How Did Jesus Fast For 40 Days

How Long Did Jesus’ Fast in the Wilderness Last?

They don’t understand what they’re doing, Father, so please forgive them (Lk 23:34). It’s your son, woman, you’ve got to see him (Jn 19:26). A thirsty person says, “I want to drink” (Jn 19:28). “Amen, I tell to you, today you will be with me in Paradise,” the Lord says to the apostle Paul (Lk 23:43). “My God, my God, why have you deserted me?” he cries out in frustration. Mark 15:34; Matthew 27:46). “It’s all done now,” I say. Jesus says this in John 19:30. “Father, I entrust my spirit into your care.

It is customary for the last days of Lent to include a Lenten meditation on “The Seven Last Words” of Christ.

into.

hands.” It wasn’t until later that I realized the “seven words” were actually seven sentences, and that they were taken from the Passion stories in each of the four Gospels.

The Cross’ pulpit had never before seen a throng quite like that which assembled there.

It is important to recall this wonderful news whenever we hear words that are depressing, serious, or even threatening in nature.

A quotation from Matthew and Mark is included among the “Seven Last Words”: “My God, My God, why have you abandoned me?” Mt 27:46 and Mk 15:34, which both feature “Eloi, Eloi.”, are the only two of the seven final words of the dying Christ that have survived in their original Aramaic, the common language Jesus would have spoken: “Eli Eli lama sabachthani?” (Eli Eli lama sabachthani?).

  1. It is divided into three sections, the first two of which are filled with apprehension.
  2. 23).
  3. It begins with the words, “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not lack.” It is one of the most comforting psalms ever written.
  4. Furthermore, the remaining sentences of the Seven Last Words are intended to convey to us about redemption, as well as about God’s kindness and love, even in the midst of death.
  5. It is likely the fifth of “the final words,” “I thirst,” that makes it the most difficult to see the message of love and hope conveyed by the language (Jn 19: 28).
  6. 16) or another Psalm of Lament (maybe Psalm 69), which has references to vinegar and gall, which John tells us Jesus was given to drink on a sponge (Jn 19:29) after uttering these words, is a reference to Psalm 22.
  7. He claimed that Jesus said these words not to anyone present at Calvary, but to everyone who has ever read the Gospel until this day: “I thirst.

As we reflect on the readings from the end of Lent and during Holy Week, bear this message in mind: God loves us so much that Jesus died in order for us to be able to live forever in God’s embrace.

The Collegeville Biblical Commentary; Psalms for All Seasons; The Seven Last Words; and The New American Bible are some of the resources used.

A well-known last phrase All of us are familiar with their cries.

One example is Pope John Paul II’s “Amen,” which is a prayer.

Thomas More’s beard from the executioner’s block, stating, “This has not displeased the monarch,” is one of the more amusing examples of the genre.

It is customary for the last days of Lent to include a Lenten meditation on “The Seven Last Words” of Christ.

into.

hands.” It wasn’t until later that I realized the “seven words” were actually seven sentences, and that they were taken from the Passion stories in each of the four Gospels.

The Cross’ pulpit had never before seen a throng quite like that which assembled there.

It is important to recall this wonderful news whenever we hear words that are depressing, serious, or even threatening in nature.

A quotation from Matthew and Mark is included among the “Seven Last Words”: “My God, My God, why have you abandoned me?” Mt 27:46 and Mk 15:34, which both feature “Eloi, Eloi.”, are the only two of the seven final words of the dying Christ that have survived in their original Aramaic, the common language Jesus would have spoken: “Eli Eli lama sabachthani?” (Eli Eli lama sabachthani?).

  • It is divided into three sections, the first two of which are filled with apprehension.
  • 23).
  • It begins with the words, “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not lack.” It is one of the most comforting psalms ever written.
  • Furthermore, the remaining sentences of the Seven Last Words are intended to convey to us about redemption, as well as about God’s kindness and love, even in the midst of death.
  • It is likely the fifth of “the final words,” “I thirst,” that makes it the most difficult to see the message of love and hope conveyed by the language (Jn 19: 28).
  • 16) or another Psalm of Lament (maybe Psalm 69), which has references to vinegar and gall, which John tells us Jesus was given to drink on a sponge (Jn 19:29) after uttering these words, is a reference to Psalm 22.
  • Jesus stated these words, he said, “not to anybody there at Calvary, but to everyone who has ever read the Gospel,” he said.
  • for love!” Jesus exclaimed, he claimed, not to anyone present at Calvary, but to everyone who has ever read the Gospel since its publication.
  • As we reflect on the readings from the end of Lent and during Holy Week, bear this message in mind: God loves us so much that Jesus died in order for us to be able to live forever in God’s embrace.

Finally, and most importantly, the last word is crucial. The Collegeville Biblical Commentary; Psalms for All Seasons; The Seven Last Words; and The New American Bible are some of the resources used in this project.

When and How Long Did Jesus Fast?

Just after Jesus is baptized by John in the Jordan river, we are informed that heaven opens and the Spirit of God descends upon him, and the voice of God can be heard proclaiming, “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.” This is recorded in the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 3:16-17). Afterwards, Jesus promptly departs for the desert, where he will be tempted by the devil (Matthew 4:1). According to the Gospel of Luke, Jesus was “full of the Holy Spirit” when he was tested for forty days by the devil.

Many believe that the temptation helped Jesus prepare for his ministry.

