Why Were The Followers Of Jesus Called Christians

How did followers of Jesus come to be called Christians?

Why was it that followers of Jesus came to be known as Christians? According to legend, Antioch, the capital of the Roman province of Syria (which is now part of the Turkish district of Antakya), was the place where the term “Christian” was originally connected with early adherents of the faith. “And it was at Antioch that the disciples were first addressed as Christians” (Acts 11:26). Obviously, the concept of being a disciple of Jesus Christ is associated with the name “Christian.” In classical times, the followers of a leader would identify themselves by adding a descriptive extension to their leader’s name to distinguish themselves from others (ianus).

Similar to the name “Christian,” the term “Christianus” (of Latin origin, but Hellenized) was used to describe those who followed Jesus Christ.

² Chrism is also the Greek term for Christ, and it literally translates as “anointed one.” ¹ The Zondervan Pictorial Encyclopedia of the Bible is a picture-based reference work on the Bible.

Abridged version of this article is in the book, What People Ask About the Church, which was written and copyrighted by Dale A.

  1. Without exception, all biblical quotations were taken from The New King James Bible, published by Thomas Nelson Inc.
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The Disciples Were Called Christians

He (Barnabas) then went to Tarsus in search of Saul, and when he found him, he brought him back to Antioch. And it came to pass that they spent a full year meeting with the church and teaching a large number of people; as a result, the disciples were known as Christians for the first time at Antioch.” (Acts 11:25-26, New American Standard Bible) “Christians” is a phrase that is heard virtually on a daily basis. It is either said, or it is found in anything we read, or it is heard on a news broadcast we are listening to, whether it is on radio, television, or the internet.

  1. Some people, I would imagine, would consider the term “Christian” to be out of style in this day and age, and I would agree.
  2. No, it wasn’t like that.
  3. called” in our text) by individuals who were not “Christians” and who did not wish to be “Christians.” They didn’t want to be associated with being a follower of Christ, so they changed their name.
  4. Christian was initially used as an appellation (“identifying name, title”) of mockery to refer to the believers.” The parenthetical addition is mine.) Dr.
  5. Wow!
  6. Furthermore, considering the second usage of the word “Christian” in Acts, where we find the apostle Paul, in chains, before Festus and King Agrippa, it appears that their allegation is supported.

‘I am aware that you do.’ “And Agrippa responded to Paul, saying, ‘Within a short period of time, you will persuade me to accept Christ.'” (Acts 26:28 – New American Standard Bible) “Agrippa” was aware of the title bestowed upon people who followed Jesus, and he engaged in light banter with the apostle Paul while he listened to him testify about Christ.

According to the information we’ve received, it was a label invented by believers to designate themselves.

In the New Testament, the most prevalent names given to persons who were followers of Christ are “believers” and “disciples.” “We (Christians) are to live in such a way that those who come into contact with us will not understand us, will be puzzled by us, will feel that we are some sort of enigma, and will be driven to say, “Well, they are as they are because they belong to that Christ of whom they speak; they are different.” I believe that the following quote by D.

Martyn Lloyd-Jones provides us with the most accurate description of a “Christian,” “We (Christians) are I frequently hear the term “Christian” used in the media, and it is evident that it is being used as a “term of scorn” in this context.

In part, this is because “real followers of Christ, sincere believers,” as Dr.

And they should be acknowledged for the fact that “they are what they are because they are members of that Christ. ” I feel that this is an excellent description of a believer, especially for people who refer to believers as “Christians.”

Why they called us Christians

Have you ever given any consideration to why we are referred to as “Christians” in the first place? The early Christians did not refer to themselves as Christians. Jesus never identified himself or his disciples by name. The title “saints” was the most frequently used in the Bible. Saints are referred to in Greek as “hagios,” which literally translates as “consecrated to God, holy, sacred, and pious.” Saints is nearly often used as a plural noun, as in “saints.” This represents not just the person’s relationship to a group of individuals who have been set apart for the Lord and His kingdom, but also the group’s connection to the individual (more on that later).

  • Beginning with Adam’s initial assignment of naming the animals, and continuing throughout human history and even now, the development of a new name or title is significant and should not be taken lightly, and should not be disregarded.
  • It was at Antioch that the early church was addressed as “Christians” for the first time by the ruling class (Acts 11:26).
  • For what reason, in the eyes of outsiders, weren’t they just grouped in with all of the various variations of the Jewish faith?
  • Antioch was developed in the same manner as most other cities of the time: With a circular wall on the outside and a marketplace in the center, the city’s interior was walled off in a way that separated different population groups from one another.
  • Here come the Christ-followers.
  • Antioch was the first city where the Church arrived, and it began to tear down the boundaries that separated people, creating an unusual diversity and an energy that threw the world’s established classification systems into disarray.
  • It was necessary for people to categorize what was happening because this group of individuals was redefining reality in a way that had never been done before, and in such a radical fashion that a new definition, a new word, was required.

Something completely new, something that had not previously been seen anywhere else in the globe, was being identified.

Technically, the suffix “-ian” denotes “belonging to the party of,” thus “Christians” were individuals who belonged to the party of Jesus.

