What Did Jesus Do On Saturday After Good Friday

What did Jesus do between Good Friday and Easter?

In the All Souls College Chapel in Oxford, England, a reredos shows Jesus releasing the Jewish patriarchs from the depths of hell, according to the artist. (Photo courtesy of Rev. Lawrence Lew and the Royal Navy) Every Christian is familiar with the story: Jesus was killed on Good Friday and resurrected on Easter Sunday, according to the Bible. But what exactly did he accomplish on Saturday night? Those are the kinds of questions that have sparked centuries of dispute, confounded theologians as erudite as St.

The Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and the vast majority of mainline Protestant churches believe that Jesus went into the realm of the dead on Holy Saturday in order to save virtuous souls, such as the Hebrew patriarchs, who died prior to his crucifixion and resurrection.

During the time when Jesus sought for Adam, “our first father,” as if he were a lost sheep, according to an old homily contained in the Catholic readings for Holy Saturday, the world was stilled by a “great quiet.” The dramatic picture of Jesus bursting down the gates of Hades, sometimes referred to as “the harrowing of hell,” has proven nearly seductive to artists throughout history, from the painter Hieronymus Bosch to the poet Dante to innumerable Eastern Orthodox iconographers, among others.

Some Protestants, on the other hand, argue that there is little scriptural support for the horrific detour and that Jesus’ own words are in direct opposition to it.

  1. In the words of John Piper, a famous evangelical author and pastor from Minnesota, “That’s the only hint we have as to what Jesus was doing between death and resurrection.” The criminal didn’t go to hell, and I don’t believe hell is called paradise.
  2. According to Robert Krieg, a theology professor at the University of Notre Dame, in order to highlight that Jesus had actually died and that his resurrection was no trick of the tomb, the apostles would have argued that he, too, had spent time in Sheol.
  3. John’s School of Theology-Seminary in Collegeville, Minn., belief in the descent was prevalent in the early church.
  4. Churches that believe he has fallen into the realm of the dead most frequently use 1 Peter 3:18-20 as their primary source.
  5. In jail, he went to preach to the spirits, and it was via the Spirit that he did so.” The souls that were imprisoned, Peter cryptically explains, were those who were “disobedient” during the time of Noah, the ark-maker, and were punished accordingly.
  6. In other words, Jesus talked to the Hebrews “in spirit” via Noah, rather than directly to them in hell.
  7. If it weren’t for a fourth-century bishop called Rufinus, who included the phrase “ad inferna” – “to hell” – in his commentary on the Apostles’ Creed, the descent may not have become a dogma.

However, shifting ideas of hell have only added to the complexity of the issues.

As a result, theologians such as Thomas Aquinas struggled to comprehend which place Jesus visited and whom he saved.

In the Catholic journal First Things few years ago, the subject, which was most recently broached by the late Swiss theologian Hans Ur von Balthasar, sparked a violent theological battle.

“The single most persuasive reason in its favor appears to be the fact that it has been there for so long,” says Grudem, a professor at Phoenix Seminary in Arizona, in his “Systematic Theology,” a popular textbook at evangelical schools and universities.

Nonetheless, the horrible experience of hell continues to be an important teaching for Orthodox Christians, who set an icon showing the fall of Hell at the front of their churches as Saturday night turns into Easter Sunday.

Peter Bouteneff, a theology professor at St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in Crestwood, New York, explained that the empty cross and tomb are not the icons that symbolise Easter for him and his students. “It is the descend of Christ into Hades.”

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Jesus is seen liberating the Jewish patriarchs from the depths of hell at the All Souls College Chapel in Oxford, England. Photo courtesy of Rev. Lawrence Lew and the Royal National Society. Each and every Christian is familiar with the account of Jesus’ crucifixion on Good Friday and ascension into heaven on Easter Sunday. And then there’s Saturday. What did he do? Those are the kinds of questions that have sparked centuries of dispute, confounded theologians as erudite as St. Augustine, and prompted some Protestants to urge for the revision of the Apostles’ Creed, one of the most ancient statements of faith in the Christian tradition.

Jesus’ descend is described as “the final step of Jesus’ messianic mission” in the Catholic church’s catechism, during which he “opened heaven’s gates for the just who had gone before him.” During the time when Jesus sought for Adam, “our first father,” as if he were a lost sheep, according to an old homily contained in the Catholic readings for Holy Saturday, the world was quiet.

  • While many evangelical Christians believe that the terrible detour was necessary, other Protestants believe that the evidence for it is weak and that Jesus’ own statements are in direct conflict with this belief.
  • In the words of John Piper, a renowned evangelical author and pastor from Minnesota, “that’s the only hint we have as to what Jesus was doing between death and resurrection.” According to my beliefs, neither hell nor heaven is where the thief ended up.
  • According to Robert Krieg, a theology professor at the University of Notre Dame, in order to highlight that Jesus had actually died and that his resurrection was not a hoax, the apostles would have argued that he, too, had spent time in Sheol.
  • John’s School of Theology-Seminary in Collegeville, Minnesota, indicated that belief in the descent was popular in the early church.
  • In the majority of cases, churches that believe he has sunk into hell quote 1 Peter 3:18-20.
  • “Disobedient” spirits were those who were imprisoned at the time of Noah, the ark-maker, according to Peter, who adds in a mysterious manner.
  • That is, Jesus talked to the Hebrews “in spirit” via Noah, rather than directly to them in torment, as is often believed today.

If it weren’t for a fourth-century bishop called Rufinus, who included the phrase “ad inferna,” which means “to hell,” in his commentary on the Apostles’ Creed, the descent may not have been a dogma.

However, shifting conceptions of hell have only added to the complexity of the issues at stake.

Other Christian philosophers, such as Martin Luther and John Calvin, were divided on the question of whether Christ’s suffering in hell was sufficient to totally atone for human sins, as some believed.

