What Does Jesus Say About The Old Testament

How did Jesus view the Old Testament?

While there are several reasons why the Old Testament is God’s Word, the best evidence comes directly from the Lord Jesus Christ himself (John 3:16). Jesus, as God manifested in human flesh, speaks with final authority. And his evidence in reference to the Old Testament is unequivocal and unequivocal. Jesus thought that the Old Testament was divinely inspired and that it was the infallible Word of God. He was right about that. According to him, “The Scripture cannot be violated” (John 10:35).

His words clearly implied that it would last forever: ‘Until Heaven and earth pass away, not the tiniest letter or stroke shall pass away from the law, until everything is done’ (Matthew 5:18).

“Have you not read what was spoken to you by God?” Jesus asked.

(Matthew 12:3, NIV) There are a plethora of examples that suggest that Jesus was familiar with the Old Testament and its substance.

We find Jesus confirming many of the Old Testament accounts throughout the Gospels, including the destruction of Sodom and the death of Lot’s wife (Luke 17:29–32), the murder of Abel by his brother Cain (Luke 11:51), the calling of Moses (Mark 12:26), and the provision of manna in the wilderness (John 6:31–51).

  • Many people wish to accept Jesus, yet they reject a substantial amount of the Old Testament because it contradicts their beliefs.
  • If someone believes in Jesus Christ, he or she should maintain consistency and think that the Old Testament and its narratives are accurate.
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  • All intellectual property rights are retained.

No, Jesus Did Not Soften the Old Testament-In Fact He Did the Opposite, and Here’s What That Means

While there are several reasons why the Old Testament is God’s Word, the clearest evidence comes directly from the Lord Jesus Christ. With final authority, Jesus, as God manifested in human form, speaks. He also gives a strong and unequivocal witness on the Old Testament. Jesus thought that the Old Testament was divinely inspired and that it was the infallible Word of God. He was right about this. ‘The Scriptures cannot be broken,’ he declared (John 10:35). According to Matthew 15:3, Scripture is referred to as “God’s mandate” and “God’s Word” (Matthew 15:4).

His words also implied that it would last forever: ‘Until Heaven and Earth pass away, not the tiniest letter or stroke shall pass away from the law, until everything is done’ (Matthew 5:18).

Matthew 22:31; ‘Yea, and have you never heard the expression, “Thou has prepared praise for thyself” from the lips of infants and nursing babies?” and ‘Have you not read what David did?’ (Matthew 21:16; quoting Psalm 8:2); and ‘Have you not read what David did?’ (Matthew 21:16; citing Psalm 8:2).

  1. He made frequent allusions to it, and he put his complete faith in it.
  2. The list of examples goes on and on, and the proof is unmistakable: for example, It was Jesus’ understanding of Scripture that it was God’s Word, and his attitude toward it was nothing short of complete confidence.
  3. The only way to tell whether Jesus knew what he was talking about was to ask him.
  4. Reasons Skeptics Should Consider Christianity is adapted from the article Publishing by Tyndale House.

Campus Crusade for Christ owned the copyright to this image in 1981. All intellectual property rights are protected by law. The New American Standard Bible (NASB) is used for all Scripture references unless otherwise specified.

  1. To demonstrate to you that Jesus completely endorsed everything in the Old Testament
  2. To demonstrate to you just how dreadful everything is

So, first and foremost, here is Jesus speaking directly about the teachings of the Old Testament:

The Law Stands

Because really, I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota or a dot will pass the law until everything is done. As a result, anybody who breaks even one of the smallest of these commandments, and teaches others to do similarly, will be regarded as the least in the kingdom of heaven; nevertheless, anyone who follows and teaches them will be regarded as the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.” — Matthew 5:18-19 (New International Version) “It is far simpler for Heaven and Earth to perish than it is for the tiniest portion of the wording of the law to be declared unconstitutional.

(See also Luke 16:17.) “Do not imagine that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets.

In the name of God, I declare to you that until heaven and earth pass away, not the least part of a letter, not the smallest part of a letter, will be removed from the law until all things have taken place.” (Matthew 5:17; Mark 1:17) “Did Moses not give you the law, and yet none of you obeys the law?” says the author.

Don’t just take my word for it; go ahead and look it up for yourself.

