What Would Happen If Jesus Wasn’T Crucified

If Christ Had Not Died

Currently based in McKinney, Texas, Erik Jones works as a full-time writer and editor for the Life, Hope, and Truth organization. More information can be found at Read on for more.

What If Jesus Had Not Died

“What If?” is a series of best-selling books compiled by Robert Cowley in which historians examine an important event in history and attempt to speculate what could have occurred if the event had not transpired in the manner that it did. What would have happened if Pontius Pilate had saved Jesus’ life? According to Carlos M. N. Eire, chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at Yale University, the chapter is titled “Religious Studies in Contemporary America.” “Christianity without the Crucifixion,” according to the subtitle of the film.

So, he speculates, what would have happened if Pilate had done the right thing and stood up to the religious leaders and rabble who were calling for Jesus’ execution and instead freed Him?

  1. “What if Jesus hadn’t been put on a cross at Pilate’s insistence?” Eire wonders aloud.
  2. What would have happened?
  3. Or just one?
  4. “To speculate on what might have occurred if anything at all had been different in the tale of Jesus and his disciples is to sail on an unlimited ocean of possibilities,” writes the author.
  5. One thing is certain: if there is no crucifixion, there will be no resurrection.
  6. To put it another way, we’re in serious trouble.
  7. Due to the fact that it is Easter season, it is fashionable for preachers and Bible instructors to lecture and teach about the key event of Jesus’ resurrection.
  8. Everything is dependent on it.
  9. The crucifixion is the first part of that tale, and the resurrection is the second.
  10. Robert Cowley should have assigned someone to write a considerably more engaging chapter on “What if Jesus had not risen from the tomb,” as I believe he should have done.
  11. To do so would be equal to acknowledging that Jesus did, in fact, rise from the grave.

Consequently, it becomes easier for these (ahem) objective historians to ignore the resurrection, which many of them have ruled out as an impossibility without having investigated it for the simple reason that “people don’t come back from the dead,” and to deal only with the crucifixion, which presents no difficulty for historians.

if Jesus’ body is decomposing in a grave somewhere, there are seven consequences for us:–our preaching is without foundation, and so is your faith;–we are false witnesses about God, claiming that He did something that He didn’t;–your faith is worthless; you are still in your sins; all who have “died in Christ” are really dead; and–we are to be pitied.

  1. Let us, on the other hand, indulge in a small amount of this type of erroneous supposition.
  2. 1.
  3. After all, what could we possibly contribute?
  4. … Should I offer up my firstborn as a sacrifice for my transgression, the kid of my own flesh as a sacrifice for my own sin?
  5. There will be no forgiveness.
  6. Do you want to be forgiven for all of your crimes against the Holy God?
  7. 3.

We wouldn’t have any good news since “gospel” implies “good news.” It would be our teaching that would consist of the following: “You are sinners, and you are going to hell.” Period.

4.

There is no church.

Nothing.

There’s nothing else to say.

He does, however, claim that the adherents of this faith will continue to wait for the arrival of the Messiah.

Jesus is not the Messiah if the crucifixion is not present.

Furthermore, there is no forgiveness without the shedding of blood.

God was well aware of what He was doing.

Jesus died on the cross in the manner that He had predicted.

They buried Him in a grave that they had borrowed.

Our response to His death is not merely to acknowledge it, but to celebrate it. That day is referred to as “Good” Friday. He has, without a doubt, endured our griefs and bore our sorrows. (See also Isa. 53:4) Thank you, God, for Jesus’ death on the cross.

What if Jesus Had Not Died?

Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/marydan If Christ has not risen from the dead, your faith is pointless, and you remain in your sins.– 15:17 in 1 Corinthians 15:17 It is a best-selling series of books compiled by Robert Cowley in which historians examine pivotal historical events and attempt to speculate what might have occurred if things had not turned out the way they did instead. What would have happened if Pontius Pilate had saved Jesus’ life? According to Carlos M. N. Eire, chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at Yale University, the chapter is titled “Religious Studies in Contemporary America.” Christianity without the Crucifixion is the subtitle of the film.

  • So, he speculates, what would have happened if Pilate had done the right thing and stood up to the religious leaders and the rabble who were calling for Jesus to be executed instead?
  • One page of the book has the phrase “The Decision That Made a Religion,” which appears beneath a 13th-century artwork of Pilate meeting the Jewish religious leaders.
  • “What if Jesus hadn’t been put on a cross at Pilate’s insistence?” Eire wonders aloud.
  • What would have happened?
  • Or just one?
  • “To speculate on what might have occurred if anything at all had been different in the tale of Jesus and his disciples is to sail on an unlimited ocean of possibilities,” writes the author.