Wayne Grudem, a former president of the Evangelical Theological Society, believes that by amending the Apostles’ Creed “for and for all” and removing the phrase regarding the descent, the misunderstanding and disagreements may be put an end to.

When saying the Apostles’ Creed, Grudem, like Piper, has stated that he skips over the part concerning Jesus’ descent.

40 days pass during which time it is revered and frequently kissed.

Peter Bouteneff, a theology professor at St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in Crestwood, New York, explained that the empty cross and tomb are not the image that signifies Easter for him and his students. “It’s the descend of Christ into Hades,” the author explains.

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On Saturday, Jesus is deafeningly quiet. His body has been anointed and deposited in Joseph’s tomb by the ladies who attended him. The cadaver of Christ is as deafeningly silent as the stone that surrounds it. On Friday, he had a lot to say. On Sunday, Christ will free the captives of death from their chains. Jesus, on the other hand, is deafeningly quiet on Saturday. God is the same way. On Friday, he made his presence known. In addition, he tore the temple curtains apart, opened the graves of the dead, shook the earth, shut out the sun from the sky, and offered up the Son of Heaven in sacrifice.

  • There will be nothing on Saturday.
  • God is deafeningly quiet.
  • Discussions about the Easter weekend tend to pass over Saturday.
  • Our thoughts are commanded by the crucifixion and resurrection.
  • You have them as well.
  • The day that occurs between the battle and the solution; between the inquiry and the answer; between the provided prayer and the response to the prayer.
  • Is God in a bad mood?

God is aware that Jesus is in the tomb; why isn’t He doing anything about it?

What is He doing that He isn’t doing?

You must follow in the footsteps of Jesus.

Keep your mouth shut.

“You will not abandon me to the tomb, nor will you allow your Holy One to see corruption,” Jesus declared as he lay dying on the cross (Acts 2:27 NIV).

You must understand that God will not abandon you in the midst of your difficulties.

Saturdays provide a specific function.

Would we have appreciated God’s deed if He had risen Jesus from the dead fifteen minutes after the death of His son?

God places a Saturday between our Friday and Sunday schedules for a variety of reasons.

In the words of one of those who had to suffer the silent Saturday: “Be patient, brethren, till the Lord comes” (James 5:7 NKJV).

What Happened on Easter Saturday?

In the Gospels, a great lot of emphasis is placed on the events leading up to Jesus’ death on Thursday and Friday of Passover week, as well as on Jesus’ joyful resurrection on Sunday, known as “Lord’s Day.” This is not without good cause. Though Holy Saturday is occasionally referred to as “Good Friday” in some circles, the day between Good Friday and Easter Sunday is given little attention in the Gospels. Aside from Luke, who simply writes, “On the Sabbath they rested according to the commandment,” no other gospel accounts any of the activities of the disciples on the Sabbath following Jesus’ burial and prior to his resurrection, except for Luke, who writes, “On the Sabbath they rested according to the commandment” (Luke 23:56, ESV).

  • When Jesus appeared in their midst on Sunday, it seems likely that Jesus’ disciples were doing exactly what they were doing on Saturday when Jesus came in their midst on Sunday: gathering together behind closed doors out of dread of the Jewish officials.
  • The man they believed would be the Messiah had been slain as a criminal, according to their beliefs.
  • 16:21–23; 17:22–23; 20:17–19 and parallels), and it would not be until the following day, when Jesus appeared among them as the risen Victor and conqueror of death, that they would grasp the significance.
  • It is only Matthew who provides specifics on what happened behind the scenes on that day, when activity was curtailed owing to the Sabbath.
  • 27:63–64).
  • According to the evidence, the disciples were not the only ones who were scared!
  • There was little doubt that the Pharisees were aware of Jesus’ prophesies concerning his resurrection, but they were not particularly inclined to believe that they would come to pass.

However, it is ironic that not only were the Jewish officials aware of Jesus’ prophesy that he would rise on the third day, but they also took action in response to it, demonstrating greater “faith” than Jesus’ own disciples were able to summon at the moment.

It is possible that the Jewish leaders’ request is granted by the Roman governor, who then provides them with a contingent of Roman troops.

In any instance, he grants them permission to guard the tomb, and they promptly go about their business as usual.

It is important to note that these events on Holy Saturday serve as evidence that the Romans and Jewish authorities had secured Jesus’ tomb, making it unlikely that grave robbers (such as Jesus’ own disciples, Matt.

Thus, Matthew sets the stage for what will take place on Easter Sunday at the crack of dawn, as he describes it in his tale.

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What is Holy Saturday?

QuestionAnswer The day between Good Friday and Easter Sunday is referred to as Holy Saturday in some circles. Some Christians believe that Holy Saturday, the seventh day of Holy Week, was the day on which Jesus “rested” from His task of bringing salvation to those who need it. “It is completed!” Jesus said as He died on the cross. Because sin had been atoned for, there was no longer a price to pay. Immediately following His crucifixion, Jesus’ corpse was put in a neighboring tomb, where it stayed for the full day of Holy Saturday (Matthew 27:59-60; Mark 15:46; Luke 23:53-54; John 19:39-42).

  • It is true that without the resurrection of Christ, we would be in a state of crisis.
  • When Jesus was arrested (Mark 14:50), the disciples dispersed, and they spent the first Holy Saturday hiding for fear of being captured themselves (John 20:19).
  • It is only in Matthew 27:62-66 that we find a scriptural reference to what transpired on Holy Saturday.
  • This visit took place on the Sabbath, because the Jews considered a day to begin at sunset when they observed it.
  • They were reminded of Jesus’ prediction that He would rise from the dead in three days (John 2:19-21), and they determined to do all they could to prevent that from happening.
  • The Lord had risen from the dead.

Holy Saturday: What Happened on Saturday To Jesus?

