Why Was Jesus Baptized If He Was Sinless

If Jesus Was without Sin, Then Why Was He Baptized?

He went to John the Baptist for baptism just before He began His public ministry and was baptized. I baptize you with water in the name of repentance. But after me will come someone who is more strong than I am, and whose sandals I am ill-equipped to bear on my shoulders. He will baptize you in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. (Matthew 3:11; Luke 3:21) The difficulty this creates is that John’s baptism was one of repentance, which creates an inconsistency. Why, if Jesus was without guilt, did He subject Himself to water baptism?

Jesus gave an explanation for why He was baptized.

Then Jesus traveled from Galilee to the Jordan River in order to be baptized by John the Baptist.

He Set a High Standard for Believers.

  • Those who have placed their faith in Jesus as their Savior are required to follow Him in water baptism.
  • Also emphasized in the Bible is the fact that Jesus emerged from the water very quickly.
  • Another sign that he did not commit a sin is the fact that he emerged from the water very quickly.
  • Because John was aware of Jesus’ sinlessness, he sought to prevent Him from proceeding.

If Jesus was without sin, then why was He baptized by John the Baptist? I thought baptism was a sign of repentance and our faith, but Jesus didn’t need to repent, did He?

No, Jesus did not need to repent of his misdeeds since He was the only person in all of human history who had never committed a single sin in his life. The rationale is that He was God manifested in human flesh, sent from heaven on that first Christmas to redeem us from our sins and bring us back to God. So why would Jesus go out of his way to find John and be baptized by him at the Jordan River? In Matthew 3:13-17, the Bible provides an account of this event. For the simple fact that Jesus, the spotless Son of God, took upon Himself your sins and mine sins, as well as the sins of the entire human race, is the reason for this.

This He accomplished by coming to earth to be among us.

His baptism served as a symbol of this profound truth, which was instantly verified by a voice from heaven, who said, “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am pleased” (Matthew 3:17).

While it is true that Jesus did not need to repent, it is also true that we need, for we have sinned and our only hope is in Christ and His atoning sacrifice for us. Is it possible for you to open up your heart and your life to His forgiveness and purifying power?

If Jesus Was Sinless, Why Did He Need to Be Baptized?

Isn’t it strange that Jesus had to go through John the Baptist’s “baptism of repentance” even though He was completely sinless? In his article ” Why Did Jesus Need to Be Baptized? “, Jonathan Pennington replies to this subject. John himself was apprehensive about baptizing Jesus. After realizing that Jesus was not simply another person seeking forgiveness for his sins, John expresses his displeasure by saying, “I need to be baptized by you, yet you are coming to me?” (See Matthew 3:14 for more information.) The response of Jesus to John’s reluctance is informative, both in terms of addressing our question and in terms of exposing an essential feature of Matthew’s theological framework.

  • It is fitting for us to complete all righteousness in this manner, therefore please allow it to happen,” Jesus added (Matt.
  • For most readers today, Jesus’ response to John is a bit arcane and difficult to comprehend.
  • It is an urgent invitation to realign our values, habits, affections, thinking, and conduct in light of a different worldview, one that is anchored in the revelation of God’s nature and impending rule (Matt.
  • In a nutshell, repentance implies “take up your cross and follow me!” Not in the sense of turning away from sin (which our repentance must involve, although Jesus’ does not), but rather in the sense of devoting himself to completely carrying out God’s purpose on earth.
  • Even though he is a virgin-born, divine-incarnate, and one-of-a-kind individual in the world, the Son aspires to be completely submissive to his Father (i.e., righteous).
  • You can read the rest of it here.
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Why Was Jesus Baptized Since He Was Sinless?

When you consider that Jesus, the Son of God, was sinless, why would He need to be baptized?

Baptism

The necessity of baptism for salvation has been disputed for a very long time, and some people even believe that you cannot be saved until you are baptized. But what does baptism truly include and what does it really mean? A person who has been saved should be baptized since it is mandated of Christians, but there is no unique quality to water because it is only through the precious blood of the Lamb of God that we are truly saved and our sins are removed from us. It is, in my own words, “an external statement of an interior declaration of our confidence in Jesus’ ability to rescue,” which is how I would describe it.

  • It does not rescue a believer; rather, it serves to demonstrate that the believer has been saved.
  • Baptism also serves as a sign of our unity with one another as members of the church.
  • When you are baptized in Greek, the term “baptizó” is used, which literally means “to dip or sink.” However, in the noun form, it literally means “to immerse” or to be entirely drowned.
  • It is noteworthy that baptism is not mentioned in the New Testament for the great majority of the occasions it refers to salvation.

