What Does Jesus Do In Heaven

What is Jesus Doing Now?

You might wonder what Jesus is doing now that He has ascended to the Father’s throne in heaven. According to the Bible, after offering Himself as a sacrifice for our sins, Jesus sat down at the right hand of the Father. Because of the wording of verse 13, we might conclude that He is simply sitting up there, waiting for the time when He will return to rule and reign on earth. However, when we take a look at other passages, we quickly realize that He is very active on our behalf. Even though the Son is present in heaven with the Father, He is also present within every believer through the Holy Spirit, whom He sent to be in and with us (John 15:26; Romans 8:9–10).

Christ is actively at work within you, shaping your character and empowering you to fulfill your responsibilities.

He makes requests on our behalf and intercedes on our behalf before the Almighty Father.

We are declared righteous in Christ’s presence because of His sacrifice and because of our faith in Him.

  1. Furthermore, according to John 14:1–3, Christ is preparing a place for us in heaven.
  2. Jesus is hard at work in heaven, carrying out the Father’s instructions.
  3. He saved us in order for us to reflect His life in our work, attitudes, words, and behavior, as well as in our relationships with others.
  4. The following is an excerpt from the book “Jesus Is Alive and Active” by In Touch Ministries (used by permission).

Three Things Jesus Is Doing Right Now — JASON JOHNSON

God’s Son came into this world flawlessly and lived magnificently before dying horribly, rising triumphantly from the dead, and ascending gloriously back into Heaven, promising to return and take us home one day. The entire process was carried out with the express intention of rescuing sinners and reconciling them to God. This narrative, more than any other, has had the greatest impact on the globe. It serves as a constant reminder that we are only a minor part of a much greater divine design.

  1. Everyone and everything that Jesus comes into contact with is transformed as a result of His presence.
  2. As a result, we rejoice what Jesus has done for us, trust that we will never be able to outdo him, and take comfort in the knowledge that we do not need to try.
  3. He has done and will continue to do wonderful things for us.
  4. While we give thanks for what Jesus has done and look forward with great expectation to what He has promised to accomplish, we frequently neglect to consider what He is doing now now, right now, right now, right now, right now, right now.
  5. Jesus is not taking a break or kicking back as He waits for God to give Him the green light to return to the world.
  6. His redemption of our past and assurance of our future are unquestionably true, but He is also uniquely and personally involved in our present.
  7. The most prominent position of influence and power in the entire cosmos is now occupied by him, and he is actively ministering to and engaging with all of creation as well.
  8. As He sits next to the Father, He has a bird’s eye view of everything, understands everything, and is able to tactically manage all things in line with His Father’s desire.
  9. His ethereal influence radiating from Heaven is greater than all of the difficulties, struggles, worries, enemies, fears, pressures, sins, guilts, shames, and oppressions that we are subjected to on this earth.

However, while it may appear at times that the kingdom of this world is the final ruler, it is our genuine and greater King Jesus who proclaims, “Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool.” (See Acts 7:49.) Jesus is larger, better, and more powerful for you right now, in whatever situation you may be in right now, now now.

  • Because he is constantly alive to intercede for them, Hebrews 7:25 says that he has the ability to rescue those who come unto God through him to the fullest extent possible.
  • He is integrally and intimately involved in our everyday interactions with the Almighty and with one another.
  • As a result, we are not required to represent ourselves.
  • He is now conferring with God concerning you, discerning what is totally best and excellent for you, and making provision in accordance with that determination.
  • He consistently refers to His work on the Cross for us as the foundation for our repentance before the Righteous Judge, and we should do the same.
  • We don’t have to account to God on our own behalf; Jesus has already done so; and we don’t have to make apologies for our own sins before a holy Judge; Jesus has already done so.
  • However, Jesus is our great defender, eternally pleasing God with His perfect righteousness, which was freely given to us by the sacrifice of His life.

Jesus provides a solution for you in your failing before God today.

He will carry your concerns, fears, uncertainties, and difficulties all the way to the heart of the Father, where they will be courageously welcomed in the mercy and grace that have been made available to you by Christ’s death and resurrection.

He gave up His life a long time ago in order to be able to stand up for your life now.

There are several rooms in my Father’s house.

Moreover, if I go and prepare a place for you, I will return and take you to myself, so that you may be with me wherever I may be.” John 14:1-3 (KJV) Jesus is looking forward to your entrance into glory with bated breath and is making preparations for your arrival right now.

This planet is not our permanent residence.

Even in times of clarity amidst the chaos of this world, we may take comfort in the knowledge that our citizenship is elsewhere (Philippians 3:20) — that while darkness and brokenness may reign around us, Jesus is preparing for us a better and more magnificent home.

His active preparation for our coming into the fullness of what He has in store for us is underway at this time.

Remind yourself that Jesus is preparing something better when the darkness seems overpowering.

All of the world’s most beautiful things serve to remind us of the even more wonderful beauty that Jesus has in store for us, and the deepest of hurts and sorrows kindle in us a frantic need to be with Him where He is most at ease, at home, eternally.

Despite the fact that Jesus has done wonderful things for us and has promised to accomplish even greater things in the future, failing to recognize what He is doing right now is to undervalue the scope of His activity on our behalf in the present.

In this very time, he is toiling for you in the heavenly realms. You may be assured that Jesus’ work for you today is entirely excellent. He is maintaining you, safeguarding you, and providing you with a flawless and plentiful supply. He is not inactive, but rather is actively working on your side.

What is Jesus doing right now?

Jesus Christ descended from heaven for only one reason: to carry out God’s purpose by offering His life as the ultimate sacrifice for our sins on the cross. He ascended into heaven 40 days after His resurrection, which marked the completion of His primary mission on earth. “He was received into heaven, and he sat at the right hand of the Majesty on high.” According to the Bible (Mark 16:19). What exactly is Jesus doing right now? It is important that we are thrilled with the response because He is praying for us right now – at this precise time.