The Eastern Orthodox Church places a strong focus on Good Friday through Easter, with particular attention paid to what is frequently referred to as the “harrowing of hell,” or Christ’s fall into hell between the Cross and the Resurrection of the body. The concept is that following his death, Christ entered Hades and invaded hell in order to ransom the righteous of the Old Testament, as depicted in the Bible. This is the traditional interpretation of Holy Saturday. As a result, it is clear that the death that occurred before to Christ’s death was not final.

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I read Archbishop Hilarion Alfeyev’s pious and learned study (Christ the Conqueror of Hell: The Descent into Hades from an Orthodox Perspective), primarily because I’d always wanted to read a good piece by an Orthodox theologian on the Eastern (and traditional) sense of the phrase “descent into Hades,” which appears in our creed.

  1. Matthew 12:40 says, “It is written, ” Because, just as Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of a giant fish, the Son of Man will spend three days and three nights in the center of the earth, according to the Scriptures.
  2. The ground began to tremble, and the rocks began to crumble.
  3. (They emerged from the graves following his resurrection and entered the holy city, where they appeared to a large number of people.) Acts 2:31: David, foreseeing this, spoke of the resurrection of the Christ, stating that he was neither abandoned to Hades nor did his body endure decay.
  4. As part of it, he traveled to a jail and preached to the spirits inside, who had been disobedient long before, while God patiently waited throughout the construction of the ark during the days of Noah.
  5. As a result of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who was exalted to the right side of the Father with angels, authorities, and powers subordinate to him, you are now saved – not by washing away bodily filth, but by promising to God that you will have a good conscience – by the power of God.
  6. Eph 4:9: What, therefore, is the significance of the phrase “he ascended,” unless it means that he also descended to the lower portions of the earth?
  7. In this case, it is the second death, which is the lake of fire.

In light of the texts that have already been cited, in particular 1 Peter 3:18-25 and Acts 2, as well as the baptism for the dead in 1 Corinthians 15 and that enigmatic text in 1 Peter 4, I believe we should be open to the possibility that Jesus gospeled the dead or announced the good news to the dead after his death and before his ascension.

  • When it was suggested that the first death is not final, but the second death is, one of the responses clarified what I meant by “is death final?” when I asked if death is final.
  • Is it important to your manner of practicing theology that all of the early theologians believed in a descend into hades or that none of them did?
  • The following are some specifics: It is customary of Irenaeus to witness both the fall and the release of the patriarchs, prophets, and saints from the time of the Old Testament period.
  • Jesus Christ descended and preached to the saints as well as to the Gentiles who were outside the true religion, according to Clement of Alexandria.
  • Origen is similar to Clement in that it emphasizes the importance of personal decision.
  • That is, there is Abraham’s bosom, and there is hell, and there is hades, and there is a jail.
  • A universal liberation of the dead by the descent is depicted poetically in the renowned work “Christus patiens,” which has been assigned to Gregory Nazianzen by certain scholars.

Many people are either indifferent or categorically think that Jesus’ liberation was solely for the saints, as demonstrated by St John Chrysostom, for example.

When it comes to declaring that not all are liberated, St Jerome falls into the camp of those who believe that sometimes all are released and at other times not all are liberated.

According to Augustine, death was final, and the only ones who were liberated from hades were those who had been predestined by God’s elective grace prior to their death.

The Augustinian point of view was finalized by Gregory the Great.

Dante transformed religion concerning the hereafter into an epic adventure, drawing inspiration from Homer’s stories as well as Virgil’s renowned poem, The Divine Comedy.

As opposed to Dante’s voyage into the underworld and then back to paradise, we find poets who presented accounts of Christ’s victory over Death, the Devil, and Hell in the Eastern hemisphere.

Known as some of the greatest poetry in the world, their work expresses the theology of Christ’s work between his death and resurrection/ascension in language that can be understood by everybody.

What is the reason for this or why is it not?

As I began to delve into the Eastern theology poetry through Alfayev’s writing, I was astonished by how personified, mythic, and epic everything had become.

Christ then illuminates Sheol with his light, annihilates Death, and makes room for the resurrection of the dead.

This is on the verge of becoming a form of universalism.

Everyone has been freed from hell and death (Orthodox liturgical emphasis).

The saints of the Old Testament have been liberated (Eastern patristic tradition emphasis; West after Augustine).

Those who adhered to Christ were set free (Augustine).

Those who lived their lives in faith and piety were set free (West; after Augustine).

There are councils alongside the liturgical texts, which are responses to specific issues at specific times.

As a result, Alfayev’s descent is based on doctrine, but the number of people who find salvation is based on personal opinion.

The CT’sBlog Forum contains the post Jesus Creed. Contribute to the work of CT. Subscribe today and receive a free year of service. The opinions expressed by the blogger do not necessarily reflect the views of Christianity Today or its staff.

What is Holy Saturday and Why is it Significant?

The Eastern Orthodox Church places a strong focus on Good Friday through Easter, with particular attention paid to what is frequently referred to as the “harrowing of hell,” or Christ’s fall into hell between the Cross and the Resurrection of the body of the Lord. Supposedly, following his death, Christ descended into Hades and invaded Hell in order to ransom the righteous of the Old Testament, according to one interpretation. On Holy Saturday, this is the traditional theology that is followed.

  • After all, is death after Christ’s death conclusive?
  • I was not disappointed.
  • Scripture reference (Matthew 12:40) : Because, just as Jonah spent three days and three nights in the belly of a giant fish, the Son of Man will spend three days and three nights in the center of the earth, as well.
  • Because of the earthquake, rocks were shattered in several places.
  • The angels came out of the graves following Jesus’ resurrection and walked into the holy city, where they appeared to a large number of people.
  • 1 Peter 3:18-21: Because Christ also suffered once for sins, the just for the unjust, to reconcile you to God, not by being put to death in the flesh but by being raised to life in the spirit, we are able to say with confidence that Christ has suffered once for all, the just for the unjust.
  • Water was used to transport a few souls into the ark, totaling eight.

