What Is The Third Temptation Of Jesus

Day 4 The third temptation.

Week 1 of the Gospel of Luke: Battle-ready | Series: The Gospel of Luke: Settled in Spirit Luke 4:9-13 (KJV) When He arrived in Jerusalem, the devil led Him up to the Temple’s highest point where he told Him, ‘If you are the Son of God, jump off!'” Because the Scriptures state that “He will command his angels to safeguard and defend you.” Also, they’ll hold you up with their hands so that you don’t even have your foot harmed when you step on a stone.’ ‘The Scriptures also declare that you must not put the LORD your God to the test,’ Jesus said.

When the devil had done enticing Jesus, he withdrew and waited for another opportunity to come along.” Discover1.

What does this tell you about his knowledge of the Bible, in your opinion?

How does Jesus continue to fight against the devil’s falsehoods and deception?

  • Is Jesus now free of his assailants’ attacks?
  • Invoke God’s blessings on your ability to gain knowledge and insight in the future.
  • When we oppose the devil, according to James 4:7, he will fly from us, just as he did with Jesus, and we should take comfort in this promise.
  • Jesus was physically weakened, but his spiritual strength was unwavering in the desert.
  • Pray for your family to be spiritually strong when confronted with temptation, and ask the Spirit to make you more aware of when your family is experiencing difficulties with temptation.

The 3 Temptations of Jesus

| Week 1: Battle-ready | Series: The Gospel of Luke | Week 2: Settled in Spirit Luke 4:9-13 is a passage of Scripture. When He arrived in Jerusalem, the devil led Him up to the Temple’s highest point when he said, ‘If you are the Son of God, jump off!'” ‘He will command his angels to safeguard and defend you,’ according to the Scriptures. You can even walk on a stone without hurting your foot because they will hold you up with their hands.’ ‘The Scriptures also state that you must not put the LORD your God to the test,’ Jesus said.

  • Which of the following statements do you think he is making regarding his Biblical knowledge?
  • Can you tell me how Jesus is continuing to fight back against the falsehoods of the devil?
  • Does this mean that Jesus is no longer under attack?
  • Continually pray to God for wisdom and insight to grow in you.
  • When we oppose the devil, according to James 4:7, he will fly from us, just as he did with Jesus, and we should take heart in this promise.
  • Jesus was physically weakened, yet his spiritual strength was unwavering during his time in the desert.

Invoking the power of the Holy Spirit Families with children at home should read this article. As you pray for your family, ask the Spirit to make you more aware of when your family is suffering with temptation so that you can intervene and help them overcome it.

The Third Temptation Of Jesus In Matthew

In Matthew 4, Satan tries to seduce Jesus three different times. Jesus is tempted three times, but each time he remains firm in his mission and refuses to yield to the temptations. The third time Satan tries, he is defeated and gives up for the time being. Jesus is taken by Satan to the top of a very high mountain for his third temptation, as described in Matthew 4. Although it is unknown exactly where this occurred, the possibility that it occurred in or around Israel is strong, given that this was the place where Jesus’ bodily life had the most direct influence.

  1. The devil, in whatever location he may have been, presents to Jesus a panoramic view of all the kingdoms of this world, complete with their splendor.
  2. Is this, however, an offer that Satan could possibly make?
  3. God is in command, and he is the exclusive owner of everything.
  4. Satan, on the other hand, has temporarily seized God’s power and has taken possession of the earth to a certain extent.
  5. –John 12:31 (NIV) I will not speak with you for much longer, since the king of the universe is on his way, and he has nothing in Me.

–John 16:11.in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit who is now working in the sons of disobedience.–Ephesians 2:2.in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit who is now working in the sons of disobedience.

Apparently, Satan is determined to obtain the devotion that only God deserves and will go to any lengths to attain this goal.

The fact, on the other hand, is that he genuinely has nothing to contribute.

As a result, Jesus raises his voice once again.

For this occasion, Jesus cites Deuteronomy 6:13, which states, “You shall fear only the Lord your God; and you shall adore Him and swear by His name.” With this reply, Jesus successfully repels the third temptation and demonstrates the idea he would later teach in Matthew 6:24: “No one can serve two masters.” Jesus’ ultimate objective is to serve only God and to complete the task of salvation to which he has been assigned.

  • At this point, Matthew informs us that Satan had left Jesus’ company.
  • Satan had departed, but he would return many times in the future.
  • The lesson for us is straightforward.
  • Our temptations are often divided into three categories: our hungers and cravings for food and other things; our confidence in God’s plan for our life; and our desire for power and status in the world.
  • Therefore, it is a valuable activity to continuously review our life for weak points, both on our own and with the assistance of others to keep an eye out for potential problems.