  1. He never stops praying for us, no matter what we are going through.
  2. Is it accurate to say that Christ abandoned our earth when He left it for heaven?
  3. Instead, He has left us here in His place, to continue on His work in the power of His Spirit, as He had done before.
  4. “Anyone who has confidence in me will do what I have been doing,” Jesus stated.
  5. What is the significance of Jesus Christ in your life?
  6. Give your life to Him in order to be certain of your salvation.

9 Facts About Heaven that Will Surprise You

When I think of the first time I went snorkeling, I recall how excited I was to see my first sight of paradise. I witnessed a plethora of fish in every form, size, and color imaginable. Just when I thought I’d seen the most gorgeous fish on the planet, another one appeared that was even more stunning. The sound of a gasp escaping through my snorkel is etched into my mind as my eyes were opened to a spectacular underwater world for the first time. It is my expectation that when we see heaven for the first time as Christians, we will gasp with wonder and ecstasy in a similar manner to this.

Despite the fact that the majority of us are not in a rush to reach our end destination, we all have questions about it.

1. We won’t miss our old lives.

Have you ever purchased an economy ticket for a trip and then found yourself being promoted to first class as a result of overbooking? Did you find yourself resenting your decision to upgrade? Is it possible that you spent some of your time wondering, “What am I missing by not being in the rear of the plane?” The upgrading from Earth to Heaven will be far more significant than the change from economy to first class on a plane.

If there is anything from our previous life that we would miss, it would be available to us in paradise. Why? Because we will be able to experience what God has planned for us. He shapes our desires to be just what He will provide, ensuring that what He provides us is exactly what we desire.

2. We won’t become angels.

When individuals, particularly youngsters, die, I’m frequently asked if they transform into angels. The answer is a resounding nay. Death is defined as the transfer of a single individual from one area to another. However, the individual does not change, despite the shift in location. The same individual who has gone absent from his or her physical body has become present with the Lord in the hereafter (2 Corinthians 5:8). We won’t pretend to be angels, but we will be there for them.

3. We won’t be tempted.

One time, someone inquired as to whether or not we would ever be tempted to turn our backs on Christ. The answer is a resounding nay. What could possibly tempt us? When it comes to sin, innocence is the lack of something, but righteousness is the presence of something (God’s holiness). God’s holiness will never be taken away from us, and as a result, we will never be able to sin in paradise. The ugliness of sin, on the other hand, will be with us forever. We who have experienced life will never desire to return to a state of death because we have known both.

We’ll constantly be aware of the price of sin.

We’ll view sin in the same way that God does.

4. We will have work to do.

Many people are unfamiliar with the concept of working in heaven. Despite this, the Bible plainly teaches it. When God created Adam, he “took the man and set him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it,” according to the Bible (Genesis 2:15). Work was a fundamental component of the first Eden. It was a necessary aspect of living a perfect human life. God is a doer in his own right. He didn’t just build the universe and then go away to relax. “My Father is constantly at work, even to this very day, and I, too, am working,” Jesus remarked (John 5:17).

The will of Him who sent me and the completion of His task are “‘my food,’ Jesus added.

Working for God is our primary responsibility, and we are created in His likeness to do so as well.

5. We will still experience emotions.

God is stated to take pleasure in, love, laugh, delight, and rejoice, as well as to be angry, happy, jealous, and delighted, according to the Bible. Being like God entails experiencing and expressing emotions. As a result, we should anticipate that emotions will exist in heaven for the glory of God and the benefit of mankind. We know that people in paradise experience a wide range of emotions, all of which are positive. Banquets, feasts, and singing are all mentioned in the literature. There will be a lot of laughter (Luke 6:21).

“He will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will be no longer be any death; there will be no longer be any sorrow, or crying, or suffering,” according to the Bible (Revelation 21:4).

Such weeping will no longer exist. We may, on the other hand, cry tears of happiness. Can you envision the tears of joy streaming down your face when you meet Christ, or when you’re reunited with family and friends? Yes, I can.

6. We stillwon’t know everything.

God is the only one who has complete knowledge. When we die, we will be able to see things much more clearly, and we will know a great deal more than we do now. However, we will never be able to know everything. We’ll be faultless in paradise, but not knowing everything isn’t a shortcoming in this world. It’s a natural consequence of being limited. Righteous angels are aware that they do not know everything, and they yearn to learn more (1 Peter 1:12). They’re perfect, yet they have a limit. As angels do, we can anticipate to yearn for higher knowledge in our lives.

7. We will recognize one another.

Scripture makes no mention of a memory wipe that would cause us to lose track of our loved ones and acquaintances. Paul was looking forward to spending eternity with the Thessalonians, and it never occurred to him that he may not recognize them. As a matter of fact, if we didn’t know our loved ones, the comfort of a hereafter reunion, as taught in 1 Thessalonians 4:14-18, would be of no use to us. In paradise, we will almost certainly not be unable to recognize an acquaintance in a throng or forget the names of other individuals.

8. What will we do to avoid boredom?

People have said things like, “I’d rather be having a wonderful time in hell than be bored in heaven,” which is true in some cases. Take note of the underlying assumption: immorality is fascinating, but holiness is dull. If you accept this notion as true, you have fallen prey to the devil’s deception. In truth, sin robs us of our ability to achieve our goals. Sin does not add interest to life; rather, it depletes it of meaning. In the presence of satisfaction, beauty, and the recognition of God as He actually is—a source of infinite curiosity, boredom becomes impossible.

9. If our loved ones are in hell, won’t that spoil heaven?

The truth will be revealed to us in the hereafter that God showed Himself to each individual and that He provided a chance for each heart or conscience to seek and react to Him (Romans 1:18-2:16). Everyone is deserving of damnation, but none is deserving of heaven. Jesus died on the cross in order to provide salvation to everyone (1 John 2:2). God is fully sovereign and does not wish for anybody to die in his or her sins (1 Timothy 2:3-4; 2 Peter 3:9). Many, though, will die as a result of their disbelief (Matthew 7:13).

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God will be the source of our happiness.

Every one of these things should encourage us to communicate the gospel of Jesus Christ with our families, friends, neighbors, and people all over the globe.

With permission, this image has been used.

Where is Jesus now? Is Jesus in heaven?