That individuals from outside the faith recognized Christians as a unique group, as shown by their word order in the Greek text, is the importance of the term.

Also noteworthy is the fact that it is a name that the early church clearly adopted and owned as the appointed name for those who are members of the Church, which is the body of Christ.

After years of coexistence with Jews and Gentiles, Peter opted to disengage from the Gentiles in order to appease a group of conservative Jews who had arrived in town.

Peter was “afraid” of what this people might believe or do, according to verse 12.

Peter had a history of fighting to transform his heart so that it would align with what he understood to be the truth of the matter.

As a result, Paul confronts Peter about it and admonishes him publicly in order to put the record straight (vs.

Paul is enraged by Peter’s compliance and his divisive posture, which he views as a violation of his principles.

That this disobedience was motivated by a fear of rejection was not only inappropriate, but it was also unfounded in light of the Gospel.

The Gentiles from whom Peter retreated received the message loud and clear that they were somehow second class as a result of what they were or weren’t, did or didn’t do, are or aren’t into, or what they weren’t into.

It is the Gospel that provides unity where there is separation, and healing where there is brokenness.

The division of people along racial lines is not only unjust, but it is also an insult to the Gospel itself, since it contradicts the Gospel’s decisive distinctiveness in this world.

Paul takes the witness of unity/diversity across international borders extremely seriously — and so should the rest of the Christian community.

Do our cities have the same appearance as Antioch?

Do our hearts beat in unison?

If so, does our presence in the world indicate the existence of a reality in which Christ transforms individuals into a new body of believers that is free of divisions based on social, economic, racial, or gender differences (Galatians 3:28, Colossians 3:10–11)?

Alternatively, should we just reflect the pattern of the world (Romans 12:2) and claim that the name Christian has no unique meaning?

The world gave us that name, and as a result, the world’s experience of the reality we represent continues to redefine what the word means in new ways.

What will be the world’s first indication that we are Christians? “the way,” “brethren,” “disciples,” “apostles,” “servants,” “believers,” “followers,” “the loyal,” “the elect,” and “the called” are other terms used.

The Disciples Were First Called Christians

Please Donate $5.00 to Help Us Keep These Thousands of Blog Posts Growing and Available to Everyone. Acts 11:26 (UASV) is an updated version of the American Standard Version. and once he had tracked him down, he transported him to Antioch. For a full year, they met with the church and taught a large number of people; and it was at Antioch that the disciples were first referred to as Christians. The Latinized Greek termChristianos (Christian) appears only three times in the Greek New Testament: in Acts 11:26, 26:28, and 1 Peter 4:16.

  • Of course, the Jews used the Greek name o because they believed in the advent of the Messiah, and they would never have referred to the followers of Jesus as Christianos because they believed in the coming of the Messiah.
  • “The disciples were also divinely summoned first among the Christians of Antioch,” according to Young’s Literal Translation (YLT).
  • When we check at more than fifty additional translations, we discover that “first called” is used instead of “divinely called.” What is the source of this discrepancy?
  • We can see how YLT arrived at their translation by looking to previous literature: “The disciples likewise were divinely called first in Antioch Christians,” as they put it.
  • 78), Strong’sExhaustiveConcordanceoftheBible definesschrematisaias as “to declare an oracle.
  • to be intimately acquainted with the divine.” This word is defined as follows by Edward Robinson’sGreekandEnglishLexicon(1885, p.
  • 671), the following definition is given: “to give a divine command or admonition, to teach from heaven.

to be the mouthpiece of divine revelations, to promulgate the commands of God.” “The word implies that this was done by divine revelation: for it has generally this signification in the New Testament, and is rendered ‘warned from God’ or ‘warned of God,’ even when there is no word for GOD in the Greek,” writes Thomas Scott in hisExplanatoryNoteson this text (1832, Vol.

419).

Specifically, Matt.

12.

The most likely scenario is that Saul and Barnabas were directed to give the name; in which case, the name Christian is a gift from God.” If the name Christian was given by divine appointment, the most likely scenario is that Saul and Barnabas were directed to give the name; in which case, the name Christian is a gift from God.” A lexicon is essentially a dictionary that includes words and their meanings in alphabetical order, such as those from an old language, such as Hebrew-English or Greek-English, or from a modern language, such as English.

  1. In cases where the BDAG (A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and other Early Christian Literature) contains Greek terms, it provides us with all of the meanings of the words that were in use at the time of the writing (early Christianity).
  2. Hands can refer to a variety of things, including what is at the end of our arm, the pointer on the clock, the cards dealt to a player in a card game (a losing hand), and an applauding round (a big hand for our next contestant).
  3. ), and about another twenty distinct meanings.
  4. Yes, if we were to be without context, we would have to assume the basic meaning, which is what we have at the end of our arm, which is the human hand.
  5. 1090, 3 rdedition).
  6. 12:25; Passive Matt 2:22) and (2) taking on or bearing a name/title(as so and so), to go under the name of, act., but it is frequently rendered as passive in English translations: be called/named, be identified as.
  7. John B.
  8. In all three situations, the term “Christian” refers to someone who is not a Christian.
  9. They chose terminology such as “believers,” “disciples,” and “brothers” above others.
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The name (Christianoi) is derived from the Greek word for Christ/Messiah (Christos), which is combined with the Latin endingianus, which means “belonging to, identifying with.” Examples of such groupings include the Herodianoi, who were loyalists to Herod, and the Augustianoi, who were zealous supporters of Nero.