Despite the fact that just a handful of Bible scriptures include the phrase “repent and be baptized,” none of these verses implies that we must “repent and be baptized in order to be saved.” Baptism is vital, yet no one has ever been saved via baptism.

Baptized into Moses

When the Greeks wanted to designate anything specific, they used the term “baptism.” If they immersed (baptizó) a fabric with purple dye, the cloth would be identified with the color purpose rather than the water in which the dye was submerged; similarly, baptism means being connected with Christ rather than with water in which the dye was submerged. As a result, the ancient Israelites were considered to have been baptized under Moses, implying that they were associated with him. “I don’t want you to be uninformed, brothers, that our forefathers were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea, and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea,” the Apostle Paul said in his letter to the Romans (1st Cor 10:1-2).

To ensure that we understood what he was saying, Paul said, “Do you not realize that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death?” (Rom 6:3), and that “as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ” (Col 2:14).

If you’ve been baptized, you’ve been identified with Christ, rather than saved by Christ through water as some people believe today.

It was Jesus’ desire that Christians be linked (or identified) with Him, so when we are out in public, there should be no question in anyone’s mind as to who and what we belong to, or with whom we are affiliated (or identified).

Jesus’ Baptism

To believe that we are saved by Jesus + baptism is to add to the work that Christ completed on the cross when He said, “It is finished,” which means it has been paid in full or brought to a close (Greek, “tele”), which is equivalent to saying, Jesus + Baptism = Eternal Life, which is not what the gospel teaches (Eph 2:8-9). Jesus was baptized in order to fulfill all of righteousness because we are unable to do so. At first, John the Baptist was adamant about not baptizing Jesus (Matt 3:14), believing that He should be baptized instead.

Our identification with baptism stems from the fact that we, who were once dead in our sins, have been made alive in Christ (Eph 2:1-4), and as a result, we have both died and been risen with Him to new life, and as a result, we have been transformed into brand-new creations in Christ (2nd Cor 5:17) once we have been born again.

Because we are incapable of following God’s Law, Jesus fulfilled the Law on our behalf and, for our sake, became sin (2nd Cor 5:21), therefore removing the curse of the Law that had been placed against us by the devil (by law breaking).

We were buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life,” writes the Apostle Paul in Romans 6:4, and “if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his,” writes the Apostle Paul in Romans 6:5.

Ceremonial Washings

Some believe that Jesus’ baptism served as a way for him to meet the legal prerequisites for ordination to the priesthood (Psalm 110:4; Heb. 5:8-10; 6:20). As directed in Exodus 28:4, where it says they are to bring “Aaron and his sons to the doorway of the tent of meeting, and wash them with water,” and later in Leviticus 8:6, where it says “Moses brought Aaron and his sons near, and washed them with water,” the priests in the Old Testament are only clean until they “wash their clothes,” and only until they “wash their clothes, they shall be clean” (Num 8:7).

When a person from outside the country of Israel desired to become an Israelite, they were required to endure seven washings, which served as a metaphor for baptism.

This tradition included the practice of baptism proselytes seven days following their circumcision, which was also followed.

Without the presence of the Holy Spirit, a person is unlikely to desire baptism.

Conclusion

Some believe that Jesus’ baptism served as a manner of completing the legal criteria for ordination to the priesthood on the part of the Roman Catholic Church (Psalm 110:4; Heb. 5:8-10; 6:20). As directed in Exodus 28:4, where it says they are to bring “Aaron and his sons to the doorway of the tent of meeting, and wash them with water,” and later in Leviticus 8:6, where it says “Moses brought Aaron and his sons near, and washed them with water,” the priests in the Old Testament are only clean until they “wash their clothes,” and only until they “wash their clothes, they shall be clean” in the New Testament (Num 8:7).

Whenever a person from outside the nation of Israel desired to become an Israelite, they were required to go through seven washings, which represented baptism.

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Among the practices associated with this tradition was the practice of baptism proselytes seven days following their circumcision.

It is unlikely that a person will desire baptism unless they have received the Holy Spirit.

Article by Jack Wellman

Jack Wellman is the pastor of the Mulvane Brethren Church in Mulvane, Kansas. He has been in the ministry for over 30 years. Jack is also the host of Spiritual Fitness and a Senior Writer at What Christians Want To Know, a Christian website whose aim is to equip, encourage, and energize Christians while also answering concerns regarding the believer’s daily walk with God and his or her faith in the Bible. You may follow Jack on Google Plus, and you can also read his book Teaching Children the Gospel, which is available on Amazon.

