the gospel, marking the official beginning of the Church.
  • (Leviticus 23:24) The Feast of Trumpets is the first of the fall feasts.
  1. Many think that this day heralds the beginning of the Rapture of the Church, when the Messiah Jesus will appear in the sky as He prepares to take His wife, the Church, to live with Him forever.
  2. The sounding of a loud trumpet is always connected with the Rapture in the Bible, and for good reason (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 and 1 Corinthians 15:52).
  3. 6) The Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:27) — Many think that this passage prophetically relates to the day of Jesus’ Second Coming, when He will return to the world.
  4. As a result of their decision to ″look upon Him whom they have wounded,″ repent of their sins, and receive Him as the Messiah on that day, the Jewish remnant will experience the Day of Atonement (Zechariah 12:10 and Romans 11:1-6, 25-36).
  5. (Leviticus 23:34) – Many academics think that this feast day is a reference to the Lord’s promise that He will once again ″tabernacle″ with His people when He comes to reign over all of the earth when He returns to reign over all of the globe (Micah 4:1-7).
  • Should Christians observe the Levitical feast days of Israel on this day in particular?
  • A Christian’s decision to observe or not observe the Jewish feast days would be a question of personal conscience for each individual Christian.
  • The Bible says in Colossians 2:16-17, ″Therefore, do not allow anybody to judge you by what you eat or drink, or by your participation in a religious holiday, a New Moon celebration, or a Sabbath day.″ These things were only a foreshadowing of what was to come; the actuality, on the other hand, is found in Christ.
  • Christian are not required to attend Jewish feasts in the same manner that an Old Testament Jew did, but we should not judge another believer who chooses to keep these unique days and feasts, whether or not they are Jewish″ (Romans 14:5).
  • While it is not essential for Christians to observe the Jewish feast days, it is useful to get familiar with their traditions.
  • It is possible that celebrating these days will be good if it leads to a deeper knowledge and respect for Christ’s death and resurrection, as well as the future promise of His coming.
  • Those of us who are Christians who choose to observe these holy days should place Christ at the center of the celebration, as He is the One who came to fulfill the prophetic importance of each one of these days.
  • Recommended Resource: William Dumbrell’s Faith of Israel, 2nd edition: A Theological Survey of the Old Testament, which is available online.

Feasts of the Lord

Many of the biblical feasts have been observed by the Jewish people down through the ages.The biblical feasts were instituted by God, and they are still observed today.Furthermore, since Israel’s independence from Britain in 1948, certain of the feasts have been designated as national holidays in the country.What we often refer to as ‘Jewish feasts’ should really be referred to as ″Biblical feasts″ or ″Feasts of the Lord,″ instead.This is especially true given that God refers to these feasts as ″His own″ in the Bible.Take a look at how many times that phrase appears in a single chapter of Leviticus: ″These are the feasts of the Lord, holy convocations, which you should announce at their allotted times,″ for instance.

The feasts of the Lord, which you should declare to be holy convocations, are those mentioned in verse 4.(23:37) You are to celebrate it as a feast to the Lord…(23:41) As a result, Moses announced the feasts of the Lord to the children of Israel.(23:44

Biblical Feast as Holy Convocation

Leviticus 23 provides a succinct overview of all of the Lord’s feasts.It is the Lord who commanded all of Israel to gather in Jerusalem for three annual feasts: Passover, Shavuot (Pentecost), and Sukkot (Twelve Days of Sukkot) (Feast of Tabernacles).Whatever the feast, no matter when or how it is held, it is referred to as a ″holy convocation.″ ″Mik-rah″ is the Hebrew word meaning ″calling together.″ This term is defined as ″anything called out, i.e., a public meeting (the act, the people, or the site); also a rehearsal,″ according to Strong’s Concordance.It refers to both the act of assembling a group of people and the actual event that is taking place.However, this is not your typical ″public gathering.″ When this term ″mik-rah″ is used in Scripture, it is usually invariably followed by the word ″ko-desh,″ which is translated as ″holy.″ When you hear the word ″ko-desh,″ you’re referring to anything that has been designated for a certain function.To make a public summons to attend a sacred rehearsal gathering is to issue a ″holy convocation,″ which is the direct translation of the Hebrew word.

