What Did Jesus Do Between His Death And Resurrection

Where was Jesus for the three days between His death and resurrection?

QuestionAnswer On the cross, after saying, “It is done,” Jesus bent his head and surrendered his spirit, according to the Bible (John 19:30). When Jesus died on the crucifixion, his corpse stayed there until it was brought down and laid in a neighboring tomb (John 19:40–42). His spirit, on the other hand, was somewhere else. Thirty-two hours later, He was raised from the dead by the reunification of his body and spirit (John 20). There has been some debate concerning where Jesus was during the three days between His death and resurrection—that is, where His spirit was during that time period.

During Jesus’ entry into His kingdom, the believing thief requests to be remembered, and Jesus responds, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise” (Luke 23:42).

As a result, upon His death, Jesus was taken to the region of blessing where God resides—heaven.

Another text is frequently cited in the debate of where Jesus was during the three days that elapsed between His death and His resurrection.

  • (ESV).
  • According to this understanding, the spirits Jesus addressed may have been either demonic or human in nature, but not both.
  • Peter does not tell us what Jesus said to the spirits that were imprisoned, but it could not have been a message of redemption since angels cannot be rescued, as we know from the Bible (Hebrews 2:16).
  • However, there is another reading of the text from 1 Peter.
  • The fact that Jesus had “in spirit” taught to the people of Noah’s day while they were still alive on earth is provided by Peter as a footnote to the passage.
  • The wordnow in 1 Peter 3:19 is included for clarity in the Amplified Bible and the New American Standard Bibles of 1977 and 1995, and it contrasts with the words “long ago” (NIV) and “formerly” (ESV) in 1 Peter 3:20.

The Amplified Bible and the New American Standard Bibles of 1977 and 1995 include the wordnow in 1 To further understand, consider the following paraphrase of 1 Peter 3:18–20: When Jesus died in the flesh, He was raised to life in the Spirit (it was by means of this same Spirit that Jesus preached to those who are currently imprisoned—those souls who rebelled during the period of God’s great patience when Noah was constructing the ark).

The prophet Noah was used by Jesus to teach spiritually to the people of Noah’s day, according to this viewpoint.

Another verse, Ephesians 4:8–10, is cited in the explanation of Jesus’ actions during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection.

According to the English Standard Version, Christ “led a multitude of prisoners.” Some believe that phrase alludes to an occurrence that is not mentioned anywhere else in the Bible, namely, that Jesus gathered all of the saved who were in paradise and transported them to their eternal home in heaven.

Another interpretation of Ephesians 4 is that the phrase “ascended up high” is a direct allusion to Jesus’ ascension.

In His triumph, Jesus had beaten and captured our spiritual adversaries, including the devil, death, and the curse of sin, and He had taken them captive.

The only thing we can be certain of is that, according to Jesus’ own words on the cross, He was taken up to be with the Father in paradise.

As well as this, we may confidently state that because His work of salvation was completed, Jesus did not have to suffer in hell. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What happened to Jesus during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection?

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QuestionAnswer He “bowed his head and gave up his spirit” on the cross after proclaiming, “It is finished,” (It is completed) (John 19:30). In John 19:40–42, we read that his lifeless corpse remained on the cross until it was removed and laid in a neighboring tomb. He was at a different place in his spirit. His body and spirit were rejoined three days later, and He was raised from the dead (John 20). For the three days between Jesus’ death and resurrection, there has been some debate as to where Jesus was—or, more specifically, where His spirit was.

  1. During Jesus’ entry into His kingdom, the believing thief requests to be remembered, and Jesus responds, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise,” (Luke 23:42).
  2. Jesus then ascended to the realm of blessing where God resides, which is known as heaven, following His death.
  3. Another text is frequently cited when discussing where Jesus was during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection.
  4. (ESV).
  5. This theory suggests that Jesus was addressing either demonic or human spirits when he spoke to the multitudes.
  6. Because angels cannot be rescued, Peter does not tell us what Jesus said to the imprisoned spirits, but it is clear that it was not a message of salvation (Hebrews 2:16).
  7. However, there is another way of looking at the text from 1 Peter: Peter is not claiming that Jesus made a special trip to Hades/hell to preach or declare anything in this view; instead, the “spirits” are those who are currently in torment.