Where Did Jesus Fast?

It is believed by scholars that Jesus fasted in the Judean wilderness, which is located close to the Jordan River. Temptation Mountain is an isolated and secluded location that overlooks the city but is steep and difficult to climb, according to legend, where the devil took him at one time. It is said to be the location where the devil kidnapped him at one point.

What Happens in This Story?

When Jesus fasts in each of the gospel stories, it signifies that he has chosen to limit or eliminate his food consumption. According to Luke’s story, “he didn’t eat anything for those days, and towards the end of them he was starving” (Luke 4:2). Jesus is tested at this period, as the devil tempts him in an attempt to take advantage of Jesus’s vulnerable position. To gain the grandeur of all the kingdoms of the earth, the devil tells Jesus to transform a stone into bread, to hurl himself from a cliff (to illustrate how the angels would save him), and to worship him (the devil).

  • The reality that “man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God” is how Jesus responds to the devil’s challenge to change the stone into bread (Matt.
  • To the challenge of jumping from the cliff, Jesus responds with the words, “Do not put the Lord your God to the test” (Matt.
  • And in response to the temptation to prostrate oneself and worship the devil, Jesus says, “Away from me, Satan!
  • After that, the devil went; Jesus had passed the test and had refused to give in to temptation.

Why Did Jesus Fast?

Jesus most likely fasted in order to prepare himself for service by becoming more intimate with God. One of the reasons people fast is to put their bodies into a condition of weakness, which allows them to concentrate on the essentials of life and hear God’s message more clearly without the distractions of so-called creature comforts, which may both soothe and divert us from our spiritual quest. Jesus was well aware that he had a difficult task ahead of him and that he needed to clear his brain before beginning to perform miracles.

He also saw that he needed to comprehend the far inferior intellect of humans, a sinful and occasionally rebellious people that sorely needed their savior, Messiah, the Christ, to be understood.

Did Jesus Drink Water or Eat Anything WhileFasting?

Fasting entails drastically decreasing one’s caloric intake, and in certain cases, completely eliminating it. We aren’t given any information on what is happening. Some academics believe Jesus ate nothing at all, which is consistent with the passage in Luke 4:2. Others believe he scavenged the bleak countryside for pieces of food that he had consumed very little of—virtually nothing. Because the fast simply mentions that he “ate nothing,” rather than that he “drank nothing,” the majority of scholars conclude that water was most likely consumed during this period.

How Did Jesus Fast for Forty Days?

Water and food are only needed for a few days, and individuals can do without water for a few weeks at the most, according to scientists. Forty days is a much longer period of time. According to the standard male lifespan, Jesus would not have survived forty days if he had only taken water and not eaten anything. He was not, however, a regular man; he was the Son of God who was empowered by the Holy Spirit and bestowed with miraculous powers, which enabled him to fast for as long was required.

Even if he had consumed some food throughout the fast, he would have been in a physically and psychologically debilitated position as a result of it.

It’s likely that he prayed and meditated in the presence of the Lord throughout this period.

What Is the Point of Fasting?

Some people fast in order to lose weight, however the majority of people fast for spiritual reasons instead. The majority of the time, individuals engage in a spiritual fast as a means of depriving themselves of physical pleasures, or even basic nutrition, in order to achieve a higher level of consciousness and knowledge of the Lord. Jesus would have fasted in order to come closer to God and to concentrate on his spiritual self, putting aside as many of his physical demands and desires as he could.

When we fast, we do it in order to deny ourselves and achieve more spiritual understanding.

We also fast in order to show our support for those who are suffering.

How Can We Do a Fast Today?

If you are interested in attempting a spiritual fast, keep in mind that you are not Jesus, and that going into the wilderness alone for forty days is not a suggested choice for you. There are, however, several safe methods of fasting that you can use. In the Bible, fasting is mentioned dozens of times as a method of prayer, of grieving, or of drawing closer to God. First and foremost, contact with a medical professional before fasting to ensure that you do it in a healthy manner. Following that, experts recommend that you begin with short durations of time at a time and work your way up to larger periods.

  • It is more important to realize that the goal is to reach a state of bodily denial in order to better focus on your spiritual heart.
  • Allow yourself to be honest and vulnerable with your Creator throughout this period of time.
  • What we don’t know is whether Jesus fasted only once or whether this was a regular occurrence for him.
  • In contrast, when Jesus emerged triumphant from the desert and into the presence of his heavenly Father, he was ready and eager to accomplish anything God asked of him—including dying on the Cross for the sins of all mankind.
  • We can also learn about the necessity of spending time alone with God and about what we can learn when we walk away from bodily comfort and embrace difficulties for a period of time.
  • What Is the Purpose of Fasting, Exactly?
  • Her novel, The Memory Garden, was nominated for the 2018 American Christian Fiction Writers Genesis Award, which she received for her work as a Christian novelist.
  • Jessica Brodie’s fiction may be found at jessicabrodie.com, as well as her religious blog.

She also does a weeklyYouTubedevotional on her channel. You may also find her on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and others. She’s also written a free eBook, A God-Centered Life: 10 Faith-Based Practices for When You’re Anxious, Grumpy, or Stressed, which you can get here.

Why did Jesus fast?

