Who Did Jesus Hang Out With

Who Did Jesus Hang Out With?

The woman realized that her life was going to come to an end. Her critics, who were gathered in a large crowd, were all holding stones. This would be her legacy, and she would be eternally known as a lady who committed adultery. She couldn’t do anything except gaze at the dust that surrounded her feet, which she was filled with humiliation and a sense of helplessness. She wasn’t, however, alone herself. There was a man sitting next to her, and he was unlike any other man she had ever met before.

She was expecting him to agree and throw the first stone, so she hid her face.

Last but not least, Jesus took his place and said, “Let the one who has never sinned cast the first stone” (John 8:7b).

On that specific day, he decided to alter the game.

  1. It was because Jesus was providing a blueprint for how to develop his Church, one lost sheep at a time, that he chose to hang out with misfits.
  2. He specifically sought out the disabled and sickly, as well as those who were thought undesirable, disreputable, and morally incorrect in their lifestyle choices by the rest of society.
  3. His inner circle consisted of an assortment of sinners that he gathered together in a haphazard manner.
  4. Society views persons in terms of stereotypes.
  5. Even when Jesus was teaching to large groups of people, he always took time to reach out to the outcast on a more personal level.
  6. The story of the “lady at the well” exemplifies the desperate need for a Redeemer.
  7. While walking through Samaria, Jesus and his companions — all of whom were Jewish — made it a point to stop and rest.

He struck up a discussion with a woman who he later discovered to be a sinner and an outcast.

Jesus announced Himself to be the Messiah at the conclusion of their conversation, and Mary enthusiastically embraced this revelation.

When Jesus encountered Matthew, a tax collector, he used the same redeeming vision that he used when he first met him (Matthew 9:9-10).

This generalization, on the other hand, did not prevent Jesus from reaching out to Matthew and eating supper with him and other unsavory members of society.

Several religious authorities were offended by Jesus’ choice of companions, and they ridiculed Him as a result of His choice of companions.

As a result, I have come not to call those who believe themselves to be virtuous, but rather those who recognize themselves to be sinners” (Matt.

Throughout recorded history, people have been afraid of groups of people who are different from themselves.

Through his personal example and by emphasizing the most fundamental commandment in the Bible: “You must love the LORD your God with all your heart, soul, and mind,” he was able to accomplish his goal.

Second, and maybe more essential, is to “love your neighbor as yourself.” These two commandments serve as the foundation for the whole law and all of the prophetic demands (Matthew 22:37-40, NLT).

However, they only had a limited understanding of what it meant to live according to that commandment.

With his trademark storytelling ability, Jesus presented the tale of the “Good Samaritan” to hammer home a point (Luke 10:30-37).

Two men, a priest and a temple aide, passed the man as he went down the street.

A third man, a Samaritan, who, as we have seen, was also an outcast, stumbled upon the battered man and instantly gave aid by caring for his wounds and paying for him to stay in an inn so that he may have time to recuperate and recover.

When we are in an unpleasant circumstance or with someone, it is in our tendency to avoid them.

Jesus exemplifies how we should always be kind and merciful to others, no matter what.

Not only people who believe, dress, and act in the same way as we do.

Which raises the question of whether or not we are following Jesus in accordance with the example he set and the teachings he taught.

It wasn’t while he walked the face of the world, either.

It will need us placing our faith in him, regardless of our concerns.

Just keep in mind that you are not alone.

By taking a risk and following your heart, you will be fulfilling God’s will, just as Jesus did. Do you require daily encouragement? For no additional charge, you can have our devotions delivered to your email every day. Sign up as soon as possible!

Did Jesus “Hang Out” with Sinners? — Advent Christian Voices

Despite her best efforts, the woman’s life was on the verge of being taken from her. Her critics were all holding stones as they stood in front of a large audience. As a result, she would be remembered as a lady who committed adultery for the rest of time. She couldn’t do anything but look at the dust that surrounded her feet, filled with guilt and a sensation of powerlessness. She wasn’t, however, alone herself in her endeavor. In front of her was a man who stood out from any other male she had ever met before.

