What Are The I Am Statements Of Jesus

What Are All of the ‘I AM’ Statements of Jesus?

I used to take great satisfaction in the fact that I knew a large number of individuals. Despite the fact that my college was considered “small” (with approximately 2,000 students), I would say that I knew the majority of them. However, looking back, I truly knew relatively few individuals; I just knew about a large number of people. There is a significant distinction. According to social psychology, getting to know someone needs personal and private knowledge gained via long-term relationships and the development of a degree of trust that allows you to have access to their personal and private information.

It’s the same thing with regard to God.

Nature, personal spiritual encounters, and (most significantly) the revelation of himself via his Son, Jesus Christ, which we may read about in the Bible are all ways in which he accomplishes this mission.

Why ‘I AM’?

It is notably evident in Jesus’ “I Am” utterances reported in the gospels that he was extremely self-revealing (specifically in the Book of John). In this collection of descriptive assertions, God’s character and essence are explained through key sentences that begin with the words, “I Am.” However, they are the most memorable and distinctive statements about Jesus’ own persona that he has made. Although we are unable to fathom the intricacies of what God is (as in all-powerful, always present, and all-knowing), the wonderful thing is that we can know who he is because he has shown himself to us via His Son, Jesus Christ, who is the only way we can know him.

  • He is a relational being that we may get to know on a more intimate level.
  • However, it is worth noting that one of these “I Am” utterances is not the first time that one of these “I Am” statements appears in the Bible.
  • At the end of Exodus 3:14, God instructed a man named Moses to travel to Egypt and demand that the Hebrew people be permitted to be freed from their servitude under the oppressive Pharaoh.
  • As a result, ever since sin separated mankind from God in the Garden of Eden, God has wished for His people to come to know Him more intimately.
  • It was hundreds of years later, when Jesus used it to define Himself to His followers, that He was going back to these statements on a consistent basis and not-so-subtly stating that He is the I AM.
  • While Jesus’ self-revealing words are strong and provocative for us, the individuals in Jesus’ immediate vicinity would have recognized what he was doing and saying as he said them.

Jesus’ crucifixion was ultimately the result of this claim! For His genuine disciples, on the other hand, Jesus’ unambiguous claim to be God was ultimately the same life-giving truth that they clung to and were willing to lay down their lives for (John 6:68).

Who Is Jesus?

While there was no clearer way for Jesus to say, “I Am Jehovah God,” he did not stop there. He went on to say, “I Am Jehovah God.” Instead, He went even farther into the revelation of His essence and character by performing deliberate miracles and making the following seven descriptive claims about Himself, each of which has significant consequences for humanity: We are nothing more than starving beggars yearning for food, and we can only be sustained by Jesus, who is the Bread of Life (I Am the Bread of Life) (John 6).

  1. 2.
  2. He is the source of all light in the universe (John 8).
  3. I Am the Gate of the Sheepfold:Jesus is the only way to eternal life for those of us who have become separated from God’s will (John 10).
  4. Jesus is the Good Shepherd (John 10).
  5. I Am the Resurrection and the Life:Jesus is the only way for those of us who are eternally bound to death because of our sin to be rescued from spiritual death (John 11).
  6. I Am the Way, the Truth, and the Life:Jesus is the easily available way, the illuminating truth, and the source of life for those of us who are lost, uninformed, and dead in our sins until we turn to Him for help (John 14).
  7. I Am the True Vine:Jesus is the source of everlasting life for those of us who are dead and useless branches away from him, and he is the source of eternal life for all of us (John 15).
  8. “Who do you say that I am?” Jesus questioned His disciples in Mark 8:29 after they had contemplated these great realities about God’s nature.
  9. Do you have a relationship with God?
  10. Instead, He can be known, He desires to be known, and He has provided a means for you to come to know Him via Jesus Christ!

What Does This Mean?

The world is chock-full of people who know just enough about God to be able to say and sing the right things, who do just enough good to make themselves feel better about themselves, who have memorized just enough out-of-context verses to convince themselves that they are fine, and who would quickly check the box of “Christian,” but who do not really see Jesus, do not really hear His voice, and do not really live in relationship with Him.