This isn’t simply another ″church get-together,″ as the saying goes.The fact that God Himself has asked Israel to come together and that He will be there in their midst denotes the presence of a sacred assembly.

Biblical Holidays

There are several Christian holidays that are well-known for being synonomous with Jewish holidays.There is no doubt that Jesus and His followers had a Passover supper.It was later on known as the Last Supper because of the way it was served.It was the night before His crucifixion, and He was alone.You may also recall that the Feast of Pentecost commemorates the day when the Holy Spirit was poured out.Not everyone is aware that Pentecost coincides with the biblical Feast of Weeks, known as Shavuot.

So, why don’t we celebrate both holidays – the Jewish one and the Christian one – on the same day, you might wonder.

The Hebrew Calendar

This is due to the fact that the Hebrew calendar differs somewhat from the Gregorian calendar used in the western world.In a nutshell, the Gregorian calendar is a solar calendar.This signifies that the sun is the one who determines the seasons.According to the Gregorian calendar, we have reached the year 2020 at this time.Our calendar years start in January.The Hebrew calendar, on the other hand, is based on the lunar calendar.

The phases of the moon define the beginning and end of each month.The year would have started in the early spring of Biblical times.God declared that the month of Passover would be the first month of the year in his word.However, in Israel today, the year begins in the early fall – but more on that later – rather than the beginning of the summer.

A Day in a Week

In the Hebrew calendar, a day is defined as the period between two sunsets.According to Leviticus 23:32, which describes the Yom Kippur festival as lasting ″from nightfall to evening,″ this concept has its origins in the biblical description of the event.This regulation is still in effect in modern-day Israel.The reason for this is that the holiest day of the week – the Sabbath – which is correctly designated as Saturday, begins to be observed on Friday evening.And, as soon as the sun sets on Saturday, the new week officially begins on Sunday morning.God created the world in six days, according to the Bible.

God created man and woman on the sixth day of creation and gave them the task of cultivating the planet.However, before they had an opportunity to rule over all of creation, day number seven — the Sabbath – arrived.The beginning of Adam and Eve’s life was marked by a close relationship with their Creator.Because of the myth of creation, the days of the week in Hebrew are simply referred to as: Day One (Sunday), Day Two (Monday), Day Third…

Shabbat, the seventh day of the week, marks the end of the reckoning.It is not really a dispute in Western societies as to whether the week begins on Sunday or Monday; in Israel, the topic is never even raised.It all starts on…Day One.

Hebrew Measure of Time in Biblical Feasts

God revealed a great deal about Himself via the biblical festivals.According to Jesus, if you trusted Moses, you would believe Me, because He wrote about Me (John 5:46).Discovering and exploring this alternative perspective to time and counting our days is intriguing and exhilarating.Despite the fact that God works in mysterious ways outside of our timescale, He uses it for our advantage, and He wants us to be aware of this fact.He instills in us the need of always vigilant.Moses conveys this sentiment well in one of his psalms, in which he prays to the Lord, ″Teach us to calculate our days, that we may obtain a heart of understanding″ (Ps 90:12).

No matter whatever calendar we use, God is educating us on the importance of His set times.We may be thankful for the wonders He has performed.Most significantly, we may make preparations for the second coming of His Son to the planet.

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The pilgrimage feasts

The term ″feast″ can be translated into two different Hebrew words.One is referred to as moed (mo-ahd) or moedim (mo-ahdim).A far more precise term for feast is ″Chag,″ which is the second word in the Hebrew language.The term ″chag″ is frequently used in conjunction with the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the Feast of Weeks (Pentecost), and the Feast of Tabernacles, all of which are considered pilgrimage feasts.Other festivals or set periods, on the other hand, might be observed in your house or wherever you were at the time.To participate in these three feasts, you had to go to the location where the Tabernacle or Temple stood in biblical times.