QuestionAnswer Fasting is a practice that may be seen throughout the Bible. In the Bible, a fast is often defined as a voluntary, total abstention from eating for a certain period of time with the goal of devoting one’s time to pursuing God. Fasting allows us to deprive our flesh of what it craves, allowing us to concentrate more clearly on developing our souls. It doesn’t appear that Jesus fasted on a regular basis. He was really criticized for “eating and drinking” by his detractors (Matthew 11:19).

  • This fast occurred soon after His baptism (Matthew 3:13), which marked the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry.
  • During his period of fasting, Jesus was subjected to several temptations by the devil.
  • While Jesus’ flesh was at its most vulnerable during those forty days, He was subjected to unrelenting temptation from Satan.
  • Satan also gave Him a way out of the situation (Matthew 4:3).
  • In his example, Jesus proved to us that fasting can be beneficial to our spiritual well-being when we use it to come closer to God.
  • “Jesus returned to Galilee in the strength of the Spirit,” says Luke 4:14 at the conclusion of the tale of this trying time.
  • The miracles, deliverance of the afflicted, and conquest of death would not be based on His humanity, but on His divinity.
  • He served as a model for those of us who “do not live in the realm of the body, but live in the realm of the Spirit,” as Paul put it (Romans 8:9).
  • Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What was the reason for Jesus’ fasting?
See also:  What Does Jesus Say About Entering Heaven?

Where did Jesus fast for 40 days?

According to the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus is baptized in the Jordan River by St. John the Baptist, and then “Jesus was brought up by the Spirit into the desert to be tormented by the devil” (Matthew 4:1-11). (Matthew 4:1). Jesus is found near the Jordan River in both the Gospels of Mark and Luke, right before he is tempted in the desert, according to their respective accounts. However, while Christian tradition frequently refers to Jesus’ temptation as taking place in a “desert,” the Greek term used (eremos) refers to an area that is remote, unoccupied, and hence unsuitable for raising livestock.

  1. The location is remote and uninhabited, and it would have provided Jesus with a lonely environment entirely shut off from the rest of the world.
  2. Eventually, a monastery was established on the mountain, and over the years, many monastic groups have resided on the mountain, which they believe to be the site of Christ’s temptation.
  3. The solitude of this mountain serves as a reminder to us to seek out our own “wilderness” during Lent and spend time each day apart from everyone, pondering God and his hidden purpose for our lives.
  4. Others may find that simply retiring to their bedroom and shutting off all of their technology and spending time in silence and seclusion is sufficient.

Continue reading:Was this the location where Jesus transformed water into wine? More information may be found at: Is Lent making you feel sluggish? Perhaps You Should Consider Venturing Into the Wilderness

Verse by Verse Ministry International

We were looking at Matthew 4:1-11, which is about Jesus being tempted in the desert, with my bible study group. What we wanted to know was if it was a literal 40 days, or if those 40 days could be interpreted as a metaphor for Jesus’ entire time on this planet. Perhaps the desert represents this world because it is as barren and devoid of spiritual nourishment as a real desert is devoid of food and water, and therefore it could serve as a metaphor for it. Assuming Jesus was a fully developed human being, he would have died after 40 literal days without food or water, wouldn’t he?

One of the most important rules of proper interpretation is the Golden Rule, which states that when the plain meaning of scripture makes common sense, there is no need to look for any other meaning.

With regard to Matthew 4, which contains the account of Jesus’ 40-day fast, there is no justification for seeking a secondary or alternative meaning for the words “Jesus fasted” and “Jesus fasted for 40 days.” The correct interpretation is that Jesus did, in fact, fast for a period of 40 days in succession.

Matt. 4:1Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.Matt. 4:2And after He had fasted forty days and forty nights, He then became hungry.

Take note that the text states that Jesus fasted. No specifics are given as to the sort of fast He underwent. Furthermore, it is stated that towards the conclusion of the fasting period, Jesus became hungry himself (but not thirsty). Finally, when we examine Luke’s Gospel account of the identical event, we discover the following:

Luke 4:1Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led around by the Spirit in the wildernessLuke 4:2for forty days, being tempted by the devil. And He ate nothing during those days, and when they had ended, He became hungry.

During the 40 days, according to the Gospel of Luke, Jesus “did not eat anything.” Based on these meticulous observations, we may conclude that Jesus fasted just from eating, rather than from food and water. Throughout the 40-day period, he appeared to have been drinking water. This is characteristic of the Jewish fasting practices that were prevalent at the time. Jews will fast either from eating alone or from food and drink for a specified period of time. Unlike food fasts, which may last up to forty days, food and drink fasts can only last for seven days or less.

In truth, 40-day food fasts are still performed today by both Jews and Christians, despite the passage of time.

Did Jesus drink water when He was fasting for 40 days?

Do you think Jesus drank water during His 40-day fasting period?

Bible Answer:

The events surrounding Christ’s temptation in the wilderness were documented by the gospel writers Matthew, Mark, and Luke. According to the three gospels, Jesus fasted for 40 days before succumbing to the temptation of Satan shortly after. Each gospel has certain details that are similar to all of them as well as those that are unique to each.

Individual Gospel Accounts

Therefore, some have asserted that the three gospels are at odds, yet a smart trial lawyer would anticipate that this is the case. Everyone reported various information since everyone had a different point of view when he wrote what he did. The prosecution would accuse three witnesses with collusion if they all reported exactly the same thing in a criminal trial. In reality, when all of the witnesses provide the exact same information, the majority of trial lawyers are dubious of the situation.