QuestionAnswer Several passages in the Bible, including Mark 16:19 and 1 Peter 3:22, indicate that Jesus is currently seated at the right side of God the Father. The physical ascension of Jesus, which took place 40 days after His resurrection, is described in Luke 24:51 and Acts 1:9-11, respectively. John 14:2–3 tells us that Jesus informed His disciples that He was going to prepare a place for them and for all who trust in Him. The Scriptures make it clear that Jesus’ ascension was a physical and bodily return to the presence of the Father.

  • When Christ returned, two angels arrived and assured him that it would be “in exactly the same way as you have witnessed Him leave” (Acts 1:11).
  • Certain traits He held as God had been momentarily suspended, but the suspension had been lifted at the time of writing.
  • “The LORD says to my lord: ‘Sit at my right hand until I make your adversaries a footstool for your feet,'” King David said in the Spirit (Psalm 110:1).
  • At the end of Matthew 22:43–45, Jesus claims that He is more than just David’s son, but that He is also David’s Lord, therefore appropriating this psalm for Himself.
  • There are a number of other texts that point to Jesus’ presence in heaven.
  • Stephen also had a vision immediately before he died, in which he “looked up to heaven and saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing at the right hand of God,” according to the Bible (Acts 7:55).
  • In a different way, Jesus is also present with us here, in this place.
  • As a result, Jesus, the Father, and the Holy Spirit may be found everywhere, rather than only “in heaven.” “The skies, even the highest heavens, cannot contain him,” Solomon declared in 2 Chronicles 2:6.

Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What happened to Jesus? Is Jesus in the presence of the Father?

What Did Jesus Say About Heaven?

Last week, we discussed the words of Jesus that he stated concerning Hell. This week, we’ll be looking at what Jesus taught about Heaven, which is both His home and the future home of everyone who place their faith in Him for redemption of their soul. When we consider the Old Covenant, we must recall that no one went to Heaven when they died under its terms. It was necessary for man’s sins to be totally atoned for and for him to be made perfect in order to be admitted into Heaven. The work of Jesus on the cross to pay the penalty for our sins was completed on our behalf by His death.

  1. Forgiveness of sins results in perfection in God’s eyes because of Jesus’ imputed righteousness (His righteousness attributed to us).
  2. (Luke 23:43).
  3. You may read more about what Jesus had to say about Abraham’s bosom here: Abraham’s Bosom.
  4. Is Abraham’s Bosom a thing?

So What Did Jesus Say About Heaven?

Following up on our discussion of Hell last week, this week we will look at the words that Jesus stated about it. In this week’s lesson, we’ll look at what Jesus taught about Heaven—His home, as well as the future home of those who place their faith in Jesus for their redemption. The fact that no one went to Heaven when they died under the Old Covenant must be kept in mind. Man’s sins had to be totally atoned for and man had to be made perfect before he could enter Heaven. The work of Jesus on the cross to pay the penalty for our sins was completed for us.

Forgiveness of sins renders a forgiven sinner faultless in God’s eyes because of Jesus’ imputed righteousness (His righteousness credited to us).

(Luke 23:43).

Please see the following link for further information on what Jesus had to say regarding Abraham’s bosom: When the Old Testament saints died, where did they go once they passed away? Are you talking about Abraham’s bosom? What was the location?

  • Last week, we discussed the language that Jesus used to describe Hell. This week, we’ll be looking at what Jesus said about Heaven, which is both His home and the future home of those who place their faith in Jesus for redemption of their soul. It’s important to remember that no one went to Heaven when they died under the Old Covenant. It was necessary for man’s sins to be totally atoned for and for him to be made perfect before he could enter Heaven. That was done for us by Jesus when He died on the crucifixion in order to atone for our sins on the cross. When a sinner repents and places his or her belief in Jesus’ work, Jesus is loyal to forgive and to impute His or her righteousness to them (2 Cor 5:20). It is Jesus’ imputed righteousness (His righteousness that has been attributed to us) that makes a forgiven sinner flawless in God’s eyes. Jesus’ earthly career included references to the place of the righteous dead, which pointed to a location on the earth that He referred to as Abraham’s Bosom (Luke 16) and Paradise (Matthew 16). (Luke 23:43). When Jesus ascended to Heaven (Acts 1), He “emptied” Abraham’s Bosom and brought the saints who died under the Old Covenant to Heaven, the place where God dwells (Eph 4:8). You may read more about what Jesus had to say about Abraham’s Bosom here: Abraham’s Bosom. What happened to the OT saints when they died? Is Abraham’s Bosom a real thing? What was its location?

Last week, we spoke about the language that Jesus used to describe Hell. This week, we’ll be looking at what Jesus said about Heaven—His home, as well as the future home of those who place their faith in Jesus for redemption of their soul. It is important to remember that no one went to Heaven when they died under the Old Covenant. It was necessary for man’s sins to be completely atoned for and for him to be made perfect in order to be admitted into Heaven. That was accomplished for us by Jesus when He died on the cross in order to atone for our sins.

  • It is Jesus’ imputed righteousness (His righteousness that has been attributed to us) that makes a forgiven sinner flawless in the eyes of God.
  • (Luke 23:43).
  • You may read more about what Jesus said regarding Abraham’s bosom here: Abraham’s Bosom.
  • Is it Abraham’s Bosom?
  • I thank you, O Father, Lord of heaven and world. (Matt 11:25)
  • I thank you, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth. (Luke 10:21)
  • I thank you, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth. (Matt 11:25)
Heaven is a place of joy, rewards, and treasures:
  • 5:12 (Matthew 5:12) Rejoice and be very pleased, because your recompense in heaven will be great.
  • 6:19 (Matthew) Do not store riches on earth, where moth and rust will ruin them and where thieves will break in and steal them
  • Instead, store treasures in heaven. However, store up treasures for yourself in heaven, where neither moth nor rust can ruin them, and where thieves will not break in and take them
  • Mat 6:20 Luke 6:23 (NIV) Celebrate that day with gusto and leap with delight! Because, truly, your recompense in heaven will be tremendous.
  • 15:7 (Luke 15:7) Furthermore, I assert to you that there will be greater delight in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous folks who do not require repentance.

