When Did Jesus Rose From The Dead

When did Jesus rise from the dead?

As recorded in the Gospels, Jesus was claimed to have risen from the grave “on the third day” or “three days later.” Although it appears to be a contradiction in words, the fact that there are numerous alternatives as to when Jesus resurrected from the dead may give the impression that there are multiple possibilities. Furthermore, the fact that Jesus died on a Friday makes these sentences even more perplexing, since a Sunday resurrection might be called into question as a result of the difference between the two days.

The difficulty with this type of current thinking is that it makes the assumption that the Gospel writers intended to constantly write with accuracy on this subject.

According to Witherington, there is an example from the Old Testament in which “‘after three days’ signifies exactly the same thing as ‘on the third day.'” As a result, even if these sentences in modern English appear to be in conflict with one another, “these writings were not created to fit our present rigorous requirements when it comes to time.” Furthermore, “days” in Jewish counting were not the 24-hour periods from midnight to midnight that we are accustomed to; rather, they were commonly defined as beginning at sunset on one day and ending at dusk on the next day.

Reverting back to the original question, when did Jesus Christ resurrect from the dead?

  • The following is Jimmy Akin’s reconstruction of the timing of Jesus’ death and resurrection, which is based on the Gospels and Jewish traditions.
  • As a result, Jesus was indeed “resurrected on the third day” (Matthew 20:19).
  • I am well aware that you are looking for Jesus the Crucified.
  • It’s hardly surprising that the Church has always adhered to this schedule, with the Easter Vigil service on Saturday night already commemorating Jesus’ triumphant return.
  • It is not essential when Jesus rose from the dead; what is significant is that he did rise from the grave and opened the gates of Heaven for us, along with the promise of a future resurrection at the conclusion of this world.

More information may be found at: After his resurrection, how many times did Jesus appear to his followers? Where did Mary go after the Resurrection? Continue reading this article

Did Jesus Really Rise From The Dead? Evidence of The Resurrection

Brittany Yesudasan is a model and actress. Many people all across the world participate in some form in the Easter celebration. The majority of people in the United States celebrate Easter with colored-egg hunts and Easter bunnies. Christians mark the day with jubilant worship services and a reminder that “He has risen from the dead.” Have you ever heard someone say something like this? Christians gather on Easter Sunday to remind one another that Jesus resurrected from the grave for several reasons.

The idea that Jesus died on the cross and rose from the tomb three days later is a fundamental part of the Christian faith.

The miracle of Jesus’ resurrection from the dead has been examined and argued for hundreds of years and continues to this day.

Fortunately, if you are prepared to hunt for it, there is a wealth of material available to you that may assist you in learning more about the subject.

Why Is It Important That Jesus Rose From the Dead?

You might have a lot of beliefs about Jesus while being skeptical about His resurrection. The fact that Jesus was crucified and died is acknowledged by many religions, but they do not accept that He rose from the dead. Jesus did indeed rise from the grave, and the fact that he did so is essential to the Christian belief. According to one group of Christians, Paul, an early Christian leader and author of most of the New Testament, stated, “If Christ has not been risen, our message is futile, and your faith is worthless” (1 Corinthians 15:14, New International Version).

On the contrary, he is asserting that the resurrection of Jesus is at the heart of the Christian religion — and that it is so vital that there is no Christian faith at all if it is not observed.

To Fulfill the Old Testament Prophecy

Today, you have the advantage of being able to read the whole Bible, including both the portion written before the time of Jesus, known as the Old Testament, and the portion written after, known as the New Testament, in one sitting. The 66 books that make up the Old and New Testaments are all part of a single tale that is continuous throughout. It is impossible to separate the Old Testament from the New Testament. A Messiah (a Savior) was on the way, and God promised His people throughout the Old Testament that He would come to transform the way they lived.

  • God revealed to the Israelites the particular signs and characteristics that would distinguish the one who would be sent by Himself.
  • He desires for you to be able to identify what He is doing at all times.
  • There were many, yet He saw to it that they were all met.
  • Even though the Messiah would experience death, His body would not deteriorate because He would rise from the dead again.

As a reminder of His death, all he had were the markings on his hands and feet, as well as the wound in his side. Christians believe that Jesus’ resurrection from the dead is vital because He was required to rise from the grave in order to fulfill the predictions of the Old Testament.