  1. The fact that it was first used in Antioch may be suggestive of two things.
  2. Those Gentiles who had become disciples of Christ were referred to as “Christians” by their fellow Gentiles.
  3. In Antioch, the prosperity of the church among the Gentiles would have accelerated this process once again.
  4. 274) (Polhill 2001, p.
  5. (Ac 9:2).
  6. 6:22; Phil 1:1), the church of God, and those who call on the Lord.
  7. Outside of Christianity, they were mainly referred to as the Way (Ac 9:2; 19:9, 23; 22:4), and their opponents referred to them as the Nazarenes or simply as this sect (Ac 9:2, 19:9, 23, 22:4).
  8. Again, we see it in Caesarea, around 58 C.E., where it was used by King Herod Agrippa II himself, who told Paul, “Within a short time you will convince me to become a Christian.” • Ac 26:28 (Ac 26:28).
  9. As a future bride for Christ, Paul was likening the spiritual brothers to a virgin (who was pure and unblemished) in the eyes of the Lord.
  10. Paul’s enthusiasm for them was evidenced via his several long letters to them and to other first-century Christians and congregations.

Christ is the head of the church, and as such, he has a responsibility to care for its members by the decisions that he takes on their behalf.

Galatians 3:26-28Updated American Standard Version (UASV) 26For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus.27For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ.28There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.29And if you are of Christ, then you are of Abraham’s seed,heirs according to promise. Colossians 3:11Updated American Standard Version (UASV) 11where there is not Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free; but Christ is all, and in all.

Please contribute to keeping these thousands of blog posts growing and available to everyone for free by making a $5.00 donation. 26 Acts 11:26 (UASV) (Unified American Standard Version) and once he had tracked him down, he transported him to the city of Antioch A year went by during which time they taught a large number of people; at Antioch, they were the first to be referred to be Christians. The Latinized Greek termChristianos(Christian) appears only three times in the Greek New Testament: in Acts 11:26, 26:28, and 1 Peter 4:16.

  • Given that the Jews believed in Jesus’s Second Coming and so used the Greek term o, it is safe to assume that they would never have referred to the followers of Jesus as Christians.
  • YLT (Young’s Literal Translation) states that “the disciples were also divinely summoned first among the Christians of Antioch.” Inferring from this that God had anything to do with their being referred to be Christianos is reasonable (Christian).
  • There are many other ways to translate the Greek verbchrematisai, but the most common is simply “were called.” It was released in 1862 as Young’s Literal Translation (YLT).
  • In its Greek lexicon (1890, p.
  • i.e.
  • 786), it is defined as “said in relation to a divine answer, oracle, pronouncement, to offer response, to speak as an oracle, to issue a warning from God.” In Thayer’s Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (1889, p.
  • to be divinely commanded, warned, or instructed.
  • III, p.
  • Clarke’sCommentaryon Acts 11:26 states, “The term in our common text, which we interpret and remember, denotes in the New Testament, to appoint, warn, or nominate, by Divinedirection.
  • ii.

uses the term in this sense: The most probable scenario is that Saul and Barnabas were instructed to give the name; in which case, the name Christian is a gift from God.” If the name Christian was given by divine appointment, the most likely scenario is that Saul and Barnabas were ordered to give the name.

  • In cases where the BDAG (A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and other Early Christian Literature) contains Greek terms, it provides us with all of the meanings of the words as they were used at the time of the writing (early Christianity).
  • Hands can refer to a variety of things, including what is at the end of our arm, the pointer on the clock, the cards dealt to a player in a card game (a losing hand), and even a standing ovation (a big hand for our next contestant).
  • ), and a variety of other concepts.
  • When faced with a lack of context, we would have to rely on what we have at the end of our arm, namely, a human hand, to provide us with the principal meaning.
  • 1090, 3 rdedition).
  • 12:25; Passive Matt 2:22) and (2) taking on or bearing a name/title(as so and so), to go under the name of, act., but it is frequently rendered as pass.
  • (Rom 7:3; Ac 11:26) But first, what is the setting in which we find ourselves?

Polhill is the focus of today’s excursion.

Evidently, Christians were not the first to use the phrase in reference to their own faith.

Around the start of the second century, Ignatius, bishop of Antioch, made widespread use of the term “fellow believers” to refer to other Christians in his writings.

The name was frequently employed by Roman authors to identify followers of Jesus Christ, and it is still used today.

Those Gentiles who had become disciples of Christ were referred to as “Christians” by their fellow gentiles.

In Antioch, the prosperity of the church among the Gentiles would have accelerated the process once again.

274) (Polhill 2001, p.

(Ac 9:2).

