What Did Jesus Say At The Last Supper

Christ’s Last Supper: Take and Eat – What did Jesus really mean?

On Holy Thursday, we commemorate the Last Supper, which took place just before Jesus’ death. “On that night,” He told them, “I have been anxiously awaiting the opportunity to share this Passover with you before I suffer.” (See Luke 22:15.) Afterwards, he took bread, and after giving thanks, he broke it and handed it to them with the words ‘This is my body, which is sacrificed for you.'” In memory of me, please perform this act of kindness.’ The cup after supper was similarly described as follows: “‘This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood,'” Jesus said.

(See also Luke 22:19-20.) In accordance with Jesus’ request at the Last Supper to “do this in remembrance of me,” the Church has fulfilled this commandment via the sacrifice of the Mass and the administration of the sacrament of Holy Communion throughout the years.

Not every Christian, or even every Catholic, believes that the Gospels mean exactly what they say; yet, the Catholic Church officially teaches that the Gospels mean exactly what they say and are literally true.

Everywhere and at all times, the Church has maintained and continues to affirm that the four Gospels are the product of the apostles’ hands.

Holy Mother Church has firmly and unwaveringly held, and continues to hold, that the four Gospels just mentioned, whose historical character the Church unapologetically asserts, faithfully hand on what Jesus Christ, while living among men, truly did and taught for their eternal salvation until the day He was taken up into heaven, have been handed down to us by the Holy Spirit and are still being handed down to us today (see Acts 1:1).

As a matter of fact, following the Lord’s ascension, the Apostles communicated to their audiences everything He had said and done.

Moreover, according to the Catholic Church, Holy Communion is more than a symbolic act; rather, in this sacrament, Jesus offers us his actual self in order to nourish us spiritually and to assist us in becoming more joined to himself so that we may have “life.” When asked who he was, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” As taught by the Catholic Church, when we partake of Holy Communion, we are partaking of Christ’s genuine flesh, blood, soul, and divinity.

The manner of Christ’s presence in the Eucharistic species is distinct from any other form of presence.

” When the Eucharist is celebrated, “the flesh and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, as well as his soul and divinity, are really, truly, and substantially contained,” according to the Catechism, “and the entire Christ is truly, truly, and substantially contained.” Christ becomes present in this sacrament as a result of the transformation of the bread and wine into the flesh and blood of Jesus Christ, respectively.

The Church Fathers reaffirmed the Church’s trust in the power of the Word of Christ as well as the operation of the Holy Spirit in bringing about this conversion in a forceful manner.

The Church believes that “the Eucharist is ‘the root and summit of the Christian life.’ ‘The other sacraments, and indeed all ecclesiastical ministries and deeds of apostolate, are tied up with the Eucharist and are oriented toward it,'” as follows: For in the glorious Eucharist, which is Christ himself, is contained the entirety of the Church’s spiritual welfare.’ (CCC 1324; CCC 1325) There was a Gallup poll in 1992 of 519 U.S.

Catholics regarding Holy Communion, and only 30% of those polled believed that when we receive Jesus Christ’s body and blood in Holy Communion that we are receiving the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ along with the Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ.

For this reason, I would like to discuss some logical reasons why we can accept this teaching (even though, if we truly understand our Catholic faith, we come to understand that the Church has infallible teachings, and this is one of them, so really each Church teaching does not need to be proven, rather, as the Catechism states: “We believe all ‘that which is contained in God’s word, whether written or handed down, and which the Church has taught’.”) And if we exclude Church doctrine, what other proof do we have that Jesus genuinely meant what he said at the Last Supper in the most literal sense?

Listed below are several arguments in favor of this doctrine, as well as actual miracles that have occurred.

Why do so many different religious factions have diverse beliefs when the Bible is so easily understood?

I think it’s reasonable to believe that Jesus would ensure, through his personal instructions to his apostles and also through the Holy Spirit’s presence at Pentecost, that Peter and the apostles would understand what He taught and meant so that they could share these truths with the rest of humanity.

  1. Jesus promised that, if they did not get the meaning right immediately, he would make certain that they did so by the gift of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost and before he commissioned them to proclaim the Gospel across the entire globe.
  2. We have the Bible as well as early church texts to help us understand what they were saying.
  3. According to the Bible, St.
  4. Because there is only one loaf of bread, we who are many become one body because we all share of the same loaf of bread.
  5. In this way, anybody who consumes the bread or drinks from the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be committing a sacrilege against the body and blood of the Lord.
  6. Moreover, everyone who eats and drinks without considering his or her own body is bringing punishment upon himself or herself.
  7. The following is what Jesus stated in John 6:48-65: “I am the bread of life.” Those who came before you ate the manna in the desert, but they perished; this is the bread that comes down from heaven, so that those who eat it will not perish.

Whoever eats this bread will live forever.’ I will offer my flesh for the life of the world.

In response, Jesus responded, ‘Amen, amen, I say to you, except you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life within you.’ Every person who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the end of time.

Whoever consumes my flesh and drinks my blood becomes a part of me, and I become a part of him.

This is the loaf of bread that descended from heaven.

These are the words he spoke while giving a sermon at the synagogue in Capernaum.

The spirit is the source of life, but the flesh is completely ineffective.

“However, there are many among you who do not believe.” Jesus foresaw those who would refuse to believe and those who would betray him from the beginning of his ministry.

Indeed, we find historical evidence that the early Christians did take Jesus’ words about Holy Communion literally, rather than symbolically, as some do today.