Which was initially a number of other locations before finally settling on Jerusalem.Chag is a term that refers to a feast or holiday, and it derives from the Hebrew word ″chah-gog,″ which literally translates as ″to circle,″ as in a circle dance or a circle feast.In accordance with their description, these three feasts are to be celebrated before the Lord in a joyful, party atmosphere complete with singing, dancing, and processions What is the purpose of God’s observance of the ‘Feasts of the Lord’?The three terms for feast and convocation reveal a strikingly common pattern when we examine them in context with one another.

An invitation to a holy and sanctified rehearsal assembly is called a convocation (mik-rah).Feast (Mo-ahd): a period set aside for a celebration that includes signs that have been planned in advance.Chag (feast): a special happy, festive celebration for pilgrims that takes place every year.

To what do the Feasts of the Lord point?

All are invited to attend to these sacred ″rehearsals″ that God Himself has commanded via the celebration of the Lord’s feasts, which are made public by God.When you go to one of these ″rehearsals,″ you’ll notice that there are precise ″signs″ and ″signals″ that were designated before the earth was created and indicate His intention for all of mankind.These signs indicate to unique happy festivities in the presence of the Lord, to which everyone is invited, but which can only be enjoyed by those who travel to the Holy Land to participate.These feasts are a harbinger of something greater.For example, ″…with regard to a holiday or a new moon or a Sabbath day – things that are but a shadow of what is to come; but the essence belongs to Christ…″ Colossians 2:16-17 (New International Version) Let us put our faith in the Lord today and praise Him for the marvels He has performed and will continue to perform!Christians may freely observe the Jewish feasts (also known as the Biblical Feasts) in order to get a deeper understanding of God’s nature.

Let’s have a look at what they are!

Feasts of the Lord in Spring

According to Jewish tradition, the Jewish year begins in the spring. Towards the end of the year, as the festival of Passover approached, God spoke to His people, saying, ″This month shall be your beginning of months; it shall be the first month of the year to you.″ Exodus 12:2 explains that

Passover

Nissan is the tenth day of this month, which is the day of Passover.It is the first of three pilgrimage holidays that will take place this year.These were the designated hours for all Jews to travel to Jerusalem to observe the Sabbath.It commemorates the Israelites’ departure from Egypt and their subsequent deliverance from slavery.By having the blood of the lamb smeared on their doorposts, the Hebrews were shielded from death because they believed God would protect them.It serves as a powerful representation of Jesus’ sacrifice, which was accomplished by his death on the Cross.

The Feast of Unleavened Bread

Passover and unleavened bread are often associated with one another since they are so closely connected.The fact that it is addressed independently in the Bible, however, justifies its inclusion in this section.In reality, Passover only took place on the first day of the holiday.The Feast of the Unleavened Bread is observed on the seven remaining holy days.People are urged to wipe out their houses of any yeast and to only consume matzah bread, which is a bread made without the use of yeast.

Feasts of the Lord in Summer

Shavuot or Feast of Weeks

Shavuot – the Feast of Weeks – is celebrated across Israel in the early summer (or sometimes even in the late spring).It is the second pilgrimage holiday in Israel, and it marks the beginning of the harvest season.It is also known as the Feast of Weeks because it is observed after seven weeks had passed since Passover.The 50-day period is also the reason for the name Pentecost, which literally translates as ″fifty days″ in both Greek and Latin.On the festival of Shavuot, God revealed His Torah to Moses and the people of Israel.God’s Spirit was poured forth on the inhabitants of Jerusalem on this day, millennia later, when they celebrated Shavuot in Jerusalem.

Summer is also a season in which the Jewish people mourn the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, which occurred in 70 AD.Tisha B’Av is the name of the day, which is observed as a day of sorrow and fasting.

Feasts of the Lord in Fall

For the Jewish people, the fall season is the most joyful time of the year. Fall feasts are the most well-known of the Jewish holiday cycle’s celebrations.