In all of these areas, Jesus was unwavering. Moreover, he accomplished this in every circumstance by sticking to God’s Word. Moreover, he proved to be correct what James would later write: “Resist the devil, and he will flee from you.” The Word of God served as Jesus’ anchor. What’s your favorite?

The Third Temptation of Jesus — Holy Family School of Faith

Jesus is tempted by Satan three times in Matthew 4, the Bible says. As a result of his refusal to yield to temptation on three separate occasions, Jesus remains strong in his purpose. Satan finally concedes after his third failed effort to seduce Eve. Satan sends Jesus to the top of a very tall mountain for the third temptation described by Matthew. It is uncertain exactly where this occurred, although it is most likely that it occurred in or around Israel, given that this was the place where Jesus’ bodily existence had the greatest immediate influence.

  1. It doesn’t matter where it happened, the devil brings a panorama of all the kingdoms of this world, complete with their splendor, to Jesus’ attention.
  2. Is this, however, an offer that Satan could even consider making?
  3. Ultimately, God is in command and has all things.
  4. While Satan has temporarily taken God’s power, he has also gained control of the earth to a certain extent.
  5. In John 12:31, the Bible says, The king of the world is coming, and he has nothing in Me, therefore I will not talk with you any more.
  6. This “ownership” is his, and he offers it to Jesus in exchange for Jesus’ devotion.
  7. We should take note that this is the one temptation in which Satan provides Jesus something of substance, the only temptation in which he displays any kindness, however flimsy his offering appears to be.
  8. He’s making an attempt at giving something to Jesus, but it’s something that Jesus already has the right to possess.

And, once again, He rebukes his enemy by quoting from the Scriptures: In this instance, Jesus quotes Deuteronomy 6:13, which states, “You shall fear only the Lord your God, and you shall worship Him and swear by His name.” With this reply, Jesus successfully repels the third temptation and demonstrates the idea he would later teach in Matthew 6:24: “No one can serve two masters.”.

  1. Matthew informs us that Satan had abandoned Jesus at this moment.
  2. The devil had departed, but he would return many times throughout the course of time.
  3. The lesson is straightforward for us to take away from this.
  4. In general, our temptations fall into one of three categories: our hunger and desires for food and other things; our faith in God’s plan for our life; and our desire for power and place in society.
  5. Therefore, it is a valuable activity to regularly review our life for weak points, both on our own and with the assistance of others to keep an eye out for potential problems.

Moreover, he accomplished this in every circumstance by sticking to God’s Word. Moreover, he showed to be correct what James would later write: “Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. The Word of God served as Jesus’ compass. What’s yours, and how did you come up with that?

two

When it comes to the growth of our soul, what is the most crucial item we require? Prayer! Let’s be clear about something. Jesus is the King of the Kingdom of God. If we desire to enter the Kingdom of God, we must first establish a personal relationship with Him. Prayer is an expression of fellowship with Jesus. And what does it take to be a friend? Spending time together, talking, listening, and simply being together is essential. That is the practice of everyday meditation. In any case, meditation is about making time to engage in a conversation with Jesus, speaking to him from the heart and listening to him via the reading or hearing of the Word of God.

It follows that if you want the Kingdom of God, you must first seek Jesus, and then you must spend time in prayer with Jesus.

three

It is essential that we complete our meditation sessions with a decision in order for our soul to evolve. Why? Because our soul develops in perfection as a result of developing in virtue. When we do good deeds until they become second nature, we are said to be growing in virtue. As a result, our meditation should prompt us to consider the positive activities that we need to put into practice. Then we make the decision to put that thinking or action into practice today. By concluding each day’s meditation with the selection of one simple concrete positive idea or deed to put into reality, you will see an increase in the perfection of your soul and the expansion of the kingdom of God.

It doesn’t matter how many workout videos you watch on YouTube; if you don’t get any exercise, you’ll be overweight and out of shape no matter how many films you view.

four

Every meditation session must end with a resolution in order for our soul to progress. Why? As a result of increasing our virtue, our soul progresses in excellence. It is only through repetition of good deeds that we can become more virtuous. So our meditation should compel us to consider the positive actions that we should put into action. Afterwards, we decide whether or not to put that thought or action into practice today. If you conclude each day’s meditation by choosing a simple concrete good thought or action to put into action, you will see an increase in the excellence of your soul and the kingdom of God as a result of your practice.

It doesn’t matter how many exercise videos you watch on YouTube; if you don’t get any exercise, you’ll remain overweight and out of shape no matter how much you watch.

five

Satan will not offer you all of the kingdoms of the earth; instead, he will only offer you the one that you desire the most. It is a kingdom of achievements, a kingdom of joy, a kingdom of children, a kingdom of health. Here’s the question: Which kingdom are you pursuing that is preventing you from spending more time in relationship with Jesus in your prayer life?