St.

“For we do not receive these as common bread or common drink; rather, because Jesus Christ our Savior was made incarnate by the word of God and had both flesh and blood in order to save us, so too, as we have been taught, the food which has been transformed into Eucharist by the Eucharistic prayer prescribed for us by him, and by the change of which our blood and flesh is nurtured, is both the flesh and the blood of that incarnated Jesus.

(First Apology No.

Irenaeus: “If the Lord came from a source other than the Father, how could he rightly take bread, which is of the same creation as our own, and confess it to be his body while affirming that the mixture contained within a cup represents his blood?” (Against Heresies4:33-32) Against Heresies4:33-32 As St.

  • This has been spoken in a very brief manner, which may be adequate for faith; but, faith does not seek teaching.” (Sermons411).
  • After all, the mixed cup and baked bread are transformed by God’s Word into the Eucharist, his body and blood, and our flesh is strengthened and nourished as a result of this.
  • is it possible that flesh is nourished by the body and blood of the Lord, and is thus a member of him?” (See also ibid., 5:2).
  • Everything we need for our growth is provided by the Lord, who delivers over his flesh and pours out his blood, and nothing is missing for the development of his offspring” (The Instructor of Children1:6:43:3).
  • Beyond the official teaching of the Church, the Bible, and the writings of the Early Church Fathers, there have been numerous miracles performed throughout history that have pointed to the “real presence” of Jesus in the Sacrament of the Mass.
  • For further information, please see this link.
  • A great devotion to Jesus in the Eucharist was also demonstrated by the Saints, through whom God performed numerous miracles.

John Vianney (also known as St.

‘There is nothing more wonderful than the Eucharist.’ “If God had something more valuable, He would have given it to us,” says the author.

Jerome (also known as St.

Leonard of Port Maurice (sometimes spelled St.

Leonard of Port Maurice.

Only a few quotes from Church teachings, Early Church Fathers, teachings of the Saints, and also miracles associated with the Eucharist are included in this section; there are many more.

It is possible that some Christians who believe in the Bible and take it literally do not take these words of Christ literally; however, upon in-depth study of the sources mentioned, if one takes the time to study them, it appears most reasonable to take Jesus’ words literally, keeping in mind that God is capable of doing any and everything.

  • (Matthew 19:26; Luke 19:26) When we go to Mass, our Catholic faith tells us that Jesus is not only there in spirit, but is also physically present in Holy Communion, and that by receiving him, we can be linked to Jesus in a particular way that is not possible otherwise.
  • When Jesus initially said this, the disciples were perplexed as to what he was referring to, and some of them deserted, but we learn what he was referring to at the Last Supper.
  • and instructed us to do so in remembrance of him, as we do at each Mass.
  • This is exactly what Jesus wished for.
  • There is so much to say about Holy Communion that it is impossible to cover it all in a short article like this.
  • It is available online at the following address: my website at is a page with links to Church documents and writings of the saints at the following address.
  • We must devote sufficient time to study if we are to gain a thorough understanding of our faith.

The following image was created for this topic about Christ’s Last Supper: Restored Traditions has permission to use an enhanced detail of Philippe de Champaigne’s The Last Supper, 1648, PD-US author’s life plus 100 years or less, Restored Traditions.

The Last Supper and Jesus’ Final Teaching (22:7-38) – IVP New Testament Commentary Series

Luke is a big fan of food. This is his sixth supper scene, and it is also one of the most emotional in the entire play (see 5:29-32; 7:36-50; 9:12-17; 10:38-42; 11:37-54; 14:1-24; two more remain, 24:28-32, 36-43). Friends might gather around the dinner table to share stories and reflect on the day’s events. In such a private environment, Jesus’ final words to his followers are delivered to his disciples. The timing of the moment adds to the intimacy of the scene. This year’s Passover supper will be held on Friday (vv.

  • As part of the celebration of God’s deliverance of Israel, Jesus will speak of his own sacrifice on behalf of his followers.
  • Even as he confronts death, Jesus continues to serve by preparing others for their responsibilities.
  • The preparation of the Passover dinner is no exception, as many of the Passion scenes indicate that Jesus is in complete command of the situation.
  • Consequently, Luke’s preface makes an unified reference to the two works of literature.
  • A suitable place was required since it was a legal necessity that the feast be celebrated inside Jerusalem, which meant that a suitable location had to be found (2 Chron 35:18;Jubilees49:15-16 even held the temple was the desirable locale).
  • Jesus informs Peter and John that “a guy carrying a jug of water”will come to them and show them “a huge upper room that is completely furnished.” The things that Peter and John discover are exactly as Jesus had told them they would be.
  • A large number of pillows would have been arranged throughout the room for guests to relax on.

They can tell that he is aware of the events that are taking place around him.

The meal itself is loaded with a range of feelings.

He emphasizes his argument by employing a Hebrew expression, “I have wanted with desire,” which means “I have sought with desire” (NIV:I have eagerly desired;compare Gen 31:30; Num 11:4).

For Luke, the supper functions as a literary “final testament,” in which Jesus’ farewell remarks to his disciples are recorded.

With knowledge of what was ahead and the realization that “I shall not eat until it finds completion in the kingdom of God,” we can only picture his feelings.

“It is over,” he says.

See also:  What Did Jesus Said On The Cross

These statements are seen as fulfillment in Acts and the Lord’s Supper, however Jesus does not participate in the meal himself; he is merely there as a witness to it.