  • She cowered as she expected him to agree and throw the first stone.
  • “Let the one who has never sinned, cast the first stone,” Jesus said at the conclusion of his speech (John 8:7b).
  • On that specific day, he decided to alter the game plan completely.
  • It was because Jesus was developing a blueprint for how to create his Church, one lost sheep at a time, that he chose to associate with misfits.
  • He specifically sought out the disabled and sickly, as well as those who were thought undesirable, disreputable, and morally incorrect in their way of life by the rest of society.
  • His inner circle was even made up of sinners who he gathered together in a ramshackle fashion.
  • By reaching out to those who are believed beyond reach, he taught and acted as a living example of “God’s will.” Rather of focusing on the labels that society places on people, Jesus focused on their needs.

Having realized that “sinners” required a Savior, he was inspired to give charity and compassion to them.

While walking through Samaria, Jesus and his companions — all of whom were Jewish — made it a point to stop and pray.

During the course of his chat, he came upon a sinner and pariah.

He had declared Himself the Messiah by the time their conversation ended, and she enthusiastically accepted his declaration.

When Jesus encountered Matthew, a tax collector, he modeled the same redemptive goal (Matthew 9:9-10).

It did not prevent Jesus from reaching out to Matthew or from having supper with him and other unsavory members of society, despite this assumption.

Many of the religious authorities of the period were offended by Jesus’ choice of companions, and they mocked Him as a result.

As a result, I have come not to call those who consider themselves to be virtuous, but rather those who recognize themselves to be sinners” (Matt.

The dread of diverse groups of people has existed from the beginning of recorded history.

Through his personal example and by emphasizing the most fundamental commandment in the Bible: “You must love the LORD your God with all your heart, soul, and mind,” he was able to accomplish this.

Based on these two commandments, God’s whole legal system and the prophets’ prophecies are built (Matthew 22:37-40, NLT).

However, they only had a limited understanding of how to live according to that commandment.

When Jesus delivered the tale of the “Good Samaritan,” he was well-known for using stories to make a point (Luke 10:30-37).

Across the street from the man were two men: a priest and a temple aide.

A third man, a Samaritan, who, as we have seen, was also an outcast, came upon the battered man and instantly gave aid by tending to his wounds and paying for him to stay in an inn while he recovered.

Situations and people who make us feel uncomfortable are something we are wired to avoid.

We should always exhibit compassion and charity to everyone around us, as Jesus demonstrated throughout his life.

Those who believe, dress, and act in the same way as ourselves are not the only ones who are targeted.

This raises the question of whether or not we are following Jesus’ example and teachings in accordance with their content.

Not only that, but it wasn’t even when he was walking the world.

Whatever our anxieties may be, we will have to put our faith in him to go through this process.

Just keep in mind that you’re not going it alone yourself.

It doesn’t matter what happens; God is with you. Just like Jesus did, by stepping out in trust, you will be carrying out God’s plan. Do you require everyday motivation? For no additional charge, you can have our devotions delivered to your email each day. Take advantage of this great opportunity.

Who did Jesus hang out with when He was on earth? Who were Jesus’ friends?

Here’s everything you need to know: Jesus hung around with his followers and the people who were in the greatest need of His help. When Jesus was on earth, He traveled quite a bit in order to spread the message of God to as many people as possible. As a result, he met and became acquainted with a diverse range of people. If Jesus, as God’s Son, wanted to spend out with nice people, wouldn’t you expect him to want to hang out with good people as well? That was something that the religious leaders of Jesus’ day, the Pharisees, expected as well!

  • Pharisees were upset by this because they anticipated Jesus to prefer spending His time with “good” people such as themselves.
  • People that are sick do this.
  • I’ve come to persuade sinners to come and follow me ” (Mark 2:17).
  • Some of the individuals were among Jesus’ twelve followers.
  • He desired to instruct these men in order to disseminate the good news of salvation after He had returned to the presence of the Father.
  • Jesus served as a model for them in terms of how they were to behave and live their lives.
  • The good news is that you can be a buddy of Jesus as well!
  • Truth According to the Bible “Later on, Jesus and Matthew were eating supper at Matthew’s home.
  • They shared a meal with Jesus and his apostles ” (Matthew 9:10).
  • “God’s love for the world was so great that he sent his one and only Son to save it.
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Jesus, Friend of Sinners: But How?