Feast of Trumpets or Rosh HaShanah

The Feast of Trumpets, also known as Rosh HaShanah, which literally translates as ″Head of the Year,″ marks the beginning of the civil year in Israel and marks the beginning of the Jewish calendar.It was a sombre day, though, according to biblical standards, with trumpet blasts asking people to reflect on their lives and repent.Despite this, the Jewish ritual on Rosh HaShanah is to dip apples in honey, giving everyone a happy and sweet new year, as per tradition.The Feast of Trumpets marks the beginning of the High Holidays, also known as the Days of Awe, which culminate in the Day of Atonement.Yom Kippur is the name given to the Day of Atonement in Hebrew.For the Jewish people, this is the most important day of the year.

Many people spend their days in intense prayer, pleading with God to pardon them.In Israel, everything grinds to a complete halt, including airports and traffic, as a result of the fasting observed today.This day serves as a reminder of what a precious gift we have in Jesus, who atoned for our sins in the ultimate way.The happy Feast of Tabernacles is the third (and last) pilgrimage festival to be observed this year.

Its significance is both memorial and prophetic in nature.It is known in Hebrew as Sukkot (booths), and it commemorates God’s directive to the Hebrews to live in temporary houses for a week in order to recall their trip through the desert.Furthermore, it serves as a reminder that our existence on this planet is only a transitory residence.

Feasts of the Lord in Winter

There are additional holidays to observe throughout the winter months.The following two festivals, on the other hand, are not included in the list of what the Torah refers to as the Feasts of the Lord.The Jewish people commemorate God’s deliverance of them from the hands of their adversaries at the Festival of Lights, also known as Chanukah, and the Purim festival, which takes place in March.

Chanukah or Festival of Light

It is known as the Festival of Lights because the custom of lighting candles every evening for eight days during Chanukah has earned it this title.Additionally, the festival celebrates the purification of the Temple, which commemorates the Jewish people’s victory against their Greek oppressor in the Second World War.The menorah (a candelabra in the Temple) burned for eight days as a result of a miracle performed by God, despite the fact that there was only enough oil to last a day.According to the Gregorian Calendar, the festival normally falls around the time of the Christmas season.

Purim

Purim is a Jewish festival that commemorates yet another triumph of the Jewish people against their adversaries.The Book of Esther narrates the narrative of how an orphan is elevated to the position of Queen, and how she, together with her wise cousin, foils an evil plan against their own people.In the face of hardship, they take a stance, and their bravery is recognized and honored on Purim.Purim is celebrated in the month of Adar, which is the final month of the Hebrew calendar and marks the beginning of spring.

Want to learn more about the High Holidays? Check out this video:

Christians and the Biblical Feasts

You may be wondering, should Christians observe the biblical feasts? In the recent years, the amount of churches across the world that celebrate these holidays has grown. My answer has always been this: we don’t have to celebrate the feasts — we get to! God revealed so much of Himself in these biblical celebrations. Many of Jesus’ teachings occurred during these biblical feasts. Why would we want to miss out on something that He said points to Him? Christians can freely celebrate these feasts out of a desire to know God’s character. “If you believed Moses, you would believe Me; for He wrote of Me.” John 5:46 Join our community of monthly donors transforming lives in Israel with the love of Jesus Join Now

Transform Lives in Israel All Throughout the Year

Are you interested in making a difference in Israel and assisting in the spread of the Gospel of Jesus Christ throughout the year?You are cordially welcomed to participate in God’s plan for his people!We are a passionate and loyal group of monthly donors on a mission to improve lives in Israel through the love of Jesus.Join us in this effort!Today is the day to join the Tribe: firmisrael.org/thetribe Reading time is estimated to be 11 minutes.

Hebrew Roots/Holy Days/Week of Unleavened Bread – Wikibooks, open books for an open world

THE WEEK OF BREAD WITHOUT LEAVENING This year’s Feast of Unleavened Bread is the first appointment in the calendar year set aside by YaHuWaH our Elohim for us to gather in His presence in a holy assembly.The holiday itself lasts seven days, with angelic Sabbaths during which no labor is done.It is marked by the commemoration of the Passover, during which they would consume a cake made of unleavened bread as part of their celebration.The commandment to celebrate this feast was given in connection with Passover, and it is both tied to and a continuation of that commandment.″These are the feasts of YaHuWaH and YaHuWshuwaH, sacred convocations that you are commanded to declare at the appropriate periods in the Hebrew calendar.YaHuWaH’s Passover is celebrated on the fourteenth day of the first month at twilight..