The benefit of reading all three gospels is that we obtain a more complete picture, with Luke providing us with the exact chronological order of events (Luke 1:3).

Did Christ Drink Water?

There is no mention of Jesus drinking water or sleeping in any of the gospels, although they do mention that he fasted or went without food on several occasions. Despite the fact that there are no references to Christ drinking water, it indicates that Jesus did drink water at some point. Medical professionals believe that the average man or woman cannot survive without water for more than 10 days; yet, some people have managed to survive for up to 21 days without water. We can survive for far longer periods of time without nourishment.

Conclusion:

What is so great about Jesus’ temptation by Satan is that He was put to the test and did not fall prey to temptation and sin. Because we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but rather One who has been tempted in every way as we are, yet has come out unscathed. (NASB) Hebrews 4:15 is a verse that states that Jesus is without sin!

Suggested Links:

Jesus was tempted by Satan. Where can I discover the next time the devil put Jesus through his paces in the Bible? Is it possible that Jesus committed a sin?

Extreme fasting: How trying to do what Jesus did could literally kill you

Alfred Ndlovu died after seeking to follow in Jesus’ footsteps by fasting in the desert. Alfred Ndlovu, a South African preacher, has starved to death as a result of malnutrition. It’s a heartbreaking narrative, but it’s not quite what it appears to be. The reason for this is that Ndlovu died, 44, not because he was unable to obtain adequate food but because he thought in his heart that he was following in the footsteps of Jesus. Ndlovu chose to fast for 40 days in the same way that Jesus did — but this time without drinking any water.

  1. This is not the first time someone has attempted anything like this.
  2. Others have attempted to fast for lengthy periods of time, but have failed, suffering either permanent health consequences or death as a result.
  3. Many Christians observe a fast.
  4. The conscious denial of our physiological cravings also serves as a statement about our willingness to deny ourselves in other aspects of life as well, such as immoral desires, laziness, and self-indulgence, to name a few.
  5. Fasting is especially mentioned in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke.
  6. Human people are capable of entirely abstaining from eating for a period of 40 days, and others believe they can go much longer.
  7. Body’s metabolism slows, and organs begin to shut down as they are strained to maintain the heart and brain operating at peak performance levels.

Someone who had gone through that experience, on the other hand, would have been close to death at the end of it and would have needed weeks to recover.

Consequently, some academics argue that the tale of Jesus’ fast in the desert has to be re-written in a new way.

Even though he may have refrained from eating, some types of fast under the Judaism of that time allowed only abstention from specific types of food, therefore it was not a complete fast.

Furthermore, the span of 40 days is associated with a number of significant events in the Bible.

Others believe it is a symbolic representation of a vast period of time rather than a numerical value that should be taken literally by the reader.

Although Jesus went out to spend time with God, the story’s thesis is that he did so in order to be away from the distractions of everyday life.

His time in the bush helped him prepare for his future as a public servant.

Fasting, on the other hand, can also be a source of spiritual vanity or vainglory.

The worst-case scenario is that it is the equivalent of setting a new personal best in an athletic event. But, ultimately, what matters is God and whether or not it aids us in our walk with him. Mark Woods may be followed on Twitter at @RevMarkWoods.

How did Jesus fast for 40 days?

Hello, Gramps. Thank you for reading this and taking the time to do so. And please accept my thanks in advance for the time you will devote to answering my query if you do decide to do so. I’ve been thinking about Jesus and his forty-day fasting experience. This is something I should have figured out by now. However, I’m curious as to whether the forty days listed in the Bible are real or allegorical in nature. It is possible that Jesus did not experience death because he was the true son of Heavenly Father, but if this is the case, why was he able to do so and avoid death?

  1. Or does it really make a difference how many days there are in a month how long it takes?
  2. It wouldn’t surprise me if the forty days of fasting that the Bible claims Jesus underwent were accurate.
  3. I couldn’t find a heading that said “fasting,” so I went ahead and inquired.
  4. Kim_ Dear Kim, I am writing to express my gratitude for the time you have taken to read this letter.
  5. If we take the passage at its value and declare that he spent forty days without food or drink, then our present understanding of human limits forces us to infer that he had assistance from a supernatural source.
  6. If this is actually accurate, it simply serves to strengthen Jesus’ claim to be the only begotten Son of God.
  7. According to some experts, the number 40 was less of a precise number and more of a general term for any significant figure rather than a specific number.
  8. There is also the notion that fasting may signify various things to different people, which is supported by research.
  9. This opens the door to the possibility that he did consume food and drink, although the amount would have been negligible.
  10. It has absolutely no effect on the core concept that the scriptures are attempting to convey.
  11. I believe that is a beautiful illustration of what we should be aiming for in our lives.

The surprising truth about fasting for Lent

Greetings, Grampa. Thank you for reading this and taking the time to consider my suggestions. If you do have the time to address my query, please accept my thanks in advance for your time and efforts. This raises some questions for me regarding Jesus’ forty-day fasting experience. This is something I should have anticipated. Nonetheless, I’m curious as to whether the forty days listed in the Bible are actual or symbolic. It is possible that Jesus did not experience death since he was the true son of Heavenly Father, but if this is the case, why was he able to do so?