To Confirm Jesus’ Own Words

According to the Gospels — the four books of the New Testament that chronicle the account of Jesus’ life — Jesus frequently referenced passages from the Old Testament to His closest friends, referring to what would take place during the week of His crucifixion and rising, according to the Gospels. He spoke with them using parables, which are tales or brief sayings that demonstrate a truth about God and His character. This enabled them to make connections between events after they had occurred, allowing them to comprehend what had occurred.

However, many of them were unable to comprehend what He was saying.

Being crucified did not fit into this notion.

And that was even after Jesus stated the obvious:From that point on, Jesus began explaining to His disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the chief priests and teachers of the law, and that He must be crucified on the third day and raised to life on the fourth day, as well as many other things.

“Never, Lord!” he said emphatically.

(Matthew 16:21-22, New International Version) As Jesus explained what was going to take place to his followers, he also promised them that He would be resurrected to life again.

By His Life, We Live

Many people do not believe that the fact that Jesus is still alive has any substantial influence on their religious beliefs. Perhaps you believe that Christianity is governed by a complex set of laws and that good actions win one’s ticket into Heaven. Some faiths, such as Buddhism and Hinduism, function on this or a similar principle. Nevertheless, according to the Bible, when you become a disciple of Jesus, you enter into a relationship with him. This relationship is not dependent on your actions, but rather on what Jesus accomplished.

  1. All humans are deserving of God’s wrath as a result of this.
  2. Despite the fact that He was sinless, He died on the cross in place of you and me.
  3. Not only did He have to die for you, but He also had to vanquish death in order to save you from yourself.
  4. Because He is alive, His disciples will continue to live even after they have died physically.
  5. Furthermore, Christ is the Son of God who came to earth in the shape of a man.

Humans are unable to return to life once they have died. In the event that He had stayed dead, it would have called into question the claim that He was the Son of God. By appearing alive and healthy, He validates what He has revealed about Himself as the Son of God in the past.

Is There Evidence That Jesus Rose From the Dead?

You may read the Gospels for yourself if you so desire. The Gospels are more than just a collection of stories. They are true, verifiable tales of real-life events that have impacted history and the Christian religion as we know it. The way they conduct themselves has a direct influence on your life. Many arguments exist to think that the events described in the Gospels regarding Jesus rising from the grave are accurate.

Jesus Really Died

The claims of Christians that Jesus died and resurrected from the grave have been explored by a number of people over the course of history. Various theories have been advanced regarding Jesus’ resurrection, but one thing that virtually everyone agrees on is that Jesus was a genuine person who lived and was executed by the Romans in the manner described in the New Testament. However, in order for Jesus to rise from the grave, he would have had to have died in the first place. There is significant suggestion that Jesus was never truly dead in the traditional sense.

  1. But, without a doubt, Jesus died.
  2. One of the Roman soldiers poked a spear into Jesus’ side as they prepared to lower him from the crucifixion, according to tradition.
  3. When such a combination occurs, it implies cardiac failure, which should be sufficient evidence for anybody to conclude that Jesus was indeed dead – totally aside from the fact that He was impaled!
  4. If they were found to have failed in their duty to execute someone, they would be held liable — and they would almost certainly lose their lives as a result.
  5. Furthermore, all stories agree that Jesus was really buried in a tomb after his death.
  6. He would not have been buried if his own disciples did not likewise accept without a shadow of a doubt that Jesus was, in fact, no longer alive.

It’s Not a Later Legend

Some have hypothesized that the tale of Jesus’ resurrection from the dead was a fiction that evolved later on — long after the real event of His death — and that it was fabricated to support a religious belief. If this were to be accurate, it would be a compelling cause to cast doubt on the narrative. No one would have been able to substantiate the events that took place decades ago. However, the tales of Jesus that were written down occurred within a few decades of his crucifixion, and the stories contained within those accounts had been passed about for years before they were recorded.

All of this occurred when those who were present at the time of the events were still alive and able to confirm or deny the narrative.

The Tomb Was Empty

The empty tomb is one of the most perplexing aspects of the tale for people who aren’t sure what to make of Jesus’ resurrection from the dead. It is also one of the most difficult to comprehend. There are a lot of questions raised by this. Is it possible that they didn’t truly bury Jesus’ body at all? The grave where He is claimed to have been buried belonged to a famous Jewish leader, according to legend. His burial site would not have been hidden or difficult to find. Perhaps a more inconspicuous place would have been more appropriate if the disciples were attempting to concoct a narrative about an empty tomb.

