What Did John The Baptist Say When He Baptised Jesus

The Baptism of Jesus Christ

From Galilee to the Jordan River was the first leg of Jesus Christ’s journey during the early years of His ministry. The preaching and baptizing of John the Baptist took place in the vicinity. Jesus approached John and requested to be baptized. John was adamant about not doing it since he believed that Jesus should be the one to baptize him. He inquired as to why he was required to be baptized by Jesus. The Savior taught that in order to be faithful to the commands of Heavenly Father, he needed to be baptized first.

Afterwards, when Jesus had been baptized, he immediately ascended out of the water; and John looked up and saw that the heavens had been opened vnto him, and that the Spirit of God had descended like a dove and had fallen upon Jesus.

3:44–46, page 802 of the LDS edition of the King James Bible, according to the JST.) Baptism is modeled after Jesus Christ, who established the standard for us.

Baptism is a covenant or pledge made to Heavenly Father in which we agree to do the following:

  • “enter into God’s flock”
  • “be called his people”
  • “ready to bear one another’s burdens”
  • “comfort those who are in need of comfort”
  • “stand as witnesses of God at all times and in all things and in all places”
  • “serve him and fulfill his commandments” (SeeMosiah 18:8–10 for further information.)

When we receive the sacrament on Sundays in church, we should remember Jesus Christ’s Atonement as well as the commitments we made to our Heavenly Father when we were baptized in order to be reconciled with Him. Color the flannel-board figures before mounting them on a heavy-weight piece of paper. Remove them off the page and use them to retell the narrative. “Jesus Christ’s Baptism,” as the phrase goes. The dove, the heavens opening up, the sacrament trays, and John the Baptist baptism Jesus Christ in the Jordan River are all images that come to mind.

Whittaker.

Baptism of Jesus – Bible Story

When we receive the sacrament on Sundays at church, we should remember the Atonement of Jesus Christ, as well as the vows we made to our Heavenly Father when we were baptized. Then you may mount them on strong paper after you’ve colored them. Using them to recount the narrative will be much easier. “Jesus Christ’s Baptism,” as it is known in the church. The dove, the heavens opening up, the sacrament trays, and John the Baptist baptism Jesus Christ in the Jordan River are all depicted in this scene.

Whittaker.) – It was Jesus who was baptized.

John Luke captured this photograph.

Bible Verses about Baptism in Jesus Christ

Peter then told them, “Repent and be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ, each of you, for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” As a result of Jesus’ resurrection, you are now saved by baptism, which corresponds to this. Baptism, which corresponds to this, does not save you as a cleansing of filth from the body, but as an appeal to God for a good conscience. 1 Peter 3:21 (New International Version) According to the Bible, Jesus said, “Truly and truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he will not enter the kingdom of God.” 3:5 (John 3:5) “We were therefore buried with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so may we also walk in newness of life,” the apostle Paul writes.

6:4 (Romans 6:4) We were all baptized into one body, whether we were Jews or Greeks, whether we were enslaved or free, since we were all baptized into one Spirit.” 1 Corinthians 12:13 (New International Version) Read the Bible passages that describe Jesus’ baptism, and then use the accompanying articles and video below to learn more about the meaning and purpose of this passage of Scripture.

In whose name was Jesus baptized?

Firstly, we must grasp the concept of “baptizing in the name of whom?” and the concept of “doing anything in the name of whom?” before we can answer the question of “who was Jesus baptized in?” Doing something in the name of someone (or something) else entails acting on behalf of that person or object with the power that has been delegated to you (the OED gives “by the authority of” as one of the meanings of “in the name of”).

“”I baptize you in the name of the Jesus” refers to the fact that “I have authority from the Jesus and I represent Him in baptism you.” I pronounce it valid with His authority, which means it is lawful because He has declared it to be valid.” Similarly, doing acts in the name of God, or even more commonplace instances, such as doing things in the name of your employer, your nation, the law, your father, and so on, are prohibited.

  1. “Please, for the sake of the law, come to a halt!” —it is the law that has authority, not the individual who is quoting it.
  2. To put it simply, this implies that they are operating under the authority of Jesus—that is, they are doing things that He has authorized and, as a result, are acting in His name.
  3. When John the Baptist baptized Jesus, he was acting under the direct supervision and authority of Jesus in person (see Matthew 3:13–15 for Jesus’ instruction to John to baptize Him).
  4. Some may argue that Jesus was operating under the command of the Father at this point, and this is valid in some cases.

I Baptize You with Water

Now, during those days, John the Baptist came, preaching in the Judean desert, and he said, 2 “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.” Specifically, this is the one to whom Isaiah, the prophet, refers when he says, “IN THE WILDERNESS, “MAKE READY THE WAY OF THE LORD, MAKE HIS PATHS STRAIGHT!” cries out a voice, “MAKE HIS PATHS STRAIGHT!” 4 Now, John himself wore a tunic made of camel’s hair and a leather belt around his waist, and his diet consisted primarily of locusts and wild honey, according to the Scriptures.