As stated in 1 Peter 4:6, the gospel was preached to people who had died in order for them to live spiritually according to God’s standards, even if they had been judged in the body according to human standards.

Death and Hades were then cast into the lake of fire, according to Revelation 20:14 (NASB).

When the evidence of the New Testament is considered in its historical perspective, it is almost probable that Jesus “did” something between the Crucifixion and the Ascension of the Lord.

What do these scriptures say about the finality of death?

The issue that the Church has posed, which has startled some, is whether or not the second death is permanent.

A fundamental historical conclusion, which is presented in comprehensible depth in Alfeyev’s work, is as follows: As late as the 4th Century, Christians in both the West and the East were unambiguous in their belief in the descend into hell, the victory of Jesus over death, and either the liberation of saints from the realm of the dead or the complete liberation of all humanity from the dominion of death and hell.

  1. Please see below for further information.
  2. In addition to John the Baptist, Hippolytus descended into hades to preach to people who were imprisoned there.
  3. Hell was, in his opinion, a place of reform.
  4. Many saw locations, but there was an issue with defining the various concepts.
  5. Athanasius: tends toward the idea of universal redemption or liberation from death at various points in his writings, including his own.
  6. Following in this vein are Cyril of Alexandria and Maximus the Confessor, to name a few.
  7. Those who are in the realm of the dead have a choice, according to John Damascene, and hence not everyone is free.

Augustine was a defining figure in this debate, particularly in the Western world, because he believed in both a decline and a “second chance,” but not necessarily in both at the same time.

That said, it’s worth noting that Augustine was definitely engaged in a battle with those who believed that Christ emptied the worlds of hades, death, and hell of their occupants.

When it comes to the Eastern fathers, Alfayev underlines that they did not lay forth their beliefs in the same way that the Western fathers did.

In many respects, the Aeneidand transports the characters into the next millennia of human existence.

Ephrem the Syrian and Romanos the Melodist are the two most important poets of the time.

What are your thoughts on Jesus’ ascension into hades (after his death)?

I’m curious about what role this theology of the fathers has in your understanding of how the descent works.

Voicie les principaux sujets de discussion: Christ, the protagonist, destroys the gates and bars of Hades, defeats Satan and his servants, and ends their opposition to his rule.

We witness in Eastern poetry a victory over death and hades and hell and Satan that is nearly universal, if not universally achieved.

Alfayev summarizes his research by pointing out four different perspectives on the consequences of Christ’s death on the human condition.

Everyone has been freed from the torments of hell and death (Orthodox liturgical emphasis).

Liberation came to those who walked with Christ (Augustine).

Accord to Alfayev, Scripture is the most authoritative source of information, with liturgical writings following closely behind.

This is followed by their views.

According to what I’ve read of him, the most widely held belief is that only those who believe are saved (or saved solely).

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Fast Facts on Holy Saturday:

  • Holy Saturday is a 40-hour vigil between Good Friday and Easter Sunday that is generally observed by the Catholic Church
  • Just as Jesus’ family and friends spent Saturday waiting and praying, we can use Holy Saturday as a day of meditation and reflection
  • Holy Saturday marks the end of Lent and fasting
  • And Holy Saturday marks the beginning of Lent and fasting again.

What Is Holy Saturday?

Each Gospel makes reference to Holy Saturday, but only Luke provides a detailed explanation of the commandment that governs this particular day. “As his body was being brought away, the ladies from Galilee followed and came upon the tomb where his body had been laid,” according to Luke 23:55. After that, they returned home and began preparing spices and ointments to anoint his body with. Although they had finished their work before Sabbath began, they took the time to rest as prescribed by statute.” Saturday is considered the Sabbath in Jewish custom, and therefore it was against the rule of the country for the women to lay the oils and spices they had prepared for the body on the body on Saturday.

When it comes to the events that transpired between the death of Christ and His resurrection, each Gospel narrative is strikingly similar.

The women had run out of time before the Sabbath formally began, so the anointing of the body would have to wait until the next morning, when the sun would rise.

How Should Christians Observe Holy Saturday?

Yes, the day preceding the miracle is a Sabbath, a day of rest, but it is also a day of silence and contemplation. “Remember to observe the Sabbath day by keeping it holy,” says God’s people in Exodus 20:8, which is the original passage detailing how to obey this rule. It is legal for you to labor six days a week in your normal capacity, but the seventh day is a day of rest devoted to the Lord your God.” It is the act of keeping something Holy that causes it to be put aside or kept for a certain purpose, and this particular day is intended to be a day of rest and commitment to the Lord.

  • The same way that Jesus’ disciples waited through the dreary hours of that Saturday to see what would happen on Sunday, we wait to see the hand of the Lord at work in our own lives.
  • In Exodus 14:14, the Israelites were commanded to “be quiet and wait for the Lord” while they stood on the banks of the Red Sea, waiting for the Lord to act.
  • After a period of trusting in the Lord’s direction and remaining still, He revealed what was to be done and when it was time to go forward.
  • In order for us to have a meaningful connection with the Lord, we must spend quality time with him each day.

Click HERE to download your FREE 8-Day Prayer and Scripture Guide -Praying Through Holy Week. Create your own copy of this wonderful daily devotional to use in the weeks leading up to Easter.

Is Holy Saturday Observed in Catholicism, Protestantism, and Orthodoxy?

Holy Saturday is observed differently by different religious denominations within the Church. It is the last day of Lent for individuals who follow the practices of their respective religions (except for those who celebrate the end of Lent on the Thursday before Easter). Lent is a period of time leading up to Easter during which something is given up or fasted from in some way. Vigils are held in Roman Catholic churches in the evenings leading up to the dawn of Easter. The Eastern Orthodox take this vigil a step further by burning flames and candles while tolling bells to represent the gladness that the Lenten season has come to an end, as shown in the video below.

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On Holy Saturday, it is recommended that you read the four stories of Christ’s death and resurrection that are scattered throughout the Gospels.