  • Do the exact amount of days actually make a difference, or does it truly not matter?
  • That he fasted for forty days according to the Bible would not surprise me in the least.
  • I went ahead and inquired because I couldn’t see a heading for “fasting.” Thank you for your help and understanding.
  • Exactly how he achieved it is beyond our comprehension.
  • The fact of the matter is that it is not ‘humanly’ doable.
  • It is possible to find additional symbolic meaning if we move away from the literal interpretation.
  • A couple days would be a significant amount of time for me in the context of fasting.
  • Perhaps our understanding of fasting differs from the term that was used to describe what Jesus did at the time of his death and resurrection.
  • Perhaps if one of these choices (or even more options I did not explore) reduces the miraculous nature of the fasting, neither of these options diminishes its significance.

That is, Jesus had conquered his bodily impulses to the point that Satan’s temptations had no effect on him any longer. That, in my opinion, is an excellent example of what we should all strive for. Gramps

Lent in the New Testament

Greetings, Gramps. Thank you for reading this and taking the time to consider my thoughts. And, if you do have time to address my query, please accept my thanks in advance for your time. I’m thinking about Jesus and his forty-day fasting experience. This is something I should have realized earlier. However, I’m curious as to whether the forty days listed in the Bible are actual or allegorical. It is possible that Jesus did not experience death since he was the true son of Heavenly Father, but if this is the case, why did he manage to do so?

  1. Or does it really make a difference how many days there are in a month?
  2. It wouldn’t surprise me if the forty days of fasting that the Bible claims Jesus observed were accurate.
  3. I went ahead and inquired because there was no “fasting” section on the website.
  4. Kim_ Dear Kim, I am writing to express my heartfelt gratitude for all you have done for me.
  5. If we take the passage at its value and state that he spent forty days without food or drink, our present understanding of human limits forces us to infer that he had assistance from a supernatural source.
  6. If this is truly accurate, it simply serves to strengthen Jesus’ claim to be the sole Begotten Son.
  7. According to some academics, the number 40 was less of a precise number and more of a general statement for any huge figure than it was a specific number.
  8. Moreover, it has been suggested that fasting might imply many things to different people.
  9. This opens the door to the possibility that he did consume food and beverages, although the amount would have been tiny.
  10. It makes no difference to the essential concept that the scriptures are attempting to convey.
  11. I believe that is an excellent illustration of what we should be aiming for.
See also:  How Does Jesus Die?

The holiness of hunger

Hello, Grandpa. Thank you for taking the time to read this. And please accept my thanks in advance for the time you will devote to answering my query if you do find the time. I’m thinking about Jesus and his forty-day fast. This is something I should have figured out already. But I’m just curious. are the forty days referenced in the Bible actual or figurative? If it is literal, is it because Jesus was the genuine son of Heavenly Father that he was able to do so without suffering the consequences of death?

  • Or does it really make a difference how many days have passed?
  • It wouldn’t surprise me if the forty days of fasting that the Bible claims Jesus observed were accurate.
  • I couldn’t find a heading that said “fasting,” so I went ahead and inquired.
  • Kim_ Greetings, Kim We have no idea how he managed to pull it off.
  • It is just not ‘humanly’ doable.
  • If we take a step back from the literal interpretation, we might seek for more of the metaphorical.
  • In the perspective of fasting, a few days would seem like a significant amount of time to me.
  • It’s possible that our concept of fasting differs from the term that was used back then to explain what Jesus did.
  • Perhaps if one of these choices (or even more options I did not explore) reduces the miraculous nature of the fasting, neither of these options diminishes its importance.

It has absolutely no effect on the major concept that the scriptures are attempting to convey. That is, Jesus had conquered his bodily impulses to the point that Satan’s temptations had no effect on him. I believe that is a beautiful illustration of what we should be aiming for. Gramps

The true origins of Lent

Fasting was mentioned in Christian writings as early as the second century, although different Christian organizations appear to have observed a variety of different sorts and lengths of fasts, and even within a church, there appeared to be divisions of opinion. Irenaeus of Lyons made a point of noting the variety: It is not just about the day that is under question, but also concerning the actual form of the fast that is being observed. Some believe they should fast one day, others two, and still others three or more; some, for that matter, believe that their day is comprised of 40 hours of daylight and darkness.

  • It is thought to have been written in the first century AD.
  • On the other hand, on Friday and Saturday, fast completely and do not eat or drink anything.
  • It is interesting that this passage does not make the connection between a six-day fast and Easter and Jesus’s suffering, but it does not make the connection between a six-day fast and Jesus’s 40-day temptation as recounted in Matthew, Mark, and Luke.
  • Detail from the Temptation of Christ.
  • As baptism grew more closely connected with Easter in the fourth century AD, it is conceivable that fasting during the three-week period leading up to baptism became more generalized to include those who were already Christians.
  • The shifting customs linked with Lent may also be observed in Pope Francis’ recent declaration that women will be permitted to participate in the foot washing ritual, which commemorates Jesus’ washing of his disciples’ feet (John 13:1–20), as well as in other recent announcements.

In any case, it is apparent that many of the Christian feast days and fast days precede the religion, but that they have also been altered over time by the faith’s members as well. Furthermore, it serves as a reminder that nothing remains the same — including religious beliefs.