The Feast of Unleavened Bread, which is celebrated on the fifteenth day of the same month, is also observed by YaHuWaH.On the first day, you will hold a holy convocation and will not be required to perform any usual tasks.For seven days, though, you must make an offering to YaHuWaH that is created with fire.The seventh day should be observed as a holy convocation, and no ordinary labor shall be performed on it.″ (Leviticus 23:4-8; 23:9-10) Consider the following passages: Exodus 13:4-10; Numbers 28:16-25; and Deuteronomy 16:2-4, 8.

The dates for these events have been determined in accordance with the sacred calendar that YaHuWaH Himself created for His people.Nisan is the first month of the year, and it is decided by the first conjunction of the moon following the spring equinox.Nisan is the first month of the year.As a result, the holy calendar is in sync with the seasons and the harvests of the crops required for the celebration of the many feasts.Barley was the first crop to be harvested in the biblical regions, and the first month was reconciled with the barley at the stage of being ″green in the ear,″ ready to be harvested for the offering of Firstfruits, which took place after the Sabbath on the first day of this celebratory week.

  • In the past, unleavened bread made from barley was traditionally consumed throughout this week.
  • Passover is observed on the fourteenth day following the beginning of the new year and is eaten after dusk on that day, which marks the beginning of the fifteenth day and the first High Sabbath of the week of Unleavened Bread, which follows.
  • The day before any ″High Sabbath″ is referred to as a ″preparation day,″ just as it is with the weekly Sabbath.
  • Thus, the 13th is also considered to be a ″preparation day″ for Passover on the 14th, which is also a Sabbath, and no labor is permitted on that day.
  • This festival season is marked by seven days of particular observance, the spiritual preparation for which begins with the New Year’s Day celebrations.″ This is a day that you are to remember; you are to mark it as a festival to YaHuWaH that will be celebrated for generations to come—a permanent decree.
  • For the next seven days, you must consume bread that has not been fermented with yeast.
  1. Remove the yeast from your homes on the first day, for anybody who consumes anything containing yeast from the first day through the seventh day will be cut off from Israel.
  2. Hold a sacred meeting on the first day, and another on the seventh day, to commemorate the occasion.
  3. Except for preparing food for everyone to eat on these days, you are not permitted to conduct any labor at all on these days.″ Exodus 12:14-16 is an example of a parable.
  4. The preparation for the first day (the 14th) includes removing the leaven from your home for the week ahead, as well as preparing food for the Passover and the High Sabbath day on the 14th.
  5. The completion of any final purchases and transactions that could not be finished before should take place on this day.
  • To commemorate the Passover sacrifice, leaven is customarily removed on the 14th day (i.e., at twilight), although it must be removed by 3 p.m.
  • on that day to be considered properly eliminated.

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FEAST

Following Passover and the Exodus, the children of Israel went through a forty-day period of fasting before being provided with manna (actual food) by the Almighty for the remainder of their journey to the promised land of Israel.The Feast of Unleavened Bread commemorates this period of their journey.The fact that it was unleavened meant that they were not bringing any of the polluting influence of Egypt, which represented the civilization of the world, with them, but simply the clean bread of life from the land of promise.The Torah, or the Word of YaHuWaH, has always been symbolized by bread according to the Scriptures.

  • Consequently, eating bread that has not been leavened is a metaphor for eating the pure Word of YaHuWaH Elohim that has not been contaminated by the ideas and beliefs of men.
  • Everything wrong with the world, including all erroneous teaching and incorrect mindsets, has its roots in the philosophies of this world, which are directed by the ruler of this world, who first began to infect man’s thoughts in the Garden of Eden.
  • Leftover leaven is defined as everything that has its origins in the deceit of the adversary and is in opposition to the truth of Scripture, with its outworkings manifested in all unrighteousness, which is defined as sin (1John 5:17).

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