That evil generation heard the word, rejected it, died in the flood, and is now incarcerated in the hereafter.

A paraphrase of 1 Peter 3:18–20 will help to clarify the situation.

One of the passages included in the explanation of Jesus’ actions during the three days between His death and resurrection is Ephesians 4:8–10.

(Ephesians 4:8).

The redeemed who were in paradise, according to some, were brought together by Jesus and taken to their eternal home in heaven, an act that has not been detailed elsewhere in the Scripture.

Another interpretation of Ephesians 4 is that the phrase “ascended up high” is a direct allusion to Jesus’ ascension to the right hand of the Father.

In His triumph, Jesus had beaten and captured our spiritual adversaries, including the devil, death, and the curse of sin, and He had taken them into custody.

All we can be certain of is that, according to Jesus’ own words on the cross, He was taken up into heaven.

Jesus did not have to suffer in hell as a result of his accomplished work of salvation. We can say this with certainty. to:Jesus Christ: Do You Have Any Questions? For the three days that passed between His death and resurrection, Jesus was unaccounted for.

Did Jesus Go to Hell Between His Death and Resurrection?

We know from Jesus’ response to the thief that when someone dies, they are instantly brought into the presence of the Father. Luke 23:42 states: “Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,” referring to the moment of death. This remark also informs us that Jesus died and was resurrected by His Father. Beyond that, we know virtually nothing about Jesus’ whereabouts over those three days. It’s important not to read too much into a parable or narrative, as this might lead to confusion.

Did Jesus Go to Hell? Bible Verses for this Theory

1 Peter 3:18-20 is the scripture of Scripture most frequently cited by people who believe in the existence of hell. “Because Christ also died for sins once and for all, the just for the unjust, in order that He might bring us to God, having been put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit; in which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who once were disobedient, when the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, namely, eight persons, were brought safely through the water.” “In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,” they say, referring to the verses in question.

  1. According to legend, Jesus descended into Hell and preached to the souls of the damned.
  2. There is no indication in the Bible that a lost soul who has died receives a second opportunity at redemption.
  3. However, there is another reading of this verse that is more logical.
  4. You may have daily words of encouragement emailed to your inbox.

Interpreting the Scripture

Jesus was crucified in the body, yet he was raised to life by the Holy Spirit after his death. The term “brought alive” is a passive verb, which means that someone other than Jesus was responsible for bringing Jesus back to life. Either Jesus was brought back to life by the Spirit, or He was brought back to life by His spirit. In either case, the Spirit had to have played a role. The chapter then goes on to tell us who these souls in prison are: they are those who did not listen to Noah (who was preaching repentance to the world in the power of the Holy Spirit under the direction of God at the time of his imprisonment).

However, just eight persons heeded the warning and were saved—”brought safely through the floodwaters” The term “jail” is used in a metaphorical sense.

Furthermore, a wide gap has been established between us and you, in order that anyone who seek to pass over from here into you will not be able to do so, and that none who wish to cross over from there will be able to do so.” Jesus did not go to hell for those three days, according to the Bible, which is not mentioned anywhere else.

Most people believe Jesus’ physical body stayed in the tomb, just as ours will remain in the grave once we die.

The distinction is that God did not allow Jesus’ body to degrade like other people’s bodies did.

Other Bible Verses and Sources Used to Support the Hell Theory

Other Bible scriptures, such as Romans 10:6-7, Ephesians 4:8-9, and Acts 2:27, that have been cited to support the belief that Jesus went to hell between his crucifixion and resurrection have also caused confusion. However, as discussed in this ZondervanAcademic.com article, these verses are frequently taken out of context and given meaning that is not intended by the author. The Apostle’s Creed was later amended to include the phrase “and he fell into hell.” Did Jesus Descend into Hell Before He Was Resurrected?, a film by Garrett Kell, explored this question.