The First Sunday of Lent: Jesus is tempted in the desert // Faith at Marquette // Marquette University

Fasting was mentioned in Christian scriptures as early as the second century, although different Christian organizations appear to have observed a variety of different sorts and lengths of fasts, and even within a church, there appeared to be disagreements. Irenaeus of Lyons made a point of noting the wide range: It is not just about the day that is under question, but also about the exact form of the fast that is being debated. Many individuals believe that they should fast for one day, some for two days, and still others for three or more days; others, for that matter, believe that their day consists of 40 hours of daylight and darkness.

  • In order to observe the fast, you must begin on Sunday, the tenth day of the week (the second day of the week) and continue until Friday, the fifth day of the week.
  • Nevertheless, on Friday and Saturday, abstain from all food and drink.
  • This scripture ties a six-day fast with Easter and with Jesus’s suffering, but, to my surprise, it does not connect a six-day fast with Jesus’s 40-day temptation as recounted in Matthew, Mark, and Luke’s accounts of the events.
  • Christ being tempted in the wilderness.

Fasting was part of the three-week preparation period for becoming a Christian through baptism, and as baptism became more strongly associated with Easter in the fourth century AD, it is possible that fasting in the lead-up to Easter became more generalised to include people who were already Christians.

A recent declaration by Pope Francis, indicating a shift in the customs linked with Lent, is shown by the inclusion of women in the foot washing ritual, which commemorates Jesus’ washing of his disciples’ feet in John 13:1–20.

The fact remains that many of the feast and fast days observed by Christians predate the church, but that they have also been shaped by its members over time. In addition, it serves as a reminder that nothing, including religion, remains the same over time.

Matthew 4:1-11

At that point, Jesus was brought into the desert by the Holy Spirit, where he was tempted by the devil. He had fasted for forty days and forty nights and had become hungry as a result. “If you are the Son of God, order that these stones be transformed into loaves of bread,” the tempter said as he approached him and added. “It is written: ‘One does not live on bread alone, but on every word that proceeds from the mouth of God,'” he remarked in response. He was then taken to the sacred city, where the devil forced him to stand on the parapet of the temple and demanded that he throw himself down since he was the Son of God.

“Again, it is stated, you shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test,” Jesus said.

It is written: “You shall worship the Lord, your God, and you shall serve him alone,” says the Bible.

Reflection from the Preface of the Mass:

Because of his forty-day fast, this is considered a holy season of self-denial. Choosing to reject Satan’s temptations has taught us to cleanse ourselves of the hidden corruption of evil, and in doing so to eat his paschal feast with purity of heart until we reach the fulfillment of the meal’s completion in the promised land of heaven.

Suggestions for Reflection

  1. Jesus was tested in the same way that we are. Temptations are not inherently harmful
  2. Rather, it is how we respond to them that determines whether we turn to God or away from God. Were we tempted by temptations as a means of turning to God rather than relying on our own resources? Is there a difference between the ways Jesus was tempted and the ways we are tempted, or is there a similarity? Satan is inviting Jesus to deny his status as the Son of God, which is hidden under the surface of the various temptations he faces. Temptations, aren’t they, an encouragement to abandon the sort of person we want to be and instead turn to harmful means of satisfying ourselves? By refusing to give in to the temptations, Jesus opted to rely on his Father to fulfill his deepest hunger, to relate to people in a normal way, and to not place his trust in his reputation, power, or wealth to provide for him. How can we sate our most insatiable cravings? Do we rely on our position of prominence and power to make ourselves acceptable to others
  3. And Are we going to utilize the forty days of Lent as a time of retreat, setting aside time for extra introspection and prayer

Jesus’ purpose when he fasted for 40 days

– Chapter 2 – John the Baptist and Jesus begin their ministry – Part 6 of The Life of Jesus Christ Previous article |Life of Jesus Christ Index|*Word List|Next article |Life of Jesus Christ Index Barrie Wetherill’s online Bible Study course on the life of Jesus is available for free. Level B of EasyEnglish is used to write this book. Please see the links below for more online Bible Study books and commentaries that may be of use. Alternatively, you can consult the Word List, which provides explanations for terms marked with a *star.

Alone with God

What did Jesus want to accomplish during those 40 days? People in the Bible were frequently left alone for extended periods of time. These were the kinds of occasions when they prayed and pondered about God. This was frequently the case before they performed a significant service for God. It happened before God had a particular message for them at other occasions. Men such as Moses and Elijah were frequently alone with God for extended periods of time. They were folks who were always on the move.

  • When they were alone with God, they gained a greater understanding of him.
  • God want for us to get to know him better.
  • When we engage in excessive activity, we can easily drive ourselves virtually insane.
  • He desires for us to restore our relationship with Him.
  • Then we’ll be certain of what he’s looking for.
  • We do it for God, and we do it with God’s might.
  • He came to show us what it’s like to be God.

He came in order to reconcile us with God.

Jesus is well aware of this.

There is a proper manner to follow God’s commands.

Men are enamored with prominence and power.

The *Devil appeared to him at the beginning of the story.

There was a very specific purpose for this to happen. The *Devil was attempting to persuade Jesus to do sinful things. God’s approach was unacceptable to him, and he urged Jesus to select his method instead. When we are doing God’s work, this is really vital to us.

The *Devil’s scheme

The *Devil* is the ruler of this planet, according to legend. He has authority over others. He manipulates people into doing incorrect things. However, Jesus, who is known as “the great friend of humanity,” had entered the earth. This was noticed by the Devil. God demonstrated this to everyone present during Jesus’ baptism. The *Devil’s dominion was about to come to an end. Men will be set free from this tyranny when Jesus came. The *Devil made the decision to oppose Jesus with all of his might.