5 Then Jerusalem, as well as all of Judea, as well as the entire region around the Jordan, came out to him, and they were baptized by him in the Jordan River as they confessed their sins.

So bear fruit consistent with repentance, and don’t fool yourself into thinking that you can say to yourself, “I’ve done my part.” “We have Abraham as our father,’ I say to you, since I believe that God is capable of raising children for Abraham out of these stones.

In my own words: “As for me, I baptize you with water for repentance,” but “He who comes after me is mightier than I, and I am not worthy to take His sandals off,” so He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.” His winnowing fork is in His hand, and He will thoroughly clear His threshing floor; and He will collect His wheat into the barn, but He will burn up the chaff with an unquenchable fire, as He did in the previous year.” 13 After that, Jesus traveled from Galilee to the Jordan, where he saw John and asked to be baptized by him.

John attempted to deter Him by asking, “I have a need to be baptized by You, and do You come near me?” 15 But Jesus responded by saying, “Permit it at this time; for it is suitable for us to complete all justice in this manner.” Then he gave Him permission.

16 Immediately following his baptism, Jesus arose from the water, and he saw the heavens opening, the Spirit of God descending as a dove and falling upon Him, 17 as well as a voice from the heavens saying, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.” (Matthew 3:16)

Baptism: part of Jesus’ Ministry and Part of our Mission

Now, during those days, John the Baptist came, preaching in the Judean desert, and he said, 2 “Repent, because the kingdom of heaven is near.” Specifically, this is the one to whom Isaiah, the prophet, refers in his prophecy: “IN THE WILDERNESS, “MAKE READY THE WAY OF THE LORD, MAKE HIS PATHS STRAIGHT!” cries out a voice, “MAKE THE LORD’S PATHS STRAIGHT!” (4) Now, as for John himself, he was dressed in a camel’s hair garment with a leather belt around his waist, and his diet consisted primarily of locusts and wild honey.

5 Then Jerusalem, as well as all of Judea, and the entire region around the Jordan, came out to him, and they were baptized in the Jordan River by him as they confessed their sins.

So bear fruit consistent with repentance, and don’t fool yourself into thinking that you can say to yourself, “I’ve done my best.” “We have Abraham as our father,’ I tell you, since I believe that God is capable of raising children for Abraham from these stones.

10 In my own words: “As for me, I baptize you with water for repentance,” but “He who comes after me is mightier than I, and I am not worthy to take off His sandals,” so He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.” His winnowing fork is in His hand, and He will thoroughly clear His threshing floor; and He will collect His wheat into the barn, but He will burn up the chaff with an unquenchable fire, as He has done in the past.” When Jesus came at the Jordan River from Galilee, he went straight to John the Baptist to be baptized.

14 But John sought to stop Him by asking, “I have a need to be baptized by You, and do You come to me?” 14 15 But Jesus, in response, said to him, “Permit it at this time; because it is proper for us to complete all righteousness in this manner.” 16 So he gave Him permission.

Baptism: Universal in the Early Church

Baptism was practiced universally in the early church, which is still another cause for the series’ development. It was neither limited to converted Jews or converted gentiles, nor was it limited to any one church. The tradition was followed by all churches for all new converts. There are no unbaptized believers that we are aware of (except the thief on the cross, Luke 23:43). For example, in Romans 6, Paul writes to a congregation that he has never visited (in response to a query about whether Christians may sin so that grace may abound), “If Christians can sin, then grace abounds.” “How can we, who have dead to sin, continue to live in it?

  • In other words, he grounds his argument that Christians cannot continue to sin wilfully on the fact that we have all died with Christ, as evidenced by our participation in baptism.
  • He presumes that all of the Roman believers had already been baptized, and he was only reminding them of what baptism represented.
  • Baptism must be taken seriously and practiced sincerely if we are to be in harmony with the entire New Testament and the entire early church.
  • Considering the nature of the ministry of the word, we think we have been delinquent in not asking for a more frank and public statement of faith in response to it.
  • These are sometimes referred to as “invitations.” “Altar calls” are made from time to time.

When looking for something like this in the Bible, there aren’t any obvious examples to be found. However, it is apparent that when Paul spoke the word, whether in a synagogue or on the Areopagus, he was able to establish relationships with people who believed (Acts 17:4,12,34).

The Decisive, Public Way of Taking a Public Stand

Baptism was the decisive, public means of declaring one’s Christian faith in the New Testament, and it is still considered to be the most effective method today. “Repent and be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ,” Peter’s preaching in Acts 2 concluded with the words, “Repent and be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ” (Acts 2:38). Our reaffirmed belief is that we must frequently provide baptism as the definitive public means for people to respond publically to the gospel message of Jesus Christ.

As a result, the series on baptism was created.

As a result, we believe that God has been and will continue to work among us in order to bring more people to a state of readiness for baptism, and that the guests and families who attend baptisms need to hear personal testimonies of how God has brought people to himself and what it means to be a Christian.

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We wish to keep the period between the confession of faith and the baptism as brief as possible because that is the way the New Testament accomplished it, and because the symbol seems more like a statement of the new reality of faith when the time between the profession of faith and the baptism is short.