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Where was Jesus between His death and resurrection?

Around Easter, it’s understandable that the question “where was Jesus?” becomes increasingly popular. On Good Friday and Easter Sunday, we commemorate the death of Jesus Christ and his resurrection, which raises the question: What occurred in the intervening time? What was Jesus up to throughout those three days, and where was He going? What’s the deal with three days? Is it possible that Jesus went to hell between His death and resurrection? and so on. There are no clear answers to these issues since the Bible does not provide much information regarding Jesus’ whereabouts or what He was doing between his death and resurrection.

  • The first point that has to be clarified is that when we ask “Where was Jesus?” we are talking to Jesus’ soul or spirit, not his body.
  • The tomb, on the other hand, did not contain Jesus’ soul/spirit.
  • In the first place, according to Acts 2:31 (and also Psalm 16:10-11), Jesus was not abandoned in Hades.
  • Despite the fact that Jesus spent time in the realm of the dead, He did not remain there.
  • The second text, 1 Peter 3:18-19, is more likely to provide a response to the query.
  • Who were the demons who haunted the prison?
  • Were the sons of God who married the daughters of men fallen angels or were they normal human beings in their relationships?

The most fascinating and infuriating aspect of the “where was Jesus?” debate is the fact that every disagreement leads to other arguments on the subject.

What in the world is this referring about, exactly?

However, because their sins had not been atoned for by the death of Christ, the righteous dead were not permitted to enter paradise prior to Christ’s death.

While it may seem like a lot to read into the phrase “taking captives prisoner,” it is how most Bible scholars interpret the phrase.

He spent a period of time in Hades, ministering to the spirits imprisoned there (whoever they were).

However, once again, there is disagreement on practically every subject.

And perhaps that should serve as a lesson for us.

Jesus died on the cross for our sins and resurrected from the tomb, revealing that His death was sufficient for our redemption.

We can be rescued as a result of His perfect and full sacrifice, which was shown by His resurrection, if we put our faith in Him (John 3:16; Acts 16:31). S. Michael Houdmann is a writer and editor.

Where was Jesus for three days between His death and resurrection?

The Bible is unambiguous in its assertion that the human body of Jesus died on the cross and rose from the dead on the third day, as described in the Gospels. It is less certain as to where Jesus actually stayed over those three days in the wilderness. First and foremost, there is the question of Jesus’ divine character, which must be addressed. If He is divine, then He is omnipresent, which means that He is present everywhere at all times. According to this interpretation, Jesus didn’t “go” anyplace.

  1. In terms of His activity throughout this time period, many are perplexed as to where He was during this “elsewhere.” Speaking to the thief on the cross, Jesus said, “Today you shall be with me in Paradise.” (John 14:3) (Luke 23:43).
  2. There are also more possible insights into the activity of Jesus over these three days provided by First Peter 3:18-22.
  3. Several commentators have speculated that this is a reference to Christ preaching via Noah in the past.
  4. This is especially true when people use Scripture to support their views.
  5. When Jesus reached the celestial world, time would not have been reckoned the same way it is on earth, which means that the three days between his death and resurrection may not have “felt” like three days to Him at the time.
  6. Truths that are related: Is it possible that Jesus spent time in hell between His death and resurrection?
  7. What are some of the reasons why I should believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ?
  8. What is the significance of the ascension of Jesus Christ?

Does the Bible Tell Us Where Jesus Was the Three Days Between His Death and Resurrection?

When Jesus died, did He immediately ascend to the throne of glory? Is it possible that He descended into hell in order to rescue people who have been imprisoned by sin?

Was He in a condition of limbo, purgatory, or hell at the time of his death? We know that Jesus died, was buried, and was risen on the third day, but where was He during the time between His death, burial, and resurrection, and where did He go after His resurrection?

Where Did Jesus Go After His Death on the Cross?