See also:  How Many Deciples Did Jesus Have?

He assaulted the second Adam in the desert from this position.

How to defeat the *Devil

Adam and Eve had done nothing wrong in the first place. The *Devil attempted to manipulate them into doing terrible things. Christ, on the other hand, had done nothing wrong. The *Devil attempted to influence him to make the incorrect decisions as well. There are two things we may take away from this. The *Devil will make every effort to persuade us to do the wrong thing. This does not constitute a *sin on our part. Even Jesus was subjected to the wrath of the *Devil, who attempted to manipulate him into doing wrong.

This happens to everyone at some point in their lives.

It will happen to us as well.

As a result, he has the ability to empower us to defeat him as well.

Why Did Jesus Fast for Forty Days and Forty Nights? And Should We?

This is the second in a series of articles about fasting and abstinence. Part 1 may be found here. The fast of Jesus, which lasted forty days and forty nights, is the most dramatic in the Bible. The event is reported by Matthew, Mark, and Luke. “Jesus was brought up by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil,” according to the Gospel of Matthew. (See Matthew 4:1) Huh? What would be the purpose of the Holy Spirit wanting Jesus to be tempted? The gospel authors are cautious with the specifics of their stories.

Preparing for Battle

This isn’t a one-time event, either. It occurs immediately following Jesus’ baptism by John and immediately before His public career, which would culminate in His horrific death. His stay in the desert, it appears, served as a kind of physical and spiritual boot camp, preparing Him for the onslaught that lay ahead of Him. The Greek word for “tempt” in the text refers to anything like “test” or “attempt,” depending on the context. He was going to have to deal with Satan and his numerous minions in this battle.

  1. And what did Jesus do in response?
  2. Do you want to lift weights?
  3. Do you want to do high-intensity interval training?
  4. No, not at all.
  5. After all, why not three hundred and ninety or forty-one?
  6. When Noah lived on the ark, it poured for forty days and forty nights straight.
  7. And the Hebrews, who were God’s chosen people, were forced to live in the desert for forty years after they were expelled from Egypt.
  8. Before beginning a new covenant with Noah, God cleared the earth of sin and prepared the way for him.
  9. Because they were in the desert, they had to rely on the water that came from rocks and God’s supernatural food from heaven, which was known as manna, as well as the odd quail to survive.

The birth of a new Israel, according to Marcellino D’Ambrosio, was a prologue to “the birth of a new Israel emancipated from sin, reconciled to God, and controlled by the Law of the Spirit rather than a law etched in stone.” The first Adam did not pass the exam. It was passed by the second Adam.

Don’t Explain It Away

It might be tempting to find an explanation for the entire incident. “Yeah,” one would think. “Well, sure.” “Jesus is the Son of God,” says the author. He has the ability to multiply fish and loaves of bread. Even though I’m a mere mortal, I’m not sure I could fast for forty days any longer than I could raise a man who had been dead in the tomb for four days. “Can you tell me what this has to do with me?” At least, that’s what I had a faint notion of for quite some time. It hadn’t occurred to me that what Jesus did could serve as a model for us as well in some ways.

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  2. (See also Luke 4:2) The primary meaning of a fast can be summarized as follows: Fasting is defined as not eating for a period of time.
  3. It is important to note that Satan appealed to Jesus’ hunger rather than His thirst.
  4. However, believe it or not, a healthy person can fast from food for up to forty days without ill effects.
  5. A pound of fat contains approximately 3,500 calories.
  6. (This is the real kicker.) I’ll explain how to accomplish this without resorting to torture in subsequent installments.) The angels do arrive to minister to Jesus, but only after he has endured a long fast and been put through three tests by Satan.

What’s This Got to Do With Me?

This does not imply that you should embark on a forty-day fast consisting just of water, although you might if you put in the necessary preparation and planning. If fasting is not a key part of our lives, we will lose out on some of what God has in mind for us. Then why did Jesus not instruct us to fast if this is the case? Because He assumed that His disciples would do as He instructed them to do. In His Sermon on the Mount, which is included in the very next chapter of Matthew, Jesus addresses a large throng of people.

You should aim to be as unobtrusive as possible while giving charity, for example, rather than attempting to get recognition for it.

(Matthew 5:16; Mark 10:16) You see what I mean? Jesus presumptively expected His disciples to donate alms, pray, and fast. He concentrated on teaching how to perform all three in the most effective way.

One of the Best Reasons to Fast

Despite the fact that you could — with rigorous preparation and planning — undertake a forty-day water-only fast, this does not imply that you should. If fasting is not a key part of our lives, we will lose out on some of what God has planned for us. Then why did Jesus not instruct us to fast if this is the case. Why? Because He assumed that His disciples would do as He instructed them to do. Following this, Jesus delivers His Sermon on the Mount, which is recorded in Matthew 5:1-11. He informs them that God is concerned about what we do as well as the reasons behind what we do.

Instead of attempting to attract attention with your prayers, pray in secret.

(Matthew 5:16; Mark 10:45) See what I’m saying?

He was particularly concerned with demonstrating the most effective way to accomplish all three objectives.

Why Did Jesus Fast?