Beginning with John the Baptist

The baptism ministry of John the Baptist serves as the starting point for our lesson today. This is where the practice of Christian baptism gets its start in the New Testament. There is a strong connection between Christian baptism and the baptism of John the Baptist. John initiated baptism, Jesus continued baptizing, and he instructed the church to continue the practice: albeit now the deed would be done in his name, it was still done in John’s name. There are several important lessons to be learned about baptism from the baptism of John.

  • This is one of the primary reasons I am a Baptist, which is to say, it is one of the primary reasons that I do not believe in baptism newborns, who are unable to make this personal commitment, confession, or repentance on their own.
  • Allow me to try to explain and demonstrate what I mean by Matthew 3 in the following ways.
  • According to verses 1-2, John appears in “the desert of Judea, proclaiming, ‘Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at near.'” John is described as saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at approach.” He is currently in Judea, where he is preaching to Jews, who are God’s special people.
  • It’s vital to remember that John’s ministry was largely directed for Jews rather than toward Gentiles.
  • As a result, John’s extreme call to repentance was addressed to Jews who were already members of the historic people of God, which indicates that they were already part of the historic people of God.

These were individuals who were a part of God’s covenant, and they had the sign of the covenant, at least in the case of the men, which was circumcision, as evidence of their membership.

Confess Your Sin, Repent, be Baptized

“Confess your faults, repent, and indicate this with baptism,” John stated, in effect, to these people, who were ethnic Jews, members of God’s covenant people, and who had the symbol of the covenant, circumcision. “God’s anger is hanging over you like an axe over the root of a tree,” John said. Take a look at verse 6: In the Jordan River, people were being baptized by Christ as they confessed their sins,” says the author. His baptism was referred to be “a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins” as a result of this (Mark 1:4).

  1. In other words, baptism served as a symbol of their decision to abandon their previous reliance on ethnic Jewishness and to rely only on the kindness of God, who promises to forgive those who confess their crimes and turn from their wicked ways.
  2. That is the crux of the matter: the anger of God.
  3. To put it another way, being Jewish was not a guarantee of salvation.
  4. John’s new symbol of membership to the genuine people of God is baptism, which is not based on Jewishness or being born into a covenant family, but on deeply personal, individual repentance and trust.
  5. At the very least, John’s goal was for conventional Jews to be transformed into real spiritual Jews via the process of repentance.

“We Have Abraham as our Father”

When John answers to the Pharisees and Sadducees, we gain a deeper understanding of his point of view even more. In verse 8, Jesus adds, “As a result, bear fruit in accordance with repentance. ” And then Jesus appears to read their minds, as he continues in verse 9, “And do not assume that you can say to yourself, “We have Abraham for our father”; for I say to you, that God is able to raise up offspring for Abraham from these stones.” What, exactly, were the Pharisees and Sadducees trying to communicate when they said, “We have Abraham as our father!” “Don’t bring up the subject of God’s vengeance with us,” they were saying.

“The wrath of God is reserved for the gentiles, not for Abraham’s descendants.” In other words, they were claiming that their bodily ancestry from Abraham ensured the certainty of their eternal salvation.

“Abraham is our forefather!” says the group.

John demonstrates this via the manner in which he answers.

In other words, they believed that God had made a promise to the children of Abraham that they would be blessed, not only with temporal blessings, but also with eternal blessings (because he would be their God and they would be his people), and that God would always be on their side as his covenant people if they followed his instructions.

  1. If God were to annihilate his own people, there would be no one left to fulfill the promises to, and God would be shown as a liar.
  2. According to John, you are correct in your assessment of God’s faithfulness, but you make a horrible mistake in believing that if you perish in his wrath, God will not be capable of fulfilling his promises.
  3. God has the ability to grow up offspring for Abraham from these stones (or from Gentiles!) if he so chooses.
  4. While he will be true in fulfilling his promises to Abraham’s offspring, he will not be loyal in fulfilling his promises to Abraham’s children who are disbelieving and unrepentant.

And if all of the children were to remain unrepentant and unbelievers, he would bring forth from the stones children who would repent and believe in the gospel.

God Can Raise up Children Who Believe and Repent

What does all of this have to do with baptism, exactly? There are three things: 1. It informs us that John’s baptism is not only a continuation of circumcision as previously understood. This is significant because those who advocate infant baptism frequently refer to circumcision as the “old sign of the covenant” and assert that baptism is the “new symbol of the covenant.” The first was given to newborns, and the second should be provided to them as well. Circumcision served as a symbol of connection to God’s people under the Old Covenant.

  • For those who were born Jewish, the sign of the covenant was first given to them as a newborn boy.
  • However, John’s baptism was a direct challenge to this illusory sense of security.
  • It marked the beginning of the formation of a new people inside Israel, as well as the establishment of a new symbol of a new covenant.
  • It was a scathing criticism of the misapplication of circumcision as a means of ensuring salvation.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • The Jews already had a sign of the covenant in the form of circumcision in their possession.