I am aware that you desire the Kingdom of God. What would you have to do in your life in order to be able to set a timer and spend 30 minutes each day with God without being distracted by anything else? This rosary contains a total of 20 beads. So you’ve got a terrific start on things.

The Third Temptation of Christ; Matthew 4:8 (Selfishness)

Again, the devil brought him to the top of a very high mountain, where he was shown all of the kingdoms of the earth and their splendor. 9 All of this, he was told, would be his if he would only bow his head and worship him.†A miraculous event occurred when the devil took Jesus and transported him to several locations, allowing Jesus to witness the large number of people. When Satan displays before Jesus large groups of people, what exactly is he aiming to achieve with this display? What is the temptation for Christ to succumb to?

  1. As a result, he now recognizes the â€multitudes.†(Matthew 28:17 ff.) This is where we first see the short cut (avoidance of the cross), and this is where we first see the genuine plan (avoidance of the cross) at the conclusion of the book (the horror of the cross).
  2. â€The world has believed the Father of lies, and itsâ€TM own glory would have consisted in worshipping false gods and engaging in all kind of immoral and evil activities.
  3. Jesus was aware of everything and yet he chose to die for it all.
  4. â€Jesus looked around and saw a world in desperate need of a Savior.
  5. All of God’s creation yearned for a Savior, a Redeemer, and He provided it.
  6. It was inevitable that something or someone would die, and that His blood would be spilt from the beginning.
  7. He got a sense of what the Father’s anger would be like since he will personally experience it one day in the future.
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10  Then Jesus told him to go, saying, “Be gone, Satan!” Because it is written, “You shall worship the Lord your God, and him alone shall you serve.” ’” Satan is well aware that his time is short and that the Father’s wrath is on the horizon; as a result, because Satan despises the Father, his aim is to take the multitudes (the ones whom the Father longs for) with him.

  1. He would only be able to save the world and himself from pain for a little period of time.
  2. As a result, the world would still be in desperate need of a Savior, and because the one One who might have redeemed them had sinned in selfishness, a holy God would remain divided from a sinful creation.
  3. There would have been no benefit other than time.
  4. If Jesus had worshipped Satan and avoided the cross, it would have spelled the end of humanity as we know it.
  5. For those who are considering taking the spiritual short route, let me lead them toward Jesus, who will show them why this is true.
  6. If you have been unsuccessful in resisting this temptation, I am right there with you.
  7. But let us travel this next stretch of road together with the understanding that it isn’t going to work.

Thank you, Jesus, for your selflessness and dependability. 1 John 5:19; Jn. 12:31; 1 Jn. 5:19. 3:20 (Genesis 3:20) Romans 2:5, 5:9, and other passages

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Again, the devil transported him to a very high mountain where he was shown all of the kingdoms of the earth and their splendor. 9 All of this, he was told, would be his if he would only kneel down and worship him. A miraculous event occurred when the devil took Jesus and transported him to several locations, allowing Jesus to witness the large number of people.†When Satan displays to Jesus large groups of people, what exactly is he trying to achieve with them? What exactly is Christ’s temptation?

  • Consequently, he now recognizes the â€hundreds†(Matthew 28:17 ff.) This is where we first see the short cut (avoidance of the cross) in the book, and this is where we see the genuine plan at the conclusion (the horror of the cross).
  • Itsâ€TM own glory would have been worshipping false gods, as well as all kind of wicked and bad acts, since the world had believed the Father of lies.†Was it really worth it for Him to die a harsh and awful death on a cross for all of these bad and wicked individuals?
  • The Bible says in Romans 5:8 that God demonstrates his love for us by sending Jesus Christ to die for us while we were still sinners.
  • Satan meant for Christ to be tempted by showing Him the masses (in sinful disobedience), but this only serves to reaffirm the job that the Father has assigned to Him — to save the entire world from its sin.
  • Redemption wouldn’t come cheap, though.
  • Satan is well aware that Jesus must die under the wrath of the Father in order to rescue the world.
  • One of Jesus’ temptations is self-centeredness; he is tempted to save himself the agony of the crucifixion and to send everyone else to hell in the process.

After all, it is said, â€â€ You shall worship the Lord your God, and him alone shall you serve.â€TM ’” Due to Satan’s understanding that his time is short and that the Father’s wrath is approaching, and since Satan despises the Father, his aim is to take the masses (those whom the Father longs for) with him to the lake of fire.

  • Only for a few while would he be able to free the world and himself from their suffering.
  • In this scenario, the world would still be in need of salvation — and since the one One who might have redeemed them had sinned in selfishness, a holy God would still be separated from a sinful world.
  • There would have been no benefit other than the passage of time.
  • If Jesus had worshipped Satan and avoided the cross, it would have spelled the end of humanity as we know it today.
  • For those who are considering taking the spiritual short way, let me lead them toward Jesus, who will demonstrate why this is so.
  • You have my full support if you have succumbed to this temptation.
  • But let us travel this next stretch of road together with the understanding that it isn’t going to be successful.

