Why Did Jesus Go To Galilee

Why Did Christ go to Galilee after the Resurrection? Three Reasons

On the morning of the Glorious Resurrection of Christ, the angel instructs the women to inform the Apostles that Christ will be going ahead of them into Galilee before they leave Jerusalem. Is it any wonder that Christ would want to travel to Galilee rather than remain in Jerusalem? After all, it is reasonable to assume that it would be preferable to remain in Jerusalem. Christ would have a greater number of witnesses to his resurrection in the city of Jerusalem. Christ, on the other hand, had intended to travel to Galilee.

In the first place, because Galilee was the native land of the Apostles, and it was there that they planned to return after the death of Jesus so that they might live more safely among their own relatives following the death of Jesus.

The Jews, on the other hand, would not have authorized them to congregate in Juda.

St.

  • 21) continues his discussion of the mystical basis for his journey to Galilee, saying: F or Galilee denotes a transition from death to life, and our Redeemer had already transitioned from His Passion to His Resurrection, from death to life, when He died on the cross.
  • So he who is announced at the tomb is depicted in the act of passing over, since He who is first known in the mortification of the flesh is also depicted in this act of passing over of the spirit.
  • The following is the chronological order of events: The events of Luke’s gospel (Chapter xxiv.
  • For the fact that Luke’s narrative is not the same as those of Matthew and Mark, as some believe, is plain from the words themselves, which are clearly distinct from one another.

Return to Galilee

When they discovered the empty tomb, the disciples were given only one order to follow in the midst of their terror and uncertainty: they were to travel to Galilee. According to Brian Purfield, it is still an instruction to us today since we are in the same position as the disciples: ‘This is where we live: after the resurrection but before the return, entrusted with a message that is magnificent, but the significance of which we do not fully comprehend.’ What is the location of our Galilee and how can we get there?

  • In the popular imagination, at least, the gospels conclude with the devout women trudging through the night to the garden, where, in a Zeffirelli-esque way, dazzling light and a blonde-haired angel emerge from the tomb to assure them that all will be well.
  • They were scared,’ Mark’s Gospel concludes, and this is the reason why (Mk 16:8).
  • In the meanwhile, there is no resurrected Jesus, no lakeside BBQ, no passing traveler who stops for supper, and no mystery gardener who knows our name.
  • As a matter of fact, Mark 16:8 is the perfect conclusion for this gospel, having been written for Christians under persecution who were themselves facing martyrdom and focused on the cross as it does.
  • If we are really honest with ourselves, we will admit that Mark 16:6-8 is the place in which the majority of us reside.
  • He has been elevated and is no longer present.
  • But go to Galilee, telling his followers and Peter that he would be there ahead of you, just as he promised.’ There you will see him, exactly as he promised.

Mt 28:1-10) opens with a similar journey by the ladies to the tomb on the day following the Sabbath, which is a similar occurrence in Matthew’s recounting of the good news of Jesus Christ’s resurrection (Mt 28:1-10).

(Mt 28:5) and instructs them to return to the disciples and inform them that “he has been resurrected from the dead, and indeed he is going ahead of you to Galilee” (Mt 28:7).

As in Mark’s account, Matthew adds that Jesus personally meets the ladies on the road and tells them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers to travel to Galilee; there they will find me” (Mt 28:10).

‘I will travel ahead of you to Galilee,’ says Jesus.

They ‘all abandoned him and fled’ on that occasion, despite having so enthusiastically joined in Peter’s protests of allegiance on the previous occasion (Mk 14:29-31; Mt 26:33-35).

That is when Jesus delivered the following message: ‘You will all slip away.’ ‘However, once I am risen from the dead, I will go ahead of you to Galilee’ (Mk 14:27-28; Mt 26:31-32).

Immediately following the death of the Master, the disciples dispersed; their confidence had been shattered, everything appeared to be over, all of their certainty had crumbled, and all of their hopes had perished.

The good word spread: Jesus had risen from the dead, just as he had predicted!

So what exactly is the significance of Jesus’s return to Galilee?

They are to return to that location, to the location where they were initially summoned to appear.

He had summoned them to that location, and they had abandoned everything and followed him (Mk 1:16-20; Mt 4:18-22).

The ladies are instructed on two occasions to inform the disciples that they should travel to Galilee in order to see Jesus personally.

For them, it must have been a lonely and dismal voyage.

They did so because they believed the amazing account of Mary Magdalene and her companions.