This was incredibly offensive, far more offensive than when a Baptist today says that baptism is not a sign to be received by infants born into a Christian home, but a sign of repentance and faith that a person chooses for himself, even if he has already been christened as an infant, in the same way that Jews were circumcised as infants, which is also incredibly offensive.

Three, John’s baptism conforms to what we will see throughout the rest of the New Testament, as well as throughout the first two centuries of the Christian era up until the year A.D.

And the rationale for this was that baptism was a symbol of belonging to God’s new people, who are not defined by their ethnic identity or their place of birth, but rather by their repentance and faith in Christ.

Today, God asks all of us, no matter who our parents were or what rituals we were subjected to as children, to repent and trust in Christ alone for salvation, and to accept the new symbol of the new covenant of God’s people, which is baptism, as a sign of our repentance and confidence in Christ.

For this reason, I implore those of you who have not yet followed Christ in this manner to “repent and be baptized” (Acts 2:38). This is God’s command to action. This is the way of obedience and a long and fruitful life.

Learn How and Why Jesus Was Baptized

Prior to the beginning of Jesus’ earthly mission, John the Baptist served as God’s designated messenger. John had been traveling across the region, preaching the advent of the Messiah to the people of Jerusalem and Judea as the Messiah’s arrival was near. People were urged to prepare for the advent of Messiah by repenting of their sins and being baptized, as instructed by John. He was directing them in the direction of Jesus Christ. Jesus had spent the most of his earthly existence in relative obscurity up until this point.

John informed him that he needed to be baptized by someone else because he was coming to him to be baptized.

To which Jesus responded: “Let it be so now, for it is fitting that we should fulfill all righteousness in this manner.” While the exact significance of this phrase is uncertain, it is believed to have prompted John to accede to baptizing Jesus.

Following his baptism, when he rose from the water, the skies opened and he saw the Holy Spirit descending on him like a dove, which he identified as the Holy Spirit of God.

Points of Interest From the Story of Jesus’ Baptism

John felt completely unqualified to carry out the task that Jesus had assigned to him. As followers of Christ, we frequently feel unqualified to carry out the job that God has given us to undertake. What was the reason for Jesus’ request to be baptized? This has been a source of consternation for Bible students for centuries. Jesus was without sin, thus he did not require purification. No, Christ’s ministry on earth included the act of baptism as part of his purpose. Jesus, like the past priests of God -Moses, Nehemiah, and Daniel — was admitting guilt on behalf of the entire world.

  1. Jesus’ baptism was one-of-a-kind.
  2. It was not a “Christian baptism” in the sense that we know it today.
  3. By surrendering to the waters of baptism, Jesus identified himself with people who were coming to John and confessing their sins to him.
  4. The baptism of Jesus was also a part of his preparation for the temptation of Satan in the desert.
  5. Last but not least, Jesus was declaring the beginning of his earthly mission at this time.

Jesus’ Baptism and the Trinity

The teaching of the Trinity was conveyed in the story of Jesus’ baptism: “As soon as Jesus was baptized, he sprang out of the water,” says the gospel writer. When he looked up, he saw the heavens open and the Spirit of God descending like a dove and settling on him. After that, there was a voice from heaven saying, “This is my Son, whom I love; I am pleased with him.” (Matthew 3:16–17, New International Version) God the Father spoke from the throne of heaven, God the Son was baptized, and God the Holy Spirit descended on Jesus in the form of a dove.

All three parts of the Trinity were present to support Jesus’ victory. The human humans in the room were aware of their existence and could perceive it. All three gave testimony to the fact that Jesus Christ was the Messiah in front of onlookers.

Question for Reflection

John had committed his life to preparing for the advent of Jesus, and he had been successful. He had devoted all of his attention and energy to this one moment. His mind was bent on doing what was right. John, on the other hand, refused to perform the very first thing Jesus requested him to do. John resisted because he felt inadequate and unworthy to carry out the task that Jesus had assigned to him. Do you ever feel that you’re not up to the task of fulfilling your God-given mission? Despite the fact that John felt unworthy even to unfasten the shoes of Jesus, Jesus declared him to be the greatest of all prophets (Luke 7:28).

Scripture References to Jesus’ Baptism

Matthew 3:13-17; Mark 1:9-11; Luke 3:21-22; John 1:29-34; are examples of passages from the Bible.

The Baptism of Jesus

What is the importance of Jesus’ baptism, and how did it come about? The following is the account provided in Matthew 3:13–17: Then Jesus traveled from Galilee to the Jordan River, where he was to be baptized by John the Baptist. In this case, John would have prevented him from doing so by declaring, “I require your baptism, and do you come to me?” However, Jesus responded, “Let it be so now, for it is suitable for us to complete all righteousness in this manner.” After that, he agreed. “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased,” a voice from heaven said as Jesus ascended from the water.

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But, in the end, he agrees to it.

As well as the meaning of the opening of the heavens, the descent of the Spirit, and the voice from on high, what is the significance of the other events?