A Holy Saturday Prayer

Father, We understand the significance of Holy Saturday in the context of the Easter season. It is more than just a day between Good Friday and Easter; it is a day to be observed in remembrance of what You have done to save our souls. We leave our own agendas, our own desires, and our own cries at the door, and we long to be silent and to rest in Your presence today, and we pray for the opportunity. It is with great gratitude that we have the capacity to calm our hearts and be in Your presence, and we desire to learn more about Your heart on this day.

  • Don’t let us get so caught up in our own life that we lose sight of the splendor that You brought forth on that day.
  • Holy Saturday served as a day of relaxation and preparation within the hearts of the women who would visit the Tomb the following day.
  • We, too, may prepare our hearts for the pleasure that will abound on Easter Sunday when the sun rises.
  • May God fill you with the joy of His love, as well as the excitement of what is to come via His hand in your life.

Sources:

Holy Saturday, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica The New International Version of the Bible (NIV) Photograph courtesy of Getty Images /Romolo Tavani et al. Cally Logan is a writer and history teacher from Richmond, Virginia, who lives in the United States. In her spare time, she likes mentoring young people and spending time in the great outdoors. Her book, Hang on in There, Girl!, will be released on April 1, 2022, and will be accessible at all bookstores. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter, where she goes by the handle @CallyLogan, and on TikTok as Cally Logan.

  • It is our goal that these articles will assist you in understanding the significance and historical background of major Christian festivals and events, and that they will also encourage you as you take time to think on all that God has done for us through his son Jesus Christ!
  • What exactly is Holy Week?
  • What is the significance of Maundy Thursday?
  • What Is the Meaning of Easter?
  • Then, how come the most magnificent period in human history is surrounded by scared fisherman, loathed tax collectors, marginalized women, wimpy politicians, and disloyal friends?

As a devotional or study for both individuals and groups, this FREE audio offers a fresh perspective on the Lenten season. It is available for download now.

Where was Jesus between His death and resurrection?

Around Easter, it’s understandable that the question “where was Jesus?” becomes increasingly popular. On Good Friday and Easter Sunday, we commemorate the death of Jesus Christ and his resurrection, which raises the question: What occurred in the intervening time? What was Jesus up to throughout those three days, and where was He going? What’s the deal with three days? Is it possible that Jesus went to hell between His death and resurrection? and so on. There are no clear answers to these issues since the Bible does not provide much information regarding Jesus’ whereabouts or what He was doing between his death and resurrection.

  • The first point that has to be clarified is that when we ask “Where was Jesus?” we are talking to Jesus’ soul or spirit, not his body.
  • The tomb, on the other hand, did not contain Jesus’ soul/spirit.
  • In the first place, according to Acts 2:31 (and also Psalm 16:10-11), Jesus was not abandoned in Hades.
  • Despite the fact that Jesus spent time in the realm of the dead, He did not remain there.
  • The second text, 1 Peter 3:18-19, is more likely to provide a response to the query.
  • Who were the demons who haunted the prison?
  • Were the sons of God who married the daughters of men fallen angels or were they normal human beings in their relationships?

The most fascinating and infuriating aspect of the “where was Jesus?” debate is the fact that every disagreement leads to other arguments on the subject.

What in the world is this referring about, exactly?

However, because their sins had not been atoned for by the death of Christ, the righteous dead were not permitted to enter paradise prior to Christ’s death.

While it may seem like a lot to read into the phrase “taking captives prisoner,” it is how most Bible scholars interpret the phrase.

He spent a period of time in Hades, ministering to the spirits imprisoned there (whoever they were).

However, once again, there is disagreement on practically every subject.

And perhaps that should serve as a lesson for us.

Jesus died on the cross for our sins and resurrected from the tomb, revealing that His death was sufficient for our redemption.

We can be rescued as a result of His perfect and full sacrifice, which was shown by His resurrection, if we put our faith in Him (John 3:16; Acts 16:31). S. Michael Houdmann is a writer and editor.

Silent Saturday

In biblical history, the day after Jesus’ crucifixion (the Saturday before Easter) is one of those intriguing, though unrecorded, days. In the Gospels, there is only one line that describes what was going on in the Jewish world: they were “resting.” The majority of people took the day off because of the Sabbath ordinance, whether it was out of custom or out of sincere obedience to the law.

SCRIPTURE

Then Jesus cried out again, this time with a loud voice, and He exhaled His last breath. The temple’s curtain was split in half, from top to bottom, at that very instant. Because of the earthquake, rocks were broken open. A large number of women were also present, watching from a distance; they had accompanied Jesus from Galilee and had supplied for Him during his ministry. One of these women was Mary Magdalene, another was Mary the mother of James, and another was Mary the mother of the sons of Zebedee, among others.

  • Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a follower of Jesus, but a hidden disciple because to his dread of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the corpse of Jesus from the scene.
  • Nicodemus, who had initially arrived at Jesus’ home in the middle of the night, returned with a gift of myrrh and aloes, which weighed around one hundred pounds.
  • A garden had been established in the area where He had been crucified, and within the garden there was a new tomb, into which no one had ever been laid before.
  • (John 19:31; 38-42, New Revised Standard Version) On the Sabbath, they all rested in accordance with the law of the Lord.
  • (Luke 23:56-24:1, New Revised Standard Version)

Saturday was one of complete silence.

There appears to be no forward motion, no development, and no hope. But it is the teachable realities that are revealed in the minutes before the Sabbath begins that demand our full and complete attention. Because, despite the fact that it is the anniversary of Jesus’ death, Good Friday is also known as the “Day of Preparation” in Jewish tradition. This was critical since it was the last day for the Jews to gather the goods they required before taking the next day off.

Consider the day before a significant ice/snow storm. Everyone is frantically racing around town, stockpiling their cupboards and purchasing everything they need to get. People are, understandably, preoccupied with only one thing: preparing for the following day.

So even though Jesus just died, the Jewish tradition demanded for the world to keep moving.