Jesus had in mind the grand fulfillment of promise, when he returns to earth and governs directly and clearly alongside his saints, which will take place at the end of time.

Those who believe in the return of Christ will believe that it will include setting up of the New Heavens and New Earth.

The cup, like the supper, represents Christ’s final act of communion with his disciples.

Jesus is certainly experiencing a bittersweet time.

They will resume their celebrations once the kingdom has arrived.

They serve as the foundation for our Lord’s Supper.

Following the consumption of the Passover lamb, the unleavened bread, and the bitter herbs, this cup was consumed.

As a result, Jesus’ statements mimic prior redemption events and reverberate with all of the imagery associated with that connection.

To put it another way, the bread symbolizes “my body offered for you; do this in remembrance of me.” Jesus is not arguing that the bread is transformed into his body, which is known as the doctrine of transubstantiation.

The bread, like the Passover, depicts his death and his self-sacrifice as his body is broken for the disciples on the cross, just as it does during the Passover.

The meal’s symbolic aspect is demonstrated by the invitation to remember it.

In 1 Corinthians 11:17-34, when the church gathers for the meal, it becomes a public declaration of unity with Jesus, as well as a public covenant renewal.

For his part, Jesus took his cup after the meal and declared, “This cup represents the new covenant in my blood, which has been poured out for you.” According to Jer 31:31, the new covenant is a significant subject of the New Testament (see also Mt 26:28; Lk 24:49, the Father’s promise; Acts 2:14–39; 2 Corinthians 3–4; Heb 8–10).

  • He uses it to purchase the church (Acts 20:28).
  • A new sacrifice heralds the beginning of a new period of fulfillment.
  • In order to grasp this interpretation of Jesus’ sacrifice as represented by the cup, two characteristics must be considered.
  • This is most strongly stated by Paul in Romans 3:20-26.
  • As a second point of emphasis, Jesus emphasizes that his death is inextricably linked to the formation of the new covenant.
  • Most eloquently expressed is Hebrews 8—10, which provides an explanation of the concept of a new covenant.
  • He must first offer himself in order to give the Spirit to others.

Jesus will return to the table at some point in the future.

That is the tale of God’s grace in its entirety.

Even when Jesus sacrifices himself for people he loves, one of them turns on him and betrays him.

One person at the table expresses a desire for Jesus to be removed.

In his final words, Jesus implies that his death was not unexpected.

Nonetheless, the betrayer has moral responsibility before God for his actions.

God was there in this case, as he was in every other case of covertly planned sin.

The ironic undertone is amplified as a result of this impact.

Even one of his own family members betrays him (Ps 41:9).

It is a terrifying prospect to turn our backs on the One who has given his life to ensure our pardon.

As a result, they begin to wonder among themselves: “Who would do this?” Those who claim to be linked with Jesus may remain close to him for a period of time before revealing that their hearts are genuinely elsewhere.

Who knows the Son clings to him; those who do not know the Son disassociate themselves from him through denial (Col 1:21-23).

Yes, fidelity is important, but much more so is the service that demonstrates faithfulness.

The text refers to a “rivalry” (NIV: quarrel) that has erupted between the two of them.

As a response, Jesus draws a distinction between leadership in the world and leadership in the kingdom.

When persons had such influence in the ancient world, their authority was publicly acknowledged, and they were referred to as benefactors by the populace.

Glory and glory were bestowed upon the commander.

The disciple-leader should be treated with respect and reverence due to his or her youth.

Jesus cites his own life as an example, rather than that of the society.

The Greek interrogative particleouchiexpects a positive response to the inquiry of whether the person at the table is seen as more important than the one in the servant’s position.

Service is defined as the giving of his life for them.

According to John 13, before this supper, Jesus washed the feet of the disciples as a gesture of humble service.

Jesus promises them something when he summons them to serve him in the kingdom of God.

They have remained firm in their commitment to God’s chosen one in the face of opposition, just as exemplary disciples have done.

A kingdom has been granted to Jesus by the Father.

As a result, he will assign them a role in his organization.

Having table fellowship with Jesus and having dominion over God’s chosen people, Israel, will be the norm in the future.

Because of their relationship with Jesus, individuals are able to reap the blessings of his authority.

No matter how awful the pain, rejection, and persecution get, he wants to assure his people that there will come a day when vindication and power will prevail.

Despite the fact that the eleven were granted exclusive power, all disciples are assured of a prize and a seat at the table of messianic fellowship.

The cosmic conflict is not limited to the conflict between Jesus and Satan.

Nothing illustrates this more clearly than the portion in which Peter is warned about his impending rejections of his faith.

The verses 31-32 are unique to Luke, and they come after his emphasis on prayer.

Despite the fact that Peter is mentioned individually in verse 32, the use of the Greek word hymas, which means “you all,” in verse 31 indicates that he is simply a part of the impending struggle.

Perhaps Satan feels that if Peter is humiliated, it would inspire others to follow in his footsteps.

It is his wish that Peter’s faith would not be tested.

Despite popular belief, Peter will not abandon Jesus completely.

There will be a period of rehabilitation.

His mission will thereafter be to encourage and support his fellow followers.

Peter will be able to strengthen the saints because he will have learned that failure is possible and that the flesh is weak.

Peter is certain that he is willing to serve in jail, and even to die, for the sake of Jesus.