Backgrounds

Was Jesus’ baptism a significant event in history? According to Matthew 3:13–17, the following is the historical record: As a result of his journey from Galilee to John’s baptism in the Jordan, Jesus is known as “the Water of Life.” “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” John would have told him if he had tried. “Let it be so now,” Jesus said, “because it is proper for us to complete all justice in this manner.” Afterwards, he gave his approval. “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased,” a voice from heaven said as Jesus ascended from the water.

The story immediately presents us with a conundrum: at first, John the Baptist is adamant in his opposition to the concept of baptism Jesus in the Jordan River.

Nonetheless, he eventually agrees to the proposal. What were his reasons for refusing to cooperate, and what led him to reconsider? As well as the importance of the opening of the heavens, the descent of the Spirit, and the voice from heaven, we must consider the following:

The History of Redemption

It is important to note that the Gospels position Jesus’ baptism within the larger historical framework of the ages-long unfolding of the history of salvation, which takes place according to God’s design. The events of creation and the fall are detailed in Genesis 1–3, which serves as the historical backdrop for this drama. In Genesis 3:15, the first promise of redemption is made in response to Adam’s sin: the promise of “her children,” the progeny of the woman, which already leads to Christ’s birth (Gal 3:16).

  1. “Repent, because the kingdom of heaven is at hand,” is the core theme of his ministry (Matt 3:2).
  2. Man must repent, but he must also make atonement in order to deal with the guilt he has brought upon himself by sin.
  3. These atoning offerings foreshadow the arrival of Christ as the ultimate atoning sacrifice.
  4. (See John 1:29 and verse 36 for a comparison.) Water is also used as a symbol of washing and purification from sin in several places in the Old Testament, including Leviticus 1:9, 8:6, 11:32, and 15:5–33, among other places.
  5. The use of water in baptism represents purification and the forgiveness of sins, and it is performed by John the Baptist.
  6. Isaiah 40:3 and Malachi 3:1, which speak of a prophetic forerunner, are referenced in the Gospels as indicating that John is the fulfillment of these predictions (Matt 3:3; Mark 1:2–3).
  7. Despite the fact that God has always been in control of the universe (Ps 103:19), the “kingdom of heaven” is only established when God climacticlly utilizes his power to bring about the salvation of his people.
  8. As a result of his casting out demons and healing sicknesses (Matt 12:28; Luke 7:22–23), Jesus, the one greater than John, is the one who truly brings this kingdom into being in its initial form.
  9. Consequently, the Bible provides us with an understanding of John the Baptist’s unique position in the narrative of salvation.

He is the one who has been tasked with “making ready the way” for Jesus (Matt 3:3). As a result, he finds himself on the edge of an entirely new period of history, the period in which God’s saving reign will be exercised and redemption will be completed by Jesus once and for all.

John’s Objection

With this greater background in mind, we are better prepared to appreciate the baptism of Jesus by John in a more profound way. By calling people to repentance, John is preparing them for the second coming of Jesus. Upon receiving the visit from Jesus himself, John realizes Jesus’ supremacy and asks, “Do you come to me?” (I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?) The Bible says (Matt 3:14). John’s point of view is reasonable in most respects. “A baptism of repentance for the remission of sins” is what John is baptizing people with (Mark 1:4).

He has done nothing wrong and has nothing to repent of.

The one who must repent and be baptized, in contrast to Jesus, is John, who declares, “I need to be baptized by you.” While the people who come to John will be baptized, Jesus, unlike the people who came to John, will be baptized with a baptism that is far greater than John’s: “I baptize you with water for repentance,”.

(Matthew 3:11; Luke 3:11)

Jesus’s Answer

It is understandable that John feels compelled to express his dissatisfaction. Yet Jesus responds to the objection by saying, “Let it be so now, for it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness in this manner” (Matt 3:15). What exactly does he mean? “Then he consented,” says John, in a mysterious statement that nevertheless satisfies him: ” Jesus declares that his baptism will be “to bring all righteousness to completion.” The word “fulfill” is appropriate in this context because it refers to the entire complex of what is happening.

  1. With the coming of Jesus, the long-awaited promises of climactic redemption, promises that date back to Genesis 3:15, have finally been fulfilled in full.
  2. The baptism of Jesus is one aspect of fulfillment and one aspect of bringing “all righteousness,” the deep righteousness that belongs to God and his kingdom, into the world.
  3. The Jews have arrived in order to repent.
  4. As already said, Jesus is without sin (2Cor 5:21; Heb 4:15; 1Pet 2:22).
  5. The sinful people of Israel identify with him, and the sin of the people of Israel identifies with him, because he is coming to be both the final sacrifice and the final high priest (Heb 8–10; see also Rom 8–10).
  6. This act foreshadows the time on the cross when he will die for the sins of the people of Israel, as well as for the sins of all those who are his disciples and disciples of Jesus Christ.
  7. Filling “all righteousness” includes not only Jesus’ righteous obedience to his Father’s will, but also providing us with a righteousness through his perfect righteousness, “in order that we might become the righteousness of God,” according to the Bible.

This act of exchange, in which Jesus takes our sin and gives it to us in exchange for his righteousness, is depicted symbolically earlier in the story when he is baptized by John the Baptist.

