Why Did Joan Of Arc, Adolph Hitler, And Jesus Christ All Have In Common

Why did Joan of Arc, Adolph Hitler, and Jesus Christ all have in common? – iWriteGigs

Many people use the internet to find the information they desperately need.They could be looking for an answer to a nagging question.They could be looking for assistance in completing an important task.For recent graduates, they might be looking for tips on how to prepare a comprehensive resume that will capture the attention of the hiring manager.Manush is a recent graduate from a well-known university in California who is looking for a job opportunity as a real estate agent.While he scoured the internet for information, Cheers!

Manush’s tale demonstrates the necessity of using strong keywords in his CV in order to secure the job he desired.

Final Exam Flashcards

Many people use the internet to find the information they desperately need.They could be looking for an answer to a nagging question.They could be looking for assistance in completing an important task.For recent graduates, they might be looking for tips on how to prepare a comprehensive resume that can capture the attention of the hiring manager.Manush is a recent graduate from a well-known university in California who is looking for a job opportunity as a real estate agent.While he scoured the internet for information, Cheers!

His experience demonstrates the value of using strong keywords in one’s CV in order to obtain the position one desires.

14.1 Power and Authority – Sociology

  1. Define power, as well as the three sorts of authority available. List the three categories of authority identified by Weber
  2. What factors contribute to the instability of charismatic power over time?

Power is distributed and exercised in a society through politics, and the political entity through which this power is distributed and exercised is referred to as the state. Decisions must be taken in every society about the distribution of resources and other issues. Except in the most primitive cultures, certain individuals and, more often than not, distinct institutions are responsible for making these judgments. Depending on the culture, people may make these decisions only for their own advantage, while at other times they may make these decisions for the good of the entire society.

  • Our examination of politics begins with a conversation about power, which is appropriate given the importance of power in political thinking.
  • When we are driving a car and notice a police car in our rearview mirror, we have all witnessed a dramatic demonstration of sheer force.
  • We make certain that we carefully adhere to the posted speed limit and all other driving regulations.
  • When a police officer approaches our automobile, we usually strive to be as kind as possible while hoping that we do not receive a ticket.
  • You were 16 at the time.
  • The power that social scientists investigate is both bigger and, at times, more inconspicuous than any of these types of power (Wrong, 1996).
  • Many years ago, Max Weber (1921/1978), one of the founding figures of sociology, as covered in earlier chapters, separated legitimate authority as a distinct sort of power from other types of power.
  • For the sake of simplicity, if a community endorses the exercise of power in a specific manner, such power is considered legitimate authority.
  • One of Weber’s most insightful insights was the distinction between different sorts of legitimate authority that characterize different types of societies, particularly as societies progress from simpler to more sophisticated forms of government.

He referred to these three categories of authority as traditional authority, rational-legal authority, and charismatic authority, among other things. We’ll get to them right away.

Traditional Authority

According to the definition given above, traditional authority is power that is rooted in the traditional, or long-established, beliefs and practices of a society. It exists and is allocated to certain persons as a result of the conventions and traditions of that particular civilization. For at least one of the two reasons listed above, people respect traditional authority. Tradition is passed down by inheritance, with certain persons being awarded traditional power simply because they are the offspring or other relatives of those who already hold traditional authority.

In many preindustrial societies, where tradition and custom are so important, traditional authority is common; however, it is also common in more modern monarchies (which will be discussed shortly), in which a king, queen, or prince enjoys power simply because she or he is descended from a royal family.

In order to inherit and wield their authority, they do not need to possess any unique abilities, as their claim to it is simply based on their lineage or alleged divine designation.

This is due to custom and tradition, after all.

Rational-Legal Authority

As opposed to traditional authority, which derives from custom and tradition, rational-legal authority derives from law and is founded on a belief in the legitimacy of a society’s laws and rules, as well as in the authority of leaders to act in accordance with these rules in order to make decisions and set policy. This type of authority is a distinguishing feature of modern democracies, in which power is delegated to individuals chosen by the people and the norms for using that power are codified in a constitution, a charter, or another written piece of documentation.