Despite this, he is confident in his ability to deal with anything comes his way.

Even in the solitude of a peaceful supper, Peter demonstrates courage, and when the soldiers arrive, he will immediately take up arms to defend Jesus from them.

It is clear from Jesus’ forecast of a triple denial prior to the sound of the rooster’s crow that he knows Peter better than Peter does.

Confidence in one’s own abilities when one is not relying on Jesus is deceitful.

He will be able to call on people to accept God’s compassion, to be prepared to suffer, and to be prepared to defend themselves because he will have had all of these opportunities himself—some with failure, some with success—and he will have learned from his mistakes.

The Savior’s love is demonstrated through intercession (1 Jn 2:2).

Not only is the lesson crucial for Peter, but it is also vital for all of the disciples who he symbolizes.

Jesus’ final statements make it quite evident that things are about to change.

Unlike previously, when Jesus sent them off empty-handed but with food (9:1-6; 10:3-4), today they will be required to bring provisions and protection for their journey.

Scriptures such as Isaiah 53:12 are finding fulfillment in the person of Jesus Christ.

The disciples misinterpret Jesus’ comments, taking them literally and in error.

Something doesn’t seem quite right, but it’s too late to fix it now.

They raise their swords at that point, but Jesus halts their attack in its tracks.

They will have to provide for themselves and fend for themselves, but this will not be accomplished via the sacrifice of innocent blood.

The purchase of swords is solely for the purpose of visualizing the upcoming battle.

At Jesus’ final supper breakfast, the issues of humility, reliance, the promise of power and reward, cautions against opposition, and the pursuit of fidelity are all discussed in detail.

They are not, however, to retreat or be fearful.

Jesus is about to demonstrate what it means to be innocent in the face of a hostile world.

His success is not proven by his retreat or even by his survival; rather, it is indicated by his loyalty to the cause (1 Pet 2:21-25). The generosity of InterVarsity Press allows us to make the IVP New Testament Commentaries available to you.

Jesus and the Last Supper

Mr. Luke is a big fan of food. The meal scene in question is his seventh, and it is also one of the most dramatic (see 5:29-32; 7:36-50; 9:12-17; 10:38-42; 11:37-54; 14:1-24; two more remain, 24:28-32, 36-43). Friends can gather around the dinner table to share stories and reflect on the events of the day. The final words of Jesus to his disciples are delivered in such a private setting. The timing of the scene contributes to the intimacy of the scene. This year’s Passover meal will be held on (vv.

  1. Jesus will speak about his sacrifice on behalf of his disciples during the celebration of God’s saving of Israel.
  2. Christ continues to serve others even as he prepares them for their own tasks.
  3. Even the Passover meal preparation, which is one of the most dramatic of the Passion events, shows that Jesus is in command.
  4. The combined reference to the two is made in Luke’s introduction.
  5. A suitable location was required because it was a legal requirement that the meal be celebrated within the city of Jerusalem (2 Chron 35:18;Jubilees49:15-16 even held the temple was the desirable locale).
  6. When Jesus tells Peter and John that they will be shown “a large upper room, fully furnished,” they are taken aback.
  7. The meal is then prepared.

Jesus directs the disciples, and they are obedient to his commands and commands them well.

He’s someone they can rely on.

This meal with the disciples has been something Jesus has longed for for a long time.

Just before he goes to the cross, Jesus gathers his disciples for one final meal.

It is as though Jesus is leaving his final impressions on those who have ministered with him in the same way that a sick person on their deathbed does.

As his earthly ministry comes to an end, Jesus recognizes that only the future great messianic banquet table will permanently and physically reunite these special men with him once more.

These words are seen as fulfilled in Acts and the Lord’s Supper, but Jesus does not participate in the meal himself; he is only present as a witness to it.

Jesus has in mind the great consummation of promise, when he returns to earth and rules directly and visibly with his saints, which will take place at the Second Coming of Christ.

This return will be interpreted by amillennialists as involving creation of the new heavens and new earth.

A final sharing of fellowship with his disciples is represented by the cup, just as it was by the meal.

In all likelihood, Jesus finds himself in a difficult situation.

The celebrations will resume when the kingdom arrives.

They serve as the foundation for the Lord’s Supper.

In addition to the Passover lamb, unleavened bread, and bitter herbs, this cup was consumed after they were all consumed.

So Jesus’ words are a mirror image of earlier salvation events, and they reverberate with all of the imagery associated with that connection.

To put it another way, the bread symbolizes “my body given for you; please do this in remembrance of me.” When it comes to the doctrine of transubstantiation, Jesus is not arguing that the bread becomes his body.

The bread, like the Passover, represents his death and his self-sacrifice as his body is broken for the disciples on the cross, just as it did at the Passover.

The meal’s symbolic nature is demonstrated by the call to remember.

In 1 Corinthians 11:17-34, when the church gathers for the meal, it becomes a public declaration of solidarity with Jesus, as well as a public covenant renewal.

For his part, Jesus took his cup after the meal and declared, “This cup represents the new covenant in my blood, which has been shed for you.” It is a major theme in the New Testament (see, for example, Jer 31:31; Mt 26:28; Lk 24:49, the Father’s promise; Acts 2:14–39; 2 Corinthians 3–4; Heb 8–10).