Do you think Jesus went to paradise right away when He died? Is it possible that He descended into hell in order to rescue people who were imprisoned by their sin? Were you under the impression He was in limbo, purgatory, or hell? We know that Jesus died, was buried, and was risen on the third day, but where was He during the time between His death, burial, and resurrection, and how did He know where He was going?

Jesus’ Proclamation to the Demons

When Jesus was imprisoned, it is stated that he issued a message to “the spirits currently in prison.” Because people are never referred to as “spirits” in the Bible, it appears that this is a reference to demon spirits who are imprisoned in the abyss, and that these demons are fallen angels who were imprisoned in the abyss because of their horrible evil. It’s something like this that is included in the study notes of John MacArthur’s Study Bible (ESV) (p 1894). In Jude 6-7, it reads, “And the angels who did not maintain their places of power, but instead abandoned their appropriate dwelling—these he has confined in darkness, shackled with eternal chains, ready to be judged on the great Day.” In a similar vein, the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, as well as their neighboring villages, surrendered to sexual immorality and depravity.

“For if God did not spare angels who sinned, but sent them to hell and bound them in chains of darkness to be held for judgment; if God did not spare the ancient world when he brought the flood on its ungodly people, but protected Noah, a preacher of righteousness, and seven others,” the apostle Peter writes.

It is written that they are bound with “everlasting chains for judgment on the great Day” (Jude 6) and that this proclamation “to the spirits now in prison” was where Jesus was believed to have been for at least a portion of the time between the day of His crucifixion and death and the day of His resurrection.

Therefore, it is not surprising that the Apostles’ Creed includes a statement that Jesus fell into hell as part of their Creed.

The possibility exists that Jesus went into heaven following this and remained there until His resurrection on the third day.

Jesus Descends into Hell

After all, according to Second Peter 2:4, God did not spare angels when they sinned but consigned them to pit, where they were bound in chains of darkness until they were brought to justice. In verse 4, Peter purposefully employs the Greek word for hell, Tartarus, which is a region deeper than Hades and destined for the most vile and terrible of all human beings, gods, and demons according to Greek mythology. According to MacArthur’s Study Bible, page 1905, Peter was underlining that this was the worst location in all of God’s creation in terms of eternal misery and pain.

The demons that were present then, and who must unavoidably be present today, had to have been the most vile of all fallen angels, if not all of them.

Instead, Jesus let them to be tossed into the swine herd.

He went to hell in spirit to declare His victory over evil and the fact that He had conquered the tomb as well.

Numerous Bible academics and theologians think that these bound demons will be freed during the Great Tribulation, which is described in Revelation 9, despite the fact that we know that there are many demons now wandering the planet under the control of Satan (Rev 12:7-9).

The Abyss Opens Up in Great Tribulation

After all, according to Second Peter 2:4, God did not spare angels when they sinned but consigned them to pit, where they were bound in chains of darkness until they were brought before the judge. Verse 4 has the Greek term for hell, Tartarus, which in Greek mythology is a location lower than Hades itself and destined for the most despicable and terrible of all human beings, as well as the most vile and evil of all gods and demons. According to MacArthur’s Study Bible, p 1905, Peter was underlining that this was the worst location in all of God’s creation, filled with unending misery and sorrow.

  • They had to have been the most wicked of all the fallen angels, which is why they had to be there then and must by necessity be there today.
  • Instead, Jesus let them to be put into the pigs.
  • He went to hell in spirit to declare His victory over evil, as well as His victory over death itself.
  • In spite of the fact that there are numerous demons currently wandering the planet under Satan’s control, many Bible scholars and theologians believe that these bound demons will be freed during the Great Tribulation, as described in Revelation 9.

Hell Was Not Made for Humans

After all, according to Second Peter 2:4, God did not spare angels when they sinned but consigned them to pit, where they were chained and imprisoned until the day of judgment. Verse 4 has the Greek term for hell, Tartarus, which in Greek mythology is a location lower than Hades itself and destined for the most vile and terrible of all human beings, as well as the most despicable and evil of gods and demons. According to MacArthur’s Study Bible, p 1905, Peter was underlining that this was the worst location in all of God’s creation in terms of eternal misery and pain.