6:22; Phil 1:1), the church of God, and those who call on the name of the Lord.

In Christian congregations, these titles had doctrinal significance and were used in conjunction with them.

24:5; 28:22; Ac 24:5; In 44 C.E., only eleven years after the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ, the name Christianos was first employed in a literary context.

‘For I am jealous for you with a godly jealousy,’ Paul remarked of the Christian assembly at Corinth, “since I betrothed you to one spouse so that I may offer you to Christ as a clean virgin.” 2 Corinthians 11:2 (New International Version).

As a future bride for Christ, Paul was likening the spiritual brothers to a virgin (who is pure and unblemished).

Through his several lengthy letters to them as well as to other first-century Christians and congregations, Paul displayed his ardor for them.

“He is the Saviour of the physical body.

As the head of the church, Christ has an obligation to care for its members by the decisions that he takes on their behalf, which he fulfills through his actions.

BIBLE TRANSLATION AND TEXTUAL CRITICISM

DEVOTIONALS IN THE CHRISTIAN SPIRIT

CHURCH ISSUES, GROWTH, AND HISTORY

Grekklesia(“assembly;” “congregation, i.e., of Christians”) is a Greek word that means “assembly” or “congregation.” The words “a great many people” from the English Standard Version (ESV) are not explicitly stated in the Greek text, but are implied. The majority of analysts agree that the phrase was coined by foreigners and applied to Christians for the first time. See H. B. Mattingly, “The Origin of the Name Christiani,”JTS9 (1958): 26–37; E. J. Bickerman, “The Name of Christians,”HTR42 (1949): 109–24; and C.

  1. See, for example, Josephus, Antiquities18.64; Tacitus, Annals15.44; Pliny, Epistles10.96–97; and Lucian, Alexander25.38 (all from the Greek).
  2. Despite the fact that it is transcribed “church” in practically all Bibles, its true meaning is “congregation.” This does not rule out the usage of the more popular term “church,” which we will continue to do.
  3. 12:28), although it may also apply to a single group in a certain city or residence as well.
  4. Anderson, Holman New Testament Commentary: vol.
  5. 8, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, and Colossians), p.

Where the “Christian” Name Really Came From

“Christian” is one of the few terms in the English language that has as much connotation as this one. It’s a heavy title, to be sure, but what’s intriguing is that Jesus never really assigned a name to His disciples, which is a fascinating fact. The early Christians did not refer to themselves as Christians. The title “saints” was the most frequently used in the Bible. It is the Greek term for saints, which implies “consecrated to God, holy, sacred, and devout,” as well as “holy, sacred, and religious.” Saints is nearly often used in the plural form, as in “saints and saints.” This shows not just the individual’s relationship to the Lord and His Kingdom, but also their connection to a group of individuals who have been set apart for the Lord and His Kingdom.

  • A name contains a profound meaning derived from personal experiences that aid in the definition of reality in a language that we can comprehend.
  • It wasn’t a name that Jesus’ followers chose for themselves; rather, it was a term that was bestowed upon them by the community at Antioch.
  • For what reason, in the eyes of outsiders, weren’t they just grouped in with all of the various variations of the Jewish faith?
  • Antioch was formerly described to as “all the globe in one city,” since it allowed visitors to see all of the world’s richness and diversity in a single location.
  • Antioch was developed in the same manner as most other cities of the time: With a circular wall on the outside and a marketplace in the center, the city’s interior was walled off in a way that separated different population groups from one another.
  • Here comes the group of Christ-followers.
  • When the Church arrived in Antioch, it immediately started about tearing down the divisions in a way that upended the society’s pre-existing categories.
  • Essentially, this group of people was redefining community in a dramatic and unprecedented fashion, to the point that a new term was required to adequately define what was taking place throughout the world.
  • They, on the other hand, recognized something distinct in Christians.

It is commonly thought that the term “Christian” was coined by the powers-that-be in a dismissive or even derogatory manner, as if as a dismissive wave of the hand to those “little Christs.” Christians were people who belonged to the party of Jesus, since the suffix “-ian” denotes in linguistic terms that they belonged to Jesus’ party.

  1. The first time is in Acts 26:28 (by Agrippa, an unbelieving King who applied the name he recognized as an outsider), and the second time is in 1 Peter 4:16.
  2. In each instance, the emphasis is placed on the fact that Christians are recognized as a separate group by those who are not believers, which is inherent in the ancient Greek language.
  3. After years of coexistence with Jews and Gentiles, Peter opted to disengage from the Gentiles in order to appease a group of conservative Jews who had arrived in town.
  4. Peter was “afraid” of what this people might believe or do, according to verse 12.
  5. Peter had a history of fighting to transform his heart so that it would align with what he understood to be the truth of the matter.
  6. As a result, Paul confronts Peter about it and admonishes him publicly in order to put the record straight (vs.
  7. It was difficult to confront Peter in public, yet the future of Gentile Christians depended on his response.
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It is the Gospel that provides unity where there is separation, and healing where there is brokenness.

The division of people along racial lines is not only unjust, but it is also an insult to the Gospel itself, since it contradicts the Gospel’s decisive distinctiveness in this world.