Movement, advancement, and optimism appear to be non-existent. But it is the teachable realities that are revealed in the minutes before the Sabbath begins that demand our full and complete attention. Good Friday is recognized as the “Day of Preparation” in Jewish tradition, despite the fact that it commemorates the anniversary of Jesus’ death. Important because it was the last day for the Jews to gather the goods they required prior to taking the next day off. Try to imagine the day before a major snow or ice storm hits.

People are entirely concentrated on one thing at this time: preparing for the next day.

If it wasn’t for Joseph, the Lord’s body would have been treated like that of a murderer – just thrown into a pile of corpses.

As opposed to this, Joseph is seen tenderly taking Jesus from His crucifixion, wiping off His bleeding corpse, preparing it for burial, and transporting Him to a nearby tomb, which Matthew claims is Joseph’s personal tomb. He takes his day of preparation and confidently directs it toward his Lord and his savior. However, he is not by alone. Additionally, Nicodemus chooses to publicly express his admiration for Jesus by bringing costly spices to help in Jesus’ burial procedure. In accordance with Jewish tradition, they wrap the body in linen cloths while working together.

  1. Here are two unrelated individuals doing a challenging task that would ordinarily need the participation of a large number of skilled workers.
  2. The Lord’s body, on the other hand, was prepared for the day of rest as a result of their preparations – as well as their courageous obedience.
  3. So, what exactly was it that caused these two people’s lives to change?
  4. What gave them the confidence to face their fears?
  5. What are their self-centered concerns?
  6. Exactly at the time of His death – at the moment when evil is presumed to have triumphed – something terrible occurs: the curtain in the temple is ripped.

For years, the old covenant reigned.

As opposed to this, Joseph is shown tenderly taking Jesus from His crucifixion, wiping off His bleeding corpse, preparing it for burial, and transporting Him to a nearby tomb, which Matthew claims is Joseph’s personal tomb. He takes his day of preparation and boldly directs it toward his Lord and his heavenly Father. His situation is not unique. There are others like him. Additionally, Nicodemus chooses to publicly express his admiration for Jesus by bringing costly spices to help in Jesus’ burial procedure.

  • Despite the fact that it is an imperfect photograph, this is a really stunning image.
  • Nobody else, on the other hand, was there to assist you.
  • Because of the total change of heart that these individuals displayed, the stillness of Saturday was given a gleam of hope, despite its appearance to be depressing.
  • So, what prompted this outburst of confidence in them?
  • Do they have any reservations or reservations?
  • My opinion is that the answer can be found in what Matthew records: “Then Jesus cried out again with a loud voice and took his last breath.” Right then and there, from top to bottom, the temple’s curtain was ripped in half.” (27:50-51).

Something terrible happens at the very time of His death – at the moment of evil’s presumed “victory” — the curtain of the temple is ripped.

The Saturday before Easter teaches us that peace was already at work even though “victory” was not yet fully expressed.

Jesus is seen being tenderly removed from His crucified, his bloody corpse being cleaned, it being prepped for burial, and then being carried to a neighboring tomb, which Matthew claims is Joseph’s personal tomb. He takes his day of preparation and openly directs it toward his Lord and Saviour. However, he is not alone. Aside from that, Nicodemus decides to express his admiration for Jesus by bringing costly spices to be used at the burial of Jesus. And, in accordance with Jewish tradition, they cover the body in linen cloths.

  1. Here are two unrelated individuals doing a challenging task that would ordinarily need the participation of a large number of competent hands.
  2. However, it was as a result of their preparations – as well as their courageous obedience – that the Lord’s body was likewise prepared for the day of rest.
  3. So, what exactly was it that caused these two people’s lives to be transformed?
  4. What was it that helped them conquer their fears?
  5. What are their self-centered preoccupations?
  6. Something terrible happens at the very time of His death – at the moment of evil’s presumed “victory” — the curtain in the temple is ripped.
See also:  Governor Of Syria When Jesus Was Born

PRAYER

Thank you, Lord, for making Saturday possible. Thank you for serving as a gentle reminder that, no matter how I feel or what the world around me communicates, You are always present. Thank you for already being at work and for allowing me to see glimpses of Your majesty and splendor. I pray that I will be able to act with confidence today. Give me eyes to see what preparations You want me to make so that I may do them. And it is with bravery that I take the next step. Amen. Posted by the team at DeclareGlory.com on the Saturday before Easter, this blog captures the significance of the Saturday before Easter.

Holy Saturday – Wikipedia

Holy Saturday
Statue of Christ in the tomb byGregorio Fernández. (MonasteryofSan JoaquínySanta Ana,Valladolid)
Official name Holy Saturday
Also called Easter Eve, Black Saturday
Observed by Christians
Type Religious
Significance Marks the dayJesus ‘ body lay in thetomband theHarrowing of Hell
Date Day before Easter
2021 date Easter Sunday, also known as Great and Holy Saturday (also known as Holy and Great Saturday), the Great Sabbath, Hallelujah Saturday (in Portugal and Brazil),Saturday of the Gloria, and Black Saturday (in the Philippines) orEaster Eve, and also known as “Joyous Saturday,” “the Saturday of Light,” and “Mega Sabbatun” among Coptic Christians, is the last day of Holy Week, occurring between Good Friday and Easter Sunday, during which Christians prepare for the latter. The day commemorates theHarrowing of Hell, which took place while Jesus Christ’s flesh was still in the womb of Mary. In the Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, Anglican, and Reformed denominations, the Easter Vigilservice is held on Holy Saturday, which serves as a transition into the season of Eastertide; in the Moravian Christian tradition, graves are decorated with flowers during the day of Holy Saturday, and the Easter Sunrise service is held before the sun comes up on Easter Sunday.