  1. The church is purchased by him as a result of it (Acts 20:28).
  2. The beginning of a new era heralds the beginning of a new sacrifice The death of Jesus and the subsequent distribution of the Holy Spirit mark the beginning of this new era of history.
  3. First and foremost, his death compensates us for our sins.
  4. Despite the fact that Luke is aware of the teaching, as evidenced by Acts 20:28, his language only suggests that he does so.
  5. When it comes to covenants, blood is always shed at the beginning.
  6. While at the table, Jesus shares the reason for his departure: to offer a new sacrifice for forgiveness, which will prepare the way for God’s Spirit to come (24:44-49).
  7. A text that is unique to the Gospel of John discusses this point in depth in chapters 14—16.
See also:  What Did Jesus Institute At The Last Supper

But he will do so after having offered himself up so that others may join him in his seat on the couch.

A lot of pathos is present here.

In the table fellowship, there is a lack of integrity.

“The Son of Man will go as it has been decreed, but woe to the man who betrays him,” the Bible says.

Death does not mark the end of a plan that has failed, nor does it signal the beginning of the end of salvation.

God, on the other hand, was not fooled by Judas’ meeting with the leadership in private.

It should be noted that this remark is placed in a different order than the parallels, where Jesus reveals his knowledge before the meal is served.

The betrayal of Jesus occurs while he is dying to secure forgiveness for others.

The one who rejects Jesus will suffer the consequences of his decision.

No one among the disciples has any idea who the betrayer could possibly be.

Despite the fact that he appeared to be Jesus’ devoted follower for more than three years, according to John 6:70, Judas was “a devil.” Who knows the Son clings to him; those who do not know the Son disassociate themselves from him by denial (Col 1:21-23).

Yes, faithfulness is required, but it is the service that demonstrates faithfulness that is most important.

In the text, they are described as having a “rivalry” (NIV: disagreement) that has erupted between them.

When asked about leadership in the world, Jesus responds by drawing a distinction between leadership in the kingdom.

When men wielded such authority in the ancient world, their authority was publicly acknowledged, and they were referred to as benefactors by their subjects.

The leader received recognition and honor.

The disciple-leader should be treated with respect and deference due to his or her youthfulness.

Not the example of the culture, but Jesus’ own life serves as a point of reference.

The Greek interrogative particleouchiexpects a positive response to the question of whether the person at the table is regarded as more important than the person at the table’s side.

It is service that he gives his life for them.

Earlier in the chapter, we learn that Jesus washed the feet of the disciples in humble service before this meal.

Jesus promises them something as he calls them to serve him in the kingdom of heaven.

They have remained steadfast in their commitment to God’s chosen one, just as exemplary disciples have done.

Jesus has been given a kingdom by the Father.

Consequently, he will assign them a role in his organization.

Having table fellowship with Jesus and having authority over God’s people, Israel, will be the rule in the future.

By virtue of their union with Jesus, they are able to benefit from his government.

No matter how bad the suffering, rejection, and persecution become, he wants to remind his followers that there will come a day when vindication and authority will reign supreme.

Despite the fact that the authority given to the eleven is unique, all disciples share the promise of reward as well as a seat at the table of messianic communion.

Jesus and Satan are only two participants in the cosmic battle; there are many others involved.

Everything about the section in which Peter is warned about his impending denials demonstrates this point more clearly.

Those verses are unique to Luke and come after his emphasis on prayer in the preceding chapter.

The use of the plural pronoun hymas in verse 31 indicates that Peter is only one of many participants in the upcoming battle, even though he is singled out in verse 32.

Some believe that if Peter is shamed, it will inspire others to follow in his footsteps.

His wish is that Peter’s faith will not be tested in the future.

Peter will not abandon his faith in Jesus in full, as some have predicted.

Reconstruction will take place.

His mission will then be to assist his fellow disciples in their efforts to spread the gospel.

The saints will be strengthened by Peter, who will have discovered that failure is possible and that the flesh is weak.

When it comes to serving Jesus, Peter is certain that he is willing and ready to die.

His confidence in his ability to deal with whatever comes his way remains unshaken.

Even in the privacy of a quiet meal, Peter demonstrates courage, and when the soldiers arrive, he will initially take up arms to defend Jesus and his followers.

It is clear from Jesus’ prediction of a triple denial prior to the sound of the rooster’s crow that he knows Peter better than Peter knows himself.

When we are not relying on Jesus, our self-confidence can be deceptive and lead to sin.

Despite the fact that he will have experienced all of these opportunities himself—some with failure and others with success—he will be able to encourage them to accept God’s mercy, to be prepared to suffer, and to make a defense.

God’s love is demonstrated through intercession (1 Jn 2:2).

Peter, as well as all of the disciples he represents, are learning a valuable lesson from this episode.

When Jesus speaks his final words, it is clear that the situation is changing dramatically.

They will need to bring provisions and protection for their journey, as opposed to before, when Jesus sent them out empty-handed but with provisions (9:1-6; 10:3-4).

It is in Jesus that Scriptures like Isaiah 53:12 come to fulfillment.

In their literal interpretation of Jesus’ remarks, the disciples make a mistake.

A problem exists, but it is too late to address it at this point in time.

At that point, they draw their swords, but Jesus puts an end to their defense.

However, they will be required to provide for themselves and fend for themselves without resorting to violence.

It is only to prepare for the upcoming battle that swords are purchased.

The subjects of Jesus’ final testament meal include humility, dependence, the promise of authority and reward, warnings about opposition, and the pursuit of faithfulness.

Their response should be non-resistance and non-fear.