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That group of demons, who were present at the time and must, by necessity, still be here today, have to have been the most vile of all the fallen angels.

Instead, Jesus permitted them to be put into the pigs.

He went to hell in spirit to declare His triumph over evil and the fact that He had conquered death as well.

In spite of the fact that there are numerous demons currently wandering the planet under Satan’s control, many Bible scholars and theologians believe that these bound demons will be freed during the Great Tribulation, as described in Revelation 9. (Rev 12:7-9).

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Where was Jesus between His death and resurrection?

Question / Comment – Where was Jesus during the time between His death and rising from the dead? Greetings, Iain How are you doing? I hope everything is going well for you. I’m really baffled by these two passages and am unable to comprehend them. What is the best way to understand Luke 23:43 in light of John 5:28-29? Is it possible that Jesus Christ arrived in paradise on the same day? What happened to Him after He died on the cross? I’m looking forward to hearing back from you! Thank you very much.

  • Thank you for the email, and yes, I’m doing good, thank you very much.
  • Now, let’s get to your questions.
  • 23:43 (Luke 23:43) Afterward, He told him, “Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.” He was overjoyed.
  • Here, the distinction is mostly related to the many elements of a human being.
  • However, it is not where their spirit is directed.

It is said that the unrighteous were sent into the underworld, while the virtuous were cast into a realm known as “Abraham’s bosom.” (Luke 16:19-31; Matthew 16:19-31; Luke 16:19-31; Matthew 16:19-31; Luke 16:19-31; Matthew 16:19-31; Luke 16:19-31; Matthew 16:19-31; Luke 16:19-31; Matthew 16:19-31; Luke 16:19-31; Matthew 16:19-31; Luke 16:19-31; Matthew 16:19-31; Luke 16:19-31; Luke 16:19- In addition, it is likely that ‘Abraham’s bosom’ was located in a different section of Hades at the time of Abraham’s death.

  1. As a result, the difference between these two passages is in the location of where their bodies are buried and where their spirits go after death, respectively.
  2. It is predicted that at the end of time, the bodies of those who have died in graves or tombs would be revived and reunited with the person’s spirit or soul.
  3. No, the spirit/soul is still alive, alert, and aware of its surroundings, and it moves to its own location.
  4. Yes, without a doubt.
  5. Following their deaths, both Jesus and the repentant thief were immediately taken to Paradise.
  6. And, more importantly, where was Paradise at the time?
  7. At that point, Heaven was no longer a possibility.

“Can you tell me where Jesus went when he died on the cross?” In the days before His resurrection, He traveled to two locations that I am aware of.

However, there is an interesting and contentious passage in Peter that appears to indicate that He also went and announced His victory to the imprisoned spirits who had rebelled during the days of Noah, which is controversial.

It is announcing His victory over sin and death on the cross.

The book of Ephesians 4:8-10 is about a man named Paul who was born in the city of Ephesus and grew up in the city of Ephesus.

(8-9) (Now, what exactly does the phrase “He ascended” signify, other than that He had also descended into the lower regions of the earth?

The phrase “when he ascended up on high” refers to Christ’s ascension into heaven.

When Christ ascended to the right hand of the Father, He took these believers with Him out of paradise and into the very presence of God.

This means that He bestowed gifts on living believers in the church so that they could share their faith with the rest of the world.

Vernon McGee’s full name is J.

“What happens to believers who pass away today?” Since Jesus’ ascension to the right hand of the Father, believers who die go directly to Paradise, which is now located in Heaven.

As a result of being “caught up” to paradise (using the same word as in 1 Thes 4:17, which is where we get the word “rapture”), Paul witnessed things that could not be described in words!

I know how such a man—whether he was in the body or apart from the body, I don’t know; only God knows—(4) was drawn into Paradise and heard inexpressible words, which a man is not permitted to utter.