Almost everyone who knows anything about the gospels — and even those who don’t — understands that Jesus was a sinner’s best friend and advocate. He frequently incurred the wrath of the scribes and Pharisees for associating with sinners, and this drew their ire (Luke 15:2). A common criticism leveled against Jesus was that he was “a glutton and a drinker, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!” Jesus was acutely aware that this was one of the insults leveled against him. (See Luke 7:34.) As Christians, we take great pleasure in singing about this Pharisaical snub because it implies that Jesus is a friend to sinners such as ourselves.

Despite how essential this fact is—that Jesus is a friend of sinners—it, like every other great truth in the Bible, must be protected against theological and ethical error in order to be preserved.

As a result, “Jesus ate with sinners” becomes “Jesus had a nice party,” which becomes “Jesus was more concerned in expressing love than choosing sides,” which becomes “Jesus always sided with religious outsiders,” which becomes “Jesus would blow bubbles for transgressions of the Torah,” and so forth.

One time, when I was a younger guy serving in the ministry, I made a casual remark about how Jesus “hung around with drunks.” Fortunately, I received gentle and intelligent correction from an older Christian who had successfully conquered his own alcoholism.

For the sake of highlighting the grace of Christ, I went beyond (around, above, and away from) the biblical text and made it sound like Jesus would do everything to hang out with John Belushi in the movie Animal House.

If we exclude the account of the woman caught in adultery (because of textual criticism), there are five primary passages in the gospels where Jesus is rebuked for getting too near to sinners, according to my counting.

  1. In Matthew 9:9-13, Mark 2:13-17, and Luke 5:27-32, Jesus calls Matthew the tax collector to be one of his disciples, and here is the tale of how he did it. There are many tax collectors and sinners at Jesus’ meal, “since there were many who followed him,” we are told in the Gospel of Matthew (Mark 2:15). When the scribes and Pharisees complain about Jesus’ company, he responds by saying that he has “not come to summon the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Luke 5:32). Matthew 11:16-19
  2. Luke 7:31-35 – Matthew 11:16-19
  3. Luke 7:31-35 Throughout this passage, Jesus chastises the “people of this generation” for rejecting John the Baptist because he was too strict and rejecting the Son of Man because he was too lax. It is because of this episode that the expression “friend of sinners” came to be. It’s important to realize that it was an insult directed at Jesus by his adversaries. This does not rule out the possibility that Christ owned it and that we should refrain from singing it, but it does imply that he may not have owned it in every aspect. If Jesus was not a “glutton and a drunkard,” as his opponents believe, it is possible that he was not “a friend of tax collectors and sinners” in the manner in which they believed
  4. The Gospel of Luke 7:36-50 – Luke’s story follows closely on the heels of this one, and they are both similar. Unclean woman anoints Jesus with costly ointment and cleanses Jesus’ feet with her tears and the hair off her head, all in the name of Christ. When Jesus is reprimanded for allowing this “sinner” to get close to him, he tells Simon that people who have been forgiven much love much more than those who have been forgiven little. In the end, Jesus forgives the woman for her transgression and tells her, “Your faith has saved you
  5. Depart in peace” (Luke 7:50). Luke 15:1-2 – Jesus tells the lady, “Your faith has saved you
  6. Go in peace.” Those first two lines of Luke 15 provide the scene for the parables of the lost sheep, lost coin, and lost son that are found later in the book of Luke. Tax collectors and sinners “were all drawing near” to Jesus, the Pharisees and scribes complained that Jesus was inviting them to dine with them since they were “all approaching near.” Afterwards, three parables explain how God searches for the lost (15:3, 8, 20) and how happy God is when sinners repent (15:7, 10, 21-24)
  7. Luke 19:1-10 – The gospel according to Luke. A second time, the Jewish officials complain that Jesus “has gone into a house where a sinner is staying to be his guest” (Luke 19:7) Despite the fact that Zacchaeus repents and has changed (19:8), the Jews are unable to understand that the Son of Man came to seek and save the lost (19:10) and that this infamous tax collector has been saved (19:9)
  8. Despite the fact that Zacchaeus repents and has changed (19:8)