The Coming of the Spirit

In being baptized, Jesus is following out the Father’s plan, which was carried out before the creation of the world (1Pet 1:20). God the Father responds positively by taking action. It was as though the sky had been opened to him.” The opening represents, in pictorial form, the opening of the path leading to the presence of God. Even while Jesus as the Son is constantly in company with the Father, this opening expresses the reality of that fellowship to those who are there. Out of the aperture, “the Spirit of God” is seen to descend.

“The Spirit is coming to rest on him,” says the author.

It is through the Spirit that Jesus performs his public ministry: “But if it is through the Spirit of God that I cast out devils, then it is the kingdom of God that has arrived upon you” (Matt 12:28).

Does Jesus Always Have the Spirit?

The arrival of the Holy Spirit to “rest on him” offers an interesting topic. Is it possible that Jesus did not have the Spirit prior to this point? According to the biblical theology of the Trinity, each member of the Trinity possesses all of God’s attributes. As John 1:1 says, Jesus is the Son of God. With God the Father and God the Holy Spirit, God the Son is constantly in close communion with each of them. One God is represented by the three individuals, and they are intertwined in one another.

  1. As a result, any further action of the Holy Spirit is motivated by Jesus’ human character rather than his divine nature.
  2. Surely, the same is true with regard to Jesus’ human nature, who is far superior than John the Baptist in terms of his humanity (compare Luke 2:40, 52).
  3. When it comes to Jesus’ baptism, what is there that is new?
  4. This new task is done in a manner that is respectful of his human character.

The Voice of the Father

The descending of the Spirit is accompanied by the sound of “a voice from heaven.” This is the voice of God the Father, speaking to us. “This is my Beloved Son, in whom I take pleasure,” the Father says (Matt 3:17). Isaiah 42:1, as well as Psalm 2:7, are two of the most important scriptures from the Old Testament that this voice picks up on. Toward the end of Psalm 2:7, the writer anticipates the arrival of Jesus as the king of the house of David. Isaiah 42:1 refers to Jesus as “my servant, whom I maintain,” which means “my servant, whom I uphold.” In Isaiah 53, the servant is the one who gives redemption to the people by dying on the cross for their transgressions against the Lord.

  1. Overall, the spectacular event of Jesus’ baptism exhibits the characteristics of a “theophany,” which is the appearance of God on earth.
  2. (Ezek 1).
  3. We are witnessing a powerful demonstration of God’s presence in this place.
  4. God the Father communicates with us from on high.

God the Spirit soars through the air like a bird. The speech of the Father is addressed to God the Son, who is the one who has spoken. The fact that Jesus’ incarnation represents the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies makes this an appropriate conclusion.

Jesus Baptizes with the Spirit

Remember also the prophesy of John the Baptist, who said that the one who comes after him will “send the Holy Spirit and fire” upon all who believe in him (Matt 3:11). The fulfillment of this prophesy corresponds to the day of Pentecost, which is detailed in Acts 2. ‘Tongues as of fire’ are seen by the apostles and the church on that day, when the Holy Spirit descends upon them (verse 3). It is in this way that Jesus’ baptism establishes a basis for our own baptism with the Holy Spirit. Jesus is the one who represents us.

  • He serves as our representation on the cross, bearing our sins.
  • As a result, the characteristics revealed in Jesus’ baptism by John come to apply to us via Jesus.
  • Heaven is made accessible to us via Jesus, allowing us to have direct communication with God the Father (Heb 10:19–20).
  • Our ears are filled with the voice of God the Father, who addresses us as sons in relationship with Christ the Son (Rom 8:14–17; Gal 4:4–7) and who expresses delight in us because he expresses delight in his eternal Son (Eph 1:4–10; Rom 8:14–17).

JESUS BAPTISED BY JOHN THE BAPTIST – WHAT HAPPENED?

  • What exactly did John do in order to baptize someone
  • What was it that Jesus and John were arguing over
  • What is the relationship between Baptism and the Exodus? What did God’s voice say to Jesus while he was being baptized by John the Baptist?

Jesus comes to the Jordan River

The baptism of Jesus by John is a pivotal event in the life of Jesus. God refers to Jesus as the Servant, the Messiah, and the Son of God. a painting of John the Baptist pointing towards a figure of Jesus approaching John the Baptist was a well-known teacher in the Galilee region He exhorted people to repent of their transgressions.

  • They were cleansed in the River Jordan, first via personal repentance in which they confessed their sins to God, and then by a ceremonial washing in which they were actually washed clean.

A symbolic reenactment of the Exodus from Egypt, in which the Israelites crossed the Jordan River into the Promised Land, took place at this ritual. Certainly, Jesus would have heard about John the Baptist and would have paid attention to his teachings. He walked up to the location on the river bank where John was teaching, and he volunteered himself as a candidate for the cleansing process, which was to be performed by baptism. John’s reaction was one of astonishment. Take a look at the blue writing at the bottom of the page.