The Law That Stands

If someone curses the name of the LORD, they will be put to death; the entire crowd will stone the blasphemer as punishment. The death penalty will be applied to both foreigners and citizens who insult the name of God. Leviticus 24:16 (New Revised Standard Version)

Cheaters Must Die

It is mandatory to execute both the adulterer and the adulteress if a man commits adultery with another man’s wife—in this case, with the wife of his next-door neighbor. (NIV) Torah 20:10 (Leviticus 20:10)

Dishonoring Your Mother or Father is Punishable by Death

No one should be allowed to live if they have dishonored their father or mother. A person who commits such an act is guilty of a capital offense. Leviticus 20:9 (New Living Translation)

People Who Work on Sunday Should be Killed

It is OK for you to labor six days each week on your regular duties, but the seventh day must be a Sabbath day of total rest, a holy day devoted to the LORD. Anyone who is at work on that day shall be put to death immediately. Exodus 35:2 (New Living Translation)

If a Woman is Not a Virgin When She Gets Married, She Has to Die

“If any man takes a wife and enters her home and despises her, accuses her of disgraceful behavior, and casts a bad reputation on her, and claims, ‘I took this lady, and when I arrived to her, I discovered she was not a virgin,’ he is guilty of adultery.” In the event that no evidence of virginity is discovered for the young woman, she will be brought out to the front door of her father’s house, where the men of her city will stone her to death with stones.

(New King James Version) — Deuteronomy 22:13-14, 20-21

There’s Nothing Wrong With Slavery

Your male and female slaves will come from the countries in your immediate vicinity; you will be able to purchase slaves from them. Leviticus 25:44 (New International Version)

Gays Should be Put to Death

If a man sleeps with another man as if he were with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination, and they will both be put to death; their blood will be on their own shoulders. (NRSV) — Leviticus 20:13 (NASB).

Women Should Shut the Hell Up and Do as They’re Told

In order for a woman to learn, she must be quiet and fully submit. Female power or teaching authority over a guy are not allowed in my house; she must remain mute. Timothy 2:11-12 (New International Version) Please keep in mind that these are not recommendations. They’re not something you can do without. As Jesus stated, “Whoever then relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches mankind in this manner will be considered least in the kingdom of heaven.” He also stated that they are not susceptible to any interpretation by the individual.

Atheists, on the other hand, should not be listened to; we are the last people you should trust.

All of the references are available to you.

But, fortunately, there is a simple solution: Consider which of the following is most likely:

  1. You may either believe that God and Jesus are bad (which the Bible’s own language reveals, if you open your copy and look) or. As it turns out, everything is a fabrication, and there is nothing to be concerned about

The solution is number two. God is not a bad person, and neither is his son, Jesus. They were created by man in order to exert control over other men. There are few things that provide more compelling evidence of this than the actual teachings of the Bible. Those of you who are nice and considerate Christian friends don’t require this. You have risen above it all.

Notes

  1. Please accept my thanks for the list of Old Testament instructions provided by Christianity Disproved.com.

What Does the Bible Say About the Old Testament Law?

  • Is there anything we should avoid eating? Is eating pork and shellfish against the law in the Bible? In what sense did Jesus say, “Nor the tiniest letter, not the slightest stroke of a pen, will by any way depart from the Law until everything is accomplished”? What has happened to all of the commandments and ordinances in the Old Testament
  • Do we have to follow the regulations in the Old Testament
  • And what has happened to all of the commandments and ordinances in the New Testament.

Introduction

During the time of the Old Testament, the Law of Moses governed practically every element of human existence. God, on the other hand, forged a new covenant of trust and love with people via the coming of Christ. Criminal and punishment laws, warfare, slavery, food, circumcision, sacrifices, feast days and keeping of the Sabbath, as well as tithe and ceremonial cleanness laws, are not essential for Christians to obey the Old Testament regulations. Even more self-discipline is required by Jesus and His apostles than by the teachings of the Old Testament when it comes to moral and ethical principles and teachings.

The Law of Moses

During the time of the Old Testament, the Law of Moses governed practically every area of life. God, on the other hand, forged a new covenant of trust and love with mankind via the birth of Jesus Christ. Criminal and punishment laws, warfare, slavery, food, circumcision, sacrifices, feast days and observance of the Sabbath, as well as tithe and ceremonial cleanness laws, are not essential for Christians to obey the Old Testament laws. Even more self-discipline is required by Jesus and His apostles than by the teachings of the Old Testament in terms of morality and ethics.