In Matthew 9:9-13, Mark 2:13-17, and Luke 5:27-32, Jesus calls Matthew the tax collector to be one of his disciples, and this is the tale of how he came to be. There are many tax collectors and sinners at Jesus’ meal, “since there were many who followed him,” we are told in the Gospel of John (Mark 2:15). When the scribes and Pharisees complain about the company Jesus maintains, Jesus responds by saying that he has “not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Luke 5:32). Jesus’ words in Matthew 11:16-19 and Luke 7:31-35 are two of the most important in the Bible.

  1. Interestingly, the phrase “friend of sinners” comes from this episode.
  2. However, this does not rule out the possibility that Christ owned it and that we should refrain from singing it; rather, it implies that he may not have owned it in every respect.
  3. Jesus’ teachings in Luke 7:36-50 are a good example.
  4. Unclean woman anoints Jesus with costly ointment and cleanses Jesus’ feet with her tears and the hair off her head, all in the name of sin.
  5. “Your faith has saved you; depart in peace,” says Jesus at the conclusion of the story (Luke 7:50).
  6. Seeing that the tax collectors and sinners “were all drawing near” to Jesus, the Pharisees and scribes expressed displeasure that Jesus was inviting them to have his meal with him.

Was Jesus Friends With Sinners? These scriptures say NO.

Those statements “Jesus hung out with sinners” and “Jesus ate with sinners” or “Jesus was inclusive” and “Jesus didn’t judge” have become so tiresome to hear. Because none of that is supported by a shred of empirical evidence. Despite what you’ve been told, and despite what you’ve read, Jesus was not a friend of the sinner in the Bible. According to the definition, a friend is someone who is on good terms with another, who is a member of the same nation or political party as another, who is a supporter of another, or who is affiliated with another by reason of contact.

  • The sinner does not have a good relationship with God.
  • God expresses His dissatisfaction with the sinner in no uncertain terms.
  • If the sinner goes to Hell, but Christ is in Heaven, then you and the sinner are not members of the same nation, according to the Bible.
  • If sin divides you from God, then you and God are not members of the same political group.
  • If God doesn’t hear you, then there is no communication between you and him or her.
  • If your sin leads God to be unaware of your existence, then He will not support you.
  • However, according to Matthew 9:11, He went inside Matthew’s home and sat down, and the Gentiles and tax collectors followed and joined Him.
  • He spoke to Himself as a physician, a doctor who had been dispatched to nurse people back to health and to a complete life free of the shackles of sin.
  • He publicly encouraged the sinner to participate in His life so that they may experience the transformation that He could bring about in them, not because He loved being in their presence.
  • “Likewise, anyone it may be among you who will not lay down all that he possesses, he cannot be my disciple,” Jesus says in Luke 14:33.

He wasn’t merely an addition to their routine; the command to “go and sin no more” (John 8:11) implied that something needed to change. They wished to live a different life, and they were certain that He was the answer, even if it meant sufferingHis reproof in return for everlasting life.

So Christ didn’t eat with the sinners, they ate with Him.

Yet, even in their presence, He never shied away from rebuking them for their wickedness, indicating that He was not an all-encompassing God. He invited individuals from all walks of life to become His disciples (pupils), but he cautioned them that they must repent of their sins in order to be engaged with this journey. He dealt with them in a just and fair manner. His actions included reversing the tables in the tabernacle, reminding men of their sin at the adulterer’s stoning, telling the woman at the well what she had done, commanding the rich man to sell all that he possessed, Herebuking Peter, scolding the disciples, condemning the religious, and declaring that sinners would not be allowed into Heaven.

  • Take your troubles to the Lord and place them at His feet; then take up your cross and follow Him.
  • He is the Great Shepherd, and we are the sheep in His pasture.
  • Despite the fact that He embodies every trait of a friend, He is nevertheless the master of the universe.
  • He remains the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords, as he has been for centuries.
  • According to James 4:4, ” Do you not understand that the friendship of the world is hostility with God?
  • as well as Romans 12: Love really, despise sin, uphold justice, and, if at all possible, live in peace.
  • It implies that we must imitate Christ and follow in His footsteps, among other things.
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By being committed to His word, you can shine a light in a dark and dying world.