There are no guidebooks or directions on what to search for at the conclusion of the trail.

“Then go swiftly and inform his followers that he has been resurrected from the dead and that he is actually coming ahead of you to Galilee; there will be a manifestation of him.” (Matthew 28:7) The notion that the Easter journey is about gaining new perspective and understanding is a fascinating one.

  • In this aspect, though, everyone of the disciples has a trip to complete.
  • Several questions are posed during the narrative, including: ‘Who are you looking for?’ ‘Aren’t you another of that man’s disciples,’ Jesus asks (Jn 18:4, 7).
  • (See also Jn 18:29.) It’s noteworthy to note that the center of those three inquiries is targeted specifically to Peter.
  • The majority of us can empathize with him.
  • I’m not sure how many of us would make the same decision as Lieutenant Colonel Arnaud Beltrame, who recently volunteered to act as a hostage during a terror assault in a French supermarket and was later killed after being shot three times.
  • The unfortunate, fickle, and impulsive, on the other hand Peter eventually made his way to Galilee, and it was there that his discipleship really began to take shape.
  • Others require immediate response.

There is a ‘Galilee’ at the beginning of each of our journeys with Jesus, just as there is for Jesus.

A second ‘Galilee’ occurs in the life of every Christian following baptism: the experience of a one-on-one contact with Jesus Christ, who asked me to follow him and to participate in his mission.

Returning to that place meant rekindling the memory of that instant when his eyes met mine, the time when he first made me realize that he cherished me and wanted me to know it.

Galilee is not have to be a destination for us.

A dismal journey of physical, mental, sexual, or spiritual agony might be our Galilee’s experience.

It’s possible that the commonplace conditions of our everyday life are to blame.

There is a place where the Lord is waiting for you.

The message of the gospel is crystal clear: we must return to the tomb in order to see Jesus resurrected and to bear testimony to his resurrection.

Rather, it is a return to our initial love in order to absorb the fire that Jesus has stoked in the world and to spread that fire to everyone and everywhere, even to the far reaches of the globe.

Currently, Brian Purfield works as a part of the Mount Street Jesuit Centre team, where he teaches short theological courses.

(Mk 16:1-8). The lengthy finish is so unlike in style from the rest of the narrative that few academics are convinced that it is part of the original text of the Gospel of Matthew. Evangelii Gaudium, a papal encyclical published by Pope Francis (2013). Evangelii Gaudium, chapter three.

Why did Jesus tell His disciples to meet Him in Galilee after His resurrection from the dead? – Airport Christian Fellowship

After His resurrection from the grave, why did Jesus warn His followers that they should meet him in Galilee? “. He is going before you into Galilee.”, Jesus said to the ladies who had come to anoint His dead body a few days after His crucifixion, prompting my curiosity about the meaning of this remark. As I examined the resurrection account this year, a specific text piqued my interest. What could His followers possibly gain by traveling to Galilee to meet Him that they would not already have gained by traveling to Jerusalem to see Him after His resurrection?

The Bible (Matthew 28:7, 10; Mark 14:28; Mark 16:9) On the day of His resurrection, Jesus appears to several people, including Mary Magdalene (Jn 20:14-18), the ladies who had gone to the tomb with Mary (Matt 28:9-10), Peter (1Cor 15:5), and the disciples as a group in a locked chamber (Matt 28:9-10).

What happens in Galilee with Jesus’ disciples is best described in Matthew, which is also where academics believe around five hundred followers saw Him at one time, according to experts (1Cor 15:6).

Perhaps the answers to two questions will help us to gain more clarity.

“What is the question that Jesus’ resurrection provides an answer to?” Is it possible that the question is “What is the significance of existence on planet Earth?” When we study Christ and His resurrection, we will discover that everything (including us) was created for Him, and that everything exists for His purpose and delight.

The sacrifice of Jesus, as well as the love that drove it, were both justified by his resurrection.

Those clarifying statements may be found in Matthew 28:18-20.

They are also far more than just something to do.

28:18 (KJV) Jesus then appeared to them and declared, “All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth.'” 19 “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age.” “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with Amen.

With these statements, we may see why it was so vital for Jesus’ disciples to hear what He had to say in Galilee at this particular time.

This same Gospel message is still being shared with friends and neighbors today, as Jesus’ teachings continue to call on followers of His like you and me to join Him in this work.