A hostile world is about to confront Jesus, who is about to exemplify the innocent’s walk before it.

His success is not determined by his withdrawal or even by his survival; rather, it is determined by his loyalty (1 Pet 2:21-25). Because of the generosity of InterVarsity Press, the IVP New Testament Commentaries are made available.

Learn About Jesus’ Last Supper With His Disciples as Told By Mark

  • During their meal, Jesus took the bread, blessed it, broke it, and handed it to them with the words “Take and eat: this is my body.” Having taken the cup and expressed gratitude for it, he passed it around to everyone in the group, and they all drank from it. 24 This is my blood of the new testament, which has been spilt for a great number of people, he told them. 25 I swear to you that I will not drink any more of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it for the first time in the kingdom of God
  • And
  • During their meal, Jesus took the bread, blessed it, broke it, and handed it to them with the words “Take and eat: This is my body.” 21 When they had finished, he took the cup, and after giving thanks, he passed it around to everyone. 24 This is my blood of the new testament, which has been spilt for many. And he replied to them, 25 Truly, I say to you, until the day comes when I drink it for the first time in the kingdom of God, I will never longer consume the fruit of the vine.

Jesus and the Last Supper

That Jesus’ “last supper” with his disciples has served as the subject of so many artistic projects throughout history is not without reason: here, at one of the last gatherings attended by all, Jesus gives instructions not on how to enjoy the meal, but on how to remember him after he has passed away. In just four verses, a great deal is said. First and foremost, it should be emphasized that Jesus feeds his followers by distributing the bread and passing the cup around the table. The concept that his followers should strive to serve others rather than seeking positions of power and authority would be consistent with his constant emphasis on the idea that his disciples should seek to serve others rather than seeking positions of power and authority.

The King James translations in this section definitely give the impression that this is the case, yet looks may be misleading.

Rather than attempting to establish a direct connection between the bread and Jesus’ body, it is far more likely that the words are intended to emphasize that by breaking bread with one another, the disciples are being united together and with Jesus’ person — despite the fact that he will die shortly after this event.

Similarly, in the post-crucifixion society in which Mark resided, Christians built solidarity not just with one another but also with the resurrected Jesus despite the fact that he was not physically there by sharing bread together.

Mark’s audience would have interpreted this community to include them, allowing them to feel closely connected to Jesus through the communal rituals in which they were routinely involved.

A strong rule against drinking blood existed in Judaism, and the sight of such an identification would have been repugnant to those who were present.

A Different Version

However, in Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians, we can find what is likely an older phrase: “this cup is the new covenant in my blood.” Mark’s phrase, which would be far more difficult to translate into Aramaic, makes it sound as if the cup contains (even if symbolically) Jesus’ blood, which is then the covenant. The fact that Mark’s version of the words here is more theologically developed than Paul’s version is one of the reasons scholars believe that Mark was written a bit later than Paul, probably after the destitute resurrected Jesus.

The fact that wine is served directly after the bread indicates that we are not witnessing a true Passover celebration, which is also notable. In a typical Passover dinner, bread is served first, followed later by wine, which is served later over the course of the meal.

The Last Supper and Jesus’ betrayal (John 13:21-36)

Jesus’ spirit was shaken as a result of what he had spoken. He testified: “Honestly and truly, I say to you, I believe that one of you will betray me.” unsure of whom he was referring to, the disciples glanced at one another for clarification. For a better viewing experience, please visitHERE. When Jesus considered the possibility that someone from his most personal circle of friends may betray him, he experienced what the Gospels describe as “trouble in his spirit.” Judas Iscariot was so well-liked and trusted that no one dared to gaze his way.

  1. Judas was the one in charge of the disciple’s treasury, which is one of the ways in which we know he was trusted by the other eleven disciples.
  2. It was the sicarii, a Jewish ultra-zealot terrorist organization that operated in Judea and dealt a series of devastating blows to the Roman occupation and their followers.
  3. (They were mostly guys with strong moral beliefs who possessed exceptional combat abilities.
  4. This would have resulted in the selection of Mathew, who was previously employed as a tax collector.) resting at the table at Jesus’ side.
  5. One of the disciples was this mystery figure known only as “the beloved disciple.” He or she was one of the twelve disciples.
  6. (None of these are really convincing.) He was most likely the author of this otherwise unidentified Gospel, which was written in the first person.
  7. Take note of the degree of information that is provided by the Gospel.

He recalls the minor details, such as the beloved disciple motioning to Jesus to catch his attention during the dinner, although the disciples were undoubtedly chatting loudly around him.

We can almost feel the stress building up inside us.

The devoted disciple gently requested that he demonstrate to him who would betray him.

To give a slice of bread to another person nearby, one would often dip it in something pleasant and then pass it on to them.) It was the ideal approach to communicate something important to the cherished disciple in such a way that no one would suspect what Jesus was actually up to.

“Whatever you’re going to do, do it swiftly,” Jesus instructed him.

Others felt that because Judas had the moneybag, Jesus was asking him to “Buy what we need for the feast,” or that he should contribute something to the needy, which was not the case.

30 And it was the middle of the night.

Because Judas had been assigned tasks on a regular basis by Jesus, it appeared that nothing remarkable had occurred.

32 The same way that God is exalted in him, God will also glorify him in himself, so glorifying him at the same time.

“You will go looking for me, and just as I said to the Jews, so now I say to you, “Where I am going, you cannot come.” Intriguingly, while we generally associate the term “glorification” with Jesus only after his resurrection, Jesus uses the phrase “glorification” before those events take place.