  1. The narrative of Jesus’ resurrection is said to have spread quickly among his disciples when it occurred, according to historical records.
  2. In addition, Roman soldiers were stationed outside the tomb, and the entry was barred from the outside.
  3. The fact that Romans and high-ranking Jewish authorities accused Jesus’ followers of taking the body was the most compelling evidence in support of the empty tomb.
  4. They might have just stated that the corpse did not appear at the tomb, and if the body did not leave the tomb, they could have simply stated that the tomb they were guarding had been left undisturbed.
  5. “Take a look around for yourself.” However, rather than contesting the fact that the tomb was empty, they accused others of stealing the deceased’s body.
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People Saw Him Alive

Women were among the first to see Jesus’ resurrection, according to the Bible, who was raised from the dead. Interestingly, the fact that followers of Jesus assert that the earliest witnesses to the live Jesus were women provides evidence that the tale is correct. The testimony of a woman was not highly regarded in Jewish society at the time in question. For example, if the disciples had concocted the entire story in order to put out a realistic and persuasive case, they would very certainly have stated that someone, most likely a notable individual, was the first to see Jesus.

If not for the fact that they were the first witnesses to Jesus’ resurrection, people who say he rose from the dead would resort to witnesses who were unlikely to be believed.

According to the Bible, there were once more than 500 witnesses there at the same moment.

Hallucinations, on the other hand, occur on an individual basis.

There has never been a documented instance of a collective hallucination in history. It is reasonable to think that if so many individuals at the time were in agreement about what they observed, it is reasonable to infer that they were speaking the truth.

His Followers Stuck to Their Story

Because of Jesus’ arrest and subsequent death, his followers were caught completely off guard. They spent the day following His death alone, dispersed, befuddled, and in mourning. They had been vanquished. These guys would go on to be outspoken supporters of the Christian message in their respective communities. Jesus had 12 close followers, who are referred to as His “disciples” in popular culture. One of these individuals, Judas, had betrayed Jesus and then committed himself as a result of his actions.

  1. In the end, ten of them were executed for their testimony that Jesus was alive, while the eleventh was deported and imprisoned.
  2. However, they continued even when they were presented with the decision of either abandoning their message and confessing it was a fraud or losing their lives.
  3. According to the only explanation for such a shift in attitude, the disciples were convinced that they had saw Jesus alive and well following His crucifixion and that the fact that He had survived was worth dying for.
  4. Why would so many men give their lives for something they were well aware was false?

Have Faith and Seek Truth

Asking the question, “Did Jesus actually resurrect from the Dead?” is vital. God does not want His children to believe blindly. Despite the fact that there are some things that we as humans can never fully comprehend, God provides us with answers when we seek them from Him. It is not improper to ask questions, since the Truth will never fail when it is questioned. You can have trust that what the Word says is true. Faith is to be based in truth. The more we discover what the Word says and the more we want to comprehend, the more evident the solutions will become.

Keep exploring on your spiritual journey.

Learn more aboutwhat makes faith in Christ distinct.

What Does Cru Believe?

The importance of asking the question “Did Jesus actually resurrect from the dead?” cannot be overstated. God does not require His children to believe blindly in order to please Him. We as humans will never be able to comprehend everything, but God provides us with answers when we turn to Him in prayer for clarification. When you question anything, it is not improper to do so since the Truth will never fail you when you question it. You may have trust in what the Bible teaches because it is true.

Because the more we study about what God’s Word has to say and the more we strive to grasp it, the clearer the answers will become.

Continue to investigate on your spiritual path. Continue your search for the truth. Learn more about what distinguishes faith in Christ from other faiths.

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On What Day Did Jesus Rise?

The May/June 2016 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review is available online. Biblical Perspectives is a weekly column. Staff of the Biblical Archaeology Society On November 16, 20217, there were 106638 views. What day did Jesus resurrect from the dead? Is it better to wait three days or to wait until the third day? During his Biblical Views column, “It’s About Time—Easter Time,” which appeared in the May/June 2016 edition of Biblical Archaeology Review, Ben Witherington III explores this subject in further depth.

—Ed.