It is critical for us to hear the resurrected Savior of the world, summon us, and lead us to join Him in what He is doing now, just as it was for His first century apostles and disciples. Let us concur with His wish to extend the reach of our connection with Him to the people and places around us.

Why did Jesus go to Galilee from Judea when John was arrested if Herod Antipas was the tetrach of those regions. Matthew 4:12

I came here to attempt to figure out what it meant when it claimed Jesus “withdrew.” That term was particularly perplexing to me since it suggests a movement away from something. According to what I’ve read in this post, and based on what I’ve read, my interpretation is as follows (please tell me if this makes sense or not): Jesus was in Nazareth, his hometown, but as stated above in the article, “Judea was under the rule of the scribes, Pharisees, and priests,” and “Because the attention of the people had been greatly stimulated by John’s teaching,” Jesus was in Nazareth, but he was not in Jerusalem.

  • This got me thinking about the holy spirit today, and how Jesus spoke about what’s in a man’s heart on a number of occasions during his ministry.
  • However, because the land was governed by the Pharisees, scribes, and priests, their hearts were hardened by their pride and arrogance in their own knowledge.
  • He did the right thing and attempted to share the good news with them, but once John was imprisoned, he “withdrew” from them and went to a place where there were open and receptive hearts because those people needed Him and their hearts were open to receive Him.
  • In the event that someone hears my call and answers the door, I will come in and have a meal with him, as well as he will with me.
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To Galilee or Jerusalem?

After Jesus’ death and resurrection, the writer of the gospel of Matthew described three instances in which selected followers of Jesus were ordered to meet with the Lord in Galilee. “After I have been risen from the dead, I will travel before you to Galilee,” Jesus told His disciples at the Passover supper that he shared with them on the night of His betrayal (Matthew 26:32). In Matthew’s account, an angel appeared to Mary Magdalene and the other women on the day of Jesus’ resurrection, telling them to notify the disciples of Jesus’ resurrection and to tell them exactly the same thing they had been told three days earlier: “He is going before you into Galilee; there you will see Him” (Matthew 28:20).

  1. Then, only three verses later, when the ladies were on their way to tell the disciples about Jesus’ resurrection and the word they had received from the angel, Matthew wrote how Jesus came to them and said: “Rejoice!.
  2. “Travel and tell My brethren that they should go to Galilee, and they will see Me there” (28:9-10).
  3. The Gospel of Matthew claims that Jesus undoubtedly desired to meet with His followers in Galilee upon His resurrection from the dead.
  4. Does Luke’s account conflict with the account recorded in Matthew’s Gospel?
  5. According to Luke’s two writings, The Gospel of Luke and The Book of Acts, Jesus is preparing a meeting in Jerusalem, which is in direct opposition to this.
  6. The Bible, like a cheating husband, has been caught in a contradiction and revealed as a liar, and as a result, it cannot be relied upon to speak the truth any longer (Smith, 1995).
  7. Is it possible that the Bible is at fault in this situation?

Jesus intended to meet with His followers somewhere in Galilee or Jerusalem, but he didn’t specify where.

One of the reasons that so many people claim that two or more Bible passages are contradictory is because they fail to grasp that just differing interpretations do not imply a conclusion of contradiction.

Have you ever looked at a single door at the back of a building and said, “That door is shut,” but then said, “That door is open,” did you think you’d contradicted your own statement?

Although the door may have been closed at one point, a strong gust of wind may have forced it open at another.

Consider yet another instance that is more directly related to the stated difficulty raised by the skeptic in this case.

Imagine that the Executive Director calls our homes three days before the event to remind us, saying, “Don’t forget about our meeting in Birmingham beginning Thursday,” and then calls our homes again the morning of the meeting to remind us, saying, “Don’t forget about our meeting today in Birmingham.” Someone might reasonably conclude that our Executive Director had lied about the meeting if, on that Thursday morning, all of the Apologetics Press employees (including the Executive Director) showed up at their places of employment in Montgomery and performed some of the same tasks that they would have done on any other workday?

  • In no way, shape, or form.
  • on the day they left for the end-of-the-year meeting in Birmingham, and then they all leave together to travel to Birmingham.
  • We happened to meet up at both locations on the same day, but at separate times.
  • When Jesus appeared in Jerusalem on the day of His resurrection, He met with all of His disciples (with the exception of Thomas), precisely as both Luke and John reported (Luke 24:33-43; John 20:19-25).
  • (Matthew 28:16).
  • The many versions of Jesus’ appearances after his resurrection are all consistent with one another.
  • During Jesus’ forty days on Earth following His resurrection (cf.