If Jesus was sinless, why was he baptised?

When Jesus is baptized by John, the beginning of his ministry is marked. The narrative is described in Matthew 3:13-17 and Luke 3:21-22, with Matthew being the primary source. But why was Jesus baptized in the first place? In accordance with Acts 22:16, when Ananias commands Paul to ‘Get up, get baptized, and wash away your sins,’ it is traditionally seen as a sign of the washing away of sins. The symbolism is particularly striking in churches that practice believer baptism: the applicant descends into the water and is completely immersed in a tremendous demonstration of faith.

  1. Reuters But, as Paul points out in Acts 19:4, John’s baptism was a baptism of repentance; thus, why would Jesus, who was spotless and had nothing for which to repent, feel it was essential to be baptized?
  2. What does it mean to “fulfill all righteousness”?
  3. It is the first point that should be made clear: baptism is more than a personal witness, as many evangelical churches like to emphasize.
  4. We are received into the company of Christians by baptism.
  5. As a result, when Jesus was baptized, he was officially establishing that new community and asking others to follow in his footsteps.
  6. Aside from what baptism’means,’ there is also the question of what it feels like to an adult believer.
  7. It is the start of a new chapter.
  8. It is performed in front of a congregation of Christians who are praying.
  9. He was to teach his followers that they, too, would have to bear their own crosses in order to follow in his footsteps.
  10. Christians are required to get baptized because Jesus urges them to do so.
  11. “I am baptised!” cried Martin Luther, the great Reformer, while he was experiencing immense spiritual upheaval and believing that he was under demonic attack.

“I am baptised!” cried Luther. And for those whose baptism took place years ago – possibly even in infancy – it serves as a point of reference, reassuring us that we are constantly in God’s care and protection.

Why Was Jesus Baptized If He Was Without Sin?

All people were asked to be baptized as a show of repentance from their sins, according to John. The acknowledgement of Jesus Christ as our Lord and the laying aside of our old ways of living in favor of the new, filled with the Holy Spirit, are two important aspects of our existence. Baptism has always represented a commitment to repenting of one’s sins, and John spoke on this subject while baptizing a large number of people. Jesus, on the other hand, was sinless. So, what exactly did He need to repent of?

Why Get Baptized, Then?

In this case, John would have prevented him from doing so by declaring, “I require your baptism, and do you come to me?” Matthew 3:14 is a biblical passage that teaches that God is love and that we are to love one another. In John 1:29, we find that John recognizes Jesus as a Savior and as someone who has come to bring about the forgiveness of sins. John was taken by surprise when Jesus requested to be baptized since Jesus was sinless at the time of his request. Jesus, on the other hand, went on with it.

Jesus’ public career started at his baptism, which marked the beginning of his public ministry.

He should have been baptized as well, given that He instructed His followers to “go forth to all countries and baptize them in the name [of] the Father, and [of] the Son, and [of the Holy Spirit].”

But What Do We Really Know?Most Of This Is Speculation?

While John baptized for the forgiveness of sins, it is significant to note that Jesus is identified as the one who would baptize with the Holy Spirit and fire. As a result, baptism was exclusively for the remission of sins up to the death of Jesus. In addition to the Upper Room, which is where Jesus is carried to Heaven, we only see the Holy Spirit descend on anybody else in the Bible. This is the time when the Holy Spirit is given to everyone, not just a select few. It’s interesting to look at the events that led up to Jesus’ baptism.

He calls them out on their false feeling of certainty about their salvation.

John also threatens the Pharisees and Sadducees, saying that Jesus would “clean his threshing floor, collecting his wheat into the barn, and burning up his chaff with unquenchable fire.” This is in response to their fury.

Those with hard hearts, such as the Pharisees and Sadducees, will be consumed in Hell (an unquenchable fire) because God has judged their hearts.

When Jesus is baptized, we witness Heaven opening up, a dove (the Holy Spirit) descending on Jesus, and the voice of God proclaiming that He is delighted with Jesus’ baptism. It is the first time that the trinity has been viewed in its entirety in one location.

Why Was God Well Pleased?

Later chapters demonstrate the significance of baptism not just for the remission of sins, but also for the infilling of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38). This was an event that Jesus had, and it paved the way for the beginning of His mission. At least until that point, we can hear him telling Mary that his time had not yet arrived (during the wedding in Cana). We had only witnessed one miracle up until that point. In contrast, when the Holy Spirit descends on Jesus, we see the beginning of his ministry, during which he does absolutely nothing apart from the Father.