  • President Barack Obama’s authority is thus vested in the institution of the presidency, rather than in the man who happens to be president of the United States.
  • This transition is often seamless and steady, and one of the wonders of democracy is that officeholders may be replaced through elections without the need for uprisings.
  • When a crisis occurs, rational-legal authority can assist in ensuring an orderly transition of power.
  • Johnson was inaugurated as the nation’s 35th president and became the nation’s 36th president the following day.
  • Ford had previously served as vice president after Spiro Agnew resigned due to financial misconduct.

It was seamless and orderly in 1963 and 1974 because the United States Constitution allowed for the transfer of power when the president was vacant, and because American leaders and members of the public recognize the authority of the Constitution on these and a wide range of other issues.

Charismatic Authority

Charismatic authority derives from an individual’s remarkable personal traits, as well as from that individual’s ability to exert influence over followers as a result of those characteristics. This type of charismatic figure may have control over a whole civilization or merely over a select group of people within a broader community. As this small list of charismatic leaders demonstrates, they may exert influence for good or for ill: Joan of Arc, Adolf Hitler, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Jesus Christ, Muhammad, and Buddha are just a few of the examples.

Dr.

Traditional or rational-legal authority can be used to elevate a person to a position of leadership, and charismatic authority might dwell in that person.

A few presidents of the United States, including Washington, Lincoln, both Roosevelts, Kennedy, Reagan, and, despite his flaws, even Clinton, were also charismatic, and much of their popularity stemmed from various personal characteristics that drew the attention of the public and, at times, the press.

Moreover, Weber emphasized that charismatic authority in its purest form (that is, when authority is vested in someone solely because of the person’s charisma rather than because the person also possesses traditional or rational-legal authority) is less stable than traditional or rational-legal authority.

  1. Although the example of a charismatic leader may continue to inspire people long after the leader has passed away, it is difficult for another leader to come along and command people’s allegiance in the same way.
  2. A successor leader, who they believe will possess the same captivating traits as their predecessor, is frequently appointed by charismatic leaders who know that their ultimate death may likely weaken the nation or cause they represent.
  3. The concern, of course, is that any subsequent leaders will lack the necessary charisma to have their authority recognized by the supporters of the original charismatic leader, which would be disastrous.
  4. Tradition may be transformed into charismatic leadership authority when charismatic leaders’ authority is seen as resting in their bloodlines, such that their authority is passed on to their children, and then on to their grandchildren.

The termroutinization of charisma was used by Weber to indicate to the change of charismatic power in any of the two ways described above.

Key Takeaways

  • A person’s capacity to have his or her will carried out despite opposition from others is referred to as power. According to Max Weber, there are three sorts of legitimate authority: traditional, rational-legal, and charismatic. Traditional authority is defined as: Because the power possessed by a charismatic leader may not readily be extended to anybody else after the leader’s death, charismatic authority is considered to be somewhat unstable.
See also:  What Did Jesus Say To The Rich Man

For Your Review

  1. Consider a charismatic leader, either a person you are familiar with or a national or historical figure who you perceive as having a strong sense of purpose. In this case, what is it about this individual that makes her or him so likable? The reason why rational-legal power is often more stable than charismatic authority is not well understood.

References

D. J. Lanoue, D. J. Lanoue, D. J. (1988). Economics and presidential popularity in the United States from 1960: From Camelot to the teflon president Greenwood Press, New York, New York. M. Weber’s et al (1978). An overview of interpretative sociology’s approach to the economy and society (G. RothC. Wittich, Eds.). The University of California Press is located in Berkeley. (The original piece was published in 1921.) D. H. was completely wrong (1996). Power is defined by its forms, foundations, and applications.