One may still wonder, “If Jesus really intended them to meet Him in Galilee, why did He tell His apostles to ‘tarry in the city of Jerusalem,’ on the day of His resurrection, until they were ‘endued with authority from on high,'” (Luke 24:49), if they were to meet Him in Galilee?” Although it is a reasonable supposition, it is incorrect to declare that Jesus uttered the aforementioned statement on the same day that He resurrected from the dead.

  • One thing we should bear in mind when we read the Bible is that it is not usually concerned with chronology in the same way that modern-day works are.
  • Luke 4:1-3; Matthew 4:1-11).
  • However, it is important to note that he never declared that Jesus remained alone in Jerusalem from the day He resurrected from the dead until the day He ascended to the right hand of the Father.
  • 24:1,13,21,29,33).
  • Acts 1:1-12).
  • When did these statements come to be?
  • This portion of Luke’s gospel does not appear to have taken place on “the first day of the week” (24:1) or on “the third day” (24:3) since Jesus’ crucifixion, as he did in the preceding verses (24:21).

50-51).

Despite the fact that many twenty-first-century readers believe that the events reported in Luke 24:44-49 took place on the precise day Jesus rose from the dead, the text is mute on the subject in its entirety.

Although the skeptic who was mentioned previously compared the Bible to a “cheating spouse” who “had been caught in a contradiction,” it is important to remember that it is as horrible to level accusations of marital infidelity when there is no evidence to support such allegations.

REFERENCESS mark a.

Jerusalem,” published in 1995, may be found at the following URL:published on May 26th, 2004.

REPRODUCTION PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMERS:We are pleased to offer permission for this material to be used in part or in its full as long as our conditions are followed. Prerequisites for Reproduction

Why Did Jesus’ Disciples Go Back to Galilee After the Resurrection?

After Jesus’ death and resurrection, the writer of the gospel of Matthew described three instances in which selected followers of Jesus were told to meet with Him in Galilee. “After I have been risen from the dead, I will travel before you to Galilee,” Jesus told His followers at the Passover supper that he ate the night of His betrayal (Matthew 26:32). Three days later, on the day of Jesus’ resurrection, when Mary Magdalene and the other women arrived at the empty tomb of Jesus, Matthew recorded that an angel told them to notify the disciples of Jesus’ resurrection and to tell them exactly the same thing they had been told three days earlier: “He is going before you into Galilee; there you will see Him” (Matthew 28:20).

  • Then, only three verses later, while the ladies were on their way to tell the disciples about Jesus’ resurrection and the word they had received from the angel, Matthew described how Jesus came to them and said: “Rejoice!.
  • Take my word for it, and urge My followers to travel to Galilee, where they will be able to see Me” (28:9-10).
  • Following His resurrection, Jesus, according to Matthew, undoubtedly desired to meet with His followers in Galilee.
  • Does Luke’s account conflict with the account recorded in Matthew’s gospel?
  • According to Luke’s two writings, The Gospel of Luke and The Book of Acts, Jesus is preparing a meeting in Jerusalem, which is in direct opposition to this.
  • The Bible, like a cheating husband, has been caught in a contradiction and revealed as a liar, and as a result, it cannot be relied upon to speak the truth any longer.
  • Whether or whether the skeptic is correct Are we to blame for this situation if we go to the Bible?

Jesus intended to meet with His followers somewhere in Galilee or Jerusalem, although it’s unclear exactly where.

It is one of the reasons that so many people claim that two or more Bible passages are contradictory is because they fail to grasp that just differing interpretations do not imply a conclusion of contradiction.

At the case of one single door in the back of a building, a person may remark, “That door is shut,” but he or she may also say, “That door is open.” Has the person contradicted himself?

A powerful blast of wind may have forced the door open after it had been closed for a short time.

Let’s look at another example that is more directly related to the purported difficulty raised by the skeptic.

Imagine that the Executive Director calls our homes three days before the event to remind us, saying, “Don’t forget about our meeting in Birmingham beginning Thursday,” and then calls our homes again the morning of the meeting to remind us, saying, “Don’t forget about our meeting in Birmingham today.” Someone might reasonably conclude that our Executive Director had lied about the meeting if, on that Thursday morning, all of the Apologetics Press employees (including the Executive Director) showed up at their places of employment in Montgomery and went about their business as they would on any other day of the week?