“It’s About Time—Easter Time”

Anachronism is a hazard that arises when reading ancient books like the Bible in the twenty-first century. By this I mean that we risk introducing damaging current notions and expectations into our readings. This challenge becomes much more serious when dealing with old manuscripts, which have significant historical significance and are thus difficult to interpret. What day did Jesus resurrect from the dead? Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome visited Jesus’ tomb on Easter morning to anoint his corpse (Mark 16:1–2), as shown in Henry Osawa Tanner’s painting “The Three Marys” (1910).

  • To provide an example, we are a people who are fascinated with time — and with accuracy when it comes to time — to the millisecond level.
  • When it came to the passage of time, they did not stress over accuracy.
  • Jesus promised that he would rise from the dead “after three days,” according to certain sources.
  • In fact, the time reference should be avoided entirely.

In Mark 8:31, on the other hand, Jesus declares, “The Son of Man will rise from the dead after three days.” In John 2:19, he refers to the same event as taking place “in three days,” and the Gospel authors tell us that Jesus used the term “on the third day” on a number of occasions (see, e.g., Matthew 16:21; 17:23; 20:19; Luke 24:46).

  1. While it is feasible that both forecasts will be incorrect, is it really possible that both will be correct?
  2. Furthermore, the term “after three days” in the New Testament might simply indicate “after a time” or “after a few days” without any obvious specificity other than to hint that multiple days, in this case portions of three days, would be engaged in the event.
  3. “Come to me again after three days,” says the Bible’s Second Chronicles 10:5, 12.
  4. According to my interpretation, the term “after three days” is a more generic or imprecise way of expressing, but “on the third day” is a little more particular (albeit it still doesn’t tell us when it is on the third day).

When it comes to time, these books were not written in a way that would suit our present high expectations.

Become a Member ofBiblical Archaeology SocietyNow and Get More Than Half Off the Regular Price of the All-AccessPass!

With an All-Access pass, you may access more than 9,000 articles from the Biblical Archaeology Society’s extensive collection, as well as much more. We must recognize that most of the time references in the New Testament are not precise, and we must give the ancient author the freedom to be general when he wants to be general and more specific when he wants to be more specific. This is one of the keys to understanding how the New Testament interprets time references. When you find both types of references to the time span between Jesus’ death and resurrection in the same book by the same author, and in some cases even within close proximity to each other, it is reasonable to conclude that these texts were not written in accordance with our modern exacting expectations when it comes to time references.

  • I believe it is past time for us to accord these ancient authors the respect they deserve and to read them with a knowledge of the standards they followed when writing ancient history or ancient biography, rather than imposing our later genre norms on them, as we have done in the past.
  • This article has been updated.
  • Ben Witherington III is the Amos Professor of New Testament for Doctoral Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary in Kentucky and a member of the doctoral faculty of St.
  • He received his bachelor’s degree from Asbury Theological Seminary in Kentucky.

Notes:

Read Ben Witherington III, Reading and Learning the Bible, for assistance in understanding how to read the Bible in light of its original settings (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 2014).

Related reading in Bible History Daily:

When Was the First Holy Communion Celebrated? Even yet, Jesus’ Last Supper was not a Passover meal. The Herod’s Jerusalem Palace Remains are on Display During a Seder Meal Tour— The site of Jesus’ trial is a possibility. And Why It Really Does Make a Difference The “Strange” Ending of the Gospel of Mark and Why It Really Does Make a Difference What Method Was Used to Seal Jesus’ Tomb?

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Why did Jesus Rise on the Third Day?

Derek Hiebert contributed to this article. 1 year ago today

Why did Jesus Rise on the Third Day?

As a matter of tradition, Christians have commemorated the resurrection of Jesus Christ on a Sunday, three days following the commemoration of his crucifixion on Good Friday. This three-day chronology is based on a number of allusions in the New Testament to the Old Testament. Many times, Jesus foretold it, and the apostles included it in their delivery of the gospel message as well (see footnote references). However, why did Jesus’ resurrection take place three days after his death is a mystery.

Is the third day only a coincidental, insignificant element put on to the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection?

The Third Day Matters

Timing is extremely important for Jesus and his apostles because it has significant theological ramifications. When it comes to biblical story, the three-day timeframe is important because it represents the one-of-a-kind day on which God creates new life and activates his covenant with mankind. How did the writers of the New Testament get at this conclusion? After all, the Hebrew Scriptures have a constant “third day” design pattern, which Jesus and the New Testament authors are using as a model.