  1. They claim to adore Jesus, yet they are not willing to follow His instructions.
  2. It is my prayer that we will hear and receive the words that Jesus stated about Himself far more than what we think, how we feel or what we have heard or even experienced in the past about Jesus.
  3. The couple has been married since 2008 and have three children, Brooklyn, Bryson, and Abram.
  4. After completing his undergraduate studies at North Greenville University in South Carolina, Robert went on to complete his Masters at Liberty University in Virginia.
  5. He has worked in a number of roles including worship pastor, youth pastor, family pastor, church planter, and presently Pastor of Worship and Discipleship at Cheraw First Baptist Church.

To serve God and His Church, he has set himself a life purpose of reaching the unreached with the gospel, discipling and inspiring others to go even farther in their spiritual journeys, and establishing a culture of multiplication for the glory of God. More information on him may be found here.

Jesus’ Seven “I Am” Statements

The 9th of November, 2018 The “I am” comments spoken by Jesus would have had a special importance to the first-century Jewish audience member. God had shown Himself to Moses in the form of a thundering “I AM” declaration (Ex. 3:14). Jesus used the same terms to describe Himself in the same passage (4:26; 6:20; 13:19). The following is a list of the seven “I Am” statements made by Jesus in the book of John.

  1. Tuesday, November 9th It is likely that Jesus’ “I am” remarks would have had a special meaning for the first-century Jewish audience member. A thunderous “I AM” had been spoken by God to Moses, revealing Himself as He was (Ex. 3:14). In describing Himself, Jesus used the same terms as the disciples (4:26
  2. 6:20
  3. 13:19). There are seven “I Am” statements in the book of John, and the list is provided here.

According to the New King James Study Bible, this commentary is correct. With more than 2 million copies sold, it’s no secret that theNKJV Study Bibleis a trusted guide for your journey into God’s Word. This Bible is a comprehensive study tool, with hundreds of notes, essays, detailed cross-references, and features supplied by leading evangelical academics from across the world.

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What Is the Significance of the Jesus ‘7 ‘I Am’ Statements in John?

Many notable remarks were spoken by Jesus, and they are all recorded in the Gospels. However, there are seven assertions made by Jesus in the book of John that were very important to His career, Old Testament prophecies, and His claims about who He was, and they are as follows: The first-century Jewish audience, who would have been better able to understand the context of what Jesus was saying, would have found them to be extremely significant. God had revealed Himself to Moses hundreds of years before with the resounding “I AM” proclamation (Exodus 3:14).

As recorded in the Bible, God’s names include such titles as Jehovah-Jireh (the Lord, My Provider), Jehovah Rapha (the Lord Heals), Jehovah Nissi (the Lord, My Banner), Jehovah Shalom (the Lord, Our Peace), Jehovah Raah (the Lord, My Shepherd), and others.

(John 13:19). Jesus’ seven “I am” utterances in the Book of John helped to further explain God for us as well as for God to define Himself for us.

What Are the “I Am” Statements of Jesus?

Throughout the Gospel of John, Jesus made the following seven remarks that stood out: 1. “I am the source of all nourishment.” “He who comes to Me will never be hungry, and he who trusts in Me will never be thirsty,” says the Lord (John 6:35). In John 6:41, 48, and 51, Jesus makes a same point again and again. 2. “I am the light of the world. I am the sun.” “Whoever follows Me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” (John 8:12). (John 8:12). 3. “I am the sheep’s door,” says the narrator.

  • I am the entrance.
  • “I am the good shepherd,” says the good shepherd.
  • “I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep, and I am recognized by My own.” “I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep, and I am known by My own.” (See also John 10:11,14.) 5.
  • Even if a person dies because of his or her faith in Me, that person will survive” (John 11:25).
  • “There is no other way to the Father but through Me” (John 14:6).
  • I’m the vine, and you’re the branches on the tree.
  • For you can accomplish nothing except I am with you (John 15:1-5).
  • The “I am” comments made by Jesus were particularly significant to his Jewish audience because of the context in which they were made and the location in which they were spoken.