There’s No Separating Crucifixion from Resurrection

Credit for the image goes to Getty Images/marydan In the event that Christ has not risen from the dead, your faith is pointless, and you remain in your sins. Corinthians 15:17 is a verse that states It is a best-selling series of books compiled by Robert Cowley in which historians examine pivotal historical events and attempt to speculate what might have occurred if things had turned out differently. If Pontius Pilate had saved Jesus’ life, how would the world have changed? According to Carlos M.

  1. Eire, chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at Yale University, the chapter is titled “Religious Studies in America Today.” Christianism sans the Crucifixion, according to the subtitle.
  2. “Have nothing to do with him,” she said in a letter to the governor.
  3. How would things have turned out had he not freed Him.
  4. No one will argue that the crucifixion and resurrection were not pivotal events in the development of the Christian religion, but no one would argue that it was a pivotal event.
  5. How would things have turned out for him had he lived a long and prosperous life?
  6. Alternatively, what if you only have one?
  7. In the end, as Eire concedes, the answers might be all over the place.

To paraphrase him, “speculating on what could have occurred if anything at all had been different in the tale of Jesus and his disciples is like sailing in an unlimited ocean of possibilities. So your guess is as good as his, if not better.

What If Jesus Had Not Risen from the Grave?

“What if Jesus had not risen from the grave?” is a considerably more exciting chapter to write, and I’m puzzled why Robert Cowley didn’t assign someone to write it. I believe we’ve figured it out. Inviting someone to write about “what if Jesus didn’t come from the dead” would be equal to acknowledging that He did, in fact, rise from the grave. And if one is willing to accept this, he or she will be confronted with a slew of implications and repercussions. The resurrection is thus made more difficult to believe in by these experts, who have dismissed it as an impossibility (without having examined it) for the simple reason that “people do not come back from the dead.” For historians, focusing solely on the crucifixion presents no difficulties.

To accept the first half as legitimate while ignoring the second part is prejudiced, showing that the experts have a predisposition against God.

Let us, on the other hand, indulge in a small amount of this type of erroneous supposition.

Image courtesy of Getty Images

1. Without Jesus’ Death There Is No Sin Offering

“What if Jesus had not risen from the grave?” is a considerably more exciting chapter to write, and I’m puzzled why Robert Cowley didn’t assign someone to write it instead. That, I believe, is what we are talking about! It would be similar to acknowledging that He truly rose from the grave if you asked someone to write about “what if Jesus didn’t rise.” Once someone accepts this, he or she must cope with a slew of ramifications and repercussions that are unimaginable. The resurrection is thus made more difficult to believe in by these experts, who have dismissed it as an impossible (without conducting any research) for the simple reason that “people don’t return from the dead.” Historical researchers have little difficulty dealing with merely the crucifixion.

A prejudiced attitude toward God is demonstrated by scholars accepting the first section of the text as authentic while dismissing the second.

The apostle Paul, on the other hand, did not speculate on what could have happened if Jesus had been freed by Pilate and had continued His preaching and healing mission for the remainder of His life in the manner that marked the first three years of His career.

Consider engaging in a little amount of this type of silly supposition, however.n’t you think it’d be fun? Think about it: if Jesus had not died on the cross for our sins, what would we be in possession of today? Getty Images provided the image.

2. Without Jesus’ Death There Is No Forgiveness

“What if Jesus had not risen from the grave?” is a considerably more fascinating chapter, and I’m puzzled as to why Robert Cowley didn’t assign someone to write it. I believe we have figured it out. A request for an essay on the topic of “what if Jesus did not resurrect” would be equal to acknowledging that He did, in fact, rise from the grave. And if one is willing to recognize this, he or she will have to cope with a slew of implications and repercussions. The resurrection is thus made more difficult to believe in by these experts, who have dismissed it as an impossible (without having examined it) for the simple reason that “people don’t return from the dead.” For historians, focusing solely on the crucifixion offers no difficulties.

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It is prejudiced for scholars to accept the first section as legitimate while ignoring the second, demonstrating a bias against God.