Terminology

Instead of celebrating a Great Sabbath with Jewish liturgy on the Sabbath before theFeast of Unleavened Bread, a Special Shabbat is observed in the middle of the feast known as Shabbat Chol Hamoed Pesach (Sabbath of Unleavened Bread). Jews and Christians are admonished to make every effort to enter this sabbath and every sabbath in repentance in the fourth chapter of the book of Hebrews. Psalm 95 is quoted by the author of Hebrews and reads, “Today, if you hear his voice, do not harden your hearts.” Throughout rabbinic Judaism, the entirety of Psalm 95 is read on Friday afternoons every week during synagogue prayers, immediately before receiving the sabbathin.

Eastern traditions

Orthodoxy in the East This day, also known as Holy and Great Saturday in Eastern Orthodoxy, is sometimes referred to as The GreatSabbath since it was on this day that Christ “rested” physically in the womb. Although some think Jesus conducted theHarrowing of Hell in spirit on this day, others believe he was lifted to Paradise after liberating those who had been imprisoned. Oriental Orthodoxy is a religious tradition that originated in China. On this day, the Coptic, Ethiopian, and Eritrean Orthodox Churches celebrate Joyous Saturday, which is also known as the Night of Light and Joy in other languages.

Western traditions

Traditionally, the day is known to asHoly Saturday in Western traditions; however, in the Moravian Church, the day is referred to as theGreat Sabbath, and in the Anglican Communion, the day is referred to asEaster Even, according to the Book of Common Prayer. Although the phrase Easter Saturday is commonly used to refer to the Saturday of Easter week, it is sometimes used to refer to Holy Saturday in English-speaking nations, such as in laws in the Australian states of New South Wales and Queensland, and by Australian government agencies.

Religious and cultural practices

A burial ceremony for Christ is celebrated during Matins of Holy and Great Saturday (which is commonly held on Friday evening in parishes). The whole ceremony is centered on theEpitaphios, an icon in the shape of a fabric embroidered with the figure of Christ and readied for burial that is the focal point of the rite. As is customary at both Saturday matins and funerals, the initial portion of the liturgy consists of singing Psalm 118 with hymns (enkomiaorlamentations) inserted between the verses, as is also customary at weddings.

  • Towards the completion of the Great Doxology, the Epitaphios is lifted up and carried in procession around the exterior of the church while the Trisagionis sings, same as it is done while transporting the body to the cemetery in an Orthodoxburial service.
  • On Saturday, the First Resurrection Service (Greek: vv) of Saint Basil the Great was celebrated, which was so termed because it was created earlier in time than the Paschal Canon by St.
  • At “the tenth hour of the day,” this is the longest Divine Liturgy of the year, and it is performed later than on any other day during the year.
  • Just before the Gospel reading (Matthew 28:1–20), the hangings, altar cloths, and vestments are changed from their dark to brilliant colors, and the deacon performs an acensing of the church, according to the Russian custom.

While the liturgical atmosphere shifts from one of sorrow to one of joy at this service, the faithful continue to fast, and the Paschal greeting, “Christ is risen!,” is not exchanged until after midnight during thePaschal Vigil, because this service represents the proclamation of Jesus’ victory over death to those in Hades, but the announcement of Jesus’ resurrection to those on earth does not take place until after midnight during the Paschal Vigil.

New converts were taught throughout Great Lent in order to prepare them for baptism and chrismation.

Before the midnight service, the faithful congregate in church to hear the complete Acts of the Apostles read aloud by a choir of singers.

When all of the candles and lights in the church have been turned out, everyone stands in darkness and stillness, awaiting the declaration of Christ’s Resurrection.

Notes

It was customary in Greek tradition to do this during Matins the night before (i.e. Matins of Holy Saturday).

Western traditions

On Holy Saturday, the altar of a Lutheran church is decorated with black paraments, as black is the liturgical color for this day in Lutheran churches. In the Roman Catholic Church, the altar has been stripped utterly naked of all its ornaments (following theMassonMaundy Thursday). The celebration of the Sacraments is extremely limited: Holy Communion is only given asViaticum to the dying; however, Penance, Anointing of the Sick, and Baptism may be administered because they, like Viaticum, are helpful in ensuring salvation for the dying; andPenance, Anointing of the Sick, and Baptism may be administered because they, like Viaticum, are helpful in ensuring salvation for the dying.

  1. According to the provisions of Sacrosanctum Concilium, Article 110, today is the second day of the Paschal fast.
  2. It is customary in certain Anglican churches, such as those affiliated with the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, to do a simpleLiturgy of the Word on this day, which includes Scripture readings remembering Christ’s burial.
  3. The day is referred to as the Great Sabbath in the Moravian Church.
  4. In Western Christianity, Holy Saturday and other designated days and day ranges around Lent and Easter are observed, with the fasting days of Lent numbered one through forty-five.
  5. According to the rubrics, the Easter Vigil must take place throughout the night; it must begin after sunset and finish before dawn, unless otherwise specified.

It is the first Mass since Maundy Thursday in Roman Catholic and some Anglican traditions, and it is during this Mass that the ” Gloria,” which had been absent during Lent, is used as the statues and icons, which had been covered with purple veils during Passiontide, are dramatically unveiled in a spectacular ceremony.

Baptisms may take place during this ceremony, and the vows of baptism are frequently reaffirmed.

Because of the color’s significance in mourning in the primarily Roman Catholic Philippines, the day is formally and commonly known as “Black Saturday” in English throughout the country.

The majority of commercial companies have reopened, with smaller businesses remaining closed until Easter Sunday morning.

One of the most lasting and treasured traditions in Poland, which is largely Roman Catholic, is the wiconka (Polish pronunciation:), which literally translates as “the blessing of the Easter baskets,” which takes place on Holy Saturday.