Fasting is a popular practice that may be traced back to the biblical text. Eating fasting is the voluntary and entire abstention from food for a specified period of time or days, with the goal of devoting oneself to God via prayer and seeking His will. In Matthew 4:1–11, we may read about Jesus’ fasting on a significant occasion. According to this verse, Jesus fasted for a number of different reasons. This essay will go into great depth about each of these four primary causes in further detail.

1. Jesus’ Flesh Was at its Weakest

One of the primary reasons for this is that Jesus’ flesh was at its most vulnerable during the period of fasting. This implies that Jesus was definitely one of us throughout this time period – a human being. Through the act of fasting, he was able to sense the frailty of flesh for the first time. What does it mean to be made of the weakest of flesh? It implies that it is sensitive to temptations, which explains why Satan was able to entice him at this period. We, as humans, are constantly confronted with the fragility of the body, just because we are human.

Jesus was both entirely God and totally man at the same time.

However, it was during this period of fasting that He was able to feel the frailty of the body and therefore become one of us, as well.

This is emphasized in Romans 8:9, when we read, Although you may be living in the body right now, you are in fact living in the realm of the Spirit, assuming that the Holy Ghost is present in your life. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to Christ, and vice versa.

2. He Had Conquered Temptation

Jesus’ fasting also serves as an illustration of how He overcame temptation throughout His life. According to the Bible, Satan tried to seduce Him several times. First, Satan tempted Jesus by offering him the opportunity to change stones into loaves of food to satisfy His hunger. Second, Satan enticed Jesus to hurl Himself on the ground in order for the angels to come to His aid, therefore demonstrating that He was actually the Son of God. Finally, Satan tempted Jesus by saying that if He worshipped Satan, all of the world’s splendor would be handed to Him.

  1. First and foremost, He stated that man cannot exist just on bread.
  2. At the end, He told Satan, “Worship the Lord your God, and serve him exclusively” (Matthew 4:10).
  3. This offers us reason to be optimistic about our own temptations.
  4. “I will overcome temptation in the name of Jesus Christ.”

3. True Nourishment Comes from God

Moreover, Jesus’ fasting serves as a testimony of His love and devotion to His Father. This is seen by the fact that He continuously refers to God when rebuking Satan’s seduction. During one of His rebuttals, He refers to Deuteronomy 8:3, which states: “He humbled you by making you hungry and then feeding you with manna, which neither you nor your ancestors had known, in order to teach you that man does not live solely on bread but on every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord.” From Jesus’ response to the circumstance, we may learn a great deal.

According to Scripture, “a lot of time had passed, and sailing had already become perilous due to the fact that it was after the Day of Atonement at this point.” As a result, Paul cautioned them” (Acts 27:9), and “the tenth day of this seventh month is the Day of Atonement.” “Convene a sacred assembly, abstain from food, and bring a food sacrifice to the Lord” (Leviticus 23:27).

4. Fasting Is a Spiritual Tool

Finally, Jesus fasted in order to prepare Himself for the ultimate spiritual fight against Satan, which Satan unquestionably lost. This is due to the fact that fasting is a spiritual instrument that prepares us spiritually and pulls us closer to God’s might. It is a means of acknowledging that our talents are not our own, but rather the result of God. As a result, this is exactly what Jesus did while fasting. It consists in His acknowledging His Father’s orders and getting strength from His Father in return (Isaiah 58:6-14).

Why Does This Matter?

We have explored four key causes for Jesus’ fasting, which are as follows: Even though Jesus’ flesh was at its weakest, He overcame temptation, displayed his faith, and, eventually, used fasting as a spiritual weapon to draw strength from His heavenly Father in order to save mankind. Fasting was undoubtedly a part of our Almighty’s overall plan to rescue us via Jesus Christ, His only born Son, and it was part of that plan. It was a part of His preparation, both spiritually and physically, for this moment.

Photograph courtesy of iStock/Getty Images Plus/1971yes.com Glory Dy has been working as a content developer for more than ten years now. She and her family reside in a peaceful suburb with their four cats, whom they adore.

Why Did Jesus Fast?

Throughout the gospels, Jesus is described as fasting for 40 days before engaging in a fierce encounter with Satan (Matthew 4:1-11;Luke 4:1-13). The objective of Jesus’ fasting, according to His own words, was to come near to God in order to receive assistance. Satan’s suggestion of turning stones into bread prompted Jesus to reference Deuteronomy 8:3, which states, “Man shall not live by food alone, but by every word that emanates from God’s mouth.” With His fasting and abstinence from physical food and drink, Jesus expressed His belief in the reality that genuine nutrition can only be obtained from the Creator.

According to Acts 27:9, the disciples continued to acknowledge and observe the Day of Atonement, which was an annual holy day that was also a fast day, for the rest of their lives (Leviticus 23:27).

We, at the United Church of God, adhere to the biblical practice of fasting on the Day of Atonement each year, as God has directed (for more information, see our free resourceGod’s Holy Day Plan).

While Jesus affirmed that His followers were not fasting while He was among them, he also stated that they would fast following His death, according to the Bible (Luke 5:33-35).

In light of the concept that fasting brings a person closer to God in need of assistance, as well as the significant physical stressors that Jesus endured on a daily basis, it would not be unexpected if Jesus fasted on a frequent basis, despite the fact that this is not documented.

In the same way that Jesus fasted in order to prepare for and ultimately win His spiritual war with Satan, we may likewise get closer to God, realize that victory comes through His strength rather than our own, and learn how to more effectively combat sin in our lives.

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