“I am the bread of life.”

Jesus spoke this just after He had fed the five thousand people and the crowds clamoured for more free food, which Jesus granted. Jesus, on the other hand, didn’t want to keep satisfying their tummies. He wanted them to understand that physical food could only satisfy hunger for a short period of time, but that He was the only one who could provide lasting spiritual satisfaction. He was implying that He is the bread that sustains life. The Israelites’ bodily necessities in the wilderness were met temporarily by manna, but only for a short period of time.

Those who put their faith in Jesus enjoy eternal life.

Jesus offers the food of life that leads to everlasting life by providing the bread of life.

“I am the light of the world.”

Following His feeding the five thousand, Jesus stated that additional free food was needed by the crowds. Nevertheless, Jesus was not interested in continuing to feed their bellies. Rather than physical food satisfying hunger for a short period of time, He wanted them to understand that He was the only one who could provide them with long-lasting spiritual satisfaction. The bread that sustains life, as he put it, is Him.’ While the Israelites were wandering in the wilderness, manna provided them with the nutrition they required.

For all time, Christ is the only one who can meet our spiritual requirements. Life is available to those who trust in Jesus Christ. Manna provided brief relief from hunger in the desert, but those who consumed it eventually died. As the bread of life, Jesus gives the pathway to everlasting life.

“I am the door of the sheep.”

This comment by Jesus was delivered during a talk with Israel’s religious readers, during which Jesus condemned them to be unworthy shepherds of the people in so many words. “Shepherds herded their flocks into stone enclosures each night to safeguard them,” according to the Nelson Study Bible. There were no doors on these constructions. To keep predators away from the entrance, the shepherd would sit or lie down in the aperture. Consequently, Jesus was portraying His concern and unwavering dedication to individuals who are His.” Additionally, His remark in John 14:6 about being the sole way to come to the Father is reinforced by this statement.

“I am the good shepherd.”

This comment by Jesus was delivered during a speech with Israel’s religious readers, during which Jesus condemned them to be unworthy shepherds of the people, in so many words. According to the Nelson Study Bible, “Shepherds herded their flocks into stone enclosures each night to safeguard them from predators.” No doors could be found in these constructions. To keep predators away from the aperture, the shepherd would sit or lie down in the space. Jesus was describing His concern and unwavering dedication to individuals who are His in this way.

Only through Jesus – the entrance or doorway – can one enter God’s “sheepfold,” “family,” or “dwelling.” There is no other way.

“I am the resurrection and the life.”

Martha, who was weeping over the death of her brother Lazarus, heard Jesus deliver this climactic proclamation of hope. His promise was further reinforced in the following verse, which reads, “And whomever lives and believes in Me shall never die.” “Do you believe what I’m saying?” (See also John 11:26.) Before Jesus said those magnificent words and showed them by bringing His dead companion back to life, death brought with it a sense of despair, hopelessness, and finality. Immediately following this, Jesus demonstrated to the entire world that He had defeated death by rising from the dead three days after He had been crucified for the sins of those who would believe in Him.

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All those who are in Christ shall dwell forever in his presence.

“I am the way, the truth, and the life.”

As a result of the disciples’ confusion at Jesus’ remarks regarding heaven, Thomas posed the question that everyone else must have been thinking: “Lord, we do not know where You are going, and how can we know the way?” “I am the way, the truth, and the life,” Jesus responded to him in response. “There is no other way to the Father but through Me” (John 14:5-6). Jesus was reinforcing the fact that there are no roads that lead to paradise. There aren’t many different religions or ways that lead to God.

People who are spiritually dead are offered the genuine life of God by Jesus.

This statement was crucial to individuals living in His day who were attempting to obtain access to God’s favor via the application of the Law and their good acts.

And it is essential to us today because we are surrounded by a plethora of ideologies and faiths, all of which promise to provide access to God as well as a means of earning God’s favor and eternal life apart from Jesus alone.

“I am the true vine.”