Heaven is Perfect

We know from all of Jesus’ statements that Heaven is the location where we will spend eternity with God once we pass away from this earth. We know that it is a place of rest and tranquility, as well as a place of perfect unity and communion with our Creator, Lord, and Saviour, as well as a place of perfect union and communion with ourselves. We are aware that it is a crowded area that has been prepared by Jesus (John 14:1-3). We also understand that, at the same time that Jesus is preparing Heaven for us, He is simultaneously preparing us to go to Heaven.

  1. To grow more and more like Jesus is the highest ambition someone could ever have.
  2. Life!
  3. If we want to be like Jesus, we need to tell others about life, not just about ourselves.
  4. *}}} Also see: What Did Jesus Have to Say About Hell?

What is Jesus Christ Doing Now? – What does the Bible say?

That is an excellent question. What would you say in response? When in doubt, we hope this little essay will assist you in understanding the moment-by-moment engagement of your living Lord Jesus in your life, to the point where you comprehend the reality of his presence and are inspired by it. Unfortunatelly, far too many Christians have never been taught about the work that Jesus Christ is doing now, and has been doing since he was elevated to the position of Lord and Head of the Church, which is comprised of the members of his Body.

  1. Is this, however, a sign that he is “just chillin’?” No way in hell.
  2. Whew!
  3. The fact that Jesus remained loyal all the way to his excruciating death on the cross ensured that he fulfilled all of the prophesies that were related to his initial appearance on the world.
  4. 2:8-11).
  5. Right hand guy is derived from this term, which we use frequently.
  6. The connection between Joseph and the Egyptian Pharaoh is shown in the Old Testament story of Joseph and Pharaoh.
  7. “God has elevated me to the position of lord over all of Egypt,” Joseph declared (Gen.
  8. Pharaoh presented Joseph with his signet ring (which signified his all-encompassing power and authority in Egypt) and assigned him the role of Second-in-Command, which he performed on a chariot.
  9. 41:44).
  10. When it comes to Jesus Christ, God has done the same thing as well.
  11. God is still God, but Jesus has now been elevated to the level of functional equality with Him, which was God’s plan.

So, what exactly is the Lord Jesus Christ up to right now? Let’s have a look at this. Where? This is not the case with People magazine or even Sports Illustrated. We are interested in learning what God’s Word has to say.

Jesus Christ is now the Head of the Church.

Ephesians 1:20-23 is a passage of scripture (20) In Christ, which he manifested when he raised him from the dead and sat him at his right side in the celestial realms,(21)far beyond every rule and authority, power and dominion, and every title that can be conferred, not only in this age but also in the one to come, (2)And God put all things beneath him, appointing him as supreme leader and overseer of all things for the church (23), which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every manner.

  1. Since he is the “Head” of his “Bodily,” Jesus is in continual communication with each of his body parts, which includes you and me.
  2. In spite of all of the temptations he faced, Jesus was the only human being who ever fully surrendered himself to God.
  3. We are “re-presenting” him in the world today, and he will assist us in being the best we can be for him.
  4. He also serves as our Commander-in-Chief, and he is the one who directs us into combat.

Jesus Christ is building his Church by pouring out the gift of holy spirit to all those who believe.

Because the growing process of the body is controlled by the head, it is the Lord Jesus Christ who is adding to his body by saving all who call upon his name. 2:46 and 47(46)Every day, they continued to gather in the temple courts to worship God. With joyful and sincere hearts,(47) they broke bread in their houses and ate together as a community, praising God and basking in the favor of all the people. And the Lord continued to increase to the number of individuals who were being rescued on a daily basis.

(33) He has been exalted to the right hand of God, where he has received the promised Holy Spirit from the Father, and he has poured forth everything you are seeing and hearing right now.

Jesus Christ is interceding for us as our mediator.

Hebrews 7:24 and 25(24) However, because Jesus lives eternally, he has a perpetual priesthood, according to the Scriptures. Therefore, because he is constantly alive to advocate on their behalf, he is able to rescue people who come to God through him in their entire lives. Romans 8:34 (NIV) Who exactly is the one who condemns? Christ Jesus, who died–and more than that, who was resurrected to life–is now seated at the right side of the Father, interceding for us on our behalf. “Make intercession” or “pray” is what the word entugchanome implies.

Even if no one on the globe recalls your existence, Jesus Christ does, and he is interceding on your behalf. According to 1 Timothy 2:5, the Lord Jesus Christ is “The Man,” the only mediator who intercedes (consults with and speaks to God on our behalf) before the Father.

Jesus Christ hears our prayers and responds to us.

When it comes to friendship, Proverbs 18:24 says, “A friend sticks tighter than a brother,” and Jesus Christ is “fixed on you.” To everyone of us, he is a big brother as well as a close friend. In him, we may place our trust, knowing that he knows all of our flaws and is “touched with the feeling of our infirmities” (Heb. 4:15). We may pour out our emotions to him at any moment, knowing that he perfectly understands what we’re going through and is there to console and encourage us. Consequently, they suggested two men: Joseph nicknamed Barsabbas (also known as Justus) and Matthias, both of whom were accepted.

Show us which of these two you have selected(25) to take over the apostolic ministry that Judas abandoned to go to his rightful place.” (26)After then, they divided the spoils, and Matthias was chosen, and he was included among the eleven apostles.

(60)At that point, he went to his knees and pleaded with God, “Lord, please not hold this transgression against them.

It was three times that I pled with the Lord to take it away from me.

Jesus Christ is giving grace to all believers.

When it comes to friendship, Proverbs 18:24 says, “A friend sticks tighter than a brother,” and Jesus Christ is “stuck” on you. To everyone of us, he is a big brother as well as a friend. In him, we may place our trust, knowing that he knows all of our flaws and is “touched by the feeling of our infirmities” (Heb. 4:15). Whenever we want, we may pour out our feelings to him, knowing that he perfectly understands us and is there to console and support us. 2:23 So they nominated two men: Joseph nicknamed Barsabbas (also known as Justus) and Matthias, both of whom were accepted.

They then divided the spoils by lot, and Matthias was chosen to be one of the apostles, making him the twelfth.