Let us, on the other hand, indulge in a bit of this sort of erroneous supposition.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

3. Without Jesus’ Death There Is No Gospel

We wouldn’t have any good news since “gospel” implies “good news.” It would be our teaching that would consist of the following: “You are sinners, and you are going to hell.” Period. It seems to me that our preaching might sound quite similar to some of the sermons I’ve heard. I’ve seen preachers say things like, “Scripture states that the soul that sinneth will perish.” And then they slam the door in your face. That is, of course, stated in the document. However, it also states that the term “law” is no longer relevant.

So, what exactly is this “law of the spirit of life in Christ Jesus” that we’re talking about?

We have some exciting news!

4. Without Jesus’ Death There Is No Christianity, No Church, No Salvation

Nothing. As an alternative to the Christian gospel burning throughout the globe, we would have something like to a Jesus Memorial Society. A small group of people who are interested in history could get together once in a while to recite Jesus’ words and learn about the legends that have grown up around Him. There’s nothing else to say. In fact, that sounds precisely like a lot of liberal churches, now that I think about it. When people lose sight of the central message of the gospel—the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus—all that is left is a collection of loosely coupled doctrines and moral concepts.

  1. He does, however, claim that the adherents of this faith will continue to wait for the arrival of the Messiah.
  2. I believe he is correct in this regard.
  3. Indeed, Psalm 22 and Isaiah 53 both allude to the death of the Messiah as atonement for the sins of the people.
  4. (See also Hebrews 9:22) However, Jesus did go to the cross, and the news is that all is well with the world.
  5. This is “good news of great joy, which shall come to all mankind,” as the angel announced to Bethlehem’s shepherds (Luke 2:10).
  6. On that day in Jerusalem, Pilate gave in to the pressure of the multitude and condemned Jesus to death.
  7. He was the one who bore our sins.
  8. And the next Lord’s Day morning, the disciples discovered the tomb empty and the Savior alive and well in the surrounding area.
  9. There’s a solid reason why we call that day “Good” Friday.
  10. –Isaiah 53:4 (NIV) Thank you, God, for Jesus’ death on the cross.

Over the course of his life, Joe McKeever has been a follower of Jesus Christ for more than 65 years, has preached the gospel for more than 55 years, and has written and drawn cartoons for Christian periodicals for more than 45 years. He has a blog at

Jesus Foretells His Death and Resurrection

The level of craftsmanship with which The Gospel According to Matthewwas written never ceases to astound me. This isn’t just some haphazard attempt by a lone individual to document the events of his life. No, Matthew wasn’t a shady writer in the traditional sense. Mattew put together a masterpiece that, like any genuinely great narrative, instills perspective and inspires understanding while constantly directing us to the true Christ. He was inspired by the Holy Spirit and learned from Jesus’ brilliance by actually walking with Him and learning from His teaching.

Matthew’s Gospel points us in the right way in this regard.

Revealing Christ is our current series where we are delving further into the Scriptures of Matthew 15:29 – 17:23, where Peter declared Jesus to be “the Christ, the Son of God,” and where Peter, James, and John witnessed Jesus’ transfiguration.

3 Times Jesus Foretold His DeathResurrection

It is in Matthew 16:21 (ESV) that we find the first prophecy, which states: “From that point on, Jesus started to teach his followers that He must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things from the elder and chief priest and scribes, and be crucified, and on the third day be risen.” (Matthew 16:21, English Standard Version) Matthew distinguishes this section from the others by beginning it with the words “From that time.” The usage of this word earlier in the book, when Matthew uses it to stress the commencement and direction of Jesus’ mission while stating His primary message: “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand,” may bring this phrase back to your memory (Matthew 4:17 ESV).

  • In the same way, Matthew used the word in this passage to call our attention to the direction in which Jesus’ ministry is now heading.
  • “You are the Christ, the Son of God,” Peter responded when Jesus went further and asked who the disciples believed He was (Matthew 16:16 ESV).
  • This prophecy of His own death and resurrection aimed to let people recognize Him as Christ in the proper light, for to confess Him as Christ while denying Him the cross would be to have incorrect expectations of what He was capable of.
  • I promise you that this will never happen to you” (Matthew 16:22 ESV).

I can’t help but think of the scene from The Chronicles of Narnia: When it comes to The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, In the middle of the night, Susan and Lucy are strolling with Aslan through the woods, gripping his mane and falling in love with him, only to realize that they are actually travelling with him to the Stone Table.