  • God was undoubtedly delighted with Jesus’ obedience, which is why he praised him.
  • Given that He did not have any sins, Jesus might have declined because it was not necessary for Him to beg forgiveness for them.
  • So, what was the reason for Jesus’ baptism?
  • Even though it was not for the remission of sins, it was necessary in order for the Holy Spirit to descend on Jesus in order for Him to begin His public ministry.
  • It’s possible that the reason Jesus’ ministry began at that time was because He was infused with the Holy Spirit at that precise moment.

Why was Jesus baptized? Why was Jesus’ baptism important?

QuestionAnswer Upon first inspection, it appears as if Jesus’ baptism serves no purpose whatsoever. Although John’s baptism was described as a baptism of repentance (Matthew 3:11), Jesus was sinless and hence did not require repentance. Even John was caught away by Jesus’ sudden appearance before him. In this passage, John recognizes his own guilt and recognizes that he, a sinful man in need of repentance, is unsuitable to baptize the immaculate Lamb of God: “I require your baptism, and will you come to me?” (See Matthew 3:14 for more information.) According to Jesus, it should be done because “it is appropriate for us to do this in order to complete all righteousness” (Matthew 3:15).

  • Among them were: The time had come for Jesus to begin His great mission, and it was only fitting that He be publicly acknowledged by His forerunner.
  • The fact that John baptized Him was a public declaration to everyone present that here was the One they had been waiting for, the Son of God, the One he had promised would be baptized “with the Holy Spirit and fire” had now arrived (Matthew 3:11).
  • According to Luke, both of John’s parents were descended from the Aaronic priestly dynasty (Luke 1:5).
  • The words of John the Baptist the day following the baptism have a distinctively priestly ring to them: “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world!” (See also John 1:29).
  • His baptism signified the baptism of sinners into the righteousness of Christ, dying with Him and rising free from sin and able to live in the newness of life that Christ has provided for them.
  • Jesus responded that it was legitimate to “fulfill all righteousness” by baptizing the innocent Son of God, when John expressed reluctance to do so (Matthew 3:15).
  • Furthermore, Jesus’ appearance to John demonstrated His acceptance of John’s baptism, bearing evidence to the fact that it had come from heaven and had been accepted by God.
  • Perhaps most significantly, the event of public baptism preserved for all future generations the perfect manifestation of the triune God who had been revealed in glory from heaven on that particular day.
  • Also depicted is the role played by the three persons of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit in the salvation of people whom Jesus came to redeem.

At His baptism, the fullness of the wonderful reality of God’s kindness revealed through Jesus Christ is on display. Return to the previous page: Questions concerning the deity of Jesus Christ What was the purpose of Jesus’ baptism? What was the significance of Jesus’ baptism?

Jesus Never Sinned. So Why Was Jesus Baptized?

  1. First and foremost, we must realize that water baptism has absolutely no role in our salvation. Salvation is only possible through trust in Christ (Ephesians 2:8). In addition, keep in mind that water baptism is an external declaration of what has already occurred within when Jesus rescues a sinner and regenerates his soul. Lastly, John’s baptism was one of repentance (Matthew 3:10), which was founded on the confession of sins (Matthew 3:10-11). (Matthew 3:6). Jesus had no faults to confess and no sins for which to repent
  2. He had nothing to regret.

So why was Jesus baptized?

Many people believe that Jesus’ baptism by John was a “picture” of the suffering and the salvation that would follow later in history. That does appear to be the case to some extent. Water is used as a symbol of God’s anger and judgment throughout the Bible, including the flood (Genesis 7:10, Hebrews 11:7), the Egyptians drowning in the Red Sea (Exodus 14:28, Hebrews 11:29), Jonah being swallowed up by the sea (Jonah 1, Jonah 2:3), and many other instances. (For additional information on this, see “What do the 12 stones UNDER the Jordan River mean?”.) Jesus took our sins upon Himself when He died on the cross.

  1. Because of His precious and pure blood, Jesus died on the cross, paying the penalty for our sins.
  2. So, absolutely, complete immersion is required.
  3. Is it, however, a true “image” of our salvation?
  4. For those who belong to Jesus, God’s anger in judgment for our sins will never be experienced.
  5. What a Saviour, praise the Lord!
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More Than Just a “Picture” of the Cross?