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The Teachings of Jesus

After Moses received the Ten Commandments from God, hundreds of ceremonial laws were created in order to carry out the tremendous moral ideals God had imparted to him. People believed that if they just followed all of the laws, they were leading holy lives. Jesus, on the other hand, was of a different mind. He said that individuals discovered enough “loopholes” to follow all the regulations while continuing to live evil and selfish lifestyles (Matthew 23:23-28). “Do not imagine that Ihave come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them, but to fulfill them,” Jesus said in reference to the Law, which sometimes creates misunderstanding.

Matthew 5:17–18 (New International Version) Christians have struggled to comprehend exactly what Jesus was trying to convey.

However, many of those laws and ceremonies were not observed by Jesus and His disciples, thus this could not be the case at all. When it comes to the time of Jesus, it is commonly pointed out that the word “the Law” might imply a variety of distinct things. 1,2

  • The ceremonial regulations, which include “clean” and “unclean” lists, sacrifices, food restrictions, ritualwashings, and other practices. The civil law is a body of laws that governs social behavior and specifies crimes, penalties, and other requirements. For example, the Ten Commandments are examples of moral and ethical laws. The Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible)
  • The Torah (the first five books of the Bible)
  • The scribal law – the 613 regulations (mitzvot) created by the scribes that were supposed to be followed by everyone
  • The scribal law The whole of the Scriptures

There was no change in the moral and ethical laws that had been in existence since the time of Moses because of Jesus. Those concepts were maintained and expounded upon by him, but he added that obedience must come from the heart (in the form of attitudes and intents) rather than merely technical observation of the law’s language (Matthew 5:21-22, 27-28, 31-32, 33-34, 38-42, 43-44, etc.). Jesus and His disciples, on the other hand, did not adhere to the stringent scribal prohibition against doing any labor on the Sabbath (Matthew 12:1-14, Mark 2:23-28, 3:1-6, Luke 6:1-11, 13:10-17,14:1-6, John 5:1-18).

  • According to Jesus, contrary to the dietary regulations of the Law, food cannot contaminate a person; rather, it is negative attitudes and acts that may render a person unclean (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23).
  • (John8:3-5, 10-11).
  • If such were the case, it would be consistent with His previous acts and teachings.
  • Additionally, it is pointed out that Jesus is the fulfillment of the Law (Matthew 26:28, Mark 10:45, Luke 16:16, John 1:16, Acts 10:28, 13:39, Romans 10:4).

The Council of Jerusalem

The early Christians came from among the Jews, and they maintained their observance of both the Law of Moses and their new Christian beliefs during this time. However, as the number of Gentiles (non-Jews) who converted to Christianity increased, there were disagreements about whether or not these Gentile Christians were required to keep the Law. The issues of circumcision and food were particularly contentious, and they posed a serious danger to the unity of Christianity. When Peter, Paul, Barnabas and James (along with other Christian leaders) convened in Jerusalem about the year 49 A.D., they were attempting to resolve the conflict (Acts 15:1-29).

The Gentile Christians, on the other hand, were instructed by the council to abstain from certain items that were particularly repulsive to their Jewish brothers and sisters – food dedicated to gods, blood, flesh from strangled animals, and sexual immorality, to name a few (Acts 15:29).

The New Covenant

God has made a new covenant with people as a result of the birth of Jesus Christ (Jeremiah31:31-34, Luke 22:20, 1 Corinthians 11:25, Hebrews 8:8-13, 9:11-15). Jesus and Hisapostles provided us with a fundamentally different view of the actual goal of the Old TestamentLaw; they heralded the beginning of a new period characterized by the rule of love for all people and spiritual truth, rather than the rule of law (Luke 10:25-28, John 13:34-35, Ephesians 2:14-18).

God, on the other hand, has not canceled His original bond with Israel and the Jewish people, as some believe (Luke 1:72, Acts 3:25, Romans 9:4-5, 11:26-29, Galatians 3:17). Although the New Covenant expresses no negative feelings toward Jews, it does not condone their persecution in any manner.