See also:  What Happened To Jesus Body

John argues with Jesus

He had the distinct impression that he was dealing with someone remarkable right away. Photograph of the Jordan RiverIt is likely that he was familiar with Jesus and his teachings. In any case, he saw that this was not a sinner in need of repentance, and he said as much strongly as he could. According to him, rather than the other way around, he was supposed to be the one who came to Jesus for baptism. His other unusual statements included labeling Jesus as the ‘Lamb of God,’ which was a first in the history of the church, and declaring that, rather than having his sins washed away by baptism, Jesus would be the one who washed away the sins of the entire world.

Jesus reprimanded him in a gentle manner.

John instantly conceded, admitting that it was Jesus, not him, who was in a position of power. Everyone there must have been astounded by what they were seeing, but it was only a prologue to the events that followed. Take a look at the green text at the bottom of the page.

The Spirit descends on Jesus

The rest of the story is consistent across all four gospels. When John discovered who Jesus was, it was a watershed moment for him. Immediately after Jesus rose from the sea (the same term is used to describe the Exodus and the entry into the Promised Land), the heavens opened – the English translation of the original Greek phrase is ‘torn or ripped asunder’ – allowing people on the ground below to catch a glimpse of heaven. Remember that during the time of the writing of the gospels, people thought that the sky was a dome that covered a flat disc, which was the earth.

People were able to witness God ‘in corporeal form’ as it transpired.

Then the voice of God could be heard.

  • When Jesus was baptized in repentance, he received the Messianic gift of the Spirit, and he was acknowledged to be the Son of God.

It was these three factors that disclosed the mystery of Jesus’ identity: After what transpired that day, John and the others in his immediate vicinity came to understand who Jesus was and the task he had come to perform. Take a look at the red writing at the bottom of the page. What occurred after that? See Cana’s Wedding for more information. A rather unique icon, dating to around 1300AD, depicts Jesus, who has been stripped of all his garments, as he walks down into the Jordan River to undergo his baptism from John the Baptist.

What the Gospels say

Reading the blue text explains how Jesus travels to the Jordan River to be baptized. 2. John engages in a debate with Jesus; see the green text. 3. The Holy Spirit falls upon Jesus, as shown by the red lettering. Matthew 3:13-1713 (Matthew 3:13-1713) Then Jesus traveled from Galilee to the Jordan River, where he was to be baptized by John the Baptist. 14 John would have prevented him by saying, “I require your baptism, and do you come to me?” 15 But Jesus responded, “Let it be so now; because it is suitable for us to fulfill all righteousness in this manner.” After that, he agreed.

16 And as he did so, the heavens were opened, and the Spirit of God descended like a dove and descended on him.

As he came up out of the water, he saw the heavens open and the Holy Spirit descending upon him like a dove; 11 and a voice from heaven said, “Thou are my beloved Son; I am much delighted with thee.” As soon as all of the people had been baptized, and as soon as Jesus himself had been baptized and was praying, the heavens were opened, 22 and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form, as a dove, and a voice from heaven said, “Thou are my beloved Son; with thee I am well pleased.” 1:29-3429 (John 1:19-3429) In the morning of that same day, he looked up and saw Jesus coming toward him and exclaimed, “Behold, God’s Lamb, whom you have crucified, who takes away the sin of the world!

30 This is the one of whom I spoke when I said, ‘After me comes a man who ranks before me because he was before me.'” 31 I did not know him personally, but I came to baptize with water in order that he may be revealed to Israel.” 32 And John testified, saying, “I saw the Spirit descend from heaven like a dove, and it remained on him.” ‘He on whom you see the Spirit descend and abide, this is the one who baptizes with the Holy Spirit,’ said the one who sent me to baptize with water, 33 but I didn’t know who he was myself.

34 And I have personally witnessed and attested to the fact that Jesus is the Son of God.”

Verse by Verse Ministry International

The Gospel of John claims that John the Baptist was unaware that Jesus was the Messiah until after he baptized Jesus; however, the Gospel of Matthew claims that John the Baptist was hesitant to baptize Jesus at first because John recognized Jesus as his superior, and so John withheld baptism from Jesus until after he had done so. Isn’t this a direct violation of the Bible’s teachings? John the Baptist is reported as saying the following in John 1:

John 1:30 “This is He on behalf of whom I said, ‘After me comes a Man who has a higher rank than I, for He existed before me.’John 1:31 “I did not recognize Him, but so that He might be manifested to Israel, I came baptizing in water.”John 1:32 John testified saying, “I have seen the Spirit descending as a dove out of heaven, and He remained upon Him.John 1:33 “I did not recognize Him, but He who sent me to baptize in water said to me, ‘He upon whom you see the Spirit descending and remaining upon Him, this is the One who baptizes in the Holy Spirit.’John 1:34 “I myself have seen, and have testified that this is the Son of God.”