The Third Day Pattern in the Hebrew Bible

The passages Jonah 1:17 and Hosea 6:1-2 in the Hebrew Scriptures are among the clearest illustrations of third-day resurrection in the whole Bible. Jesus used Jonah’s three days in the belly of the huge fish as a metaphor for his own three days in the belly of the great fish. The prophet Hosea predicted that God’s reviving operation for Israel would take place on the third day. While these are important passages to study, the pattern of resurrection on the third day is established far earlier in the tale of Jesus.

The creation narrative in Genesis 1 and Abraham’s test in Genesis 22 both begin to develop a pattern of new life emerging on the third day.

The First “Resurrection”

What is the location of the initial glimpse into the three-day significance? The first page of the Bible. The creation story in Genesis 1 is written in the style of a poetry, with repeated declarations and parallelism between events. Within the rhythm of these repeats, two events in the creation tale stand out as particularly noteworthy, each occurring at a three-day interval and occurring at different points in the narrative. During the first “third day,” God creates dry ground and enables flora to emerge from the soil, including plants that produce seeds as well as trees that give fruit for human use (1:11-13).

The second “third day” event occurs on the sixth day of creation, when God produces animals and human beings for the first time (1:24).

Humans were produced from the dust of the earth, according to what we learn later in the book (2:7).

Take note of the parallels between humans and trees: both are newly generated from the ground (2:7, 9), both carry seeds and produce fruit (1:11, 28; 3:15), and both are made in this manner on the third day of creation.

One thing that distinguishes people from other animals, however, is that they are created in God’s image, and that God enters into a covenant with human beings, blessing and instructing them in their behavior.

A Pattern Emerges

There are three major characteristics of the “third day” events in Genesis 1 that serve as a template for subsequent events:

  1. God brings new life where there was once only death (1:11-13
  2. 26-27
  3. 2:7)
  4. God establishes his covenant with the creatures he has newly created, in this case humans (1:28-29)
  5. God creates new life where there was once only death (1:11-13
  6. 26 In Eden, which we understand to be a lofty site from which a river runs out (2:10-14), the event takes place.

It is impossible to emphasize the significance of this picture and pattern, since it serves as a precedent for future resurrections to come.

Abraham’s Test on the Third Day

Is there any other place where this pattern can be found? Abraham is put to the test by God in yet another “third day” occurrence, which is one of the most interesting events in all of Scripture (Genesis 22:1-19). When God commands Abraham to present his only son Isaac as a burned offering on a mountain, the Bible states that Abraham spotted the location from a distance on the third day and proceeded to complete the test (22:4). God wants Abraham to learn to put his confidence in him when it comes to the covenant and the blessing of offspring in this scenario.

The connection to the “third day” concept is established in this passage by a strikingly dramatic act of atonement on the part of God, in which he substitutes a ram for Isaac (22:13-14).

On the third day, we notice the same trend as we did on the first:

  1. God working to bring fresh life, in this case to Isaac by his life being spared and to Abraham with the return of his son (22:11-14). (Genesis 22:17-18) God confirms his bond with Abraham, using language and ideas identical with Genesis 1:28
  2. (22:2, 14) This event takes place on the summit of a mountain.

Israel’s Third Day at Sinai

At a critical moment in the Bible’s narrative, we discover still another occurrence taking place on the third day. With his people just delivered from decades of tyranny in Egypt, Yahweh is on the verge of entering into another covenant with Israel, this time on a mountaintop (Exodus 19:2-3). God makes it clear that he will descend to Mount Sinai in the presence of all of the people on the “third day” mentioned above. This time is a test for Israel, just as it was for Abraham. Their preparations for entering into covenant with God are to be completed by the “third day,” when they will be ready (Exodus 19:9-16).

As a result of what we’ve seen so far with “third day,” we should have come to assume a specific pattern, which we’ve now witnessed yet another time:

  1. It is God who brings about new life for his people — in this case, new identity for Israel — just as he did at the creation and with Abraham and Isaac (19:4-6)
  2. God enters into covenant with his people, specifically Israel (19:4-6)
  3. God accomplishes all of this on a mountain (19:2)
  4. And God accomplishes all of this on a mountain (19:2).