Conclusion

Jesus’ teachings, the Council of Jerusalem, and other New Testament teachings (John 1:16-17, Acts 13:39, Romans 2:25-29, 8:1-4, 1 Corinthians 9:19-21, Galatians 2:15-16, Ephesians 2:15) make it clear that Christians are not required to follow the Old Testament rules about crimes and punishments, warfare, slavery, diet, circumcision, animal sacrifices, feast days, Sabbath observance, ritual cleanness, and so on.

Christians are Old Testament scriptures continue to be relied upon by Christians for moral and spiritual direction (2 Timothy 3:16-17).

Christians, on the other hand, should not consider their liberation from the Old Testament Law to be a license to lower their moral standards.

Christian Practice

For example, below are a few instances of Old Testament commandments that Christians do not often follow:

  • Here are a few instances of Old Testament regulations that Christians do not normally adhere to.
  • Male circumcision is compulsory on the eighth day (Leviticus 12:1-3)
  • The death penalty is applied to anyone who:
  • Exodus 21:15,17
  • Disobedience to parents (Deuteronomy 21:18-21)
  • Failure to confine a dangerous animal resulting in death (Exodus 21:28-29)
  • Witchcraft and sorcery (Exodus 22:18, Leviticus 20:27, Deuteronomy 13:5, 1 Samuel 28:9)
  • Having sexual relations with an animal (Exodus 22:19, Leviticus 20:16)
  • Working on the Sabbath (Ex
  • Observances of the Feast of Weeks or Pentecost(Shavuot)(Leviticus 23:15-21)
  • Observances of the Feast of Trumpets or New Year Festival(Rosh Hashanah)(Leviticus 23:23-25)
  • Observances of the Feast of Tabernacles(Sukkot)(Leviticus 23:39-43)
  • And Observances of the Feast of Tabernacles(S
  • The Feast of Weeks or Pentecost (Shavuot) (Leviticus 23:15-21)
  • The Feast of Trumpets or New Year Festival (Rosh Hashanah) (Leviticus 23:23-25)
  • The Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) (Leviticus 16:29-32)
  • And the Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot) (Leviticus 23:39-43).
  • For the forgiveness of sins (Leviticus 4:27-35)
  • For the commemoration of the Passover (Exodus 12:3-11)

Because of sin (Leviticus 4:27-35); because of the Passover (Exodus 12:3-11); and because of other reasons

Jesus’s View of the Old Testament

Through church history, some Christians have downplayed the importance of the Old Testament and its message. Despite this, they pretend to be followers of Jesus as their Lord. Since a result, understanding Jesus’ perspective on these Scriptures is critical, as it should guide Christians’ attitude to the first three-quarters of their Bible.

Similarities between Jesus and His Contemporaries

When it comes to his people’s Scriptures, Jesus’ attitude toward them would have been almost identical to the sentiments of his fellow Jews in many aspects. He appears to have embraced the same set of authoritative sources as the Judaism of his time, which is a remarkable coincidence. As Christians would later understand them, he quotes from all three major portions of the Hebrew Bible (the Law, the Prophets, and the Writings), as well as from all three primary types of laws (the moral, civil, and ceremonial).

He believes that God is the ultimate author of the Bible and that the words of Scripture are God’s words.

Jesus and the Historicity of the Old Testament

It indicates that Jesus considered the Old Testament narratives to be historically accurate. He regularly makes reference to incidents that occurred in the lives of significant Old Testament figures in order to promote his teaching or to excuse his actions. To some extent, he can assume that his audience shares his view that these events took place and that they were recorded in order to serve as authoritative patterns of good and evil behavior for God’s people throughout history. Those who have persecuted God’s prophets in the past, for example, are brought to mind by him (Matt.

Tyre, Sidon, and Sodom are cited as examples of old bad towns by the author (11:21-24 par.).

He alludes to the days of Noah and later Lot, and the terrible destruction that happened in and around each of their respective eras (24:37-39 par.).

He believes that God provided manna for the Israelites over the same length of traveling as they did for the rest of their lives (6:32, 49, 58).

Jesus and the Prophecies of the Old Testament

There is evidence that Jesus regarded historical accounts of the Old Testament. When defending his teachings or justifying his actions, he usually draws on the lives of significant Old Testament figures to substantiate his claims. To some extent, he can assume that his audience shares his view that these events took place and that they were recorded in order to serve as authoritative models of good and evil behavior for God’s people in subsequent ages. Those who have persecuted God’s prophets in the past, for example, are brought to mind by He (Matt.