The Gospel of John claims that John the Baptist did not realize that Jesus was the Messiah until after he baptized Jesus; however, the Gospel of Matthew claims that John was hesitant to baptize Jesus at first because John recognized Jesus as his superior, and so John withheld his baptism from Jesus until after he had done so. Don’t these verses seem to be at odds with one another? As recorded in the first chapter of John, John the Baptist says:

Matt. 3:13Then Jesusarrived from Galilee at the Jordan coming to John, to be baptized by him.Matt. 3:14 But John tried to prevent Him, saying, “I have need to be baptized by You, and do You come to me?”Matt. 3:15 But Jesus answering said to him, “Permit it at this time; for in this way it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then hepermitted Him.Matt. 3:16 After being baptized, Jesus came up immediately from the water; and behold, the heavens were opened, and he saw the Spirit of God descending as a dove and lighting on Him,Matt. 3:17 and behold, a voice out of the heavens said, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.”

According to Matthew’s narrative, John the Baptist was hesitant to baptize Jesus at first because he recognized Jesus’ greater status in the hierarchy of deities. John suggested that Jesus should baptize him instead, showing that John was aware of Jesus’ status as the Messiah. Is this a contradiction to John’s version of events? No, there isn’t any inconsistency here. First and foremost, it is important to note that Matthew’s version never specifies how John came to know about Jesus’ identity.

  • So when John responds, “I have need to be baptized by you,” he was just accepting Jesus’ greater status in terms of righteousness over John.
  • Remember that John and Jesus were cousins who were born six months apart and most likely grew up together, thus Jesus’ superior righteousness must have been obvious to John even at that young age.
  • In his heart, John saw that Jesus was far more righteous than he was, which is why he cried that Jesus should instead be baptized by him.
  • John finally realized that Jesus was the Messiah!
  • Even though John the Baptist did not realize Jesus was the Messiah until after the baptism, he regarded Jesus as the most virtuous of the two brothers.

John the Baptist baptises Jesus

– Chapter 2 of the Life of Jesus Christ – John the Baptist and Jesus begin their work – Part 4 of the series Previous article |Life of Jesus Christ Index|*Word List|Next article |Life of Jesus Christ Index Barrie Wetherill’s online Bible Study course on the life of Jesus is available for free. Level B of EasyEnglish is used to write this book. Please see the links below for more online Bible Study books and commentaries that may be of use.

Alternatively, you can consult the Word List, which provides explanations for terms marked with a *star. English Bible homepage|Matthew(commentary) |Mark(commentary) |Luke(commentary) |John(commentary) |Matthew(commentary) (commentary)

Matthew 3:13-17, Luke 3:21, 22

People had done things that were bad. Some people expressed regret for the bad acts they had done. Those individuals were baptized by John. Jesus and other individuals came to him for *baptism, and he received them. John attempted to dissuade him (Matthew 3:13). Christ, on the other hand, had done nothing wrong. He had committed no *sin that needed to be atoned for. Jesus, on the other hand, was about to begin his public ministry. This was the appropriate moment. He wished to demonstrate that he was a guy.

He had come to save people’s lives.

In an instant, the *Holy Spirit descended on Jesus like a descending bird.

I’m madly in love with you.

John recognized that Jesus was the *Messiah

God had instructed John on how to identify the *Messiah. If God had not told me about him, I would not have known who he was. The *Holy Spirit will descend on him and dwell on him for a period of time. He will be the one who will be *baptized with the *Holy Spirit *into the church (John 1:33). Jesus was given authority by God at this point. Jesus had a task to do. It was the power of the *Holy Spirit that enabled this job to be accomplished (Acts 10:38). On another occasion, John noticed Jesus standing close by.

At the time, neither John nor the assembled people could have comprehended the significance of this.

He then came back to life for a second time.

After then, males were able to comprehend a greater number of these concepts.

The Lamb of God

This particular name for Jesus appears only once in the *New Testament, in John 1. In the Book of Revelation, Jesus is referred to as the Lamb on several occasions. It is unclear what John the Baptist was referring to. It is unclear what his *disciples were supposed to take away from this phrase. Here are some of the possible meanings: � The * Passover Lamb � Exodus 12 � To remind us of the animal which God gave in Genesis 22:13. It was the *sacrifice offered in Isaac’s place. � The lamb which Isaiah 53:7 refers � The lambs which the Jews offered every morning and evening as *sacrifices in the *Temple � The lambs which Jews sacrificed to God as *sacrifices, when they were sorry for their *sins.

Perhaps John did not mean only one thing.

Jesus would be the *sacrifice to take away *sin.

John’s authority to *baptise

John talked about Jesus with a tremendous deal of authority. People were under the impression that John was a *prophet. He demonstrated this via the simplicity with which he lived. He demonstrated this with his words. Following that, the men who reigned over the *Temple came to see Jesus. They arrived just as he was about to die on the *cross. They questioned him about the power he possessed. What motivated him to act in the manner that he did? Jesus responded with a question in Mark 11:29 (NASB).

Please respond to me.

Is it true that God appointed John to *baptize people?

The members from the *Temple were adamant in their refusal to answer Jesus’ questions.

All of the people were convinced that God had chosen John to be a *prophet. In response, Jesus said: I will not tell you by what authority I am doing these miracles either. MissionAssist was in operation from 2002 until 2005.

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