In other words, when a believer dies today, they (their spirit and soul) will immediately go to this ‘Paradise’ (Heaven) to be with Jesus (Luke 2 Cor 5:8, Phil 1:23, Heb 12:23), while their body will be buried in the ground.

If you’re interested in learning more about this type of topic, you can find it here: I hope this has been of assistance. Iain, may God bless you.

What happened between crucifixion and resurrection?

Dear Father Gregory, I have a question. Do people have a clear understanding of what occurred to Jesus between the time of his death and the time of his resurrection on Easter Sunday? Was he just dead, or had he gone somewhere else? Answer: This topic was posed to me by a student, and it is a question that frequently arises around Easter season, when churches ponder on these kinds of concerns in their sermons. This period of time between Jesus’ death and resurrection is referred to as the harrowing of hell in traditional Christian doctrine.

This is an issue for which the Scriptures do not provide a very clear response.

12:40) (Matthew 12:40) (Matthew 12:40) (Matthew 12:40) (Matthew 12:40) This is made clearer in the First Epistle of Peter, which states that “this is why the Gospel was proclaimed even to the dead, that, while they were condemned in the body like men, they may live in the spirit like God.” (4:6) (II Peter 4:6) These verses imply an early idea that individuals who had died, probably those who lived before the time of Christ, were granted a second chance by Christ himself before the resurrection in order to respond to the Christian message after death.

However, this is merely one reading of the text, and it is not the only conceivable interpretation.

It is today known as the Creed of the Apostles.

180 and as late as A.D.

“Christ fell to the lowest,” according to the Greek text, which can be translated into modern English as either “Christ descended to the dead” or “Christ sank into hell.” The book was first written in Latin in the ancient world, which tells us something about how the individuals who were historically closest to the composition viewed it.

  • This can be translated as “to those below,” or it can be translated as “to the infernal regions,” which might refer to the doomed.
  • A number of early Christian theologians, some of whom have subsequently been canonized, including St.
  • Hippolytus of Rome (170-235), claimed that Christ entered hell and released a number of the damned.
  • Hippolytus was expelled from the Catholic Church as a result of his outrage.
  • Peter, in contrast with Callixtus, who was more flexible, and Pope Pontian, who was more conservative.
  • His opinions on the harrowing are particularly important because, despite the fact that he was never regarded as a church teacher, they reflect those of a large number of early Christian writers, with the harrowing serving as an excellent illustration.
  • Following the death of Hippolytus, the concept of harrowing was further developed.
  • In this painting, Christ is represented as descended into hell and speaking to the noble people of the Old Testament, such as Adam and Moses, before delivering them from the flames of the underworld.

In the scripture, Christ enters hell and is described as follows: “And the Lord stretched out His hand, and said: Come to me, all my saints, who bear my image and likeness.” You who have been convicted by the tree, as well as by the devil and death, now see the devil and death condemned by the tree, don’t you?

  1. Adam looked up at the Lord, who was holding him by the right hand, and exclaimed, “Peace be to you, with all your children, my righteous ones!” Following this response, Adam and the other Hebrew saints are exorcised from their earthly bodies and transported to heavenly bodies.
  2. Because the concept of Jesus Christ storming the gates of hell is so compelling and has been employed in so much Christian imagery throughout history, including medieval, Byzantine, and Renaissance art, it deserves to be discussed more.
  3. Even the present Catholic Church supports this idea, albeit it clarifies that this descend to the abode of the dead did not benefit the genuinely condemned, but only those who were already in the abode of the dead.
  4. However, in response to the question posed to me by the student, I believe it is fair to reply that, from a Christian perspective, whatever Jesus was doing after his death, he was surely rather busy in those three brief days.

Please write to him at P.O. Box 8102 Redlands, CA 92375-1302 or send an email to [email protected] You can also follow him on Twitter at @Fatherelder if you want to get in touch.

Life after death: What did Jesus do between his resurrection and ascension?