And that is exactly what we see in the tale! The rest of Israel’s experience in the Hebrew Scriptures, on the other hand, is defined by rebellion and disbelief, as well as a failure to fulfill their half of the agreement. This leads us back to the prophetic texts that refer to the third day, such as Hosea and Jonah, which we discussed before.

Hosea’s Hope, Jonah’s ‘Resurrection’

By returning to these prophets, we get a more complete picture of the “third day” and the tremendous imagery of resurrection that it evokes, as well as its relationship to God’s covenant with Abraham. A typical prophetic phrase for repentance toward covenant integrity is “return to Yahweh,” which Hosea uses to exhort Israel to do, and he also provides them hope in the form of resurrection language (Hosea 6:1-2). This restoration to the covenant will be marked by a renewal of life, as well as our resurrection as a people into the life of Yahweh, which will take place on the “third day,” in accordance with our pattern.

In many respects, the story of Jonah and his failure is a metaphor for the story of Israel. God, on the other hand, does not give up on him or his people. In the third day, he vomits Jonah out of the fish, bringing him back to life in one of the most bizarre “resurrections” recorded in the Bible.

Jesus Predicts a Third Day Resurrection

In the Gospels, we find Jesus speaking of a third-day resurrection while he is discussing his death with his followers, which leads us to believe that he would rise from the dead on the third day. In fact, he refers to “three days” a total of 21 times! By now, you’ve undoubtedly figured out that this was not a coincidental choice of words. It is on the third day that Jesus was adamant, since it signifies God’s initiative in the creation of new life and the establishment of a covenant with mankind.

  1. When we go to the Gospels, we find Jesus talking about his death with his followers, and he mentions a third-day resurrection. This is the first time we’ve heard that phrase. The phrase “three days” is mentioned a total of 21 times in this passage. It is likely by now that you have realized this was not a coincidental choice of emphasis. It is on the third day that Jesus was adamant, since it reflects God’s initiative in the creation of new life and the establishment of a covenant with mankind. Take a look at how the Easter event – the resurrection of Jesus — corresponds to our third-day design pattern as follows:

With the imagery of new life coming up from the earth in Genesis 1-2 on the third day, combined with the connection to the divine covenant found throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, the imagery of Jesus’ resurrection paints a striking picture of the theological importance of his resurrection. The significance of Jesus’ resurrection is underscored even further on the third day. It is the culmination of God’s mission of new life and covenant, which has been brilliantly represented since the beginning of time, and which will culminate in the future resurrection of Jesus’ disciples and the restoration of the entire universe at the conclusion of time.

So what does this mean for us?

This year, as we commemorate the resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday, we are not just carrying on a centuries-old tradition. We are engaged in a profoundly important theology centered on the third day, with all of the implications of God’s redeeming work that it entails, at this time. The design pattern for the third day serves as a reminder that God has begun the process of reviving individuals to new life and bringing them into his covenant partnership with them. What role are we going to play in it today?

The Resurrection Was Not on Easter Sunday!

Every year, billions of people throughout the world celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. However, most people are unaware that the Bible presents a totally different tale from the one they are used to hearing from the pulpit. When it comes to Jesus’ resurrection, what is the truth? Every year, thousands of thousands of professing Christians come for Easter morning services. Even those who are not regular churchgoers will attend services at the church of their choosing on Easter Sunday, regardless of their religious affiliation.

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As unbelievable as that statement may appear, it is true—and you can demonstrate it!

In reality, it teaches something very different!

When exactly did Christ’s resurrection take place?

So, what’s the relationship between an Easter egg hunt and the resurrection of Jesus Christ? Continue reading to find out the answers to these and other important questions!

The Sign of Jesus’ Messiahship

The fact that Jesus of Nazareth was the prophesied Messiah of the Old Testament was supported by a number of evidences for people who sought to learn the truth with sincerity. When the disciples of John the Baptist came to Jesus after John’s arrest and imprisonment by Herod, take note of what He told them: “Because you have come to me, I will tell you what I have done for you.” “And when John learned of Christ’s deeds while imprisoned, he dispatched two of his disciples to confront Him with the question, “Are You the Coming One, or should we look for another?” When they asked what Jesus had said, he replied, “Go and tell John what you have heard and seen: the blind see and the crippled walk; lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear; the dead are resurrected and the poor have the gospel preached to them.” Also, happy is the one who does not feel offended by Me.'” (Matthew 11:2–6; Mark 10:2–6).