When Jesus arrived at the Jordan River to visit His cousin John, I believe there was much more going on than just that. First and foremost, it was a proclamation of who Jesus is! “Look! Here it is!” John said. “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the whole world!” (See also John 1:29) John went on to announce to everyone in attendance that Jesus is not only the Lamb of God, but also the Son of God, as well as the Messiah (John 1:33-34). In spite of the fact that I did not know Him, the One who sent me to baptize with water told me, ‘On whoever you see the Spirit descending and abiding on Him, this is He who baptizes with the Holy Spirit.’ And I have personally witnessed and attested to the fact that Jesus is the Son of God.”

Jesus’ Desire to Be Baptized

When Jesus came up to John, he expressed his reluctance to baptize Him. “I need to be baptized by You, and are You going to come to me?” John inquired. (Matthew 3:14). After that, Jesus explained to John why He wished to be baptized: Mat 3:15However, Jesus responded and said to him, “Permit it to be so now, for it is suitable for us to complete all righteousness at this time.” Then He was restored to health. When Jesus arose from the water, God verified what John had spoken regarding Jesus’ identity: “Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Mat 3:16 When Jesus arose from the water after being baptized, He saw the heavens opened to Him, and the Spirit of God descended like a dove and landed on Him.

A Baptism of Confirmation and Preparation

Although the Scriptures are silent on the cause for Jesus’ baptism, his own statements provide some hints as to why he chose to be immersed in water. “Allow it to be now,” Jesus instructed. By making that statement, He was saying, “Allow this to take place,” and He was also stating that it was to take place at a specified moment (“at this time”) as well. “As a result, it is appropriate for us to accomplish all righteousness,” he continued. Consequently, Jesus was carrying out the righteousness of God at the optimal moment and in the optimal manner.

They were dedicated for service in the Temple, and Jesus was dedicated at this time (“now” – the beginning of His earthly ministry) to preach and teach, as well as mediate for men and women, until His death.

Comparison: The High Priest and the Priest of the Most High God

Mark 10:45 a.m. Even the Son of Man did not come to be ministered to, but rather to minister and to sacrifice his life as a ransom for the sins of the world. Jesus was 30 years old (Luke 3:23), which corresponded to the age at which a priest was first authorized to serve (minister) in the Temple (Numbers 4:3, 47). There is no doubt that Jesus’ baptism, which took place at the age of thirty, marked the beginning of His earthly mission.

  • Prior to performing Temple duty, priests were required to wash their hands (Leviticus 8:6).

Exodus 29:1,4 (KJV) I’ll explain further: “This is what you’ll do to sanctify them so that they can serve me as priests.wash them with water.” Leviticus 8:6 (KJV) Also, Moses brought Aaron and his boys, washing them in the Jordan River. The word “wash” refers to the act of bathing. The cleansing and consecration that God required before any ministering could take place were carried out here.

  • Following the water washing (baptism by water into service), the priests were dressed and then anointed with holy oil.

Exodus 29:5–7 Take the clothes and put them on Aaron. Pour anointing oil on his head after taking the anointing oil from the jar. Leviticus 8:7,10 And he placed the coat on him, and girded him with the belt. And Moses took the anointing oil and anointed the tabernacle and everything inside it, sanctifying them in the process. Through the Bible, oil is used to depict God’s might and as a representation of the presence of the Holy Spirit. It was the Holy Spirit who descended upon Jesus (Mat 3:16), as well as God’s statement, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well delighted,” that marked Jesus’ anointing.

Priests were responsible for delivering the Word of God to the people.

  • Priests were sent to act as a link between God and mankind. In the same way, Jesus did

1 Timothy 2:5 For there is only one God, and there is only one Mediator between God and men, and that Mediator is the Man Christ Jesus.

Jesus Had No Sins

The fact that Jesus was sinless meant that He could not have been fulfilling the righteousness of confession and cleansing from sin in His own life. Rather, Jesus was starting His three and a half year ministry, during which He would serve as a priest for the people of God (preaching, healing, interceding, ministering, etc). God’s just command was that all human priests be devoted to His service, and this was carried out. Herein lies the righteousness that Jesus was doing — the washing (baptism) in preparation for anointing and receiving God’s power and presence (the Holy Spirit) in order to carry out His mission.