Types of Authority

  • Explain the concept of political power and authority. The three categories of authority described by Max Weber are identified and described in detail.

Despite the variations between government systems in the Middle East and the United States, both governments serve the same essential function: they impose control over the people over whom they have authority. It is vital to note that the form of that control—what we will refer to as power and authority—is a distinguishing feature of society. Sociologists have a different method to examining governmental power and authority than political scientists, and this approach is separate from that of political scientists.

They would note, for example, that the political system of the United States is divided into three distinct branches (legislative, executive, and judicial), and they would investigate how public opinion influences political parties, elections, and the political process in general, among other things.

Sociologists also look at how the exercise of power impacts local, state, national, and international agendas, which in turn influence people in different ways depending on their social rank, class, and socioeconomic standing, among other things.

What Is Power?

Figure 1. Adolf Hitler, the head of the Nazi Party, was one of the most powerful and destructive dictators in modern history, as seen in Figure 1. Here he is posing with Italian fascist Benito Mussolini for a photograph. (Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration of the United States.) Philosophers, politicians, and social scientists have been delving into the essence of power for centuries, and their work continues today. Similarly, Pittacus (c. 640–568 B.C.E.) stated, “The measure of a man is what he does with power,” and Lord Acton (c.

  1. Indeed, the notion of power may have very negative implications, and the phrase itself is difficult to define in a straightforward manner.
  2. Beyond personal connections, power has an impact on bigger dynamics such as social groupings, professional organizations, and political institutions.
  3. For example, a dominating nation will frequently use its influence and support to influence or assist other governments, as well as to acquire control of other nation states.
  4. Figure 2.
  5. The use of social media was also critical in mobilizing grassroots support for the cause.
  6. Efforts to achieve power and influence may not always result in violence, exploitation, or abuse, as some people believe.
  7. and Mohandas Gandhi, for example, commanded large-scale movements that brought about significant change without the use of armed might.
  8. They used a range of peaceful protest techniques, including rallies, sit-ins, marches, petitions, and boycotts, to bring attention to their cause.
  9. Today, demonstrators may utilize mobile phones and the Internet to broadcast information and plans to large groups of protesters in a quick and effective manner, saving time and money.
  10. In addition, social media was critical in disseminating truthful stories of the demonstrations throughout the world, in contrast to many previous circumstances in which government control of the media restricted news coverage.

They discovered that they possessed power as a result of their ability to exert their will over their own political leaders. In this way, political power is not always synonymous with unquestionable authority.

Types of Authority

Figure 1. Adolf Hitler, the head of the Nazi Party, was one of the most powerful and destructive dictators in modern history, as shown in Figure 1. This photograph shows him standing next to Italian dictator and fascist leader Benito Mussolini. National Archives and Records Administration photo courtesy of the United States National Archives and Records Administration In their explorations and comments on the nature of power, philosophers, politicians, and social scientists have done so for millennia.

  • 640–568 B.C.E.) stated, “The measure of a man is what he does with power,” and Lord Acton (c.
  • Indeed, the notion of power may have very negative implications, and the phrase itself is difficult to define in a straightforward way.
  • Beyond personal connections, power has an impact on bigger dynamics such as social groupings, professional organizations, and political structures.
  • In the case of a dominating nation, for example, it is common for it to use its power to influence or assist other governments, as well as to acquire control of other nations.
  • The recent Arab Spring was marked by the presence of a large number of young people and students who were vocal proponents of political transformation.
  • The photo above was provided by cjb22/flickr.
  • Leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr.
  • In order to oppose corruption and injustice, both men organized peaceful rallies, which were successful in sparking far-reaching reforms in their respective countries.
  • Because of advancements in technology, peaceful ways of reform are now simpler to put into action.
  • Tweets and other social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter were used to assist protestors organize their activities, discuss ideas, and build morale.
  • In addition, social media was critical in disseminating factual accounts of the demonstrations throughout the world, as opposed to many previous circumstances in which government control of the media restricted news reporting.