It is important that we take the social divides of the world seriously, just as Jesus did.

Do our cities have the same appearance as Antioch?

Do our hearts beat in unison?

How well do we communicate to the rest of the world a vision of community in which there is no distinction between people based on their social, economic, racial, or gender identities (Galatians 3:28; Colossians 3:10-11)?

Because they no longer enjoy what it means to be Christian from the world’s perspective, it’s possible that some Christians are moving away from the term “Christian,” giving birth to statements such as “I’m a Christ-follower, not a Christian.” Ancient Antiochians may have given us that name because of the radical inclusion of early Christians, but it is now up to us to ensure that name is maintained in the modern world.

Because the term “Christian” is always being redefined in light of the reputation we accord it.

8 Beautiful Marks Of The First Christians (Acts 11:26) — Nate Holdridge

“Christian” is a term that carries a lot of baggage in the English language, and it’s one of the worst. Yes, it’s a loaded label, but what’s interesting is that Jesus never actually gave a name to the people who were following Him. Christian was never used by the early Church to refer to themselves. “Saints” was the most often used title in the Bible. A saint is defined in Greek as someone who has been consecrated to God, who is holy, who has been dedicated to a sacred cause, or who has been pious.

  • It has been important to provide new names or titles to things since Adam’s first assignment to name the animals.
  • A name contains a deep meaning derived from personal experiences that aid in the definition of reality in a language that we can comprehend and comprehend.
  • At fact, it wasn’t a term given to them by Jesus’ followers themselves; rather, it came from the society in Antioch who had given it to them.
  • For what reason, in the eyes of outsiders, weren’t they just grouped in with all of the other branches of the Jewish faith?
  • Known as “all the globe in one city,” Antioch allowed visitors to see all of the world’s richness and diversity in a single setting.
  • It was developed in the same way as other cities of the time: with a central plaza.
  • When I think about it, I always think of this map of Chicago that shows the city’s races divided up.
  • The Gospel is brought in.
  • All around the city, Jews and Gentiles alike, people from all walks of life had come together at the same time.
  • Antiochians never bothered to study or categorize differently since there were so many diverse offshooting sects within Judaism, which is intriguing.

This conviction that something new and unprecedented was taking place led to the coining of the name “Christian.” In many circles, it is claimed that the term “Christian” was coined by the powers-that-be as a dismissive or even derogatory term for those “little Christs,” as if it were a dismissive wave of the hand.

  1. Only two more use of the word “Christians” are found in the New Testament following Acts 11:26: in Acts 26:28 (by Agrippa, an unbelieving King who applied the name he recognized as an alien) and in 1 Peter 4:16.
  2. The fact that Christians were recognized as a unique group by those who were not Christians is emphasized in each mention, as is implicit in the original Greek text.
  3. After years of coexistence with Jews and Gentiles, Peter opted to disengage from the Gentiles in order to appease a group of conservative Jews who had arrived in town.
  4. According to verse 12, Peter was “afraid” of what this people would say or do.
  5. Peter had a history of fighting to transform his heart so that it would align with what he understood to be the truth of the situation.
  6. As a result, Paul confronts Peter about it and admonishes him publicly in order to put the record straight (vs.
  7. It was difficult to confront Peter in public, but the destiny of Gentile Christians depended on it.

It is the Gospel that provides unity where there is conflict and healing where there is brokenness.

Race-based division is not only unjust, but it is also an insult to the Gospel itself, since it exposes the Gospel’s decisive distinctiveness in the world.

He took the world’s socioeconomic inequalities seriously, and so should we.

Whether or if we are living up to our monikers Our cities resemble Antioch, or do they look like it?

Our hearts do we believe?

How well do we communicate to the rest of the world a vision of community in which there is no distinction between people based on their social, economic, racial, or gender identity (Galatians 3:28; Colossians 3:10-11)?

Because they no longer enjoy what it means to be Christian from the world’s perspective, it’s possible that some Christians are moving away from the term “Christian,” giving birth to words like “I’m a Christ-follower, not a Christian.” Ancient Antiochians may have given us this name because of the radical inclusion of early Christians, but it is now up to us to ensure that this reputation is maintained in the modern world.

Because the term “Christian” is constantly reinventing itself in light of the reputation we accord it with each passing day.

1 They spoke of Jesus and what he had done for them.

Upon arriving at Antioch to see the church, Barnabas was struck by the presence of God’s favor. Many of the Christians had experienced tremendous salvation when they were there. Their conversion stories were typically clear and unique, and as a result, they delighted in sharing the love of Christ with the people in their neighborhood. They went out into the community and preached about him and his gospel message.

2 They lived out their devotion to Christ for all to see.

The lifestyles of those believers were markedly different from those of the rest of society in which they lived. The church had never experienced anything like this before, because the Christians in Jerusalem led a lifestyle that was comparable to the society in which they lived, although one that was entrenched in Judaism. This was a new experience for the church. Because Judaism and Christianity frequently disagree on moral issues, the church was distinguished primarily for its belief in Jesus as the Messiah (Christ).