”11 The devil then left him, and lo and behold, angels appeared and began ministering to him on his behalf. Jesus, thank you for your sacrifice and dedication. 1 John 5:19; Jn. 12:31. Genesis 3:20 is a verse that states that The Bible says in Romans 2:5, 5, and 9 that

The Temptation of Christ

In this video, Dr Rachel Moss from Trinity College Dublin examines the Book of Kells’ depiction of Jesus Christ’s temptation. It is recorded in three of the gospels that after Jesus was baptized, he walked into the wilderness and fasted for 40 days and 40 nights. During this time period, Satan came to Jesus and attempted to entice him on three separate occasions. On fol. 202v, a scenario depicting what is often referred to be Jesus’ third temptation is represented. It appears to be an illustration for the text from the Gospel of Luke 4:9-12:9 that follows a few pages later (fol.

“If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down from here,” the devil told him as he was placed on the pinnacle of the temple, saying, “For it is written, ‘He will command his angels concerning you, to protect you,’ and ‘On their hands they will bear you up, so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.’ 12 As a response, Jesus stated, “It is written, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.'” FIGURE 1.Folio 202v, depicting Christ’s temptation.

The Trinity College Board of Trustees of the University of Dublin.

  • Researcher Dr Rachel Moss of Trinity College Dublin examines the story of Jesus Christ being tempted in the Book of Kells. Several gospels claim that after being baptized, Jesus walked into the desert and fasted for 40 days and 40 nights, as recorded in three of them. The devil appeared to Jesus three times during this time period and attempted to entice him on three separate occasions. On fol. 202v, a picture depicting what is commonly referred to be Jesus’ third temptation is seen. A few pages later (fol. 204r), it appears to be an illustration for the text from the Gospel of Luke 4:9-12:9 that follows. “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down from here,” the devil told him as he was placed on the pinnacle of the temple, saying, “For it is written, ‘He will command his angels concerning you, to protect you,’ and ‘On their hands they will bear you up, so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.'” 12 “It has been said, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test,'” Jesus responded. Christ’s temptation is depicted in Figure 1 of Folio 202v. Trinity College, University of Dublin’s Board of Trustees. I find this to be an unusual and perplexing portrayal of the event.

Jesus Christ is seen looming huge both on top of and behind a lavishly painted structure, which is assumed to be a representation of the Old Testament Temple of Solomon, in this painting (1 Kings 6.6). The artist who created the illustrations for the Book of Kells opted to depict this in the form of an early Irish timber church, which is distinguished by its modest rectangular shape and steep pitched roof. This building’s decorating is done in the same colors as were used to decorate another Old Testament structure, Moses’ Tabernacle, which was ornamented with textile hangings in the same colors as this one (Exodus 25-27).

  • 3: The Temple MacDara in Co.
  • The Trinity College Board of Trustees of the University of Dublin.
  • His significance in relation to Jesus Christ is plainly demonstrated by his lesser stature and the fact that he is depicted below the Christ image on the shield.
  • the Trinity College Board of Directors at the University of Dublin in Fig.
  • The Devil The Board of Trinity College, University of Dublin, in a close-up photograph revealing the stab marks (Fig.
  • While some of the characteristics listed above appear to correspond to the account told in the Bible, some characteristics do not.
  • Usually understood as Christ the Judge or Christ the Triumphant, this position may be found on some somewhat later high crosses, as well as on some earlier ones.

The Trinity College Board of Trustees of the University of Dublin.

The structure is surrounded by throngs of people.

The artist has gone to great lengths to make the faces seem different from one another.

Figures 8 and 9 show the faces of people in the throng (fol.

The Trinity College Board of Trustees of the University of Dublin.

Others disagree.

In this case, the person at the entryway might symbolize a typical metaphor of that period – the concept of a saint or holy figure as a column,’ or support, for the Church, while the people below are the living stones,’ or members of the congregation.

The 3 Temptations of Jesus

An elaborately painted structure, assumed to symbolize the Old Testament Temple of Solomon, is seen with Jesus Christ towering enormous both on top and behind it (1 Kings 6.6). The artist who created the illustrations for the Book of Kells opted to depict this in the form of an early Irish timber church, which is distinguished by its modest rectangular shape and steeply pitching roof. This building’s decorating is done in the same colors as were used to decorate another Old Testament structure, Moses’ Tabernacle, which was ornamented with textile hangings in the same colors as the one in this building (Exodus 25-27).