They discovered that they had power as a result of their ability to exert their will over their own rulers and authorities. In this way, government power is not always synonymous with unbridled authority.

Table 1. Max Weber identified and explained three distinct types of authority.
Weber’s Three Types of Authority
Traditional Charismatic Legal-Rational
Source of Power Legitimized by long-standing custom Based on a leader’s personal qualities Authority resides in the office, not the person
Leadership Style Historic personality Dynamic personality Bureaucratic officials
Example Patriarchy (traditional positions of authority), royal families with no political power but social influence Napoleon, Jesus Christ, Mother Teresa, Martin Luther King, Jr. U.S. presidency and Congress, Modern British Parliament

Traditional Authority

The power of traditional authority is recognized because it has historically been the case; its legitimacy exists because it has been accepted for a long period of time, according to Weber’s theory of authority. For example, the monarchy of the United Kingdom is headed by Queen Elizabeth II, who ascended to the throne following the conventional lines of succession for the monarchy. People hold to traditional authority because they have a vested interest in the past and a sense of obligation to see it through to completion.

  • Traditionalism takes on a more particular shape in the form of patrimonialism, which is traditional dominance supported by an administration and military that are completely personal agents of the master’s will (Eisenberg 1998).
  • In addition, these officials have no rights, and their privileges can be raised or decreased depending on the leader’s discretion.
  • RACE, CLASS, and Gender can all play a role in the establishment of traditional authority.
  • However, in other nations, the probable leader is a woman, rather than a male.
  • In a similar vein, individuals of dominant racial groupings or upper-class families are more likely to command respect.

Charismatic Authority

Followers are willing to accept the authority of charismatic leaders because they are drawn to the leader’s personal characteristics. It is possible to be captivated by a charismatic leader to the point that followers are inspired to make exceptional sacrifices or to endure in the face of immense adversity and persecution. It is common for charismatic leaders to arise during times of crises to provide creative or unconventional remedies. Even a vision of a new world order may be offered by these individuals.

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According to Weber, charismatic leaders tend to be in power for just a limited length of time, and they are just as likely to be despotic as they are heroic in their actions.

They possessed official positions of authority in a few cases, but the majority did not.

Leaders with great charisma include Joan of Arc, Margaret Thatcher, and Mother Theresa, among many others, according to many historians.

In spite of the fact that she no longer holds a formal position of power (and some could even argue that being First Lady does not confer authority), Michelle Obama is an example of a charismatic leader in the present political climate.

WATCH IT

Greta Thunberg, a seventeen-year-old Swedish girl, has been making headlines throughout the world for her forceful and emotive climate change talks. What began as a protest eventually evolved to talks at international conferences such as the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. Despite the fact that she holds no official position of power, she is influencing change by being a leader that others can connect to. As a result, hundreds of thousands of children are now asking for drastic changes in climate change policy, thanks in part to her efforts.

Rational-Legal Authority

According to Weber, rational-legal authority refers to power that has been legitimized via the use of laws, codified norms, and regulations. In this sort of authority, power is entrusted in a certain logic, system, or ideology, rather than in the individual who is responsible for putting that theory into action. It is not the person who has the capacity to influence under a rational-legal system; instead, it is the precise, organized, bureaucratic offices that have that power, and individuals who occupy certain positions have the authority to act in the name of those positions.

  1. Employee handbooks, which give the employee with a different form of power than the employer, are an example of rational-legal authority in the workplace on a more localized scale.
  2. There are few administrations or presidents who can be cleanly classified.
  3. The same is true for leaders and governments, who may start off embodying one sort of authority before gradually evolving or changing into another type.
  4. Similar to this, a someone in a rational-legal authority position receives exposure, which may enable them to become charismatic leaders after they have left their official positions of power.