According to the Bible, He is a friend who clings closer to you than a brother (Proverbs 18:24).

“There is no greater love than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends,” according to John 15:13.

PIN You are my pals if you obey whatever I instruct you to do.

This uniqueness of thought, of fellowship, and of commitment is the unifying component that binds you to Christ and your connection with him (Philippians 2:13).

Jesus was not friends with sinners, Jesus is not a friend to sinners- and this remains true today.

Given my background as a former misfit who went on to graduate from a classical Christian institution, many of my favorite pupils to instruct have also been misfits. Back when I was in my junior year of high school, I detested studying, despised reading, favored violent films, despised hard work, and would routinely run away at lunch to smoke cigarettes with people who shared my anti-educational viewpoints. Even though I wouldn’t claim to have been cool in high school, I was frantic to deal in the currency of cool that was most generally recognized by classical Christian students: friendship with the rest of the world.

  • Those who are dissatisfied with a classical Christian school are not always those who sneer at religion; rather, they are those who ridicule devout and religious individuals.
  • It is necessary to seek refuge from illness.
  • It’s a succinct, Biblical apologia that has gained more than a modicum of acceptability since its publication in the 1960s.
  • It’s like a secret code to the swankiest speakeasy, and that tiny phrase is incredibly effective at unlocking the doors to the ultimate repository of coolness: hanging out with public school students.
  • ), an intuitive understanding of authenticity, and thin critiques of religion, many of which are even thinner than the honestly obtained critiques that the malcontent could supply on his own initiative.
  • Jesus frequented the company of prostitutes.

The same is true for American Christians when confronted with secularists who bring up institutionalized ignorance in the Middle Ages, witch hunts, the persecution of Galileo, the Spanish Inquisition, the Puritans, Vladimir Putin, and the Westborough Baptists as examples of historical wrongdoing.

  • In the Middle Ages, there was no such thing as institutionalized ignorance, and Jesus didn’t hang out with prostitutes either.
  • If a teacher had asked me this question twenty years ago, I would not have been able to answer it, and I have not encountered a kid who has done it in a timely manner subsequently.
  • We dissatisfied people know very little about the Bible.
  • After noticing this, the Pharisees approached his disciples and said, “Why does your teacher dine with tax collectors and sinners?” Luke 15:1-2 (NIV): Tax collectors and sinners were now congregating around Jesus to hear what he had to say.
  • I’ll bet a dollar that it was something a holy person once told him about the universe.
  • When it comes to Matthew and Luke’s description of Jesus hanging around with sinners, there is one important part of the narrative that has to be addressed.
  • Jesus is not bored among his own people, and he is on the lookout for a few colorful folks to liven up His days.

Despite His humanity, Jesus is kind and compassionate, and He demonstrates this love to His own self-centered, opportunistic people, whom He constantly blesses and chastises and with whom He nearly always shares a meal.

Neither the Gospel authors nor the early church historians mention Jesus accompanying them on their journey, washing their feet, or empowering them to perform miracles.

While it is true that Jesus interacted with the Samaritan woman at the well, who was a social outcast, it is also true that He developed deep connections with the very men who want to bring down fire from heaven to kill the woman and her community.

The apostles were antsy for bloodshed, irritated by children, arguing over control, and generally acting like country mice who were easily awed by the large metropolis.

I don’t want to imply that Jesus was too nice for prostitutes, or that he was too excellent for public schools, or that prostitutes are similar to public school pupils by making this analogy.

To borrow a phrase from the malcontent, Jesus did not hang out with cool public school kids, but rather with parochial school kids who wore shabby clothing and smelled like fish.

They were not modest, courteous, or giving in any way.

There was much excitement among them as they looked forward to the restoration of Israel’s monarchy and all the spilt Roman blood that would accompany it.