  • 2: A close-up of the Temple Board of Trinity College, University of Dublin, Ireland.
  • Galway displays the peculiar shape of ancient Irish churches.
  • Figure of the Devil in Western art is a fairly early portrayal of the shape with which we are now acquainted – inky black (albeit initially with richer reds and browns), with cloven feet and a twisted tongue (although this was not always the case).
  • In any case, either the artist or an early reader sought to emphasize the point, and microscopic examination has revealed that the figure was stabbed numerous times.
  • 4.
  • 5) While some of the characteristics listed above appear to correspond to the biblical tale, others do not.
  • A much later high cross depicts Christ in this position, which is commonly regarded as Christ the Judge or Christ the Triumphant.
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6).

FIGURE 7: Figure of Jesus Christ as Judge/Triumphant Christ on the tenth-century high cross at Termonfechin, County Louth, Ireland Trinity College, University of Dublin’s Board of Trustees.

According to the Bible, Christ was alone during the temptations, which is in direct conflict with this view.

If you think about it, this may be a reference to the second temptation, during which Jesus Christ was carried to a high location and shown every country in the world, with the promise that they would all be his if he worshiped the devil (Luke 4:5-8).

(fol.

Trinity College, University of Dublin’s Board of Trustees.

They contend that the Temple is truly the body of the Church, with Jesus Christ as its head, based on evidence from contemporary biblical commentators.

While the person at the entryway may symbolize a prevalent metaphor of the period – the concept of a saint or holy figure as a ‘column’, or support, of the Church, while the people underneath him or her represent its “living stones,”

  • Jesus Christ is seen towering big both on top of and behind a lavishly painted structure, which is assumed to be a representation of the Old Testament’s Temple of Solomon (1 Kings 6.6). The artist who created the Book of Kells opted to depict this in the form of an early Irish timber church, which is distinguished by its modest rectangular shape and steeply pitched roof. When it was painted in these colors, it was reminiscent of another Old Testament structure, Moses’ Tabernacle, which was also decked with textile hangings in similar colors (Exodus 25-27). Fig. 2: The Temple of Trinity College, University of Dublin, as seen in detail. Fig. 3: The Temple MacDara in Co. Galway, which demonstrates the peculiar shape of early Irish church architecture. The Trinity College, University of Dublin, Board of Trustees In the context of Western art, the figure of the Devil is a very early portrayal of the shape with which we are now acquainted – inky black (albeit initially with more reds and browns), with cloven feet, and a twisted tongue. His significance in relation to Jesus Christ is plainly demonstrated by his modest stature and the fact that he is depicted underneath the Christ image on the altar. Regardless, either the artist or an early reader sought to emphasize the message, and microscopic study has revealed that the figure was stabbed many times. Figure 4: The Board of Trustees of Trinity College, University of Dublin. The Board of Trinity College, University of Dublin, in a close-up shot displaying the stab marks. While the characteristics listed above appear to correspond to the account told in the Bible, some characteristics do not. A haloed person standing at the Temple’s entryway is clutching two crossed rods. Usually understood as Christ the Judge or Christ the Triumphant, this position may be found on some slightly later high crosses, as can be seen here. Figure in the Temple’s entryway (Fig. 6) The Trinity College, University of Dublin, Board of Trustees Figure of Jesus Christ as Judge/Triumphant Christ on the tenth-century high cross at Termonfechin, County Louth. The Trinity College, University of Dublin, Board of Trustees The structure is surrounded by hordes of people. This is in direct conflict with the Bible, which describes Christ’s solitude during the temptations. The artist has gone to great lengths to make each of the faces seem unique. Perhaps this is an allusion to the second temptation, during which Jesus Christ was taken to a high location and shown all of the kingdoms of the earth, with the promise that they would be his if he worshipped the Devil (Luke 4:5-8). Figures 8 and 9 depict individuals in a throng (fol. 202v). The Trinity College, University of Dublin, Board of Trustees Some academics believe that the depiction was intended to convey a broader symbolic message in addition to recalling the temptation(s). They argue that the Temple is truly the body of the Church, with Jesus Christ as its head, based on evidence from current biblical commentators. The figure at the entryway may symbolize a prevalent metaphor of the period — the concept of a saint or holy figure as a ‘column’ or support of the Church, while the people below are the ‘living stones’ of the Church.
  • Today’s five lessons are as follows: (1) No one is immune to the effects of temptation. (2) Temptation and sin are not the same thing. (3) When faced with temptation, respond with God’s word. (4) Resist the devil’s schemes in the strength of the Holy Spirit. (5) Seek God’s will in whatever you do.