Think It Over

  • Explain why figures as disparate as Adolf Hitler and Jesus Christ are both classified as charismatic authority, notwithstanding their differences. The question is why do people accept conventional authority figures, despite the fact that these sorts of leaders have limited ways of maintaining their authority
  • Leaders who are charismatic are among the most intriguing characters in human history. Choose a charismatic leader about whom you would want to learn more, and then perform internet research to discover more about that particular figure. Then, taking into consideration the society in which this individual evolved, write a paragraph detailing the personal characteristics that contributed to his or her impact.

glossary

Authoritarian authority: power that people accept because it originates from a source that is regarded to be legitimatecharismatic authority: power that is legitimated on the basis of a leader’s extraordinary personal characteristics A kind of authority in which military and administrative forces work together to impose the authority of a master Power that is justified by rules, regulations, and laws is referred to as rational-legal authority.

traditional authority: power that is legitimated on the basis of long-standing conventions and traditions

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Power and Authority

You will be able to do the following by the conclusion of this section:

  • Define and distinguish between the concepts of power and authority. The three forms of authority should be identified and described.

The White House, one of the most well-known state buildings in the world, represents the authority of the United States presidency and is located in Washington, D.C. (Image courtesy of the United States National Archives and Wikimedia Commons) Despite the variations between government systems in the Middle East and the United States, both governments serve the same essential function: they impose control over the people over whom they have authority. It is vital to note that the form of that control—what we will refer to as power and authority—is a distinguishing feature of society.

Political scientists are primarily concerned with understanding how power is allocated in various sorts of political systems.

Sociologists, on the other hand, are more concerned with the effects of governmental authority on society and the ways in which social disputes occur as a result of power distribution.

What Is Power?

Adolf Hitler, the head of the Nazi Party, was one of the most powerful and destructive dictators in the history of modern times. Here he is posing with Italian fascist Benito Mussolini for a photograph. (Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration of the United States.) Philosophers, politicians, and social scientists have been delving into the essence of power for centuries, and their work continues today. Similarly, Pittacus (c. 640–568 B.C.E.) stated, “The measure of a man is what he does with power,” and Lord Acton (c.

  • Indeed, the notion of power may have very negative implications, and the phrase itself is difficult to define in a straightforward manner.
  • Beyond personal connections, power has an impact on bigger dynamics such as social groupings, professional organizations, and political institutions.
  • For example, a dominating nation will frequently use its influence and support to influence or assist other governments, as well as to acquire control of other nation states.
  • Efforts to achieve power and influence may not always result in violence, exploitation, or abuse, as some people believe.
  • and Mohandas Gandhi, for example, commanded large-scale movements that brought about significant change without the use of armed might.
  • They used a range of peaceful protest techniques, including rallies, sit-ins, marches, petitions, and boycotts, to bring attention to their cause.
  • Today, demonstrators may utilize mobile phones and the Internet to broadcast information and plans to large groups of protesters in a quick and effective manner, saving time and money.
  • In addition, social media was critical in disseminating truthful stories of the demonstrations throughout the world, in contrast to many previous circumstances in which government control of the media restricted news coverage.
  • They discovered that they possessed power as a result of their ability to exert their will over their own political leaders.

During the recent Arab Spring, young people and students were among the most vocal champions of democratic reform. The use of social media was also critical in mobilizing grassroots support for the cause. The photo above was provided by cjb22/Flickr.

Social Media as a Terrorist Tool

After being beheaded in front of video cameras in a video titled “Another Message to America and Its Allies,” Alan Henning, a British aid worker, became the fourth victim of the Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL) to be beheaded in front of video cameras in a video titled “Another Message to America and Its Allies,” which was posted on YouTube and pro-Islamic state Twitter feeds during the fall of 2014.