Even the sinners and tax collectors with whom Jesus dined were Jews, not pagans who happened to be roaming around in Jewish communities at the time.

If you attend a public school, those are the folks with whom you will interact.

In the same manner that God placed a half-dead body in the path of the good Samaritan, these are your neighbors, individuals God has placed in your path to help you.

While I believe it is possible to complete an adequate training in missionary service before the conclusion of high school, I do not believe it is possible.

When confronted with the raised eyebrow of an honest missionary on furlough from Calcutta, a sophomore classicist who prefers to spend his weekends playing Call of Duty and watching Zach Snyder movies with his unchurched friends from across town would, I hope, be too embarrassed to defend himself with “Jesus hung out with prostitutes.” To generalize about every public school kid in the country as foul-mouthed, engaged in drugs and other sordid pleasures is unjust, yet they are precisely the kinds of public school students who are defended with the phrase “Jesus hanged around with prostitutes.” It is not the classical Christian student who is too cool for conservatives who listen to Casting Crowns and don’t curse who is looking for a public school friend who speaks softly, has a collection of classical CDs, has an agape love for David Hume, and doesn’t like tattoos.

It is the classical Christian student who is too cool for conservatives who listen to Casting Crowns and don’t curse.

The malcontent will learn no greater humility or generosity than by being seen in public, smiling and having a wonderful time next to a group of youngsters who are unable to clothe themselves and who have asked for Lifeway gift cards as Christmas gifts.

Have you ever had the sensation that your entire sense of humor is evaporating? And that’s exactly what John the Baptist was getting at when he declared, “I must diminish.”

How Early Church Leaders Downplayed Mary Magdalene’s Influence by Calling Her a Whore

She was Mary of Magdala, one of Jesus of Nazareth’s early disciples, and she was one of the most famous women in the world. In accordance with the Bible, she accompanied him on his journey, witnessed his Crucifixion, and was among the first persons to learn of his Resurrection. Everybody, from early church officials and historians to authors and filmmakers, has contributed to the revision and expansion of the tale of Mary Magdalene throughout history. On the one hand, they downplayed her significance by stating she was a prostitute, a wrecked woman who repented and was rescued by Christ’s teachings.

However, some early Christian literature regarded Mary Magdalene as more than just a mere follower; she was also depicted as Jesus’ close companion—which some have taken to suggest his wife.

What exactly do we know about Mary Magdalene, the lady who is considered to be the most intriguing woman in the Bible?

What the Bible Says About Mary Magdalene

However, only the Gospel of Luke discussed Mary Magdalene’s role in Jesus’ life and ministry, listing her among “some women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities” (Luke 8:1–3). All four canonical gospels of the New Testament (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) noted Mary Magdalene’s presence at Jesus’ Crucifixion, but only the Gospel of Luke discussed her role in his life and ministry. According to Luke, when Jesus drove out seven devils from her, Mary joined a group of women who went with him and his twelve disciples/apostles, “proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God.” They were “proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God.” Although Magdalene is not a surname, it is used to identify the location where Mary originated from: Magdala is a city in the Galilee area of ancient Palestine, situated in the northernmost portion of the country (now northern Israel).

Those who saw Jesus’ crucifixion included the Virgin Mary, Saint John the Baptist, and Mary Magdalene.

In the words of Robert Cargill, an associate professor of classical and religious studies at the University of Iowa who is also the editor of theBiblical Archaeology Review, “Mary Magdalene was one of Jesus’ early supporters.” “She was mentioned in the Gospels, which indicates that she was significant.

As a result, the fact that she has been identified is significant.” Mary Magdalene had an important role in the tale of the Resurrection, which took place after Jesus’ crucifixion, which she observed from the foot of the cross with many other women, and after all of Jesus’ male disciples had fled from the scene.

The ladies are the ones who go to the disciples and inform them what has happened, as Cargill points out.

According to the Gospel of John, Jesus personally comes to Mary Magdalene after his Resurrection and urges her to inform his followers of his appearance (John 20:1-13). WATCH THIS VIDEO: What Did Jesus Look Like?