Discussion:

  1. What are your initial thoughts on this subject? What was it that stood out to you
  2. Give some examples of the attitude “do what seems right” in today’s environment that you have observed. Why is it such a strong temptation for the majority of people? What should we do if we are faced with a temptation? Take a look at Matthew 4:3-4. Because Jesus was fasting, the temptation to eat was quite present at the time. What were the circumstances that placed you in a position to be tempted by Satan in the past? Take a look at Matthew 4:5-7. What situations have you been in where you have been tempted to doubt God’s love for you? Might you provide me any scripture verses that can assist you in overcoming that lie? Take a look at Matthew 4:8-10. What are some of the ways in which we are inclined to exert control over our own lives? Make a list of everything. What is it about this mentality that is so damaging for us
  3. Take a look at James 1:14-15. Are you of the opinion that temptation is not a sin? If something is sinful, when does it become sinful? James 4:7-10 should be read. Discuss some of the efforts you may take to keep temptation at bay in your life
  4. Is there something you need to do as a result of today’s discussion?

The three great temptations of the end times

Do you have any first thoughts on this subject? How did you notice something? Give some examples of the attitude “do what seems right” in today’s environment that you have encountered. The most common reason for this is because it is a strong temptation for most individuals. When faced with temptation, what should we do? Examine the verses 3 and 4 of Matthew 4. Being tempted by food was a serious possibility for Jesus during the time of his fast. How did Satan entice you in the past; what were the circumstances that led to your temptation?

  • What circumstances have you faced when you were tempted to doubt God’s affection for you?
  • Examine Matthew 4:8–10 for further information.
  • Organize your thoughts into a list of things.
  • Accepting that temptation is not a sin, do you think that it should not be avoided?
  • Look at James 4:7-10 for some inspiration.
  • Considering today’s theme, is there anything you need to do?

We all face temptations (Matthew 4:1-2)

“Then Jesus was taken up by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil,” the New King James Version (NKJV) translates verse 1 as. The Bible says in James 1:13, “Let no one say to himself or herself when he or she is tempted, ‘I am being tempted by God,’ for God cannot be tempted by evil, nor does He Himself tempt anyone.” The dynamic New Life Version makes sense in light of God’s own self-assertion: “Jesus was led by the Holy Spirit to a wilderness,” says the Bible. He was tempted by the devil at that place.” Furthermore, the temptations were genuine for Jesus.

2), and Satan believed he had the upper hand because of this.

The three big temptations

1. The need for self-preservation (Matthew 4:3,4) Satan tempted Jesus by quoting from the Bible (see Deuteronomy 8:1-3). This temptation is reminiscent of the first treachery in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 3:1-7). The human species has long struggled with its ability to maintain a healthy appetite. And it was genuine for Jesus as well, especially after 40 days of prayer and fasting in the wilderness. Satan enticed Jesus to sacrifice His own life in order to save others. It’s as if he’s saying, “Save Yourself,” as if all you have to do is turn those stones into bread and you’ll be OK.

  • He would overcome his desires and desire for physical nourishment by submitting himself to God in complete surrender and reliance on Him.
  • Controlling our appetites and maintaining a healthy lifestyle allow us to live a full and abundant life.
  • It is not our efforts or living a flawless life that determine whether or not we will live in eternity.
  • We must continuously remind ourselves that our everlasting existence is entirely contingent on our ongoing trust on “every word that God speaks” (Hebrews 4:12).
  • 2.
  • Demonstrate Your total faith in God by throwing yourself off the temple’s peak.
  • To persuade Jesus to glorify Himself, demonstrate arrogant confidence, and place his reliance in God’s gracious protection, while also being irresponsible or jeopardizing himself, the temptation was designed to do just that.

Their assumption is that, even when they put themselves or others in danger, God will still be watching over and protecting them.

Being a member of the remnant Church does not guarantee that we will be immune to the miseries of life, disease, or death if we are heedless in our spiritual practices.

Presumption will not be displayed by those who sincerely love God, but they will place their complete trust in the Word of God (see Deuteronomy 6:16).

The ability to provide for one’s own needs (Matthew 4:8-10) The third temptation is a demonstration of the devil’s hubris that goes above and beyond.

He had seized control of the globe when Adam and Eve fell into sin, and he was presenting Jesus with a convenient means of completing the plan of redemption on this planet.

Perhaps one of the most difficult temptations of the end times is the urge to be self-sufficient or to put our faith in others and do things our own.

How do we decide on whom we are completely devoted to and to whom or which organization we pledge our allegiance?

Despite this, many of us raise our voices in opposition, referring to the remaining people as “Babylon” or actively encouraging others to leave her.

All of this causes God’s heart to ache.

In addition, it demonstrates misdirected devotion and allegiance, as well as unfaithfulness to God, who is in control of the remnant Church.

Rival organizations that betray the remaining members of the population will get proper restitution.

At the end of the day, God will have the last word. It is His assurance to us that the remnant people, those who stay true to Him, will triumph and be freed from the tribulations of the latter times (Daniel 12:1-3).

What is in this story for me?