  • According to John’s narrative, Jesus performed a series of miraculous wonders, beginning with the wedding feast at Cana, when He transformed water into wine (John 2:11).
  • These signs were observed by Jesus’ disciples, confirming their belief that He was, in fact, the Messiah who had been foretold.
  • John penned the following: “There was a guy named Nicodemus who belonged to the Pharisees and was the ruler of the Jews.
  • During the first Passover season of Jesus’ ministry, in the year 28 AD, this occurred.
  • None of this was satisfactory to them.
  • Jesus assured them on each of these instances that they would only get one sign like this in their lifetime.

When He was confronted by the religious leaders, who demanded that He demonstrate another sign in addition to the miraculous healings He had performed in the temple, He responded by saying, “I will show you another sign.” “‘Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up,’ Jesus responded to their question.

  • Because, just as Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of the giant fish, the Son of Man will spend three days and three nights in the center of the earth.” (Matthew 12:38–40; Mark 10:38–40).
  • The sole indication Jesus gave to the doubting religious leaders of His day was that He would be in the tomb for precisely three days and three nights, as He had promised them.
  • Absolutely!
  • “He is not present because, as He stated, He has risen from the dead.
  • Jesus had vowed that He would remain in the tomb for precisely three days and three nights, and He resurrected exactly three days and three nights after He said He would.
  • It is not possible to count it yourself; it will just not work!
  • Others believe that it is a colloquial expression.
  • It is important to note that Jesus was referring to Hebrew terminology rather than Greek.
  • “The L ord had prepared a massive fish to engulf Jonah at this point.
  • As Queen Esther instructed her cousin Mordecai, “Go, collect all the Jews who are present in Shushan, and fast for three days, neither eating nor drinking, day or night” was the exact term used (Esther 4:16).
  • This is exactly what Jesus was referring to, and the Pharisees were well aware of it.

They were well aware that Jesus was not referring to a simple day and a half, but rather three whole days, as he had stated.

When Was the Crucifixion?

The Bible, however, says that Jesus was crucified and buried on Friday, and that the tomb was empty on Sunday morning. “But,” many would argue, “doesn’t the Bible indicate that Jesus was crucified and buried on Friday, and that the tomb was empty on Sunday morning?” However, although it is true that the tomb was already empty on Sunday morning, the Bible makes no mention of Jesus being crucified on Friday. In Mark 15:42–45, it is said that He was crucified on the “prepared day.” However, it is important to understand which preparation day this was.

  1. Leviticus 23:4, 7, 24, 27–32).
  2. The next day, Abib 15, is a Holy Day that occurs once a year, marking the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.
  3. Thursday was the first Holy Day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, which marks the beginning of the yearly Sabbath.
  4. He stayed in the tomb Wednesday night, Thursday night, Friday night, and Saturday night—three days and three nights, just as He had promised.
  5. When the ladies arrived at His bedside at the crack of dawn on Sunday morning to embalm His body, He had already passed away.
  6. Jesus Christ came to earth in the role of “the Lamb of God” to pay the price for sin (John 1:29).
  7. A close examination of the gospel stories reveals that Jesus and His followers ate the Passover supper after sunset at the beginning of Abib 14 (Mark 14:16–18, Luke 22:13–15, cf.

It was later in the evening after dinner that they traveled to the Mount of Olives (Mark 14:26), when soldiers under the command of Judas Iscariot apprehended and arrested Jesus (verses 43–46).

It was 9 a.m.

25).

When Jesus died at around 3 p.m.

33–37), there was utter darkness over the whole region from midday until the time of his death.

43).

44–45).

Luke 23:53–54).

Numerous readers fail to notice John’s description that this “Sabbath was a special day” (John 19:31).

As a reminder, Abib 15 (the day following Passover) was the first of seven yearly Holy Days mandated to ancient Israel (Leviticus 23:5–7).

The numerous gospel narratives make it clear that there were actually two Sabbaths that week: an annual Holy Day on Thursday and the ordinary weekly Sabbath on Saturday, according to the gospel reports.

During both the weekly and yearly Sabbaths, shops in Jerusalem would have been closed, as would be expected.