This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well delighted,” God said as He anointed Jesus with His power (the Holy Spirit) and with His confirmation, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.” (Matt 3:17; Acts 10:38; Luke 3:17)

Beloved Son / Beloved Saviour

Is Jesus your cherished Saviour, or is he not? Are you completely pleased in Him? Jesus came to minister and to seek and redeem sinners, and he did it in three ways. Have you been baptized in the genuine sense of the word – the baptism of the Holy Spirit? Many believe that Jesus was baptized in order to identify with us. Obviously, this isn’t the case. Jesus took on the form of a man in order to live a human existence and experience life in the same way that we do, but He never became one of us.

  • He didn’t have to identify with us either.
  • Sinners must repent and turn to Jesus in order to be saved by Him.
  • When Jesus died on the cross, the anger of God, which should have been directed at us, was instead directed at Him.
  • Believers are baptized in water in order to publicly announce what Jesus has done for them.

He has cleaned us from our sins and has equipped us to be His instruments of service. Water baptism is a public statement of one’s salvation and should be used as a preparation for ministering God’s Word and testifying to the love and saving grace of Jesus Christ in the world. *}}}

If Jesus Was Sinless, Why Did He Need to Be Baptized?

The Baptism of Jesus Christ will be commemorated in the Church this coming Sunday. As a CCD teacher and a parent, there are certain questions I enjoy hearing from the mouths of children, and one of them comes up every year around this time: “If Jesus was sinless, why did he need to be baptized?” As a CCD teacher and a parent, there are certain questions I enjoy hearing from the mouths of children: “If Jesus was sinless, why did he need to be baptized?” If for no other reason than to demonstrate that they have been paying attention, it is an excellent question.

  • Indeed, the Catechism states that the Sacrament of Baptism accomplishes only four things: 4) provides the person being baptized with a personal testimony of salvation that they can share with the rest of the world.
  • It was also an oddly timed event, considering that the Church as we know it would not exist for at least another three years after that.
  • So, what exactly is the situation?
  • For the most part, the simple answer is that Jesus was simply setting an example for his disciples.
  • However, there’s more to it than just that.
  • And when we look beneath the surface explanation that Christ was simply setting a good example, we discover that the event was much more than a how-to manual for his future disciples.
  • How could this have happened?

When John performed “baptisms,” he was actually performing ritual washings (mikveh/ pl.mikvaot), which were given to Jews who were converting or reverting, symbolizing the death of one’s old, sinful self and the birth of one’s new, ritually clean self.

He had been traveling all over the country, urging people to be baptized in order to prepare themselves for the return of Jesus Christ.

He was on the verge of refusing because he knew Jesus was pure and sinless.

Matthew in the gospel of Matthew: “This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased,” a voice from above said as Jesus arose from the water immediately following his baptism.

He also heard a voice from above say, “This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased.” 3:16-17; Luke 3:16-17; Matthew 3:16-17).

And the fear of the LORD will be the source of his delight.

His righteousness will be the belt around his waist, and his faithfulness will be the belt around his loins.

This one had a strange twist to it, which was as follows: Baptism worked in the opposite direction for Jesus.

However, when Jesus stepped into the perfectly normal waters of the Jordan River, he transformed them into holy waters simply by his presence and touch.

Instead of representing new life for Jesus, the ritual that represented it for so many others foreshadowed his death and subsequent descent into hell, as he bore the punishment for the very sins that we now look to baptism to cleanse us of.

Jesus did not require baptism, and this is the correct answer to the question “Why did Jesus need to be baptized?” Jesusdidn’t need to be baptized in the traditional sense. We were in need of having him baptized. And because he loves us, he was.

Why Did Jesus Need to Be Baptized?

The Baptism of Jesus Christ will be commemorated in the Church this Sunday. While working as a CCD teacher and a parent, there are certain questions I enjoy hearing from the mouths of children, and one of those questions is one that comes up every year around this time: “If Jesus was sinless, why did He need to be baptized?” As a CCD teacher and as a parent, there are certain questions I enjoy hearing from the mouths of children: “If Jesus was sinless, why did He need to be baptized?” For no other reason than the fact that it demonstrates that they have been paying attention, it is a fantastic question!

  1. Indeed, the Catechism states that the Sacrament of Baptism accomplishes four specific tasks: 4) provides the person being baptized with a personal testimony of salvation that they can share with the rest of the world.
  2. It was also a strangely timed event, given that the Church as we know it would not exist for at least another three years after this event.
  3. In other words, what exactly is the situation?
  4. According to the simple explanation, Jesus was just setting an example for his disciples.
  5. However, there’s more to it than just this.
  6. Undeniably, when we get above the superficial interpretation that Christ was just setting a good example, we see that the event was much more than a how-to manual for his future disciples.
  7. Because Jesus had not yet formed his Church, the sacraments had not yet been instituted by the Roman Catholic Church.
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mikvaot were ceremonial cleansing rituals that Jews used to purify themselves of sins and ritual pollutants before entering the temple, but John’s “baptism” mikvaot were particularly intensive, resembling more of a refiner’s fire than a brief soak in the tub.