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As a result, by the time the events that ultimately led to his death and resurrection occurred, he was already able to proclaim, “Now is the Son of Man exalted.” 34I offer you a new commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you: just as I have loved you, so you are to love one another as I have loved you.

  • However, it was initially meant for the benefit of all loyal Christ-followers everywhere and at all times (and with good reason), but it was in reference to the twelve apostles.
  • Given that Jesus was choosing new leaders for Israel’s tribes and as such was restoring Israel’s hope, when might we anticipate there to be any link between the accounts of the 12 chief leaders of Israel and Jesus’ actions and words?
  • There are few things more unloving than the leaders of Israel’s most prominent family attempting to assassinate their brother.
  • This is, in fact, how people who are real Israel would acknowledge their authority as authentic disciples of Jesus Christ in their own right.
  • “You will not be able to follow me now because of where I am going,” Jesus responded.
  • “I am willing to give my life for you.” 38Jesus said, “Are you willing to lay down your life for me?” I swear to you that the rooster will not crow until you have rejected my existence three times.
  • When Jesus informed Peter that the day would come, Peter would deny him, he was serious.

One of the reasons Jesus stated this was because he was already aware that Judas Iscariot was on his way to the Temple to inform the authorities of Jesus’ whereabouts in order to have him arrested immediately. To see all of the preceding parts, go to THIS PAGE.

Bible Verses about The Last Supper

Twelve days before Passover, on the first day of the Festival of Unleavened Bread, when it was traditional to slaughter the Passover lamb, Jesus’ disciples approached him and asked, “Where do you want us to go so that we might make arrangements for you to eat the Passover?” 13Therefore, he dispatched two of his followers, instructing them to “go into the city, and a man carrying a jug of water will meet you.” Keep up with him.

14, tell the owner of the home he enters: “The Teacher inquires as to where I might find a place to stay so that I can have a meal with my followers during the Passover.” 15He will take you upstairs to a huge room that has been equipped and is waiting for you.

As a result, they prepared for the Passover.

18As they sat reclining at the table, eating, Jesus declared, “Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me—one of you who is dining alongside me.” 17When they realized it was him, they were distraught, and one by one, they protested, “Surely you don’t mean me?” Twenty-one “It is one of the Twelve,” he said, “one of the Twelve who dips bread into the basin with me.” 21The Son of Man will follow in the footsteps of those who have gone before him.

However, woe betide the one who betrays the Son of Man!

Then, as they were eating, Jesus took bread and, after giving thanks, he broke it and handed it to his followers with the words “Take it; this is my body.” Afterward, after giving gratitude, he handed the cup to them all and asked them to drink from it together.

25″Truly I tell you, I will not drink from the fruit of the vine again until the day comes when I drink it for the first time in the kingdom of God.

The Last Supper – Bible Story

A magnificent invitation from Jesus to receive his gift is the subject of the tale of the Last Supper. This is a synopsis of the biblical tale of the Last Supper as told in the books of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, which may be found below. Check out the Scripture passages below for additional in-depth Bible verses, and utilize the articles and videos to gain a better understanding of the significance of this teaching event in the Bible. During the first day of Passover, also known as the Festival of Unleavened Bread, the final supper took place.

  • Passover commemorates Israel’s liberation from slavery in Egypt, and more particularly, the time when the angel of death passed over the Israelites’ dwellings, which had been marked with the blood of lambs on their doors, commemorating their deliverance.
  • All of the disciplines, even Judas, disputed that they were the ones who would betray their profession one at a time.
  • Jesus prayed and expressed gratitude to God for the supper.
  • This is where the tradition of communion in the church derives from.
  • When Peter objected to Jesus washing his feet, Jesus responded by saying that He was doing it to serve as an example to the disciples.

The disciples would now be able to wash each other’s feet, indicating that they would be able to serve everyone. Here’s where you can get your FREE Holy Week Guide. Every day has a purpose, scriptures, and prayers that you should know!

Bible Commentary on The Last Supper

In the book of Matthew, chapter 26, the following is a Bible commentary by Matthew Henry on the final supper of Christ with his disciples: The Passover Scriptures (verses 17-25) Take note that Christ pointed out to the disciples the location where they would be enjoying the Passover meal. He is aware of people who are secretly supporting his cause, and he will kindly pay visits to those who are eager to accept him. The disciples carried out the instructions given by Jesus. Those who wish to experience Christ’s presence during the gospel Passover must follow his instructions.

  1. We have no way of knowing how hard we will be tempted or how far God will abandon us; as a result, we have reason to be fearful rather than proud.
  2. The Lord Jesus Christ institutes His Holy Supper.
  3. Verses 26-30 You should take it and eat it; accept Christ as he is provided to you; accept the atonement and approve of it; and submit to God’s favor and governance.
  4. Spiritually speaking, this is my body; that is to say, it symbolizes and reflects his body.
  5. The wine is a symbol and representation of the blood shed by Christ on the cross.
  6. This cup was given to the disciples with the instruction, “Drink it thoroughly.” The forgiveness of sins is the primary benefit that is bestowed on all true Christians during the Lord’s Supper; it serves as the basis for all other blessings to follow.
  7. That will be the kingdom of his Father, and the drink of comfort will be available on an ongoing basis.