Their first opportunity to purchase and prepare spices would have come on Friday, after the Holy Day that marked the beginning of the Festival of Unleavened Bread.

Please keep in mind that Luke notes that it was after the women prepared the spices and aromatic oils, which would have taken several hours, that “they slept on the Sabbath in keeping with the law” (Luke 23:56).

Understanding this issue is essential to comprehending the length of Jesus’ stay in the tomb after his death.

Was it to commemorate the first Easter morning service that was held there?

They arrived at the scene as soon as the possibility to embalm a deceased person presented itself (Luke 24:1).

What was it about this particular indication that convinced the religious leaders that Jesus was the Messiah?

Remember that Matthew recounted that on the day following the crucifixion—early in the morning of the “high day” Sabbath—the Jewish leadership dispatched a delegation to Pilate to ask for permission to station an armed guard to protect Jesus’ tomb from thieves and thieves’ agents.

These guards were there during the subsequent events, and they were the ones who notified the religious leaders of what had truly transpired on the battlefield (28:11).

These officials learnt that Jesus had fulfilled the sign of the prophet Jonah directly from the mouths of the same guards that they themselves had stationed. It was just as He had promised!

Where Did Easter Come From?

The Bible, however, states that Jesus was crucified and buried on Friday, and that the tomb was empty on Sunday morning. “But,” many would argue, “doesn’t the Bible state that Jesus was killed and buried on Friday, with the tomb empty on Sunday morning?” However, although it is true that the tomb was already empty on Sunday morning, the Bible makes no mention of Jesus being crucified on a Friday afternoon. In Mark 15:42–45, it is said that He was crucified on the “preparation day.” However, it is important to note which preparation day it was.

Abib 14 (Abib 14 on the Hebrew calendar) was the day before an annual Sabbath, during the daylight phase of the Passover festival.

In addition to being an annual Holy Day, Abib 15 also marks the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, which begins on the 15th of this month.

Thursday marked the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and the yearly Sabbath.

Exactly 72 hours after His death and burial, He was raised just before sunset on Saturday afternoon.

However, they did not see the resurrection; instead, they witnessed an empty tomb and were informed by an angel that He had risen just as He had promised.

For Christ, our Passover, was slaughtered on the cross for us, according to Paul (1 Corinthians 5:7).

Exodus 12:1–8), at the end of the first day of the month.

When the Sanhedrin convened shortly after sunrise, they formally charged Jesus with murder and ordered His delivery to Pontius Pilate (15:1).

on that morning when Christ was carried to a hill on the outskirts of Jerusalem and crucified in the manner characteristic of the Romans (the “third hour” from daybreak in Jewish usage, v.

He was accompanied by two convicts.

(verses 33–37).

43).

44–45).

John 19:43–44).

John’s remark that this was “a holy day” is often overlooked by readers (John 19:31).

As a reminder, Abib 15 (the day following Passover) was the first of seven yearly Holy Days decreed to ancient Israel (Leviticus 23:5–7), and it marked the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread.

Keep in mind that the following is what Mark says: “Now after the Sabbath had passed, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome went out and bought spices so that they may come and anoint Him” (Mark 16:1).

During Jesus’ burial, which occurred just before the annual Holy Day Sabbath began, the women were present, as was the men (15:47).

The women “rest[ed] on the Sabbath, in accordance with the commandment,” according to Luke, after they had prepared the spices and fragrant oils — a task that would have taken hours (Luke 23:56).

Understanding this point is essential to comprehending the length of Jesus’ stay in the tomb after his resurrection.

The purpose of the visit was to commemorate the first Easter sunrise service.

They were rushing in to embalm a dead body as soon as it became available (Luke 24:1).

In the eyes of the religious leaders, why was this a particularly significant sign confirming Jesus’ status as Messiah?

For those who don’t recall, Matthew explained that on the day following the crucifixion—early in the morning of the “high day” Sabbath—the Jewish leadership sent a delegation to Pilate to request permission to station an armed guard to protect Jesus’ tomb.

Their presence at the scene provided eyewitness testimony to what transpired, and it was they who informed the religious leaders of what had occurred (28:11).

These leaders learned that Jesus had fulfilled the sign of the prophet Jonah directly from the mouths of the very guards that they themselves had stationed. It was exactly as Jesus had promised!

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