  • As members of the human family, none of us are immune to the temptations that life throws at us. The fact that we succumb to temptations is not a sin in and of itself
  • Rather, it is a violation of God’s trust
  • God intends that we grow healthy in all aspects of our Christian life. However, our adherence to His precepts does not entitle us to eternal life. We must place our whole reliance in God’s Word as the Way, the Truth, and the Life, as well as in the redemption He provides in Jesus Christ. We must fight the temptation of self-preservation
  • The temptation of self-elevation is a major temptation for Adventists in this day and age. Being filled with spiritual pride and arrogance, knowing that we are the remnant people, does not give us permission to be careless with our beliefs. We must avoid falling into the trap of “becoming so spiritually oriented that we are no longer of practical value.” God requires that our trust be firmly established in the teachings of His Word
  • Self-sufficiency is a deceit of the end times. In open rebellion and treason against God, those who call for independence from the remnant Church—those who take tithes and offerings for personal use in opposition to God’s clear instructions for the remnant people—are calling for open rebellion and treason against God
  • God is inviting us to remain loyal to Him in recognition of who He is: the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end (Revelation 1:8). A remnant people has been set up by God, and He will see them through to the end of the age. Make your brains stronger with the words “It is written,” and you will be able to fight the deceptions of the devil.
See also:  Where Did Mary And Joseph Live Before Jesus Was Born

Ilam Church in New Zealand is led by Dr Limoni Manu O’Uiha, who is also its pastor.

What does the Order of the Three Temptations of Jesus Mean?

Father Fortea, can you tell me the sequence in which Jesus was tempted in the desert throughout his ministry? Is there any importance to the order in which these items were delivered? In the synoptic gospels, we read about Jesus’ temptation by the devil in the wilderness, just before the beginning of His public ministry (see Mt 4:1-11; Mk 1:9-15; Lk 4:1-13). Bread, power, and worldly recognition were among the temptations that awaited him. After all, why would the devil tempt Jesus to worship him when he was unable to even persuade Him to break His fast to begin with?

  • Given that Jesus had already rejected the glory of the entire world, why does the devil’s final temptation appear to be so insignificant?
  • He would first tempt Jesus with idolatry and then tempt him with something that is not even a venial sin, such as breaking a voluntary fast, in order to gain his obedience.
  • According to a more nuanced reasoning, the devil’s attacks are carried out in a series of steps.
  • It’s for this reason that these three temptations have a strong symbolic meaning.
  • Defeating this type of temptation (which includes all of the bodily appetites) means the devil will have no reason to tempt the soul in this manner in the future because the soul has fortified itself against it.
  • The soul is aware of the splendor and allure of the world that it has left behind it.
  • During this time, the soul is tempted by the world in which it currently lives but no longer appreciates.

This is a feeling of satisfaction with the gifts that one has received from God.

The following specific examples of deception were employed by the devil against Jesus: -For starters, the devil did not tempt Jesus with sin, but rather with imperfection.

In this instance, it’s as if the devil is saying, “Make a sign of acknowledgment toward me, proud as I am, and as a reward, I will place myself at your side.” All I ask in return is that you acknowledge my existence, and I will assist you in your efforts to save souls.

What part of yourself is not capable of lowering yourself just a little bit further for the eternal good of souls?” This second temptation is densely packed with profound spiritual significance.

Couldn’t the Righteous One, who had already made so many sacrifices for the sake of souls, perhaps make one more?

Its purpose was to detract from the truth that God is the one who exalts His followers at the appropriate moment.

“Why remain in the shadows when so much good may be accomplished by bursting into the light in a wonderful and dramatic way?” says the author.

Note from the editor: Interview with an Exorcist – An Insider’s Look at the Devil, Demonic Possession, and the Path to Deliverance is an excellent resource for those interested in learning more about spiritual warfare and demonology.

The following artwork was created to accompany this essay about Jesus’ three temptations: In the painting Tentaciones de Cristo (Crucifixion Tentaciones de Cristo), by Sandro Botticelli, 1481-2, the author’s life plus 100 years or less is indicated; in the photograph Padre José Antonio Fortea 2017, taken by Elgatoconbotaselgatoconbotas, 5 May 2017, his own work is indicated; both images are from Wikimedia Commons.

The cover of “Interview with an Exorcist” was used with permission, and all rights remain with the author.

The Temptations of Christ

While battling the challenges of mortality, there may be moments when we will become exhausted, weaker, and vulnerable to the temptations that seem to be thrown in our path. The narrative of the Savior’s life has a valuable lesson for us today. Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert shortly after his baptism, where he spent the rest of his life. He stayed there for forty days and nights, preparing himself for the formal ministry that would begin shortly after. The largest mission that had ever been undertaken on this planet lay ahead of him, and he need heavenly assistance to do it.

When Jesus had finished his forty-day fast and had spent time in prayer with God, he was left in this hungry and physically weakened state to be tempted by the devil.

At such times, we are most exposed to the temptations of the devil, since we are emotionally and physically exhausted, vulnerable to his ideas, and least equipped to reject them.