  1. Henning was apprehended while taking part in a convoy transporting humanitarian supplies to a hospital in the conflict-torn northern Syrian region of Aleppo.
  2. Terrorist groups also took to social media to call for an end to U.S., British, French, and Arab military engagement in the Middle East, which they said was a violation of international law.
  3. France and the United Kingdom, both members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), as well as Belgium, are seeking clearance from their respective governments to join in attacks in Syria.
  4. Because of perceived national interest and geopolitical factors, Britain and France are more prepared to participate in airstrikes against ISIS targets in Iran and are less likely to hit ISIS targets in Syria, according to the United Nations.
  5. These include Bahrain, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates, to name a few.
  6. The United States’ engagement in Libya and Syria has sparked discussion regarding the role of the United States in foreign affairs, as well as the practical need and effect of military action in the Middle East, among other issues.
  7. Some believe that if ISIS is allowed to continue to expand, it will pose a direct and rising threat to the United States.
  8. intervention in the Middle East has unnecessarily exacerbated the situation, and they would prefer that resources be directed toward domestic needs rather than increasing military involvement in a region of the world where they believe the United States has intervened for far too long.
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Types of Authority

Separate from their positions in a government, the Tunisian protestors and the civil rights demonstrators on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday had considerable power. Their popularity stemmed in part from their ability to speak for what many people considered to be vital moral principles. Government leaders may also wield this type of influence, but they also have the benefit of wielding authority that is linked with their position in the government, which is advantageous. As the above example illustrates, there are several types of power in a given community.

  • People pay attention to authoritative figures because they believe that these persons are deserving of their admiration.
  • The interaction of a person with a police officer serves as an excellent example of how individuals react to authority in ordinary situations.
  • A driver in this situation is most likely under the impression that the police officer behind him represents a genuine source of authority and has the power to pull him over.
  • If the same police, on the other hand, ordered the driver to follow her home and trim her grass, the driver would almost certainly object, claiming that the officer lacked power to make such a request.
  • In addition to official positions of power, authority can be derived through tradition and personal characteristics.
  • He also studied large-scale systems of authority, as well as how they connect to a society’s economy.

Weber built a classification system for authority on the basis of his previous research. Traditional authority, charismatic authority, and legal-rational authority are the three sorts of power he possesses (Weber 1922).

Max Weber identified and explained three distinct types of authority:

Weber’s Three Types of Authority
Traditional Charismatic Legal-Rational
Source of Power Legitimized by long-standing custom Based on a leader’s personal qualities Authority resides in the office, not the person
Leadership Style Historic personality Dynamic personality Bureaucratic officials
Example Patriarchy (traditional positions of authority) Napoleon, Jesus Christ, Mother Teresa, Martin Luther King, Jr. U.S. presidency and CongressModern British Parliament

Traditional Authority

The power of traditional authority is recognized because it has historically been the case; its legitimacy exists because it has been accepted for a long period of time, according to Weber’s theory of authority. For example, the monarchy of the United Kingdom is headed by Queen Elizabeth II, who ascended to the throne following the conventional lines of succession for the monarchy. People hold to traditional authority because they have a vested interest in the past and a sense of obligation to see it through to completion.

  1. In modern times, patrimonialism has emerged as a modern version of traditional rule, characterized by traditional dominance enabled by an administration and military that are wholly personal agents of the master (Eisenberg 1998).
  2. In addition, these officials have no rights, and their privileges can be raised or decreased depending on the leader’s discretion.
  3. RACE, CLASS, and Gender can all play a role in the establishment of traditional authority.
  4. Additionally, members of dominant racial groupings or upper-class families are more likely to be respected than others.

Charismatic Authority

Followers are willing to accept the authority of charismatic leaders because they are drawn to the leader’s personal characteristics. It is possible to be captivated by a charismatic leader to the point that followers are inspired to make exceptional sacrifices or to endure in the face of immense adversity and persecution. It is common for charismatic leaders to arise during times of crises to provide creative or unconventional remedies. Even a vision of a new world order may be offered by these individuals.