Mary Magdalene as sinner

Because of Mary Magdalene’s obvious significance in the Bible—or maybe because of it—some early Western church leaders attempted to minimize her power by presenting her as a sinner, notably as a prostitute, according to the Bible. In Cargill’s words, “There are many academics who think that because Jesus empowered women to such a great extent early in his career, it made some of the males who would govern the early church uncomfortable later on.” In response to this, there were two different reactions.

  1. These women included an unnamed woman, identified in the Gospel of Luke as a sinner, who bathes Jesus’ feet with her tears, dries them, and applies ointment to them (Luke 7:37-38), as well as another Mary, Mary of Bethany, who also appears in Luke.
  2. Look at what she did for a job, and you can see why she couldn’t have been a leader,” Cargill adds.
  3. Some believe she was actually Jesus’ wife or friend, rather than his mother.
  4. Is there any further evidence?
  5. Photo by Sergio Anelli/Electa/Mondadori Portfolio/Getty Images.
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Mary Magdalene as Jesus’s wife

Early Western church leaders attempted to diminish the significance of Mary Magdalene by presenting her as a sinner, notably as a prostitute, despite—or maybe because of—her obvious significance in the Bible. In Cargill’s words, “there are many academics who think that because Jesus empowered women to such a great extent early in his ministry, it made some of the males who would govern the early church uncomfortable later on.” In reaction to this, there were two answers. To convert her into a prostitute was one of the options.

  1. These women included an unnamed woman, identified in the Gospel of Luke as a sinner, who bathes Jesus’ feet with her tears, dries them, and applies ointment to them (Luke 7:37-38), as well as another Mary, Mary of Bethany, who also appears in the Gospel of Luke.
  2. In becoming a prostitute, she is reducing her own significance.
  3. Her profession, on the other hand, precluded her from being a leader, according to Cargill.
  4. ” A number of people have speculated that she was truly Jesus’ wife or partner.
  5. Apparently, Jesus existed according to the Bible.

There is no other evidence. When Mary Magdalene comes to meet Jesus, he sits at a table at the house of a Pharisee, who is shown as a prostitute who bows at his feet. Photo by Sergio Anelli/Electa/Mondadori Portfolio/Getty Images. Image courtesy of the photographer.

Mary Magdalene as trusted disciple

The Bible, on the other hand, provided no indication that Mary Magdalene was Jesus’ wife. One can’t get a sense of that type of connection from any of the four canonical gospels, despite the fact that they include the women who travel with Jesus and, in some cases, their husbands’ names as well. The depiction of Mary Magdalene as a prostitute endured for decades after Pope Gregory the Great declared it official in his sixth-century sermon, though neither Orthodoxy nor Protestantism embraced it once their respective religions separated from the Catholic Church later in the sixth century.

Mary Magdalene is now venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran churches, and her feast day is observed on July 22nd in all four of these denominations.

He notes that while the prostitute and wife hypotheses have been around for centuries, they are tales and customs that have developed long after the fact: “Neither of them is anchored in the Bible itself.” MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: The Evolution of Christian Thought

5 Groups of Outcasts That Jesus Loved

Every civilization, in every age, contains individuals and organizations that are compelled to survive on the periphery of society; the first century city of Jerusalem was no exception to this rule. Certain groups on the perimeter of social approval were pushed there by Jewish culture, and dominant religious views frequently assisted in keeping them there. When Jesus appeared, the entire system was thrown into disarray and completely changed. When Jesus made remarks like the following (Matthew 20:16, New International Version), he reset the limits, restoring dignity and value to individuals who had been pushed to the fringes of society.

1. Women

In first-century Palestine, a woman’s social sphere was limited to the confines of her immediate family. It is stated clearly in Jewish scriptures that “it is the way of a woman to remain at home, and it is the way of a male to go out into the marketplace.” (Source: Bereshit Rabbah) When it came to training young men to read the Bible, literacy was considered a need, while it was considered a luxury for women. As a result of the Old Testament’s specific prohibition against women teaching Scripture to “sons” (Deuteronomy 4:9, New American Standard Bible), women were barred from receiving Torah education.

4:27).

In addition to healing the woman with the bleeding issue, Jesus refers to her as “daughter,” which means she is his daughter.