  • Of course, the news that Jesus imparted would be devastating to Peter and the rest of the disciples.
  • There is good news beyond Jesus’ death, although it appears to have escaped Peter’s awareness, and that good news is that Jesus will be risen from the grave on the third day.
  • Death, on the other hand, having been overcome, shows Him to be the genuine and better King; the suffering Servant promised by the prophet Isaiah.
  • Not only do we read the recorded interaction between Jesus and His followers, but as we read the tale, our gaze is drawn to the cross and the resurrection of Jesus Christ as well.
  • In Matthew 17, Jesus foreshadowed the events leading up to His own death and resurrection for the second time.
  • Matthew, on the other hand, goes on to describe two further events in which Jesus disclosed these truths to His followers.

A few of the disciples had just witnessed Jesus’ transfiguration and heard the voice of the Father saying, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; listen to Him.” In this second instance, the disciples had actually just witnessed Jesus’ transfiguration and heard the Father say, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; listen to Him” (Matt.

At the very least, Jesus’ motivation to live and die in complete surrender to His Father’s will, knowing that His Father’s goals and mission are the best shows itself in this prophecy when considered in its context.

You will notice that there was no reply this time; there was simply distress, and because Matthew’s account moves on to a different scenario directly after this paragraph, we should feel the weight of this essential pause at the end of this verse in Matthew 17:22-23 (ESV): In Galilee, while they were assembling, Jesus appeared to them and told them, “The Son of Man is going to be put into the hands of mankind, and they will murder him, and he will be risen on the third day.” And they were in a great deal of anguish.

Third and last point: Jesus’ prophecies about His own death and resurrection add to the dramatic tension of this most ultimate of redemption stories.

Let’s get ready.” After that, the Son of Man will be handed up to the chief priests and scribes, who will condemn him to death and hand him over to the Gentiles to be ridiculed, flogged, and crucified, after which he will be resurrected on the third day.” Jesus and His followers had embarked on a journey to the city of Jerusalem from Galilee.

  • Jesus had not informed them when or where His death and resurrection would take place; all He had told them was that it was coming, that it was essential, and that He was fully committed to the mission.
  • By the time they arrived at their final objective of Jerusalem, which they were well on their way there, the time for these occurrences would have come.
  • To some extent, this proof of His foresight speaks volumes about His divinity, and Matthew is surely conveying this point for his audience with this storyline.
  • The betrayal and execution of Jesus would be gruesome, with beatings, blood, and a crucifixion among the many horrors that would befall him.

There would be no such thing as a half-hearted belief. You’d have to be completely convinced that Jesus is who He claims to be, that His is the only path to genuine life, and that it’s definitely worth it to push through the muck and gloom in order to see the beauty.

Moving Forward Together

When we get to this third section at Redemption Church, as we continue our journey through Matthew, we will be officially kicking off Lent as a community of believers. We don’t normally do much in the way of Lent observance around here, but just as Advent is tied to Christmas, Lent is tied to the Passion of Christ and the celebration of the Resurrection. A period of preparation is underway, and we will be encouraging you to walk through that season intentionally; knowing that at the end of the road lies a bloody cross and our Saviour, who rose from the dead and is God with us.

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As we come to see Jesus as the Christ, the Messiah, and the Savior, may we also recognize that in order for any of this to be real, He had to take the route of the cross.

May we purposefully prepare ourselves to answer the call for His glory and our delight, as we discover that there is abundant grace and restoration for all of us as we lean into the brokenness and muck that lies before us.

Jesus Christ May Not Have Died on Cross

– – – – – – – – – – For more than 2,000 years, the crucifix has served as a powerful symbol of both Jesus Christ’s death and the Christian faith. According to a Swedish theologian, despite the crucifix’s widespread use in art and literature, there is no evidence in the Bible or other ancient texts to suggest that Christ was crucified on a cross. In order to investigate his newly finished 400-page PhD thesis, Gunnar Samuelsson, an evangelical preacher and theologian, claims he spent three years going through hundreds of historical manuscripts to do so “The Crucifixion was practiced in antiquity.

“While there were several allusions to “suspension devices,” none of them were specific “He was unable to locate any explicit references to the typical T-shaped cross, which was often employed for executions at the time of Christ’s death.