It took John by surprise when Jesus appeared and demanded that he be cleansed as well as the others.

Then, as Jesus persevered, John relented, and another piece of the puzzle came into focus: by being baptized, Jesus fulfilled a centuries-old prophesy about the arrival of the Jewish messiah, as recorded by St.

The heavens were opened to him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending as a dove and lighting on him.

3:16-17 is a passage from the Gospel of Matthew.

And the fear of the LORD will be his greatest joy.

He will strike the earth with his rod, and he will kill the wicked with the breath of his lips.

(See Isaiah 11:2-5 for further information).

However, this one had an unusual twist to it: Baptism had the opposite effect on Jesus.

In contrast, when Jesus walked into the Jordan River, which was entirely normal at the time, he transformed them into holy waters simply by being there.

Instead of representing new life for Jesus, the ceremony that symbolized it for so many others predicted his death and subsequent fall into hell, as he accepted punishment for the exact crimes that we now look to baptism to cleanse us of.

Jesus did not require baptism, and this is the correct response to the question “Why did Jesus need to be baptized?” Baptism was not required for Jesus in any way. Baptism was required for him. And since he cares about us, he was there.

Why Was Jesus Baptized?

However, both Mark and Luke report this incident without posing any questions about it (Mark 1:9–11; Luke 3:21–22). Instead of recounting the details of Jesus’ baptism, John’s Gospel highlights the same result that has been emphasized in all of the other Gospels: that the Spirit of God descended on Jesus, anointing him as the Son of God (John 1:32–34). Among the Gospel writers, only Matthew brings up the subject of baptism by presenting an element of the account that the other writers do not include: John himself was hesitant to baptize Jesus.

  1. The response of Jesus to John’s reluctance is informative, both in terms of addressing our question and in terms of exposing an essential feature of Matthew’s theological framework.
  2. 3:15).
  3. Something significant is taking place here.
  4. As a result, please allow me to provide this paraphrase: Jesus is carrying out his responsibilities as the obedient Son of God by exercising the needed righteousness of surrendering to God’s will to repent and turn from his sins (i.e., to live in the world wholeheartedly devoted to God).

How Does a Sinless Man Repent?

There are a few of parts to this that we need to examine in order to fully comprehend it. According to Matthew’s definition, righteousness is whole-person behavior that is in accordance with God’s will, nature, and upcoming kingdom. The apostle Paul uses this term in a variety of different contexts, but Matthew’s usage is more characteristic of the Old Testament notion of heartfelt, steadfast devotion to God. By consenting to John’s baptism, Jesus demonstrates to the world that he is the good and obedient Son of God who fully fulfills God’s desire.

  1. ” ” Biblical repentance is wider and more tailored to specific needs.
  2. 3:2; 4:17).
  3. In the sense of turning away from sin (which human repentance must always involve, although Jesus’ does not), Jesus repents in the sense of devoting himself to completely carrying out God’s purpose on earth.
  4. As a result, whatever reservations we (and John) may have regarding why Jesus would submit to John’s baptism are dissipated.
  5. Consequently, he must adhere to the God-ordained message of life-dedication proclaimed by John in order to save his soul.
  6. 1:18–2:23), and something he will continue to argue in the following stories (Matt.

He is the ultimate destination and culmination of all of God’s rescuing action. In order to fulfill God’s promise to send John as the ultimate herald of the King’s coming, Jesus now falls into line with this and submits himself to John’s baptism.

Jesus as the Last Adam

So, what was the reason for Jesus’ baptism? We believe this is because Jesus’ aim in becoming the Savior of the world is centered on his own unwavering obedience to the Father. Philippians 2:8 and Romans 5:18 both say that he was obedient up to the point of death on the cross, which resulted in our redemption. In the words of Brandon Crowe, “Jesus is depicted in the Gospel as the final Adam, whose obedience is required in order for God’s people to receive the joys of salvation.” Jesus’ baptism marks the beginning of his mission as the obedient Son, as well as the beginning of his role as a paradigm of what it is to be faithful to God.