  1. In no way, shape, or form!
  2. on the day they left for the end-of-the-year convention in Birmingham, and then they all leave together to travel to the gathering.
  3. If someone else inquired as to whether or not we had traveled to Birmingham for a two-day meeting on Thursday, we could honestly respond, “Yes.” In this case, both assertions are correct.
  4. At other points in His ministry, Jesus also met with His disciples in Jerusalem and in Galilee, but at different periods.
  5. Because Jesus was only on the Earth for forty days after His resurrection (cf.
  6. (Matthew 28:16).
  7. The many versions of Jesus’ appearances after his resurrection do not conflict with one another.
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As indicated in 1 Corinthians 15:1-7, Jesus may have appeared to the disciples on a number of occasions during His forty days on Earth following His resurrection, with only the more notable appearances being recorded in order to demonstrate the reality of His resurrection.

The Bible, unlike modern texts, is not usually concerned with chronology, which is something we must keep this in mind when we read it.

Luke 4:1-3; Matthew 4:1-11).

However, it is important to note that he never declared that Jesus remained alone in Jerusalem from the day He resurrected from the dead until the day He ascended to the right hand of God.

24:1,13,21,29,33).

Acts 1:1-12).

Did these remarks come about at a certain time period?

This portion of Luke’s gospel does not appear to have taken place on “the first day of the week” (24:1), or on “the third day” (24:3) since Jesus’ crucifixion, as he did in the preceding verses (24:21).

50-51).

The events reported in Luke 24:44-49, which many twenty-first-century readers believe occurred on the day of Jesus’ resurrection, are not explicitly stated in the text, despite popular belief to the contrary.

It is important to note that, while the skeptic mentioned before likened the Bible to a “cheating husband” who “had been caught in a contradiction,” it is also reprehensible to level accusations of marital infidelity when there is no evidence to support such claims.

REFERENCESS mark a.

Jerusalem,” published in 1995, may be found at the following URL: published on May 26, 2004: URL: REPRODUCTION NOTICE OF DISCLAIMER: We are pleased to offer permission for the reproduction of this work in part or in its entirety, provided that our conditions are followed. Conditions for Reproduction

Reprinted from theBaptist Bulletin(April 2004).© 2004 Regular Baptist Press. All rights reserved.Used by permission.

The Word became man and lived among us, and we saw his glory, which was like that of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth (John 1:14). Galilee served as the setting for the most of Jesus’ ministry. It was located in modern-day Northern Israel, which at the time of Jesus’ death was a part of the Roman Empire at the time of his death. Known as the Northern Province, it included the whole northern region of the kingdom, with both the Jordan River and the Sea of Galilee constituting its eastern border.

Lower Galilee, with its vast plain and hill region that stretches all the way down to the Jordan, was “one of the wealthiest and most beautiful sections of Palestine,” according to Smith’s Bible Dictionary.

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, Jesus was born and raised in Nazareth, one of the two major cities in Galilee.

The Roman Empire made great efforts to maintain calm in the realm, but the message of Jesus and His disciples threatened to break that peace, and finally reached all the way to Rome.

Where Does the Bible Talk about Galilee?

The Word became man and lived among us, and we saw his glory, which was like that of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14). Jesus spent the most of his ministry in Galilee. Because it was located in modern-day Northern Israel, which was a part of the Roman Empire during Jesus’ time, it is known as the Garden of Eden. Known as the Northern Province, it included the whole northern region of the kingdom, with both the Jordan River and the Sea of Galilee serving as its eastern borders.

“One of the wealthiest and most beautiful areas of Palestine,” according to Smith’s Bible Dictionary, was the Lower Galilee, with its vast plain and hill country that ran down into the Jordan.

“.but in the future, he will honor Galilee among the nations, along the Way of the Sea, beyond the Jordan,” according to Isaiah 9:1.

The Roman Empire made great efforts to maintain peace in the realm, but the message of Jesus and His disciples threatened to break that calm and finally reached all the way to Rome.

What Is the Historical Significance of Galilee?