  • Nonetheless, the Christians in that area were a part of the city, as opposed to being isolationists like the Jewish population in that area.
  • That was the time when religion and race were intertwined and formed a knotted knot.
  • True conversions occurred when Christianity expanded around the world, as a result of missions journeys and gospel preaching.
  • It was clear at Antioch that the gospel did not need individuals to dress and speak in a specific way because of their cultural background.

4 They had a new sexual ethic.

Our civilization has moved away from a biblical sexual ethic and toward a Roman-world-sexual-ethic, whereas the believers in Antioch have moved away from a Roman-world-sexual-ethic and toward a biblical one. Their regard for women grew as a result of their recognition that dignity and equality are owed to the feminine gender. They made the decision to respect marriage rather than make a mockery of the institution of marriage. They saved their sexual encounters until when they were in a covenantal partnership with another person.

5 Women were given honor and equality.

The attitude toward women that the early church possessed was unique in the ancient world. It could not be found anywhere else. Marriages were frequently arranged in advance. Women were treated as though they were property. Men took to the streets in a riot. The believers in Antioch, on the other hand, began to act differently toward women.

6 Children were honored.

In those days, infanticide was a regular practice. If a kid causes their parents dissatisfaction or difficulty, they may be removed from the family.

This mindset is not difficult to conceive in today’s abortion-friendly society. However, Christians began to treat children with the respect that they deserved. Children were cherished by Christ and his early disciples as well.

7 They had a new work ethic.

Instead of living for the purpose of accumulating riches, Christians began to labor with the objective of bringing praise to God. They wished for their labor to be a positive reflection of God, and they began to regard their job as a means of worshiping him. Additionally, the lazy among them put their sloth aside and adopted a strong work ethic.

8 They loved one another.

The love that these Christians had for one another was the most striking of all. They were well-known because of their love. As they shared their lives with one another day in and day out, the rest of the community took notice of how they interacted with one another as well as with people outside their circle. They would not live in the same manner as the rest of the world, but they cherished the world in which they lived. Then, as Brian came to the end of his lecture, he noted that followers of Christ were like Jesus in that they were a mystery to their culture.

  1. They were unable to be identified by the general public.
  2. Unlike other Christians, they had not been contaminated by customs and behaviors that had nothing to do with Jesus or genuine Christianity.
  3. When I consider these eight characteristics of the church in Antioch, which was the first church to be referred regarded as “Christian,” I am challenged because they symbolize the church that I adore.
  4. If believers can live their lives in the same way that the church in Antioch did, their faith and walk with Christ will be evident in stunning ways.
  5. However, it is possible that through living out these eight characteristics, the church will be able to distinguish itself for the distinctive ways in which we are following our Lord.

The Disciples Were Called Christians

The book of Acts chronicles the beginnings of the church and the spread of the gospel from Jerusalem to the city of Rome, among other things. The church in Jerusalem flourished until persecution erupted, causing the disciples to scatter around the world (Acts 8:1-4). Some of them who had been dispersed made their way to the city of Antioch (Acts 11:19). Before then, the scattered disciples had only taught other Jews about the gospel; nevertheless, at Antioch, some of them “began teaching the Lord Jesus to the Greeks as well,” according to the New Testament (Acts 11:20).

  1. In Antioch, where we find the first community made up of both Jews and Gentiles, “the disciples were first called Christians,” according to the New International Version (Acts 11:26).
  2. What was the source of this moniker?
  3. One theory holds that the name “Christian” originated as a disparaging moniker applied to the disciples’ adversaries, which was eventually adopted by the disciples themselves.
  4. According to my understanding, we may use the Bible to demonstrate that the latter is correct — the term Christian was given to the disciples by God, not by their opponents (in fact, there is not even any mention in Acts of persecution in Antioch).

When seeking to define a phrase, it might be helpful to look at how the term is translated in different portions of the Bible. Observe what happens to the Greek term called(a variant of the wordchrematizo) when it is translated in a few additional passages:

  • “And having been warned by God in a dream not to return to Herod, the magi fled for their own country in a different manner,” Matthew 2:12 says.
  • It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not see death until he had seen the Lord’s Christ, according to the text in Luke 2:26. The Holy Spirit is the personification of God who is doing the unveiling in this passage. This indicates that the revelation came from God
  • Romans 7:3– “So therefore, if she is united to another man while her husband is alive, she shall be considered an adulteress
  • But if her husband dies, she is free from the law, so that she is not an adulteress even if she is joined to another man.” It is important to note that while this verse does not specifically state that she would be labeled an adulteress by God, the wording implies that she will be. Due to the fact that she was in breach of God’s rule about marriage, she would be referred to as an adulteress. Paul was not making any allusion to the law of man in this passage. As a matter of fact, if the laws of man acknowledge her as “attached to another man,” the civil authorities will not consider her marriage to be an adulterous union. The law in this passage is God’s law, as the text indicates. Consequently, God is the one who names her an adulteress, based on what has been revealed in His marital rule
  • Hebrews 11:7– “By faith Noah, having been warned by God concerning things he had not yet seen, prepared an ark for the preservation of his household.”
See also:  Why Is Jesus Called The Light Of The World

The summons, warning, or revelation in each of these texts came directly from God in the heavens. “The disciples were originally called Christians at Antioch,” Luke recounted in Acts 11:26, implying that God bestowed this designation on the disciples. It is a fulfillment of a prophesy from the book of Isaiah, which states: “The nations will see your righteousness, and all kingdoms will recognize your glory; and you will be called by a new name, which the mouth of the Lord will designate” (Isaiah 62:2).