Even as we contemplate Christ’s broken body and his shed blood for the remission of our sins, let us remember that the feast cost him as much as if he had really sacrificed his flesh for us to consume and his blood to drink on the day of Pentecost.

What Was the Meaning of the Last Supper?

I can’t begin to comprehend the significance of the Final Supper, when the Lord asked His followers to share a meal with Him for the last time on this world (Luke 22:14-16). The Lord Jesus set two ordinances in the Bible that every believer is required to obey. The first is baptism, in which the believer publicly confesses Jesus as his or her Lord and Savior. The second is confirmation of faith. Its counterpart, known as the Lord’s Table, is fashioned after the Last Supper, which Jesus shared with His apostles during the Last Supper.

  1. In the absence of His atoning death and resurrection (John 6:53; 1 Corinthians 15:14, 17), we have no relationship with Him (since we are unable to be saved without both).
  2. By obeying His instruction, we are announcing what He has done for us.
  3. As we partake of the meal, we are once again reminded of the reality of Christ’s work on our behalf.
  4. Because He is alive, so are we who believe in Him!
  5. Meditating on what Jesus accomplished strengthens and expands our faith in ways that real food cannot (John 4:32, cf.Deuteronomy 8:3,Matthew 4:4,Luke 4:4).
  6. The event unfolded in the same manner as others in which I’ve participated here in the United States, but the location proved to be deep.
  7. I participate in sharing the Lord’s Supper (Communion) with my local church family, and I join other Christians from all over the world in proclaiming His death until He returns, despite the fact that we are separated by thousands of miles (Ephesians 4:4).
  8. Christians all throughout the world are united by their faith in Christ.
  9. Regardless of what is happening in the world, Christ remains the same (Hebrews 13:8), and His church remains united in Him (1 Corinthians 10:17).

Why Was the Last Supper so Important?

Jesus’ gaze had been fixated on the city of Jerusalem (Luke 9:51-52). He was well aware of what he had to accomplish and did not swerve from the path put out before him by the Father. He told the disciples that He would have to die, and that He would rise from the dead on the third day as an exclamation point. The disciples, on the other hand, were uninterested in His message (Matthew 16:21-23,Mark 8:31-33,Luke 9:22). (It was not until His ascension that they realized what he was talking about, and it was not until He appeared to them for forty days following His resurrection that they realized what he was talking about.) The assembly of Jesus and His disciples in the Upper Room would be His final opportunity to educate them and demonstrate His love for them in public before He died.

Peter and John were tasked by Jesus with the responsibility of making arrangements for the preparing of the chamber for the Last Supper.

As soon as Judas’ upcoming betrayal was revealed and he left (Matthew 26:21-22, Mark 14:18-19, Luke 22:21-23, John 13:21-30), Jesus informed the remaining eleven of His impending departure and told them, “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another” (John 13:31-35).

His prayer reaffirmed some of the fundamental principles He had given to His followers in the Upper Room earlier that day.

When we go ahead to the book of Revelation, written by John the Apostle, there is reason to be joyful since, in chapter 19, a thunderous “Hallelujah” is heard (Revelation 19:6).

In the presence of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, we who have been called (Romans 8:28), will be with him (Revelation 19:6-9). We shall never longer be separated from Jesus, for we, as His slaves, will be with Him “forever and ever” in His presence (Revelation 22:3-5).

Why Was the Last Supper Scheduled during Passover?

The Jews were delivered from slavery at the hands of Pharaoh during the last plague (death) upon the Egyptians, and the Lord God created Passover to commemorate their deliverance (Exodus 12:1-30). Every Jewish household was required to slaughter a lamb at dusk and use part of the blood from the lamb to “apply it on the two doorposts and the lintel of the dwellings where they consume it,” according to the Torah. Following that, they would consume the lamb’s meat that very same night (vv. 7-10).

  • 11b), referring to the fact that He permitted the angel of death to pass over those who had the blood applied on their doorposts and lintels.
  • “The Lamb of God,” as John the Baptist (the final Old Testament prophet) referred to Jesus, was a reference to Jesus as “the Lamb of God” (John 1:29,36).
  • (See Isaiah 53:4-12 for further information.) Sin is a barrier that separates us from our holy God, and in the Old Testament, an animal may be sacrificed as an atonement for our transgression.
  • It is noteworthy that Jesus died during the Jewish Passover holiday, when tens of thousands of more people would be in Jerusalem, that he did so.
  • In Matthew 5:17, Luke 24:44, and John 1:17, Jesus demonstrated that no other offering for sin is required (Hebrews 10:12), and that no other sacrifice for sin is required after a person chooses Jesus as their Lord and Savior.

5 Important Details about the Last Supper

1. When Jesus dispatched John and Peter to make preparations for the Last Supper, he instructed them to search for a man “carrying a pitcher of water” in order to find him (Luke 22:10). This evidence may appear flimsy to us today, but in those days, males were not responsible for collecting water. The owner of a room like the one Jesus and His disciples stayed in would have had a servant on hand to wash the feet of his visitors, as Jesus and His followers did. No servant was present during the solemn ceremony in order to protect the privacy of the participants.

3.

Four, the Lord’s foot washing demonstrated that no one is so great that he cannot serve another.

This He did after the disciples had a disagreement over who would be the most important (Luke 22:24-27). 5. After the Last Supper, Jesus was in the Upper Room, where he recited His High Priestly Prayer (also known as the Lord’s Prayer). Source: Public Domain Image courtesy of Leonardo Da Vinci

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