Prior to going into heaven, Jesus was born, died, and resurrected from the dead again. All of these facts serve as the core of our Christian belief system. We’re all familiar with the accounts of the Triumphal Entry, the Last Supper, and the Crucifixion, but what transpired between the resurrection and the ascension is less well-documented. In the Hosios Loukas Monastery in Boeotia, Greece, there is a Byzantine picture of Doubting Thomas. Wikimedia Commons Unlike the passion story, which is well-known and frequently depicted in art and literature as well as in the Church, the facts of the 40 days that elapsed between Jesus’ resurrection and ascension are significantly less widely known.

  • There are a total of ten appearances of the rising Jesus recorded in the Gospels, five of which occur on the day of his resurrection and five more times before he went into heaven.
  • The Lord came to them over a period of forty days and spoke to them about the coming kingdom of God.” (See Acts 1:3).
  • Appeared to be a female Mary Magdalene was the first person to receive Jesus’ revelation; no one else received it before her.
  • She thought him for the gardener at first, but when he addressed her by name, Mary recognized his voice right away.
  • When women testified, their evidence was not accorded the same weight as that of a man, whether it was in person or in a legal setting.
  • He then instructed her to “go and tell” the other disciples what he had said.
  • His second apparition was to a group of ladies who had been with Mary at the cemetery when Jesus made his first visit.
  • (See Matthew 28:9 for further information.) He made an appearance to his disciples.
  • When he broke bread with them after they had related to him the events of the Passion, “their eyes were opened and they recognized him,” says the Gospel of John (Luke 24.31).
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His followers were not abandoned when they did not recognize him as the source of their confusion; rather, he stayed with them until they realized that their hearts had been “burning within us as he chatted with us.” In a similar vein, when Jesus appeared again a short time later, his followers were unperturbed by the fact that they had mistaken him for a ghost.

  • It is, in fact, I myself!
  • “This is what I told you when I was still among you: Everything that is written about me in the Law of Moses, the Prophets, and the Psalms must be fulfilled.” He directed his followers away from supernatural conjecture and toward the Biblical roots of his resurrected body (Luke 24.44).
  • (See also John 20:25) In this meeting, we witness Jesus’ compassion as well as his willingness to criticize the situation.
  • Afterwards, the Gospel of John recounts the narrative of Jesus’ last known miracle, in which he overflowed the fishing nets of his disciples with an enormous catch of fish.
  • In the same way that Peter refused Jesus three times, Jesus asks him three times whether he loves him: “do you love me?” Following his denial of his master in his hour of need, Peter is restored at this location and is instructed to “feed my sheep” and “follow me,” among other things.
  • Jesus recognized Peter’s frailty, but he also recognized his love for him, and he decided to stick by him.
  • “The Great Commission” is a biblical phrase that means “Go and make disciples of all nations.” The Gospels of Matthew and Mark both conclude with the “Great Commission,” which is Jesus’ directive to his disciples to go forth into the world and share the good news of redemption.
  • Consequently, go into all the world and make disciples of all people, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, and instructing them to follow everything I have ordered you.

Jesus’ mission did not come to a stop with his death; rather, it continued through his resurrection and into the days leading up to his ascension to the heavenly realm. During this period, he exposed and reinforced critical aspects of his character as well as the nature of his purpose.

Where was Jesus for the three days between His death and resurrection?

Pixabay The tale of the cross and resurrection is one that many Christians are drawn to, and many of them wonder, at some point, where Jesus was between the days of His death and resurrection. As Christians, we commemorate the crucifixion of Jesus on Good Friday and the resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday, which are two separate events. But where had Jesus been throughout those intervening years? It’s a quick and honest answer to say that no one actually knows what happened to Jesus during that time period.