  • Keep in mind what we witnessed in Antioch.
  • The outcome was that “a substantial number of those who believed converted to the Lord” (Acts 11:21).
  • This is the reason why a new name was given to the place.
  • Christian was the given name.
  • Wearing the name Christian should be seen as a privilege and an honor in and of itself.
  • We should also be careful not to overuse the word.
  • A label for colleges, bookshops, rock music, and countries may be found on this product.
  • Disciples and Christians are those whom God has called.
  • By subscribing, you will also receive three complimentary PDFs: Plain Bible Teaching on the Gospel, the most recent issue of Plain Bible Teaching Quarterly Review, andDangers on the Safe Side.

How did Christian come to be the name for believers?

What is the origin of the term “Christian” to refer to followers of Jesus? There are just three instances of the term “Christian” being used in the New Testament, and each of those instances is referring to the earliest “Christians” of the early church. “.As a result, Barnabas and Saul spent a whole year meeting with the church and teaching large groups of people. At Antioch, the disciples were the first to be referred to be Christians” (Acts 11:26). “Then Agrippa asked Paul, ‘Do you believe you’ll be able to persuade me to become a Christian in such a short period of time?'” (See Acts 26:28.) But, if you suffer as a Christian, don’t be ashamed; instead, give thanks to God that you are called by that name (1 Peter 4:16).

  • What and when was the first time the term “Christian” was used?
  • “Christian” is an adjective, not a noun, in the dictionary.
  • Christ never referred to himself as a Christian, and Christ never referred to his disciples as Christians.
  • So, how do we go about establishing our identities?
  • Additionally, we might refer to ourselves as “bondservants” of Jesus Christ.” Cristianos, Christian: a term that is technically formed not in the Greek but in the Roman fashion, expressing attachment to or supporters to Christ and derived from the Greek word christos.
  • Tacitus (A.D.

“This name (Christian) appears just three times in the New Testament, and it is never used by Christians to refer to themselves; rather, it is used to refer to individuals who are not members of the church.” Brethren, disciples, believers, and saints were some of the broad terms used by early Christians to refer to themselves in various contexts.

  1. – See, for example, Thomas W.
  2. Is it OK for us to refer to ourselves as Christians?
  3. (which is thought to be the year in which this phrase was originated) served as the capital of the Roman province of Syria, which is worth mentioning (now within the region of Antakya, Turkey).
  4. “And it was at Antioch that the disciples were first addressed as Christians” (Acts 11:26).
  5. Rome’s forces were referred to as Pompeiani, while Caesar’s men were known to as Caesariani, respectively.
  6. – What is the origin of the term “Christian” to refer to followers of Jesus?

Peter was the founder of the Church of Antioch, as well as the first bishop of the Christian population that had been established there; the Church of St. Peter is traditionally believed to be located at the location where he first preached the Gospel in Antioch.

Church of Antioch – Wikipedia

Is it possible to trace the origin of the term “Christian” back to Jesus’ followers? There are just three instances of the term “Christian” being used in the New Testament, and each of those instances refers to the very earliest “Christians” of the early church. “.As a result, Barnabas and Saul spent the whole year meeting with the church and teaching large groups of people. At Antioch, the disciples were the first to be referred to be Christians (Acts 11:26). “And Agrippa said, ‘Do you believe that you will be able to persuade me to become a Christian in such a short period of time?’ It is written in the book of Acts that But, if you suffer as a Christian, don’t be ashamed; instead, give thanks to God that you are known by that name (1 Peter 4:16).

  1. What and when was the first time the term “Christian” was heard or written?
  2. Christians are referred to as “Christians,” not as “Christians.” The content is not included inside the term “Christian,” rather, the substance is contained within the heart of the individual it is seeking to describe, and which the pagan user is unable to discern.
  3. There is no evidence that the apostles addressed one another as Christians.
  4. After that, how can we establish our own unique identifiers?
  5. Additionally, we might refer to ourselves as “bondservants” of Jesus Christ.
  6. ‘The vulgar refer to them as Christians,’ writes Tacitus (A.D.
  7. Christus, the inventor or originator of this designation, had been executed by the procurator, Pontius Pilate, during the reign of Tiberius.

152, A Critical Lexicon and Concordance of the English and Greek New Testament, by Ethelbert William Bullinger (1908).

Brethren, disciples, believers, and saints were some of the generic terms by which the early Christians addressed themselves.

Note 3 on page 567 of Thomas W.

Is it appropriate for us to refer to ourselves as believers?

(the year in which this phrase is thought to have been originated) (now within the region of Antakya, Turkey).