Tyre, Sidon, and Sodom are cited as archetypes of ancient wicked towns, according to the author (11:21-24 par.).

He alludes to the days of Noah and later Lot, and the terrible devastation that happened in and around each of their respective times periods (24:37-39 par.).

While the Israelites were wandering in the wilderness, he believes that God gave them with manna during the same period of wandering (6:32, 49, 58).

Differences between Jesus and His Contemporaries

However, Jesus’ view of the Old Testament differs from that of his Jewish contemporaries in certain important respects, as follows. In spite of the obvious parallels between his and their points of view, he frequently references Scripture in opposition to significant authorities or groupings of authorities. He contends that they have missed the original meaning or aim of a work because of a long tradition of twisting or misinterpreting it, which he believes has occurred. He may sometimes directly question individuals with whom he speaks, saying that they have overlooked or even defied the plain instruction of a certain passage of Scripture.

  1. 9:13).
  2. However, in this particular case, Jesus’ application is much more extreme.
  3. 6:6; cf.
  4. 15:22; Isa.
  5. “X, not Y” denoted that “X was significantly more important than Y.” Mark 2:15b, on the other hand, has Jesus forgiving sinners and accepting them as disciples, with no suggestion that they are required to offer animal sacrifices at the temple.

Right now, his actions are clearly in violation of the usual understanding of biblically mandated procedures, and he should be punished accordingly.

Jesus and the Judgment of Ethnocentrism in the Old Testament

A lot of times, Jesus believes that the Scriptures are being fulfilled in him or via the events in which he is involved. On rare occasions, they turned out to be accurate foreshadowings of events that had already occurred. They symbolize typology, which is the observation of patterns in history as God exposes his distinctive, repeating methods of dealing with human people, particularly in rescuing or judging them, than they do anything else. As a result, in Matthew 10:35-36 (and the corresponding passages), Jesus uses a typological quotation from Micah to emphasize that his disciples would experience enmity and rejection in their own families, just as Micah did in his day.

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Jesus’ use of Isaiah 6:9-10 to justify speaking in parables to his own generation (Mark 4:11-12 parables) and his reapplication of Isaiah 29:13 to the sham worship practiced by religious leaders in his day (Mark 4:11-12 parables) are both examples of this (Mark 7:6b-7).

7:11).

However, it will assume much more significance during the messianic period, when people from all over the world will make pilgrimages to Jerusalem in unprecedented numbers to worship the God of Israel.

Jesus and the Christological Nature of the Old Testament

Frequently, Jesus analyzes Scripture from a Christological perspective, recognizing both direct and typological prophecies that lead to himself as the recently arrived messianic King. Even when his use of Scripture does not directly advance Christology, his sovereign power over Scripture at the very least raises the question of who he is, or at the very least of who he believes himself to be. His death and resurrection bring this approach to a crescendo, as he says in Luke 24:44 that “everything must be fulfilled concerning me that has been written about me by Moses and the prophets and the Psalms.” The Psalms serve as a metaphor for the Writings in general, as Jesus alludes to all three major portions of the Hebrew canon at the same time, marking the only instance in the whole New Testament that all three are cited together at the same time.

Note that Christ does not claim in this passage that everything in all of Scripture refers to him, as certain Christians have said at various moments throughout church history.

As an alternative, Jesus is asserting that everything was written in each section of Scripture that was supposed to point to him has in fact occurred.

Jesus and the Purity Laws of the Old Testament

At the same time, there are instances in which Jesus appears to completely reinterpret the fulfillment and application of the Levitical regulations. And perhaps most significantly of all, Jesus created an unprecedented precedent by establishing the precedent of declaring all meals pure, which is an express departure from the dietary regulations of Leviticus. The multitude who is listening to him is urged to comprehend that “nothing outside you can contaminate you by entering you,” as recorded in Mark 7:14-15 and comparable passages.

What is it that the disciples require greater clarification for?

Peter himself would have to see the vision of filthy flesh and the Lord instructing him three times that he should eat it before he would be persuaded, and that may take another ten years or more (Acts 10:9-16).