This is what Jesus told to His disciples in the Upper Room on the night before His arrest and approaching execution. Israel is frequently referred to be God’s vine throughout the Old Testament (Psalm 80:8;Isaiah 5:1-7;Ezekiel 15;Hosea 10:1). As a result of the nation’s failure to produce fruit, Jesus was sent to complete God’s purpose. By living in, residing with, or attaching oneself to Christ, we make it possible for His life to flow through ourselves and into the world. Then we are compelled to produce fruit that will bring praise to the Father.

You and I may reach our full potential and yield abundant fruit if we place our trust in Him and His care, tending, and pruning.

Why Are Jesus’ Statements Important?

When Jesus made these bold declarations, He wasn’t merely practicing positive self-talk for the sake of it. He was letting the first century Jews, who were already familiar with God’s concept of Himself, know that He was, in fact, God incarnate, the Messiah they had been waiting for, and the Most High God manifested in human flesh. This would have been considered blasphemy if said by anybody else (which is exactly what Jesus was accused of by the Jewish authorities, who subsequently conspired to have him killed as a result of His “blasphemy”).

  • Through these words, Jesus fulfilled and confirmed a number of Old Testament prophecies about Himself that had been made about Him.
  • He cannot be reduced to only a “ticket to heaven,” but must be viewed as our daily nourishment, our guidance, our guardian, our sacrificial Savior, our victorious over death, our gateway to the Father and eternal life, as well as our source of vigor and strength, among other things.
  • Do you know Jesus as more than just a great teacher, more than just a miracle worker, more than just your Savior?
  • Discover the truth and freedom that comes from understanding who Jesus truly is, as well as the value of this knowledge for you individually and for a wounded world that desperately needs Him.
  • Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/Aiden Franklin.
  • A mother and pastor’s wife, she is also the author of 17 books, including When Women Walk Alone (which has sold more than 150,000 copies), When God Sees Your Tears, Letting God Meet Your Emotional Needs, and Drama Free: Finding Peace When Emotions Overwhelm You.

Her website provides further information about her speaking ministry, writing coaching services, and publications to help you develop your spirit, marriage, and parenthood.

The Eighth “I am” statement in John’s Gospel

“Are we not correct in claiming that you are a Samaritan and that you have a demon?” the Jews asked him in response. ‘I have no demon,’ Jesus said, ‘but I reverence my Father, but you insult me.'” But I do not want my own glory; there is One who seeks it, and he is the one who will judge me. 51 “Truly, truly, I say to you, if anybody maintains my promise, he will never die.” “If anyone keeps my word, he will never die.” 52The Jews responded to him by saying, “Now we know you have a devil!” Despite the fact that Abraham and the prophets died, you claim that “if anybody keeps my word, he will never experience death.” 53Are you more powerful than our ancestor Abraham, who passed away?

  1. “What kind of person do you portray yourself to be?” ‘If I exalt myself, then my glory is worthless,’ Jesus said.
  2. I’m familiar with him.
  3. 56Your father Abraham was overjoyed that he would live to see my birth.
  4. –John 8:48-59, emphasis added The Co Cathedral in downtown Houston, Texas, is home to a statue of the glorified Jesus.
  5. In John’s Gospel, depending on how you count them, there are either seven or eight “I am” statements spoken by Jesus.
  1. In response, Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life. ” “He who comes to Me will never be hungry, and he who trusts in Me will never be thirsty,” says the Lord. (Matthew 6:35
  2. John 6:35)
  3. Jesus then addressed them once again, proclaiming, “I am the light of the world.” It says in John 8:12, “He who follows Me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” It also says, “I am the door.” The Bible says, “If anybody comes by Me, he will be saved, and he will walk in and out and find pasture” (John 10:9)
  4. “I am the good shepherd. ” “The faithful shepherd sacrifices His life for the sake of the sheep.” According to John 10:11, Jesus declared to Mary, “I am the resurrection and the life.” Even if a person dies because of his or her faith in Me, that person will survive.” (John 11:25) Jesus responded to him by saying, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. “There is no other way to the Father but through Me.” “I am the actual vine, and My Father is the vinedresser,” says Jesus in John 14:6. (See also John 15:1)

It is here in John 8:58 that the eighth “I am” declaration is found, and it is by far the most deep of the group. Two dubious statements are made by Jesus in this passage, which rocked the world of the Jews to whom he was addressing, and should give us pause as well. He claimed to have existed earlier to Abraham, who he said died around 2000 years before Jesus of Nazareth. As part of this, he adopted the holy name that God revealed to Moses in the burning bush (Exodus 3:14), which was so revered that the people of Jesus’ day would not even speak it aloud in front of others.