In exchange for Hiram king of Tyre supplying him with all the cedar, juniper, and gold he desired, King Solomon granted Hiram twenty towns in Galilee (1 Kings 9:11). According to Smith’s Bible Dictionary, Galilee is a piece of land containing approximately twenty towns that was given to King Hiram of Tyre by Solomon “in recognition of his service in transporting timber from Lebanon to Jerusalem.” According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, during the reigns of King David and King Solomon in the 10th century BC, “it came under the jurisdiction of the northern kingdom of Israel.” Scholars disagree on the reasons why Galilee was largely deserted for more than a half-millennium following the Assyrian invasion.

A century before the birth of Jesus, the country was re-populated by Jews who had fled the Roman Empire.

Frederick Bruner, claims that Galilee was “the most pagan of the Jewish provinces.” “Their mixed origin explains the differences in speech that distinguished them from their brethren in the south, who regarded Galilee and the Galileans with a certain proud contempt,” says the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.

“Galilee was a region of great natural fertility,” according to the Bible Hub, which goes on to say that “it rejects no plant, for the air is so genial that it suits every variety of plant.” It was a prosperous land with a sophisticated population.

In this way, we are able to better comprehend the large throngs who assembled and followed Jesus in this territory.” Galilee was a province of the Roman Empire at the time of Jesus’ life.

Relations between Gentiles and Jews were difficult during a time when they were ruled by strangers.

Galilee’s strong resistance to the Roman Empire is historically significant, as it was the region that put up the most significant fight among Jewish populations. In the words of Easton’s Bible Dictionary, Galilee was “the setting for some of the most significant events in Jewish history.”

How Was Galilee Important in the Earthly Life of Jesus?

“After a short while, others who were still waiting there approached Peter and said, ‘Surely you are one of them; your accent gives you away’.” (Matthew 26:73; Mark 1:15) Jesus spent around thirty years in Galilee before returning to Jerusalem. Because Galilean Jews spoke with a distinct accent, Jesus’ followers were easily distinguished from one another. When John the Baptist was jailed, Jesus left Judea for Galilee in order to make a dig at the Pharisees (experts in Jewish law). It is crucial that He journeyed from Judea to Galilee in such a specific manner.

  1. However, despite the animosity that existed between Jews and Samaritans, Jesus opted to pass through Samaria before commencing His public ministry in Galilee.
  2. He had been rejected at His birthplace of Nazareth, and as a result, he came to the Galilean city of Capernaum to begin His mission there.
  3. The Galilean people were predominantly Jewish, although their lineage had been mingled through the centuries, resulting in a “quite small” proportion of “the totally Jewish element.
  4. The people who lived there were in the dark, which meant that they were without Christ and without the truth of the Gospel.
  5. Jesus is relentless in His pursuit of His own, no matter where they are or what situation they are in.

What Should Christians Remember about Galilee Today?

Men of Galilee, what are you doing standing here staring up at the sky? ” “The same Jesus, who has been carried away from you into heaven, will return to you in the same manner in which you have witnessed him ascend into heaven” (Acts 1:11). It is the same hope that the early disciples held in their hearts as they looked up into the clouds to which Jesus had risen that we have in our hearts today. It is hoped that the Gospel Trail, which leads pilgrims from Nazareth to Galilee and highlights many of the significant biblical events that took place during Jesus’ time, would give a chance for future generations to engage with their religious heritage.

It is be that the most compelling thing we can recall about Galilee now is its true past.

She holds an Ashland University Marketing/Public Relations degree and works as an author, freelance writer, and blogger for Sunny 80.

Meg is a Bible study leader/teacher in the Women’s and Junior High Ministry.

She has been married to Jim for a decade and counting, is the mother of two tween kids, is a distance runner, a photographer, and a Cleveland Browns fan. She lives in Northern Ohio with her husband and two daughters. Credit for the image goes to Getty Images/irisphoto2.

When I Am Raised Up, I Will Go Before You To Galilee

“Take, eat; this is my body,” Jesus remarked as they were eating the bread he had taken and blessed it before breaking it and giving it to the disciples. After saying thank you to them, he poured out a cup into their hands, telling them, “Drink from it, all of you,” for this is the blood of the covenant that has been poured out in their place for the remission of sins. 29 I swear to you that I will not drink any more of this fruit of the vine until the day comes when I shall drink it again with you in my Father’s kingdom.” 30 And after they had finished singing a hymn, they walked out to the Mount of Olives.