Jesus and the Fulfillment of the Old Testament

The fulfillment and application of Levitical regulations, on the other hand, appear to be completely upended at times when Jesus appears to be acting in a revolutionary manner. Perhaps most significantly, Jesus created a precedent for proclaiming all meals to be pure, which is an express break from the dietary restrictions of Leviticus, which was previously in effect. The multitude listening to him is urged to comprehend that “nothing outside you can contaminate you by entering you,” as recorded in Mark 7:14-15 and comparable passages.

The disciples want more clarification as to why.

Peter himself would have to see the vision of filthy flesh and the Lord instructing him three times that he should eat it before he would be persuaded, and that may take another ten years or so at the most (Acts 10:9-16).

Conclusion

In summary, we witness God’s word to the world in Jesus’ understanding of the Old Testament, as indicated by his citation of a wide variety of texts, even though they are not necessarily in ways that his Jewish contemporaries would have agreed with. One thing we don’t see in Jesus’ own teachings, which are based on the Bible of his own people, is anything that would indicate that the Bible should be divided into canons, with just certain sections of the Bible being authoritative. For fact, Jesus recognizes some books as more important than others and can discriminate between the lighter and the heavier portions of Scripture, just as previous rabbis have done throughout history (Matt.

  • However, the Bible as a whole continues to be inspired, and all of God’s commands must be followed.
  • In these two examples that go beyond the gospels and Jesus’ teaching, we discover that there is no tithing for Christians, but instead sacrificial giving that makes ten percent too little for many (2Cor.
  • We don’t see any gleaning, but we do see enough concern for the poor to prompt us to explore for methods that are similar to gleaning that assist the impoverished in becoming self-sufficient.
  • Neither the inerrant nor the errant, nor between things of faith and practice on the one hand and topics of history or science on the other, does he make a distinction.

We would never force an Old Testament text to teach on a subject that it was not intended to discuss. As followers of Jesus, however, we should accept his understanding of the Scriptures, which includes their entirely divine origin, veracity, and authority in our lives.

What Did Jesus Believe About the Bible?

We perceive God’s word to the world in Jesus’ understanding of the Old Testament, as indicated by his citation of texts from a diverse range of sources, but not necessarily in ways that his Jewish contemporaries would have agreed with him. One thing we don’t see in Jesus’ own teachings, which are based on the Bible of his own people, is anything that would indicate that the Bible should be divided into canons, with just specific sections of the Bible being authoritative. For fact, Jesus recognizes some books as more important than others and can discern between the lighter and the heavier sections of Scripture, just as previous rabbis have done throughout history (Matt.

  1. However, the Bible as a whole continues to be inspired, and all of God’s commands must be observed and observed strictly.
  2. In these two examples that go beyond the gospels and Jesus’ teaching, we discover that there is no tithing for Christians, but rather sacrificial giving that makes ten percent too little for many (2Cor.
  3. We don’t see any gleaning, but we do see enough concern for the poor to prompt us to explore for methods that are similar to gleaning that assist the poor in becoming self sufficient.
  4. Neither the inerrant nor the errant, nor between questions of faith and practice on the one hand and topics of history or science on the other, does he make any distinction between them.
  5. As followers of Jesus, however, we should accept his understanding of the Scriptures, which includes their entirely divine origin, trustworthiness, and authority in our lives as well as their dependability and authority in our lives.

Jesus believed that the Old Testament was decisive and binding

It is one of the most effective methods to discover what Jesus believed about the Bible is to pay attention to how he utilized the Bible during his earthly life and ministry (Matthew 4:4). During the Gospel of John 10, Jesus gets embroiled in a violent debate with a hostile Jewish mob. It is because Jesus just made a highly contentious claim: “I and the Father are one” that they are angry against him (John 10:30 ESV). That is a strong remark, and the Jews responded angrily to the news. What’s more, doesn’t the Bible declare: “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one”?

  • The obvious question: if there is only one God, how can Jesus and the Father both be God at the same time?
  • Obviously, the Jews felt the same way.
  • “I have shown you many excellent deeds from the Father; for which of these are you going to stone me?” Jesus said.
  • “Is it not stated in your Law, ‘I said, you are gods,’ that you are gods?” Jesus responded.
  • If I am not performing the works of my Father, then do not believe me; however, if I am performing them, even if you do not believe me, believe the works so that you may know and understand that the Father is in me and that I am in the Father.