After then, he got down on his knees and begged the Lord not to punish them for their wickedness.

It was three times that I begged the Lord to take it away from me (see 2 Corinthians 12:8 and 9(8)).

But he told me, “My grace is sufficient for you, because my power is made perfect in weakness.” (9) To the extent that my infirmities are magnified by Christ’s strength, I shall take pleasure in them much more fully.

Jesus Christ is strengthening and protecting his people.

Satan, the Lord’s adversary as well as your adversary, wishes to have you removed from service. “To steal, murder, and destroy” is the objective of the Devil and his army of evil spirits, which is divided into three categories (John 10:10). In the face of such a tremendous supernatural adversary, we require an even more powerful supernatural ally to stand by our side. With Jesus, we have such a wonderful companion! 2 3rd Thessalonians 3:3rd Thessalonians 3:3rd Thessalonians 3:3rd Nevertheless, the Lord is trustworthy, and he will strengthen and safeguard you from the evil one.

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I am able to accomplish anything because of him, who provides me with strength.

Jesus Christ is giving revelation to the members of his Body.

It is Satan’s desire to have you removed from service as the Lord’s adversary as well as yours. ‘To steal, murder, and destroy,’ the Devil and his army of evil spirits are tasked with doing in three steps: (John 10:10). A more powerful supernatural companion is required in the face of such a great supernatural adversary. Our Savior is a wonderful buddy. 2 3:3 Nevertheless, the Lord is loyal, and he will strengthen and defend you against the evil one. Philippians 4:13 is a verse in the book of Philippians that states: My power comes from Him, and I am able to achieve anything.

Jesus Christ is giving ministries to Christians.

Satan, the Lord’s adversary as well as your adversary, desires to have you removed from service. ‘To steal, murder, and destroy’ is the purpose of the Devil and his army of wicked spirits (John 10:10). We require a more strong supernatural ally in the face of such a great supernatural adversary. With Jesus, we have such a great companion! 2 3rd Thessalonians 3:3rd Thessalonians 3:3rd Thessalonians 3:3 But the Lord is loyal, and he will strengthen and safeguard you from the evil one. Philippians 4:13 is a verse in the book of Philippians.

Jesus Christ is the Commander of the angels.

The globe is a battleground, and the majority of the fighting is taking place in the spirit realms. The Devil is in command of his army of evil spirits, and the Lord Jesus is in command of God’s army of angels, according to the Bible. Their major responsibility is to provide service to God’s people. Hebrews 1:4 and Hebrews 1:5 (4) As a result, he gained the same level of superiority over the angels that the name he acquired has over theirs. “You are my Son; today I have become your Father,” God spoke to which of the angels at any point in time.

2 Thessalonians 1:6 and 7 (New International Version) (6) God is just: He will repay those who cause you difficulty by causing them trouble(7) and will provide help to those who are tormented, as well as to us.

Jesus Christ is eagerly anticipating raising all dead Christians and giving them and all living Christiansnew bodieswhen we meet him in the air.

Jesus Christ will both resurrect from the dead and judge all believers throughout history (John 5:21-23), beginning with all Christians at the conclusion of the Church Administration when he brings us all together to meet him in the air (Matthew 25:31-46). Paul writes in Philippians 3:20 and 21. (20) Our citizenship, on the other hand, is in heaven. And we joyfully anticipate a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ(21), who, by the power that enables him to put everything under his control, will convert our humble bodies into something that resembles his magnificent body on the other side.

(16)For the Lord himself will descend from heaven with a resounding command, with the voice of the archangel, and with the sound of the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will be the first to rise.

As a result, we shall be with the Lord for all eternity.

The Lord Jesus Christ is “alive and well” now, and he will be until he returns to collect his followers.

He will be an active and strong force in each of our lives to the extent that we allow him to be, and he will be able to make himself known to the rest of the world as a result. Let us take his hand in ours and walk with him.

What Jesus Really Said About Heaven and Hell

Everyone dislikes thinking about death, yet there are moments when we have no option but to confront it. As the infection spreads, hospitals become overcrowded, and systems become overburdened. Survival is the most pressing of our concerns, both personally and nationally. Many individuals – including the apparently healthy – have, however, found themselves confronted with the shadow of death itself, which has become our daily companion, despite our best efforts to ignore it the majority of the time.

  • While NBC’s huge hit comedy seriesThe Good Place was the most recent and most memorable effort, the humor even there was founded exactly in horror, as Eleanor Shellstrop and her pals desperately tried to avoid the eternity they earned in the Bad Place and its unending torments.
  • After learning he will spend forever groveling in dust and being devoured by worms, Gilgamesh writhes with misery in the epic poem The Epic of Gilgamesh.
  • The prospect of endless sorrow, on the other hand, makes many people shiver.
  • In the globe, there are more than two billion Christians, with the great majority of them believing in the existence of a heaven and a hell.
  • In spite of an increasing number of “nones,” Americans continue to expect a version of the options shown in The Good Place: independent of religious affiliation, 72 percent believe in a genuine paradise and 58 percent believe in a literal hell, according to the Pew Research Center.

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The great majority of these individuals understandably believe that this is what Jesus personally told them. However, this is not the case. Neither Jesus nor the Hebrew Bible, which he translated, supported the notion that departed souls went to either paradise or everlasting punishment. Ancient Jews, in contrast to the majority of Greeks, historically did not think that the soul could exist independently of the body. The opposite was true for them; they saw the soul as more like “breath.” Adam, the first human being God created, began as a lump of clay, then God “breathed” life into him after that (Genesis 2: 7).

  • Afterwards, everything was reduced to dust and ashes.
  • It is not true that when we cease breathing, our breath does not leave our body.
  • In the same way, the “soul” does not continue to exist outside of the body, where it may experience postmortem joy or anguish.
  • It is assumed by the Hebrew Bible itself that the deceased are simply dead—that their corpse rests in the grave and that they will never regain awareness again.
  • However, in the majority of cases, the term “Sheol” is just a synonym for “tomb” or “grave.” It’s not a location where people really go to hang out.
  • The fact that there was no life at all, and so no family, friends, talks, food, drink – and even communion with God – made death so depressing: nothing could make an afterlife existence more pleasant since there was no life at all, and hence no wonderful afterlife existence.
  • To be honest, the most one could aspire for was an enjoyable and exceptionally long life in the here and now.