  • Because it is said, ‘I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock will be dispersed,’ and this is exactly what will happen.
  • That isn’t the primary focus of my message today, though.
  • The idea that there is a God, or that humans have souls, or that faith in a higher power has positive psychological effects are examples of spiritual ideas and experiences.
  • All of these concepts and experiences are spiritual in nature.) Spiritual thoughts and experiences, whether true or erroneous, do not constitute the foundation or the entirety of Christianity.
  • In the absence of evidence that Jesus Christ lived, died, and rose from the grave as a historical person at a specific time and location, Christianity is a farce, according to many scholars.
  • Moreover, if any of these events are incorrect — if they never happened or will never happen — then Christianity is wrong, and no one should believe it.

Before we get into our text from Matthew, I’d like to lead you in the direction of five lines of evidence that you might want to consider in order to answer that issue.

Five Lines of Evidence That Jesus Rose From the Dead

  1. The apostle Paul’s personal witness. Hispen has written us a total of 13 letters. He lived in the same time period as Jesus. He claimed to have witnessed the resurrected Christ. In his writings, Paul mentions additional people he knows who saw him alive after his crucifixion, including 500 people all at once. Many of these people were still living when Paul wrote his book (1 Corinthians 15:5). This provides Paul’s writings with what is known as “historical control,” which means that there is good reason to take what he says seriously because there were so many people around who could easily falsifyhis claims if they were not true
  2. The empty tomb in Jerusalem where Jesus had been buried
  3. And the resurrection of Jesus from the dead. This is significant because the claim that Jesus was resurrected from the dead spread in a city that was opposed to the idea and would have done all in their power to suppress it if they had the opportunity. The only thing they could have done was to produce the dead body of Jesus, which they were unable to do (Acts 5:30-33)
  4. The courage of Jesus’ disciples and their willingness to lay down their lives to preach that Jesus had been raised from the dead just weeks after they had abandoned him out of fear and the belief that they had been badly mistaken about his Messiahship (Luke 24:21). What had shifted their mindset from one of fear to one of courage so quickly? And do guys really put their lives in danger for something they know to be a fraud? The many testimonies of Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Peter, James, and the writer of the book of Hebrews are all included. You must get to know these individuals as witnesses in order to determine whether or not they are credible. Give them a chance to convince you that they are more deserving of your trust than the modern-day doubters
  5. The ring of truth in the biblical perspective of the universe is there for you to listen to. This whole tale of God and creation and sin and Christ and redemption, doesn’t it, from beginning to end, assist to explain and make sense of more things in this world more effectively than any other perspective of reality?
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There are five lines of evidence. I am hoping that you will follow up on these. What you draw from these will determine whether or not you will live forever.

Christ Is Sovereign, Christ Is Merciful

It is not the historical truth that Christ died or that he was risen from the dead, however, that is important in today’s message, but rather the reality that Jesus Christ is sovereign over us because he was raised from the dead, and he is gracious to us because he died for our sins. God is sovereign over us and kind toward us. His death-defeating resurrection ensured the continuation of his sovereignty. His death for sins, which removed anger from the world, ensured mercy. For a more poetic expression, sovereign mercy prevails now through the God-Man, Jesus Christ.

Look at where he used to be!

Watch as he is sacrificed.

We Need a Merciful Savior

We are in desperate need of kindness since we all have a guilty conscience. We are well aware that we have fallen short of our own expectations, let alone those of God. It is true that we are sinners, and that our own emotions condemn us. Our most honest moments are those in which we recognize that the law inscribed on our hearts is an echo of God’s law, and that as a result, we are in greater trouble with God than we are with ourselves. We are in desperate need of mercy. If God is all-powerful and all-merciless, then we are doomed.

We are in urgent need of a compassionate Savior.

And the Bible makes this point much more emphatically.

We Need a Sovereign Lord

However, we require a sovereign Lord in the same measure as we require a merciful Savior. What good would Christ’s mercy be if he is kind to us but does not have the authority to govern over the forces that harm us? In countless ways, our lives are precarious and subject to danger. What will happen in Iraq? Will it be another Viet Nam, or something even worse? What will be the outcome of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, as well as the resulting worldwide tension? And what is going to happen with North Korea and its nuclear weapons program?

  1. What will be the outcome of my health?
  2. What about my husband or wife?
  3. (Little children wonder aloud: What if Mommy and Daddy pass away?) What natural calamities are likely to harm me or my loved ones?
  4. What could happen to me?
  5. If you are honest with yourself, you understand that you will not be able to defend yourself from these situations.
  6. You will be alone and lonely behind the illusion of self-made security.
  7. We require a leader who has complete control over Iraq, Israel, Korea, terrorism, sickness, natural disasters, and accidents—right down to the smallest minutiae of our existence.
  8. My thesis this morning is that Jesus Christ is both compassionate and sovereign in his dealings with mankind.
  9. So let’s take a look at the text of the Bible to see how Jesus demonstrates this in his words and deeds.