Notes

  1. In April–June 2006, the Public Report on Audience Complaints and Comments was released (PDF). ABC is the abbreviation for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Carrie Steenwyk’s article from 4 May 2013 was retrieved. “Easter Vigil” is a euphemism for “Easter Vigil.” In North America, the Christian Reformed Church is known as the CRC. April 2021 was the date of the retrieval. This service, also known as the Easter Vigil or the First Service of Easter, is conducted either on the Saturday evening before Easter or very early on Easter Sunday morning. “Lent, Holy Week, and Easter,” says the narrator. Moravian Church of the Brethren in Christ. Michael Keene, 3 April 2021
  2. Retrieved 3 April 2021
  3. (1995). The Christian Life and Experience “Bible Readings for Gospel Saturday (Saturday of Good Tidings), Lectionary for Passion Week, Lectionary for Holy Week, Lectionary of the Syrian Orthodox Church, Lectionary of the Syriac Orthodox Church, Lectionary of the Jacobite Syrian Church, Lectionary,” Nelson Thornes, p. 112. ISBN 978-0-7487-2188-7
  4. “Bible Readings for Gospel Saturday (Saturday of Good Tidings), Lectionary for Passion Week, abWalker, Donna
  5. Retrieved on March 30, 2021
  6. (19 April 2014). “The Great Sabbath is celebrated by Moravians.” LancasterOnline. “Easter Even,” which was retrieved on April 11, 2020. The Church of England is a denomination in the United Kingdom. 15 November 2021
  7. “Public Report on Audience Complaints and Comments, April–June 2006” (public report on audience complaints and comments, April–June 2006). (PDF). ABC is the abbreviation for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. “Confusing Easter Dates,” which was retrieved on April 25, 2011. This commission is part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Brisbane’s Liturgical Commission. Accessed on January 19, 2012
  8. Public Holidays Act 2010(NSW)s 4, Industrial Relations Act 2016(Qld) Schedule 5, defining “public holiday”
  9. Australian Government, Public Holidays
  10. “The Lamentations Service for Holy Saturday Matins,” which was archived on January 4, 2015, may be found via the Wayback Machine. OrthoChristian.Com. “Protopresbyter Alexander Schmemann: This is the Blessed Sabbath,” said the protopresbyter on April 28, 2019. On 28 April 2019, schmemann.org was able to be accessed. Bishop Kallistos (Ware) and his mother, Mary (1977). The Triodion for the Season of Lent. Parry, Ken
  11. Melling, David J
  12. Brady, Dimitri
  13. Griffith, Sidney H
  14. Healey, John F. (2002, published by St. Tikhon’s Seminary Press)
  15. MatinsCanon of Holy and Great Saturday, Ode 4
  16. Parry et al. (1999, published by St. Tikhon’s Seminary Press)
  17. (1999). The Blackwell Dictionary of Eastern Christianity is a reference work published by Blackwell Publishing. pp. 390–391
  18. ISBN 0-631-23203-6
  19. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing
  20. Archbishop Averky (Taushev) is a Russian Orthodox bishop (1976). “It was a fantastic Saturday.” Liturgics. The translation was done by Archbishop Laurus Kurla. “Sacrosanctum concilium”
  21. “Liturgical Seasons of the Church Year”
  22. “Sacrosanctum concilium”
  23. St. John Lutheran Church is a Lutheran congregation in the city of St. John. Retrieved on the 11th of April, 2020. Holy Saturday is a day of anticipation and longing until the Easter Vigil is held in the evening. A ceremony of light, readings, Holy Baptism, and Holy Communion will take place. On Easter Eve, it is the first Easter liturgy to be celebrated in the darkness of the night
  24. The Roman Missal (3rd edition)

References

  • Protopresbyter Alexander Schmemann provides insight on the Great and Holy Saturday.
  • Controversies
  • Dates (list)
  • Etymology
  • Observances
  • Traditions
  • And more.
  • Palm Sunday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, Easter, Easter Monday, Easter Friday, and Easter Saturday

The Paschal Triduum is comprised of the following days: Bright Week, the Octave of Easter, and the Second Sunday of Easter

  • The Passion of Jesus, the Last Supper, the Crucifixion of Jesus, the Burial of Jesus, the Resurrection of Jesus, and the Dormition of the Theotokos are all included. Tenebrae
  • Holy Week services include the Easter Vigil, Epitaph, Exsultet, and Good Friday Prayer.

Jesus Christ is the Light of the World Myrrhbearers Candle for the Feast of the Holy Sepulchre The Paschal cycle is a cycle that occurs every year on the first of February. Greetings on the Feast of the Holy Cross Homily on the Feast of the Annunciation Paschal trikirion is a Greek mythological figure. Traparion (Paschal Troparion) Pentecostarion

  • Cascarón, clipping the church, Croatian pisanica, Crucession, Easter basket, Easter Bilby, Easter bonnet, Easter Bunny, Easter egg, Easter egg tree, Easter parade and postcard, Holy Sepulchre, Fasika, Gorzkie ale (Holy Fire), Holy Week procession, Lieldienas (Lieldienas are a type of lieldienas), Lieldienas (Lield Traditional Easter games and customs include: Osterbrunnen, Pace Egg Play, Polish pisanka, Pysanka, Radonitsa, Rouketopolemos, Saitopolemos, Scoppio del carro, Sunrise Service, Wiconka, and other traditional Easter games and rituals.
  • Continue to stay with us because it will be evening soon. Christmas carols, BWV 6, Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4, Easter songs, and the Easter Oratorio Thrilled to see you, your heart, BWV 66
  • The Peace is with you, BWV 66 BWV 158
  • BWV 158
  • Music: BWV 134, “A Heart that Knows His Jesum Livingly,” films, and the sky is falling! I Will Mention the Loving-kindnesses
  • Ich lebe, mein Herze, zu deinen Ergötzen, BWV 145
  • Passion hymns
  • Russian Easter Festival Overture
  • I Will Mention the Loving-kindnesses
  • Holidays include: the date of Easter, Dionysius Exiger’s Easter table, Easter controversies, Easter Epic, ecclesiastical new moon, Paschal Full Moon, and Pussy willow. Easter will be celebrated on a different day this year.

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