According to Weber, charismatic leaders tend to be in power for just a limited length of time, and they are just as likely to be despotic as they are heroic in their actions.

In part due to the fact that relatively few women have occupied dynamic leadership roles throughout history, the list of charismatic female leaders is unusually brief.

Leaders with great charisma include Joan of Arc, Margaret Thatcher, and Mother Theresa, among many others, according to many historians.

Rational-Legal Authority

According to Weber, rational-legal authority refers to power that has been legitimized via the use of laws, codified norms, and regulations. In this sort of authority, power is entrusted in a certain logic, system, or ideology, rather than in the individual who is responsible for putting that theory into action. This form of control is exercised by a country that adheres to its constitution. The rules set out in the employee handbook, which give a different form of authority than that of your employer, may be an example of rational-legal power in the workplace on a more personal level.

There are few administrations or presidents who can be cleanly classified.

The same is true for leaders and governments, who may start off embodying one sort of authority before gradually evolving or changing into another type.

Summary

In order to understand the influence of government and politics on people and broader social systems, sociologists must first understand government and politics itself. An institution or individual’s capacity to dominate or guide others is defined as “power,” but authority is defined as influence based on a perceived legitimacy that is defined as “authority.” Max Weber investigated the notions of power and authority, distinguishing between the two concepts and developing a method for categorizing different sorts of authority.

Short Answer

  1. Explain why figures as disparate as Adolf Hitler and Jesus Christ are both classified as charismatic authority, notwithstanding their differences. The question is why do people accept conventional authority figures, despite the fact that these sorts of leaders have limited ways of maintaining their authority
  2. Leaders who are charismatic are among the most intriguing characters in human history. Choose a charismatic leader about whom you would want to learn more, and then perform internet research to discover more about that particular figure. Then, taking into consideration the society in which this individual evolved, write a paragraph detailing the personal characteristics that contributed to his or her impact.

Glossary

People embrace authoritypower because it comes from a source that is viewed as legitimatecharismatic authority is a type of authority that is accepted by people. The legitimacy of a leader’s position is based on his or her extraordinary personal traits. When military and administrative factions work together to enforce the authority of the masterpower, this is referred to as patrimonialism. having the power to impose one’s will on other people power in a logical-legal sense power that has been granted legitimacy by rules, regulations, and legislation Traditionally held authority is legitimated on the basis of long-standing conventions and traditions

Further Research

You might be interested in learning more about sociologists at work in the real world. Please read the following blog post to find out more about the roles sociology researchers performed during the Arab Spring uprising:

References

Acton, Lord, ed., Essays on Freedom and Power (2010, 2010). The Ludwig von Mises Institute is based in Auburn, Alabama. Chelsea Catrer and Ashley Fantz published a paper in 2014 titled A video released by ISIS appears to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloft. Retrieved October 5, 2014 from CNN ()Eisenberg, Andrew (1998; accessed October 5, 2014). “Weberian Patrimonialism and the History of Imperial Chinese Empire.” Theory and Society27(1):83–102, January 2007. Hosenball, Mark, and Slyvia Westall.

Hosenball, Mark, and Slyvia Westall.

“Debate: Does U.S.

Military Intervention in the Middle East Help or Hurt?” Mullen, Jethro (2014, October 7).

“What you need to know about U.S.-led airstrikes against ISIS in Syria.” Mullen, Jethro (September 24th, 2014; retrieved October 5th, 2014) CNN (2014).

“How Egyptian and Tunisian Youth Hijacked the Arab Spring,” published in 2011.

Obtainable on January 23, 2012 ().

An Outline of Interpretive Sociology’s Approach to the Economy and Society The University of California Press is located in Berkeley.

Max Weber published his first book in 1947. The Theory of Social and Economic Organization (also known as the Theory of Social and Economic Organization). A. M. Henderson and T. Parsons collaborated on the translation. Oxford University Press is based in New York.

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