Satan’s initial temptation was to persuade Jesus to give in to his hunger, which was the most fundamental bodily and biological need of all.

When he asked if he was the Son of God, he was told to “order that these stones be transformed into bread.” (See Matthew 4:3.) After weeks of thought and prayer, the Savior had been nourished by the elevation of spirit that inevitably accompanied such devotion to God and contact with the skies.

Satan was not simply attempting to persuade Jesus to eat something.

Satan’s temptation was to have him consume in a spectacular manner, taking use of his almighty abilities for his own selfish gain.

When confronted by the tempter, Jesus’ response was unequivocal: “It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of God’s mouth.” (See Matthew 4:4) After that, there was a second temptation.

In the Holy City, he led Jesus up to the temple’s pinnacle, where he looked down on the expansive courts below and the crowds below, and quoted scripture: “If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down: for it is written, He shall give his angels charge concerning thee: and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone.” (See also Matthew 4:6 and Psalm 91:11–12.) Another temptation of the human part of mortal nature lay beneath the surface of Satan’s appeal: the urge to do some brilliant performance, some astonishing achievement that would draw large throngs of startled and interested viewers.

  • Jumping from the dizzying heights of the temple turret and landing in the courtyard unharmed would surely qualify as a remarkable achievement.
  • It would be a sign and a wonder, and the news of it would spread like wildfire over all of Judaea, leading many to assume that the Messiah had truly arrived on the scene.
  • It goes without saying that Jesus responded to scripture for scripture by saying, “Again, it is written, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord your God.” (See also Matthew 4:7 and Deut.
  • During his third temptation, the devil abandons all hints of subtlety and scripture, as well as all deception and disguise.
  • From the top of a mountain, he revealed to Jesus all of the kingdoms of the earth, as well as their splendor—the towns, the fields, the sheep, the herds, and everything else that nature had to give.
  • This was despite the fact that Jesus had led a simple village carpenter’s life.
  • In other words, it is the concept that everyone has a price, that material things are ultimately what important, and that you can purchase everything in this world for money in the end.

Accepting the gifts of time or eternity on Satan’s terms is the surest way to forfeit those rewards.

‘Get thee hence, Satan,’ Jesus said, commanding with authority and dignity: “It is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only, and him only shalt thou serve.” (See Matthew 4:10) Satan, distraught and dejected, turned and walked away from the scene.

(See Matthew 4:11.) Relief and miracles are experienced by us, just as they were by Jesus, after we have been tested and tempted by our faith in him.

Then, if you are the Son of God, command that these stones be turned into bread.

It was not essential for Jesus to satisfy the curiosity of men, especially unholy men, at that time or any time in the future.

Will we be able to hold our ground?

Even though Satan believes he has lost Jesus, he does not feel he has lost us as well.

As we fight this struggle, we should draw courage from the truth that Christ was triumphant not as a god, but as a human being.

If there had been no potential of his succumbing to Satan’s temptation, there would have been no true test, and no genuine triumph as a consequence.

It was he who had come to protect and preserve the agency of the individual human.

As the apostle Paul wrote, “Though he were a Son, yet learnt he obedience by the things which he suffered” (Heb.

4:15); and he “was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin” (Heb.

(Heb.

In other words, he was pure and blameless not because he had to be, but rather because it was his obvious and deliberate desire to be so.

We live in a world of temptation—temptation that appears to be more genuine and oppressively prevalent than at any time since the days of Noah and his family.

Every member of this congregation should examine his or her own life and ask himself or herself, “Am I living in such a way that I am remaining unspotted from the ills of the world?” “Classify them, and you will find that nearly every given temptation that makes you and me spotted, ever so little maybe, comes to us as (1) a temptation of the appetite; (2) a yielding to the pride and vanity of those alienated from the things of God; or (3) a gratifying of the passion, or a desire for the ribbing of the ribbing of the ribbing of the ribbing.” Afterwards, he stated, “Now, when do temptations strike?

For one thing, they come to us in our social gatherings, they come to us at our weddings, they come to us in our politics, they come to us in our business relations, on the farm, in the mercantile establishment, in our dealings in all the affairs of life, we find these insidious influences at work, and it is at this point that the defense of truth should exert itself.” (David O.

Most assuredly, The Lord would be delighted with His Saints if they were to stand before the world as a beacon of light that could not be concealed because they are willing to live according to the gospel principles and to observe all of the commandments of the Lord.

While singing, we will recite the words of the Psalmist: “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for the Lord is with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.” Tu preparest a feast before me in the midst of my adversaries, anointest my head with oil, and my cup overfloweth with blessing.” “Surely goodness and mercy will follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for all of eternity,” says the prophet.

(See Psalm 23:4–6.) In the name of our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ, I hope that this will be our ultimate destiny. Amen.

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