The belief that there was something beyond death—a form of justice to come—began to spread among Jewish philosophers some two hundred years before the birth of the Messiah.

However, the flaws in that line of reasoning were immediately apparent: God’s own people Israel suffered repeatedly, brutally, and frustratingly as a result of natural disasters, political crises, and, most significantly, military defeat.

Some philosophers came up with a solution that described how God would bring about justice, but one that did not require eternal happiness in a paradise above or eternal pain in a hell below, as had previously been proposed.

In spite of the fact that God is the ultimate master of the universe, he has temporarily ceded authority of this planet for an unexplained cause.

Heaven and earth are about to be thrown into chaos when God intervenes to destroy everything and everyone who stands in his way, and to usher in a new kingdom for his loyal followers, the Kingdom of God, a paradise on earth.

Indeed, God will breathe life back into the dead, bringing them back to earthly existence, and God will bring all the dead back to life, not just the virtuous, to be with him forever.

The crowd who had stood in the path of God will also be raised.

During the time of Jesus, this notion of the impending resurrection dominated the outlook of Jewish thought in general.

The end of time is approaching quickly.

God will soon annihilate everything and everyone who stands in his way, and a new order will be established on the planet.

All of the others will be wiped out.

Unlike other Jewish leaders, Jesus preached that no one will inherit the glorious future kingdom by strictly adhering to all of the Jewish laws in their most minute details; or by meticulously following the rules of worship involving sacrifice, prayer, and the observance of holy days; or by pursuing one’s own purity by fleeing from the vile world and the tainting influence of sinful others.

  • For the most part, this is placing God first in one’s life, despite personal difficulties, and dedicating one’s time and energy to the benefit of others, even when doing so is extremely difficult.
  • (Leviticus 19:18).
  • In the same way that the Good Samaritan helped anybody in need, genuine love includes assisting everyone in need, not just those in your chosen social circles, as depicted in the parable of the Good Samaritan.
  • Only a small number of individuals are.
  • It’s no surprise that it’s easier to get a camel through a needle than it is for the wealthy to get entry into the kingdom.

Although Jesus does not explicitly mention “Hell” in the Sermon on the Mount, standard English translations suggest that he does so sometimes — for example, in his cautions that anybody who labels another a fool, or who permits their right eye or hand to transgress, will be put into “hell” (Matthew 5:22, 29-30).

  1. However, the name does not allude to a perpetual tormenting region, but rather to an infamous valley just outside the walls of Jerusalem, which was widely considered by many Jews at the time to be the most unholy, god-forsaken area on earth.
  2. For anyone who died in the ancient world (whether they were Greek, Roman, or Jewish), being refused a proper burial was the harshest punishment they could get after death.
  3. Souls would not be tortured in that place, according to Jesus.
  4. The emphasis that Jesus places on the complete destruction of sinners may be found throughout his teachings.
  5. There are two paths to “life.” One is narrow and demands an arduous road, yet it leads to “life.” That is a route used by few.
  6. However, it results in “destruction.” It is an extremely essential term.
  7. In the same way, Jesus compares the coming kingdom to a fisherman who brings in a vast net of fish (Matthew 13:47-50).

He does not subject them to torture.

Alternatively, the kingdom might be compared to a person who collects the plants that have grown in his or her field (Matthew 13:36-43).

These do not burn indefinitely.

Other verses, on the other hand, may appear to imply that Jesus believed in the afterlife.

Some are referred to as sheep, while others are referred to as goats.

These are welcomed into the “kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world,” as the Bible states.

Upon first glance, that surely sounds like a hellish creation of the public imagination.

They are not “eternal pleasure” and “eternal pain,” as some people believe.

As a result, annihilation is the penalty.

This is due to the fact that the fire never goes out.

And what is the significance of the term “eternal” punishment?

These individuals will be exterminated for all time.

In this way, Jesus followed in the footsteps of a long line of respectable philosophers who have refused to accept the notion that a benevolent God would torture his beings for all eternity.

Yet neither Jesus nor his early Jewish disciples taught about the torments of hell; rather, they originated among later gentile converts who did not believe in the Jewish concept of a future resurrection of the dead, as did the apostle Paul.

A large number of Greek intellectuals, dating back at least to Socrates’ time, have advocated for the notion of the immortality of the soul.

Following the example of gentile Christians, later Christians who emerged from these groups embraced this viewpoint for themselves, reasoning that since souls are made to survive forever, their final destinies will do the same.

As a result of this innovation, an unsatisfactory amalgamation of Jesus’ Jewish beliefs and those found in parts of the Greek philosophical tradition has resulted.

Nonetheless, in a fascinating and comforting sense, Jesus’ own beliefs on either eternal recompense or full destruction are similar to Greek notions that were taught more than four centuries before Jesus.

His “Apology” (that is, “Legal Defense”), which was recorded by his most renowned pupil, Plato, is still available for reading today.

He is, on the contrary, energised by the prospect of going from this world to the next.

On the one hand, it may result in the deepest, most uninterrupted sleep that anyone could possibly imagine.

It may, on the other hand, imply the presence of a conscious being.

It would mean continuing on with life and all of its joys while avoiding all of its suffering.

As a result, there are no poor options in the afterlife, just good ones.

Two thousand and four hundred years later, with all of our improvements in our knowledge of our world and human existence within it, certainly we can conclude that both Jesus and Socrates were correct about a great many things.

We should pay attention to what he has to say.

Of course, none of us can predict what will happen to us after we leave this world of transience behind.

On the one hand, we may lose our consciousness since we will no longer be concerned about anything in this world.

Both scenarios result in the cessation of all suffering.

To that end, the greatest teacher of the Greeks and the founder of Christianity agreed on the following: when we finally depart from this earthly realm, we may have something to look forward to, but we have absolutely nothing to be afraid of.

Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife, Ehrman’s latest book from which this essay is adapted, is available now. TIME Magazine has more must-read stories.