In Matthew 26:26, it is the night before Jesus’ crucifixion on Friday, hence it is Thursday night. It is the last dinner of the night. Let us first consider the evidence for Christ’s sovereignty, and then consider the evidence for his kindness, in that order.

Evidence of Jesus’ Sovereignty

The proof for his sovereignty may be found in his ability to foretell the behavior of all of his followers, as well as his ability to predict his own death and resurrection. Keep in mind that in verse 31, Jesus says, “Then Jesus said to them, ‘You will all slip away because of me tonight.'” As a result, he can confidently anticipate what each and every one of them will do. Afterward, pay attention to verse 32: “But once I am risen from the dead, I will travel before you to Galilee.” He anticipates his own resurrection from the grave, and he does it with authority.

  • After three years with these guys, it’s possible that Jesus has gained valuable insight into their personalities and recognizes that they are the type of men who will cower in the face of a catastrophe in a matter of hours.
  • Furthermore, it’s possible that his faith in being raised from the dead stems from his belief that God will aid an innocent prophet, and nothing more.
  • There is, however, more to it than that.
  • “It has been written” (Zechariah 13:7).
  • During these hours, there is an unseen hand working behind the scenes.
  • God’s sovereignty is demonstrated in the fact that he brought about our redemption via the arranged death of his Son.
  • “But is it Jesus’ sovereignty?” you inquire.
  • Yes, it does.

When it comes to particular behaviors, Jesus not only anticipates the conduct of all of his followers before it occurs, but he also knows completely what Judas will do before it occurs (the betrayal, Matthew 26:25), and he knows perfectly what Peter will do before it occurs (the treachery, Matthew 26:25).

  1. And when it will occur: before the rooster crows, to be precise.
  2. So the significance of these explicit predictions—not just generic comments about groups, but specific actions of particular persons down to the specifics of certain times (before the crows)—is Jesus’ way of saying: I am more than a mere man.
  3. In addition, when he predicts his own resurrection in verse 32 (“But once I am raised up, I will travel before you to Galilee”), he is not simply expressing his personal opinion about what God may do to an innocent prophet.
  4. The authority to lay it down and the authority to pick it up again is in my possession.” As a prophet, Jesus did not anticipate his own resurrection; rather, he foretold what God would do with his own almighty sovereignty in the case of an innocent prophet such as himself.
  5. In a world like ours, he is exactly what we require.
  6. Easter signifies that Jesus has risen from the dead.

He has complete control over Iraq, Israel, North Korea, terrorists, natural catastrophes, sickness, and accidents. He also has complete control over the United Nations. This is just what we require: a sovereign Lord. If only he were compassionate as well!

Evidence of Jesus’ Mercy

Other than that, it’s possible he’ll use his sovereignty not for but against us. As a result, we are forced to rely on the kindness of Christ. In our text, where does this come up? The message is brought home in a very poignant and priceless way by contrasting the initial half of verse 31 with the concluding portion of verse 32. The Lord Jesus declares in verse 31, “You will all betray one another because of me this night.” As well as saying, “I will go before you to Galilee,” in the latter section of verse 32.

And if that’s not enough, have you ever treated someone far, far worse than they deserved and then felt terrible about it later?

What do you want to call it?

And it is one of the most delectable things on the face of the planet.

They all turned their backs on him in his hour of greatest need.

The situation is similar to that of you and a buddy strolling along a road together, talking about your friendship, when two thugs assault you and seize your friend.

Afterward, you see your buddy approaching on the road, stitches and bruises covering his face, and before you can say anything, he embraces you and says, “Oh, it’s so lovely to see you, friend; I’m so pleased you’re okay.” And you thank him for his kindness.

Is it not true that kindness breaks our hearts?

Likewise, he extends forgiveness and acceptance to everybody who comes to him seeking forgiveness and acceptance.

“But if you would come to me, I will be your sovereign, gracious Savior and Lord,” he says to you this morning.

This is the image of the resurrected Christ.

He will forgive you of your sins eternally because of his kindness.

He is a magnificent Savior as well as a magnificent Sovereign.

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