“And it was at Antioch that the disciples were first referred to as Christians’ (Acts 11:26).

Following a leader in classical times would identify themselves by adding a descriptive extension to the leader’s given name (ianus).

It was thought that the Christianus (a term of Latin origin that had been Hellenized) was used to describe Christ’s disciples in a similar way.

Additionally, there is a revered Christian tradition that the Apostle St.

Peter was the founder of the Church of Antioch, as well as the first bishop of the Christian population that had been established there; the Church of St. Peter is traditionally believed to be located at the location where he first preached the Gospel in Antioch.

History

The Church was constituted and established on the Feast of Pentecost in Jerusalem. When it comes to followers ofJesus as the Messiah (Ha Maschiach), the group created in Antioch is where they trace their origins of becoming recognized across the globe as ‘Christians.’ “Then left Barnabas to Tarsus, in search of Paul, and when he found him, he brought him to Antioch.” They spent a whole year meeting with the church and teaching big groups of people. The disciples, whose origins can be traced back to a dispersion caused by persecution in Jerusalem, were “first called Christians at Antioch,” according to the New Testament.

  • One of its leading members, Barnabas, was later recognized by the Apostles in Jerusalem and was tasked with organizing the new church (see Acts 11:19-26).
  • Later, it was elevated to the status of Patriarchate of Antioch, one of the five main patriarchates (i.e., thePentarchy).
  • The rules of EmperorJustinian Iof the Byzantine Empire were the most comprehensive manifestation of this philosophy.
  • In Antioch, they were joined by Christians who had come from Cyprus and Cyrene to the city.
  • Nonetheless, the advancement of Christianity among non-Jewish believers is a major point of fascination.
  • St.

Certain Cypriote and Cyrenaic Jews, who had been brought up in Greek communities and who had different perspectives on the world than the Palestinian Jews, came to Antioch during the dispersion of the original Church in Jerusalem, during the troubles that followed Stephen’s audacious action, and established themselves in Antioch.

  • We may deduce from this that (1) effective preaching and the admission of Greeks to the Christian congregation were implied by the terms employed, and (2) that such an innovation occurred gradually and began in the synagogue, where Greek proselytes first heard the word.
  • It served as a major focal point from which missionaries to the Gentiles might be dispatched (presumably following theGreat Commission).
  • 407, it was the birthplace of the legendary Christian father Chrysostom, who was martyred in the city.
  • In accordance with the Alexandrian manuscriptActs 11:20–26, the Christians who had been dispersed by Stephen’s murder preached at Antioch toidolatrousGreeks, not “Grecians” or Greek-speaking Jews, from whence a church had been organized under the supervision of Barnabas and Paul.
  • Here is where Paul established a methodical approach to his mission.
  • In this passage (Galatians 2:11–12, the Incident at Antioch), Paul reprimanded Peter for his deception.
  • He began his second missionary tour in Antioch following the Jerusalem edict, which was addressed to the Gentile converts there, and finished it there (Acts 15:36, 18:22-23).
  • Ignatius was then appointed bishop of the city, a position he held for forty years until his crucifixion in A.D.
  • Historically, the patriarchate’s headquarters were in Antioch, which is now part of Turkey.
  • Priestlyrites and hymns from the Greco-Roman “old synagogal” period have survived in part to the current day, most notably in the distinctchurch services of the Melkite and Greek Orthodoxcommunities in theHatay Provinceof Southern Turkey, Syria, Lebanon and Northern Israel.

Members of these groups continue to refer to themselves as Rûm, which literally translates as “Eastern Roman,” orByzantine in Turkish, Persian, and Arabic, respectively. The name “Rum” is preferred over the term “Ionani,” which literally translates as “Ionian.”

Successive branches

  • Patriarchate of Antioch and All of the East, of Alexandria, and of Jerusalem of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church
  • Syriac Catholic Patriarchate of Antioch

These are in complete communion with the Catholic Church and, as a result, recognize the claims of the other. Also in 1000 by Bohemond, founder of thePrincipality of Antioch, one of the Crusader nations, the Catholic Church established aLatin Patriarch of Antioch (Patriarch of Antioch in Latin). Following the Crusades, this post was elevated to the status of titular in 1268, and it remained such for several centuries till being dissolved in 1964.

Eastern Orthodox

  • The Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and the Eastern Orthodox Church

Oriental Orthodox

  • Syriac Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and the Eastern Orthodox Church

References

  1. Smith’s Bible Dictionary
  2. St. Paul the Traveler and the Roman Citizen by W.M. Ramsay, Chapter 3, The Church in Antioch
  3. Easton’s Bible Dictionary
  4. Faussett’s Bible Dictionary

In Antioch they are called “Christians”

St. Paul the Traveler and the Roman Citizen, by W.M. Ramsay, Chapter 3, The Church in Antioch; Easton’s Bible Dictionary; Faussett’s Bible Dictionary; Faussett’s Bible Dictionary; St. Paul the Traveler and the Roman Citizen, by W.M. Ramsay, Chapter 3, The Church in Antioch;

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