  • Most of these individuals understandably believe that this is what Jesus himself taught. It is not the case, however. It is not supported by either Jesus or the Hebrew Bible that he translated that departed souls go to paradise or suffer for all eternity. Traditional Jewish beliefs, in contrast to those held by the majority of Greeks, held that the soul could exist independently of the body. The opposite was true for them
  • They regarded the soul as more like “breathing.” Initially, Adam, the first human being God created, was nothing more than a lump of clay, into which God then “breathed” life (Genesis 2: 7). When Adam’s breathing stopped, he was still alive. Afterwards, everything was reduced to nothing more than dust and ash. According to ancient Jews, this was true for all of humanity. It is not true that when we stop breathing, our breath does not leave our bodies. It simply comes to a halt. In the same way, the “soul” does not continue to exist outside of the body, where it could experience postmortem pleasure or discomfort. It is no longer in existence. It is assumed by the Hebrew Bible itself that the deceased are simply dead—that their body lies in the grave and that there is no consciousness whatsoever after death. It is true that some poetic authors, such as those who wrote the Psalms, use the mysterious term “Sheol” to describe a person’s new location in their poetry. Although Sheol is often used as a synonym for “tomb” or “grave,” it is not always the case. Not many people actually go to this location. Traditional Israelites did not believe in life after death, only in death after death, as a result of this belief. The fact that there was no life at all, and thus no family, friends, conversations, food, drink – and even communion with God – made death so mournful: nothing could make an afterlife existence sweet because there was no life at all. In God’s eyes, the individual would be forgotten, and the individual would be unable to even worship. To be honest, the best one could hope for was an enjoyable and especially long life right now. Jewish thought, on the other hand, gradually evolved over time, albeit without the inclusion of the concept of an afterlife. The belief that there was something beyond death—a kind of justice to come—began to spread among Jewish thinkers about two hundred years before the birth of Jesus Christ. Jews had long held the belief that God was the supreme ruler over the entire world and all people, both living and dead, for thousands of years. There were, however, obvious flaws in that line of thinking, as God’s own people Israel suffered from natural disasters, political crises, and, most significantly, military defeat on an almost constant basis. Why does God’s people suffer so much tragedy if he loves them and is sovereign over the entire world, you might wonder. Some thinkers came up with a solution that explained how God would bring about justice, but one that did not involve eternal bliss in a heaven above or eternal torment in a hell below, as had previously been suggested. That there are evil forces in the world aligned against God and determined to afflict the people of God was the premise of this new theory of evil. For some unexplained reason, God has temporarily relinquished control of this world, despite the fact that he is the ultimate ruler of all. There is only a limited amount of time left for the forces of evil to act. Heaven and earth are about to be thrown into chaos as God intervenes to destroy everything and everyone who stands in his way, and to usher in a new realm for his true followers: the Kingdom of God, a paradise on earth. This new earthly kingdom will be available not only to those who are alive at the time of its establishment, but also to those who have died. This is particularly significant. Certainly the dead will be brought back to life by God, allowing them to resume their earthly existence, and God will do so for all of the dead, not just those who have done good. The multitudes who had stood in opposition to God will also be raised, but for a different reason: to be shown the error of their ways and to be judged by God himself. Their existence will be erased from the face of the earth once they have been shocked and filled with regret – but it will be too late. During the time of Jesus, this view of the impending resurrection dominated Jewish thought and practice. Furthermore, it was the point of view that he himself advocated. A short while from now, the universe will be terminated. The coming of God’s earthly Kingdom is “near” (Mark 1:15). God will soon destroy everything and everyone who stands in his way, and he will establish a new order on the planet as a result of this destruction. For the rest of their lives, those who enter this kingdom will live in a utopian state of mind. Those who oppose us will be wiped out entirely. Jesus, on the other hand, put his own spin on it. To the contrary of what other Jewish leaders taught, Jesus preached that no one will inherit the glorious future kingdom by strictly adhering to all of the Jewish laws in their most minute details
  • Or by meticulously following the rules of worship involving sacrifice, prayer, and the observance of holy days
  • Or by pursuing one’s own purity by fleeing from the vile world and the tainting influence of sinful others. Instead, according to Jesus, those who are completely dedicated to the most pervasive and dominant teachings of God’s law will be granted entry into the earthly utopian state. Simply put, this entails placing God first in one’s life despite personal difficulties and dedicating one’s time and energy to the welfare of others, even when doing so is extremely challenging. People who have not been living lives of complete unselfish love need to repent and return to the two “greatest commandments” of Jewish Scripture: a deep love for God (Deuteronomy 6:4-6) and a committed love for one’s neighbor (Deuteronomy 6:13-15). (Leviticus 19:18). Despite the fact that it appears to be straightforward, it is not. In the same way that the Good Samaritan helped anyone in need, true love means helping everyone in need, not just those in your preferred social circles, as depicted in the story of the Good Samaritan. When it came to the poor, outcasts, foreigners, those on the margins, and even the most despised enemies, Jesus was the most concerned person. There aren’t many of them. Those who have a comfortable life and a lot of money, in particular. That explains why it is easier to get a camel through a needle than it is to get the wealthy into the kingdom. A surprising number of people today would be surprised to learn that Jesus believed in a bodily eternal life here on earth, rather than in eternal bliss for souls, and that he did not believe in a place of eternal torment known as hell. Although he does not explicitly mention “Hell” in the Sermon on the Mount, traditional English translations suggest that he does so occasionally – for example, in his warnings that anyone who calls another a fool, or who allows their right eye or hand to sin, will be cast into “Hell” (Matthew 5:22, 29-30). It should be noted that none of these passages actually refer to the concept of “hell.” “Gehenna” is the word that Jesus uses. However, the term does not refer to an eternal tormenting place, but rather to an infamous valley just outside the walls of Jerusalem, which was widely regarded by many Jews at the time as the most unholy and god-forsaken place on earth. Ancient Israelites practiced child sacrifices to foreign gods there, according to the Old Testament, and the Lord God of Israel had condemned and abandoned the site as a result. For people who died in the ancient world (whether they were Greek, Roman, or Jewish), being denied a proper burial was the worst punishment they could receive