It was the Jews who were accusing you of “blasphemy,” claiming that “the Bible teaches there is only one God” and that “you claim to be God.” In answer, Jesus points out that the Bible refers to other individuals as “gods” in Psalm 82:6 – so, the question is not “do I use the word God to refer to myself,” but rather “am I using the word God legitimately,” and by legitimately, I mean according to biblical standards.

  1. This is what D.A.
  2. There is no biblical foundation for anybody to object to Jesus’ claim that he is the Son of God, because there are others whom God (the author of Scripture) can address as ‘god’ and’sons of the Most High’ (i.e.sons of God).
  3. Yes, I have.
  4. “Scripture cannot be broken,” Jesus believes, which guides him in his response to this specific disagreement (John 10:35 ESV).
  5. Consequently, if you have a verse and are accurately applying it, you will win the debate.
  6. They came to him with a fabricated question in an attempt to trap him, but Jesus cuts them off in their tracks.
  7. After defeating a representative of the Pharisees in a similar manner, Matthew puts the chapter to a close with the words: “And no one was able to answer him a word, nor did anybody dare to ask him any more questions from that day on” (Matthew 22:46 ESV).
  8. It was that day that the opponents of Jesus learnt an important lesson: never bring a knife to a gunfight.
  9. When it came to the Old Testament, Jesus thought it to be authoritative, definitive, and binding.
  10. Take, for example, Matthew 5:19.
  11. (Matthew 5:19, English Standard Version) Although Jesus did not command his followers to abolish the Old Testament, he used Deuteronomy 8:3 to confront the devil, Exodus 3:6, to confront the Sadducees, and to confront the Pharisees, Psalm 110:1, to confront the Pharisees.

Clearly, Jesus functioned under the idea that the entire Old Testament – when correctly understood – was binding and conclusive, and to be his disciple means that you must operate under the same assumption.

Jesus believed that the Apostles were speaking on his behalf

When Jesus was nearing the conclusion of his earthly career, he held an important discussion with his followers. He informed them that he would shortly die and rise again, after which he would ascend to the heavenly realm. When he was preparing them for those events, he told them, “I still have many things to say to you, but you are unable to handle them at this time.” Because he will not speak on his own authority, but rather on the basis of what he hears, the Spirit of truth will guide you into all truth when he appears.

  • He will exalt me, because he will take what is mine and announce it to you as his own.
  • (John 16:12–15, English Standard Version) Jesus stated that he had more to say to his followers than he had said to the rest of the world during his time on earth.
  • He had promised the twelve that the Spirit would come to teach them what He had left unsaid during His own earthly ministry, and He had kept His promise; thus, the apostolic teaching was in reality the complete and final version of His own teaching.
  • Packer offers the following commentary on this passage: In reality, there are no Red Letters to be found.
  • What the Father wishes to be stated has been passed on to the Son, who has then been passed on through the Spirit, who has then been handed on to the Apostles.
  • You don’t deserve to have a Bible that’s any smaller than Jesus’s.
  • Scripture, on the other hand, cannot be broken.
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Jesus believed that he was the climax and focus of all of Scripture

When asked why he searched the Scriptures, Jesus said, “You seek the Scriptures because you believe that in them you have everlasting life; and it is they who bear witness about me” (John 5:39 ESV) Jesus felt that the entire Old Testament was a preparation for and a pointing towards his own life and mission, and that the entire Old Testament pointed people towards him. Is it possible that God ordered you to slaughter pigeons and doves, goats and lambs for some reason? Is it possible that he was doing so for some reason?

He wanted you to realize that sin results in death, and he wanted to prepare you for the day when you would recognize and honor me!

“Behold, the Lamb of God, who wipes away the sin of the world!” he exclaimed with the assistance of the Holy Spirit when he first saw Jesus.

(John 1:29, English Standard Version) John has grasped the situation! He saw that the entire Old Testament sacrifice system was attempting to communicate three ideas to a people who were extremely resistant:

That was noticed by John. He saw the entire sacrificial system culminating in the person of Jesus Christ – he saw the entire Old Testament Scripture pushing people in the direction of, and driving them to, the person of Christ. It took a long time for the disciples of Jesus to arrive at the same destination. Even after the resurrection, when they walked along the Road to Emmaus, they were still unable to make all of the connections. Jesus appeared to them in a disguise and walked with them, giving them a Master’s level education in Christian hermeneutics in the process.