  • It is through his baptism that we receive the Holy Spirit; it is by his baptism that we are baptized into him.
  • Our Lord Jesus was baptized as a symbol of his devotion (wholehearted obedience), and in doing so, we are following in his footsteps.
  • Our baptism does not take place merely because he did.
  • Though, like John the Baptist, we may have been bewildered as to why Jesus was baptized at first, we can now understand that Jesus’ baptism was an essential aspect of his redemptive mission in the world, and that it should always be remembered as such.

Why Did Jesus Need to Be Baptized?

There are a plethora of hypotheses as to why Jesus agreed to be baptized. If He was blameless, as the New Testament asserts, then His baptism had to have had a hidden agenda behind it, right? Some believe that John and Jesus plotted or conspired together in order to gain attention for Jesus’ ministry; others believe that Jesus came as a representative of the sinful human race; still others believe that Jesus submitted to baptism as a foreshadowing of his death and resurrection; and still others believe that Jesus’ baptism made the act of baptism work for everyone else.

  1. For example, despite the fact that John and Jesus were cousins, we have no proof that either of them spoke before the time of the baptism.
  2. But, most importantly, John’s baptism was not primarily a baptism of repentance as some may think (the turning away from sin).
  3. Those who were baptized had previously confessed their sins and desired to be united with the future Messiah and His kingdom.
  4. His job was to prepare the way for Jesus’ arrival, not to remove sin from the world.
  5. Jesus requested John to baptize Him merely as an act of obedience to God’s intentions, rather than as a religious ceremony.

God had given John the promise of a future Messiah, as well as the means of identifying Him when He arrived. That promise was fulfilled by Jesus. His baptism was just the appropriate thing to do at the appropriate time: it was the final act of His private existence.

The Baptism of Jesus

According to BibleStudyTools.com, the Baptism of Jesus is referenced in the Gospel Bible books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, among other places. In this account, we observe that Jesus comes up to John and wants to be baptized with his disciples. After preaching the Gospel for three years and baptizing individuals who repent and seek to restore their connection with God while looking forward to the coming Messiah, John was ready to retire. John is taken aback by the fact that Jesus, the spotless Son of God, is seeking to be baptized, since he believes that he should be the one asking Jesus to baptize him!

When Jesus is baptized, it is a symbolic expression of His submission to His Father as well as the beginning of His earthly ministry.

Why Did Jesus Have to be Baptized?

According to BibleStudyTools.com, Jesus’ Baptism is referenced in the Gospel Bible books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, among other places. This narrative shows us that Jesus approaches John and wants to be baptized, which is a common practice in Christianity. Since then, John has been preaching the Gospel and baptizing individuals who repent of their sins, desire to restore their connection with God, and look forward to the advent of the Messiah. It takes John by surprise that Jesus, the spotless Son of God, would want to be baptized, because John believes that he should be the one asking Jesus to baptize him.

During His baptism, Jesus expresses His submission to His Father and marks the start of His earthly ministry.

Why did Jesus get baptized by John if he had no sin? – Evidence for Christianity

Question:,If Jesus was without guilt, why did he need to be baptized by John?, Answer:, What you’ve asked is a really good question. Though his response is a little cryptic, Jesus has provided us with a solution to the subject at hand. It is suitable for us to do this in order to fulfill all righteousness, according to Matthew 3:15, therefore let it be so right now. Of course, the issue is: what did Jesus intend to convey by this statement? This was not done in order to achieve righteousness, as noted by the author.

He did this in order to bring righteousness to completion.

To be quite honest, I have no idea how Jesus satisfied the prerequisites for righteousness, however I will provide some options below.

Here are a few reasons why Jesus submitted to baptism, as suggested by the gospels.

We are unsure as to what this means in detail.

According to Matthew 3:16, it was at that point that the Holy Spirit descended on Jesus in the form of a dove.

John 1:32-34 adds further support to this notion.

This anointing of Jesus was a demonstration to John the Baptist, if not to others, of who Jesus was and what he had accomplished.

It was recorded in 1 Samuel 16:13 that the prefiguring incident took place.

(3) Jesus’ baptism was a sign of his humility and devotion to God as well as to the ministry of John the Baptist, as described in the Gospel of Mark.

,4.Jesus’ baptism serves as a model for others to follow.

In other words, Jesus did not ask us to do something that he himself was not willing to accomplish. Even though he did not need to be forgiven, he did need to display his surrender to God and to set an example for the rest of us by getting baptized. Dr. John Oakes has a Ph.D.

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