after their deaths. A repugnant scenario was developed by Jesus based on this viewpoint: the corpses of those who were excluded from the kingdom would be unceremoniously thrown into the most desecrated landfill on the planet. Souls would not be tortured there, according to Jesus’ words. They’d simply cease to exist as a result of the change. It is clear throughout Jesus’ teachings that he is focused on the complete annihilation of sinners. He claims that there are two gates through which people must pass (Matthew 7:13-14). There are two paths to “life.” One is narrow and requires a difficult path, but it leads to the other. That is a route taken by only a small number. As a result, it is commonly used because it is broad and simple. The result is “destruction,” on the other hand. It is an extremely important word. Terrorism does not result from choosing the incorrect route to begin with. Jesus compares the coming kingdom to a fisherman who hauls in a vast net, then he goes on to explain (Matthew 13:47-50). Then, after separating the excellent from the bad, he retains the good and tosses out the bad fish. His treatment of them is not torturous. Nothing happens to them
  • They simply perish. Alternatively, the kingdom might be thought of as a person who collects the plants that have grown in his or her garden (Matthew 13:36-43). He saves the excellent grain, but he burns the weeds in a hot fire to make room for more good grain. There is a time limit on how long they will burn. It seems as though they have been engulfed by fire and are no longer alive. Other verses, on the other hand, may appear to imply that Jesus believed in the existence of hell. Particularly noteworthy is the statement of Jesus that all countries would gather for the final judgment (Matthew 25:31-46). It is said that some of them are sheep, while others are thought to be goats. These are the (good) sheep — those who have assisted others who are in need – those who are hungry, sick, destitute, or alien. The “kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world” welcomes these people into its fold. As a result of their refusal to assist people in need, the (wicked) goats are sentenced to “eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels,” which means they will burn forever. Initially, that sounds like the devil of popular imagination, and it surely is. However, as Jesus finishes his argument, he clarifies that the opposing destinies are “eternal life” and “eternal damnation.” “Everlasting joy” and “eternal suffering” are not the same thing. Death, not agony, is the polar opposite of living. Therefore, destruction serves as punishment. But what is the significance of “everlasting fire” in this context? This is due to the fact that the fire will never go out! Flames, not torments, are the only thing that lasts forever. What is the significance of the term “eternal” punishment? For the simple reason that it will never come to an end. These individuals shall be eliminated off the face of the earth for all time! Even if it isn’t nice to think about, it will have no negative impact after it is complete. As a result, Jesus joined a very long line of serious thinkers who have refused to accept the notion that a benevolent God would torture his beings for all of eternity in the hereafter. Fire and brimstone preaching, which subsequent followers often attributed to Jesus himself, was a latecomer to the Christian scene, having emerged decades after Jesus’ death and been fine-tuned to a fine pitch in the teachings of fire and brimstone. Yet neither Jesus nor his initial Jewish disciples taught about the torments of hell
  • Rather, they originated among later gentile converts who did not believe in the Jewish concept of a future resurrection of the dead, as was the case with the early Christians. Greek culture and the notion that souls are immortal and would endure death influenced the development of these later Christians. A large number of Greek intellectuals, dating back at least to Socrates’ time, have advocated for the concept that the soul is eternal. Despite the fact that the human body will die, the human spirit will not and will not be able to die. Following the example of gentile Christians, later Christians who emerged from those circles embraced this viewpoint for themselves, reasoning that since souls are made to survive forever, their final destinies will do the same. Either eternal happiness or endless agony will await the chosen ones on the other side. Jesus’ Jewish beliefs and those found in elements of the Greek intellectual heritage have been combined in an unsatisfactory way in this invention. A bizarre mix, one that was shared neither by the early Christians, nor by the ancient Greek elite who came before them. Nonetheless, in a fascinating and comforting sense, Jesus’ own beliefs on either eternal reward or full destruction are similar to Greek notions that were preached more than four centuries before. During his trial before an Athenian jury on capital charges, Socrates presented the concept in the most memorable way. Because it was written down by his most renowned pupil, Plato, the text of his “Apology” (also known as “Legal Defense”) may still be seen on the internet. As a matter of fact, Socrates proclaims outright that he has no need to be concerned about the impending execution. The prospect of leaving from this life, on the other hand, gives him a burst of energy. Death will come in one of two forms for Socrates. However, on the one hand, it may result in the deepest, most restful slumber that anyone could ever hope to experience. A decent sleep, on the other hand, who doesn’t like? The presence of a conscious being on the other hand, is possible. That would also be beneficial, perhaps much more so. It would mean continuing on with life and all of its delights but avoiding all of its pains and difficulties. Having unending debates about serious themes with well-known philosophers from his history would be a dream come true for Socrates, the most famous seeker of truth in the classical world. There are no negative decisions to make in the afterlife
  • Just excellent ones. In the face of death, there was no sense of horror or even dread in his eyes. Two thousand and four hundred years later, with all of our improvements in our knowledge of our world and human existence within it, we may safely conclude that both Jesus and Socrates were correct about a great many things. We should commit ourselves to the benefit of others, especially the poor and needy, the ill and afflicted, the outcasts and aliens, during our brief existence, according to Jesus’ teaching. This is someone who should be taken into consideration. Nevertheless, Socrates was probably definitely correct in his assessment of the situation. Of fact, none of us has any idea what will happen to us once we leave this realm of transience and become immortal. However, his two most feasible alternatives remain the same. As a result of no longer having to care about anything in this world, we may lose our consciousness, to some extent. Socrates perceived it as a peaceful deep slumber, but Jesus regarded it as eternal annihilation. There will be no more suffering in any circumstance. But it’s possible that something better is still to come, a better place, a happier place. To that end, the greatest teacher of the Greeks and the father of Christianity agreed on the following: when we finally leave this earthly sphere, we may perhaps have something to look forward to, but we have absolutely nothing to be afraid of. Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife, which is the title of Ehrman’s latest book and the source material for this article. TIME Magazine has more must-read articles.
See also:  When Jesus Calls My Name

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