Not only did Jesus enable women to provide a substantial portion of the financial support for His ministry (Luke 8:1–3), but it was also to women that He made his first post-resurrection appearance (Luke 24:1–11) after his resurrection.

In a period where men and women were regarded differently, it would be difficult to find an instance in which Jesus treated men and women differently.

2. The poor

In a society where the great majority of people were not exceptionally well off, the typical attitude toward the poor looked bizarre. In general, the average Jewish person in Roman-occupied Israel did not have a lot of material possessions. Perhaps this is why it was so crucial for people to believe that they were better than the underprivileged in their own eyes. Because of Jesus’ teachings, the poor were given a face, which proved God’s immense care for their well-being. He also condemned those who disregarded or disenfranchised them, as follows: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor” (Luke 4:18a, NIV).

Invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind, and the lame and blind will be present at your dinner, and you will be blessed.

3.The unclean

The concept of purity occupied a significant portion of the Old Testament. The exposure to potentially infectious illnesses (or bodily fluids that may convey disease) or the consumption of unclean foods are two ways in which one might become unclean. Once someone has been declared unclean, they must refrain from entering sacred locations or performing religious responsibilities until they have been cleansed. To be dirty was to be socially shunned in ancient times. Lepers were one of the most numerous—and stigmatized—unclean communities in history.

  • They had been plagued with a dreadful sickness.
  • Mark 1:40–45 tells the story of a leper who approaches Jesus and requests that he be healed of his illness.
  • In fact, Jesus not only heals the man, but He also touches him!
  • Jesus’ answer to this guy, who had most likely not had physical contact in a long time, demonstrated a humanizing kindness that helped him to see himself in Jesus.
  • She would have been filthy if she had touched Him because of the bleeding, but she decides to do it anyhow.

4. Oppressors

The Jews had little affection for the Roman Empire, and their quest for a messianic deliverer was mostly motivated by a desire to see their Roman overlords vanquished. When a group of Jews chose to make the best of a terrible situation by collecting taxes for Caesar, they were grouped together with the worst sorts of sinners. A particular centurion sent a group of Jewish elders to request that Jesus come and heal his dying servant, and Jesus responds without a shred of scorn in his tone. Even as Jesus is on His way, the centurion sends his servant and his companions to tell Jesus that he is unworthy of having the teacher in his home, but that if Jesus would only speak the word, he knows his servant would be healed.

“I assure you, I have not encountered so much faith anywhere else, not even in Israel,” Jesus says after taking a glance about him.

5. Racial enemies

Between the Samaritans and Jews, there has long been a well-documented animosity that dates back millennia. Because of their interest, the authors of the Gospels and Acts were particularly interested in capturing Jesus’ interactions with this group as well as their exposure to the gospel itself. When Jesus informed a teacher of the law that loving one’s neighbor as oneself was a vital element of completing the law, the teacher of the law inquired as to who Jesus’ neighbor was. Jesus replied that he was his neighbor.

In another account that pushes Jesus against both race and gender inequality, Jesus finds himself alone with a Samaritan lady at a nearby drinking well (John 4:4–42), and the two become friends.

Many people in Samaria are converted as a consequence of this dialogue in the long run.

Tearing down walls of division

The apostle Paul states the following concerning the reconciliation of Jews and Gentiles: “For he himself is our peace, who has reconciled the two groups and has demolished the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility, by laying aside in his flesh the law with its demands and rules.” In order to bring about peace between them, Jesus sought to “make in himself one new humanity out of the two, thereby bringing about reconciliation,” and “to reconcile both of them to God via the cross, by which he put to dead their hatred” (Ephesians 2:14–16, NIV).

The whole ministry of Jesus was devoted to tearing down barriers of hatred and bringing people together who had previously been separated.

The Bible emphasizes that the adversary comes to take and destroy, but Jesus came to provide us life and eternal life (John 10:10).

The sequence depicting The Woman with the BloodIssue in the Magdalena film is a lovely representation of the genuineness with which Jesus treated the outcasts of society.

This message should be shared with individuals who are in desperate need of Christ’s love!

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