  • (Luke 24:27 ESV).
  • It was a labor of love, but it was also a miracle.
  • (Luke 24:45–47, English Standard Version) In order to understand the Bible, Jesus taught his disciples how to read it in such a way that everything in the Old Testament points to the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ!
  • That is the way Jesus read the Bible, and it is the basis for the Christian faith today.
  • We stand on the foundation laid by the Prophets and the Apostles, with Christ as the cornerstone.
  • God is to be praised!
  • N.B.

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What Did Jesus Say About the Bible?

What did Jesus have to say about the books of the Old Testament? Finding a clear picture of how Jesus viewed the Old Testament law might be challenging. For example, he said:“The law and the prophets were in effect until John. Since then, the good news of God’s kingdom has been spread, and everyone has been attempting to enter it with bated breath. Although heaven and earth can both pass away, it is much more difficult for a single letter to be struck from the books of law.” 16-17; (Luke 16:16-17.) For further information, see Matthew 5:17-20 and Matthew 11:12-13.

  • They can be taken as Jesus stating that the Old Testament law no longer applies as of the time of John the Baptist.
  • So, how do we go about resolving this issue?
  • “For the law was delivered through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ,” says the apostle John, pointing us in the correct road.
  • Jesus, as well as the Jewish religious authorities with whom he was conversing, frequently referred to the Old Testament law as written by Moses rather than as authored by God.
  • On one occasion, Jesus was asked a question about the legality of divorce, which he answered affirmatively.
  • This is why a man must abandon his father and mother in order to be united with his wife, and the two will become one flesh.

In order to protect what God has brought together, let no one tear it apart.” Those present questioned him as to “why Moses directed that a divorce certificate be issued and that she be placed in a mental institution?” He told them, “Because of your hardness of heart, Moses permitted you to divorce your wives, although this was not the case from the beginning.” See Matthew 19:5-9, as well as Mark 10:2-9, for further information.

As a result, there is no clear explanation of Jesus’ attitude toward the Old Testament.

(See, for example, Matthew 5:21-22; 27-28; 7:12; 12:1-8) And, fortunately for us, he made it very clear that the Old Testament law could be summed up in just two commands: “‘You will love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.'” (See, for example, Matthew 5:21-22; 27-28; 7:12; 12:1-8) This is the biggest and first commandment.

  1. Is it still possible for God to communicate with us now through the Old Testament?
  2. Nonetheless, this does not imply that we must meticulously scrutinize every word of the Old Testament law in search of specific principles that we should follow.
  3. We have the two main commandments and, critically, we also have the mandates of Jesus.
  4. Jesus’ commandments are straightforward, unambiguous, and practical, yet there aren’t many of them.
  5. Jesus made no mention of the New Testament in his teachings.
  6. Even while Jesus stated that the Holy Spirit would continue to educate his disciples after he was no longer there, this has not been proven (John 14:26).
  7. What did Jesus have to say about the importance of studying the Bible?

He was speaking to religious leaders when he remarked, “You study the Scriptures with zeal because you believe that they contain the keys to eternal life.” This is the identical Bible that testifies about me, and yet you reject to accept my offer of eternal life through me.” (See John 5:39-40.) The words “study the Scriptures attentively” have been taken out of context by certain Christians, who argue that Jesus is urging his followers to study the scriptures in this passage.

This is not what he intended by his statements.

While the religious leaders are being criticized for believing, imagining, supposing, or supposing that they would find eternal life in their scriptures, the fact is that those exact texts speak of Jesus, who is the only one who has the ability to provide them with eternal life.

Not that we shouldn’t study our Bibles, but Jesus lays a strong focus on instructing his followers to love one another, pray for one another, be humble, and serve others.

The importance of studying the scriptures is not stressed by Jesus.

The New Testament was not mentioned by Jesus at all.

Articles that are related “Does knowing the Bible make me a better person if I desire to know God?” In what manner does Jesus tell his disciples to act?

“I really like our Bible.” How do we know that our Bible was inspired by God?

“Can you tell me what Jesus had to say about prayer?” “Can you tell me what Jesus had to say about prayer?” (Part 2). “Can you tell me what Jesus thought of his own words?”

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