“There is no distinct punishment device called a ‘crucifix,’ anywhere mentioned in any of the ancient texts, including the Gospels.” The author, who is a devout believer in the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection, asserts that for generations, people have misinterpreted and mistranslated the Greek word “stauros,” which means “suspension device,” when in fact the term could have meant anything from a “pole or a tree trunk” to a “cross.” The Greek language was used to write the first versions of the New Testament.

  1. ” If you only read the text and ignore the art and religion, you will find that there is very little information concerning the crucifixion in it.
  2. Everyone assumed it meant cross, but it actually means a variety of things.
  3. A suspension device, which consisted essentially of a tall pole or pike, was commonly employed in the ancient world, by the Romans and their contemporaries, both as an execution device and as a public warning mechanism to exhibit the bodies of killed criminals and foes.
  4. Instead, interpreting the term as “suspended” would make more sense.
  5. He, on the other hand, claims “We don’t know what happened to those evil guys who stood next to him on the right and left sides of the room.
  6. However, we have not been able to locate any proof of them in the ancient scriptures “He went on to say more.
  7. Roberts.

“If you were wandering around Galilee and heard Jesus declare that he will be hung in a matter of days, you would be alarmed.

The passion is also recounted in different ways in different Gospels and has been depicted in diverse ways throughout history, which is another point to consider.

In other scholarly publications, he is only depicted as carrying the cross beam.

Samuelson said that he had not anticipated the positive response his theory has received on a global scale.

He stated that he had anticipated that his work would pique the interest of academics, but that he had been shocked by the widespread interest.

I believe that Jesus is God’s son, according to the Bible. Every day, I read from the New Testament. It feels like the Holy Spirit has descended upon me. I keep assuring them that this does not imply that we have to demolish all of the crosses in the churches across the world.”

Crucified God: Jesus wasn’t kidding, God really forsook him

“My father, if it is at all possible, please remove this cup from my hands.” (Matthew 26:39; Mark 12:39) “And he brought with him Peter, James, and John, and he started to be exceedingly disturbed and troubled,” the Bible says. (Matthew 14.33) Please, Father, remove this cup from me if you are willing. And while he was in anguish, he was frantically praying, and his sweat turned into drops of blood that fell to the ground.” (See Luke 22:4244.) “Since my Soul is tormented, should I pray to the Father to deliver me from this hour?” But it was for this reason that I arrived at this hour.” (See John 12.27 for further information.) One part of “Good” Friday and the extremely trying conditions that surrounded Jesus that is sometimes overlooked is a very clear scriptural depiction that states: Jesus was a real person.

  1. In addition, Jesus did not possess any supernatural abilities, such as mind reading or fortune telling, that would have allowed him to survive these few moments of torment leading up to his betrayal, trial, and final execution as a result of his death.
  2. The events of the Passion recorded in the Gospels are not merely pleasant details to fill our bibles with so that God has a tale to tell about his death; they are central to the account of God’s death.
  3. To put it another way, the details are significant.
  4. Jesus has no need to be concerned since he knows that he will be raised from the dead.
  5. Even if we give our lives to save our friends’ lives, we know that our lives will be taken away from us again.is the loss of our lives truly love?
  6. Is it possible that Christ did not truly feel despair and that he did not mean it when he begs God to “take this cup away from me?” If this is the case, I’m perplexed as to why Jesus would pray so fervently that something that appears to be “blood” began to perspire from his forehead.
  7. In terms of Christ, the gospels give us with a highly dialectical picture of him.

Knowing his time had come, he heroically stretched out his back to be flogged, he spoke truth to those who had the authority to murder him, and he unflinchingly extended out his arms on a cross as he welcomed the nails that would drive into tendons and bone in his hands and feet.

Christ, on the other hand, is not so daring, and he is not looking forward to what appears to be unfolding all around him.

The synoptic Christ is not looking forward to the possibility of being brought before the authorities.

Mark tells us that Jesus was extremely agitated and filled with inner conflict, while Matthew and Luke tell us that Jesus even asked, “If this cup can pass.then please make it so.” If Jesus’ sentiments were not genuine, why would he have them in the first place?

It is true that Jesus concludes his petition with the words “not my will, but yours be done,” but this is just an acknowledgment that Christ has resigned himself to God’s task for which he is responsible.

Jesus has been extremely active in declaring the Kingdom of God and demonstrating the Kingdom via tangible manifestations.