  • Nonetheless, there are a few of Bible scriptures that we may examine to see if they provide any type of signal.
  • He was put to death in his physical body, but he was raised to life in the Spirit.
  • Throughout history, people have typically thought that when a man dies, his spirit can only travel to one of two places: Paradise or Hades.
  • The faithful are taken to Paradise, and the unbelievers are sent to Hades.
  • While this is taking place, the physical corpse will remain in the grave, as dust returns to dust.
  • However, for at least a portion of the time between the crucifixion and the resurrection, He was not in Paradise with His Father as He should have been.
  • According to this interpretation, the ghost of Jesus traveled to Hades and delivered numerous proclamations to individuals who were imprisoned there.
  • Many believe that Jesus is preaching to the people who have drowned in the flood.
  • The Bible, on the other hand, tells us that all men will die once and will then stand before God in judgment for all of eternity.

When Jesus was crucified with two other criminals in Luke 23:43, one of them spoke to Him, and the Bible tells us that Jesus responded by saying, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” As a result, many people believe that Jesus was taken to Heaven shortly after He died, and that He spent at least some of the time between the cross and the resurrection with His father in heaven throughout that period.

The specific answer to the question of whether or not Jesus went to Heaven or somewhere else is not totally obvious, and as previously said, this is most likely due to the fact that there is very little discussion in the Bible regarding what transpired during those three days of fasting and prayer.

Let us rejoice in Jesus’ resurrection and express our gratitude for His incredible sacrifice.

Where Is Jesus Between His Death and Resurrection?

What happens to Christ after He dies on Friday afternoon and before He rises on Easter Sunday? Where is He? This question is answered by both Scripture and tradition. Examine the following passage from a sermon delivered in the second century, as well as this reflection taken from the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The following is an ancient Homily for Holy Saturday (about 2nd century A.D.): Today, the planet is filled with a tremendous silence and a great serenity, as if the world were at peace.

The earth trembled and continues to quiver because God has fallen asleep in the flesh and has awoken everyone who has slept since the beginning of time.

He has gone to release Adam from his shackles and Eve from her captivity with him, out of a deep desire to visit people who live in darkness and under the shadow of death.

… “I am your God, and for your sake, I have taken on the form of your Son.” I command you, o sleeper, to come to your senses.

Ascend to life from the dead, for I am the resurrection of the dead.” Nothing could be more lovely than the statement addressed to Adam and Eve, which reads: “I am your God, who for your sake has taken on the form of your Son.” According to St Ephrem the Deacon, who also attests to this descend among the dead, and who depicts it somewhat colorfully, “This descent among the dead is confirmed by St Ephrem the Deacon.” In order for our Lord to enter the underworld and be swallowed by death, he had to first acquire the body of another.

Hell could not swallow him up until our Lord had taken on our flesh, and so our Lord went in quest of a vehicle in which to ride to the underworld.

(Sermo de Domino nostro, 3-4.

Lamy, 1, 152-158.

9: Opera edit.

166-168) Scripture also bears witness to Christ’s ascension to the dead and what He accomplished there: The righteous for the unjust, Christ suffered once for sins, that he may bring us to God.

… For this reason, the gospel was proclaimed even to the dead, so that, although being judged in the body in the same way that humans are, they may live in the spirit in the same way that God lives (1 Peter 3:18; 1 Peter 4:6).

However, Jesus went into the underworld as a Savior, delivering the Good News to the spirits that were imprisoned inside.

This is because people who are there are deprived of the view of God, according to Scripture.

When Christ the Lord went into hell, it was precisely these pure souls, who had awaited their Savior, who were delivered by Christ the Lord.

Even to the dead, the gospel message was preached.

All who have been rescued have been become sharers in Christ’s redeeming work, and this is the final phase of Jesus’ messianic mission, a phase that is condensed in time but vast in true significance: the spread of Christ’s redemptive work to all men of all times and all places.

“He who holds the power of death, that is, the devil, and all those who were subjected to perpetual bondage because of their fear of death,” as Jesus was known, was destroyed by his death.

As a result, the resurrected Christ now controls “the keys of Death and Hades,” and “at the name of Jesus, every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth,” according to the Bible. You may listen to a tape of a sermon I delivered on this topic: Where Is Jesus Now?

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