However, to this God, whom Christ has previously addressed as his “father” in the Synoptics, and with whom Christ has a much more intimate connection than is customary, he prays, “If this cup may be taken away from ME.please make it so.” The Jesus of the Synoptics is neither a bold or an enthusiastic figure.

  • Jesus was beaten, maimed, and made into a human billboard.
  • As a result, the Synoptics provide us with a very hesitant Jesus, a human Jesus, who is filled with deep sensations and emotions that shake him to his core.
  • The Gospel of John, on the other hand, presents us with a Christ who is not afraid to speak his mind.
  • The Johannine dynasty Jesus is not fearful, and he will not be distracted from his impending “hour” of judgment.
  • This is John’s manner of drawing the attention of his readers to the passion of Christ and his “raising up” on the cross.
  • Following the introduction to the narrative, chapter 2 takes us to Cana, where we see Jesus’ first miracle: the miracle of the wedding feast.
  • “Woman, what do you think I have to do with you?” Jesus responds sharply.
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If his family is attempting to get him into problems with the authorities, they cleverly point out that “no one does anything in secret when he desires to be recognized by others.so if what you are doing is true, reveal yourself to the world,” as the text indicates.

His historical family, according to the scripture, did not believe in Jesus or his works.

” Your hour, on the other hand, is always here.

In John 7, Jesus does eventually go to the Feast of Booths, but he does so in secret because he does not want to cause a commotion because his HOUR has not yet arrived.

John 18.11 shows the Johannine Christ stepping into his mission with confidence, while the Roman cohort closes in on him.

He swings his sword at a nearby soldier, wounding him in the ear.

Despite this, even if John sanitizes Christ’s human anguish and Luke presents a Christ who on the cross suffers a peaceful death, a death in which he quietly says to God, “Into your hands I submit my spirit,” the gospels portray a Christ who dies a good death.

In the gospels of Matthew and Mark, Jesus does not die gently by releasing his spirit.

Due to the fact that the community of Jesus would not want to keep remarks made by Christ that would appear to generate hatred between Jesus and God, this is most likely an ancient tradition that has survived for a long period of time.

Jesus was adamant in John’s presence about his hour and purpose, as well as about the cup of which I must partake.

As recorded in Matthew and Mark, he musters the strength to shout, moan, and call out to his “Father,” saying: “MY GOD MY GOD, WHY HAVE YOU FORSAKEN ME?!?” Do we truly mean what we’re saying when we say this?

Do we believe that Jesus was simply making a hyperbolic statement on the cross in order to provide the gospels with drama that would captivate the readers?

As a Christian tradition that has sanitized and neglected to see the significance of his very last words, how does this make sense?

For the entirety of Jesus’ public career, he has preached about the closeness of God to people.

In his ministry, he has witnessed people being healed.

He has been preaching a message of grace that is non-judgmental and extends to anybody who would believe.

The man has revived the dead and has experienced a closeness with God that had before gone unnoticed.yet, at the very moment when he most needs this God who is so close.this God is in reality very, very far away.

During his dying hours on earth, Jesus, the one who prayed to this God as his “Father,” comes to the realization that the closeness and grace that he has proclaimed.are not available to him anymore.

The pain of hell is being abandoned and handed over to death as one who has been rejected yet fully cognizant that God is close at hand in his grace.” To put it another way, the God who animated the very preaching and life of Christ is now allowing his preaching and life to come to a conclusion.

He and his prophetic mission have been abandoned by the God that Jesus is so familiar with and intimately understands.

However, he is tying his life to the life of God as if they were inseparable realities.

Despite the fact that the term “incarnation” is not used in the Gospels, he has considered his existence to be the manifestation of God to the world.

Jesus ties his own existence with God’s very mission by saying, “I am the mission.” To be crucified on a Roman cross is not just an indictment of a God who has failed to fulfill his promises, but it is also a scream that represents the most excruciating betrayal anybody of us will ever experience: the betrayal of our faith.

  1. The cry of forsakenness, then, must imply not only that Jesus feels abandoned by God, but also that Jesus is essentially asking, “Why is God forsaking Godself!?” in the act of uttering the cry of forsakenness.
  2. On this hill, Jesus is not the only one who has been crucified; God has also been killed.
  3. This is an event that is taking place between Jesus and his Father, who is the one to whom he prayed, wept, and pleaded with to allow these events to pass without further incident.
  4. God has taken on the characteristics of an absentee, neglectful father in the eyes of Jesus!
  5. However, while we are frequently ready to offer reasons in Christian theology as to the “why” of Jesus’ abandonment, we must refrain from doing so on the Feast of the Transfiguration.
  6. Therefore, we must refrain from claiming on Good Friday that Jesus died for this cause or that reason.
  7. Resurrection is a race against the clock.
  8. During the next three days, let us not forget about these Gospel accounts and the various depictions of Christ that have been presented.

While many faiths have prophets and disciples who have died in the sake of their beliefs, Christianity is the only religion in which God dies for Godself and declares to Godself that God has been abandoned.

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“They nailed him on a cross” (John 19:1). He wasn’t the first person to die on a crucifixion; it’s believed that by the time of Christ, the Romans had crucified 30,000 individuals in Palestine alone, according to historical records. He would not be the first to do so. To the contrary, Jesus was the only One who could and did die on a cross for the sins of a lost world, “the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring you to God” (Romans 3:25). (1 Pet. 3:18). In order to demonstrate the one-of-a-kindness of Jesus’ death, Matthew narrates four extraordinary incidents that occurred immediately after Jesus died.

According to John MacArthur, these incidents serve as God’s own commentary on the crucifixion.

The Darkness

As a result, “from noon till three o’clock in the afternoon, darkness fell over the entire area” (Mark 15:25), and Jesus was crucified at 9 a.m. (Mark 15:25). (Matt. 27:45). The relevance of this: Darkness is commonly used as a symbol of judgment in the Old Testament (see Amos 5:18; 8:9). Remember that the ninth plague of the exodus event was a three-day period of darkness over the country of Egypt, a darkness that could be felt by the people of Israel (Ex. 10:21-22). Next the plague of darkness, the firstborn sons were killed in the following year (Ex.

  1. Death was preceded by a period of darkness.
  2. What is the importance of this?
  3. The presence of darkness as a manifestation of divine judgment draws attention to the substitutionary aspect of Christ’s sacrifice.
  4. 3:13; 2 Cor.
  5. 2:24).

The Curtain

As a result, “from noon to three o’clock in the afternoon, darkness fell over the entire area” (Mark 15:25), and Jesus was crucified at 9 a.m. (Mark 15:26). (Matt. 27:45). Here’s why it’s important: Darkness is commonly depicted as a symbol of judgment in the Old Testament (see Amos 5:18; 8:9). Remember that the ninth plague of the exodus event was a three-day period of darkness over the country of Egypt, a darkness that could be felt by the people living there (Ex. 10:21-22). It wasn’t long after that the firstborn sons were killed by the scourge of darkness (Ex.

Death came first, followed by darkness.

Was there a point to all of this?

The presence of darkness as a manifestation of divine judgment draws attention to the substitutionary aspect of Christ’s death and resurrection. Jesus bore the punishment of God for our sins by dying on the cross (see Gal. 3:13; 2 Cor. 5:21; 1 Pet. 2:24).

The Earthquake

As a result, “from noon till three o’clock in the afternoon, darkness fell over the entire area” (Mark 15:25), and Jesus was crucified at 9 a.m. (Matt. 27:45). The relevance of this is as follows: In the Old Testament, darkness is usually seen as a harbinger of impending judgment (see Amos 5:18; 8:9). Remember that the ninth plague of the exodus event was a time of three days of darkness over the country of Egypt—a darkness that could be felt (Ex. 10:21-22). The death of the firstborn sons followed the scourge of darkness (Ex.

  • Death was preceded by darkness.
  • What is the significance?
  • As a manifestation of divine judgment, darkness emphasizes the substitutionary aspect of Christ’s death.
  • 3:13; 2 Cor.
  • 2:24).

The Dead Raised

What happened:Jesus was nailed to the crucifixion around 9 a.m. (Mark 15:25), and then “from noon until three o’clock in the afternoon, darkness fell over the entire nation” (Matt. 27:45). The importance is as follows: In the Old Testament, darkness is commonly seen as a symbol of judgment (see Amos 5:18; 8:9). Remember that the ninth plague of the exodus event was a three-day period of darkness over the country of Egypt, a darkness that could be felt (Ex. 10:21-22). Following the scourge of darkness, the firstborn sons were killed (Ex.

Death was preceded by a period of obscurity.

What’s the importance of this?

The presence of darkness as a manifestation of divine judgment draws attention to the substitutionary aspect of Christ’s death.

3:13; 2 Cor.

2:24).

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