  1. However, they are unsuccessful in their effort to throw stones at Jesus since Jesus’ time had not yet arrived (cf.John 7:6).
  2. Some believe that Judges 2:10 is the most depressing verse in the Bible.
  3. Others may point to Genesis 3:6 as a possible reference.
  4. He came in order to fulfill the entire Law.
  5. Jesus, on the other hand, is the everlasting I AM.
  6. He will go from the temple, but he will be eternally present with his people – those who call on him in faith – throughout all of time.

During his eighth “I am” statement, Jesus formally establishes himself as our Lord and Creator. He is our Redeemer and Friend, as well as the origin and fulcrum of all truth.

What are the seven I AM statements in the Gospel of John?

QuestionAnswer Seven utterances of Jesus, all of which begin with the phrase I am, are recorded in the Gospel of John. We can have a better understanding of Jesus’ work in the world as a result of each of these “I am” declarations. They also make a connection between Jesus and God’s revelation in the Old Testament. God revealed His identity to Moses in the Old Testament, saying, “I AM WHO I AM.” What you are supposed to tell the Israelites is: “The I AM has sent me to you” (Exodus 3:14). As a result, the phrase “I AM” is undoubtedly interpreted as a reference to God in Judaism.

  • Listed below are the seven metaphorical “I am” statements found in the Gospel of John: “I am the bread of life,” says the author (John 6:35, 41, 48, 51).
  • In this particular instance, Jesus declares that He is the bread of life immediately following His feeding of the 5,000 in the wilderness.
  • John’s gospel contains the second of Jesus’ “I am” statements, which occurs just before He heals a man who was born blind.
  • The words and actions of Jesus are reminiscent of Genesis 1:3, which states, “And God said, ‘Let there be light,’ and there was light.” ” I am the entrance” (John 10:7 and 9, ESV).
  • Throughout this passage, Jesus’ words are couched in the imagery of a flock of sheep.
  • In the name of the Lord, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold by the door, but climbs in through a different entrance, that man is a burglar and an outlaw (verse 1, ESV).
  • With this “I am” declaration, Jesus expresses His deep love and concern for others.

In referring to himself as the Good Shepherd, Jesus clearly appropriated one of God’s titles from the Old Testament: “The Lord is my shepherd,” which means “the Lord is my shepherd” (Psalm 23:1).

Immediately prior to raising Lazarus from the dead, Jesus made the “I am” statement that we know so well.

He is in possession of “the keys to death and the grave” (Revelation 1:18, NLT).

In the absence of Jesus, neither resurrection nor eternal life are possible.

This powerful “I am” statement by Christ is densely packed with significance.

The Bible says that “the very essence of words is truth” (Psalm 119:160, New Living Translation), and here is Jesus proclaiming that He is the truth—confirming His identity as the Word of God (John 1:18).

The source of life is Jesus alone; He is the Creator and Sustainer of all life, as well as the Giver of eternal life, and no one else can provide this.

The final metaphorical “I am” statement in the Gospel of John emphasizes Christ’s ability to provide long-term support for his followers.

In the same way that a branch cannot bear fruit unless it is joined in vital union with the vine, only those who are united to Christ and receive their power from Him bear fruit in the Christian lifestyle.

The first instance occurs when Jesus responds to a complaint lodged by the Pharisees in the Gospel of Matthew.

The verbs Jesus uses are in stark contrast with each other: Abrahamwas, but Iam.

(verse 59).

When the mob came to arrest Jesus, He asked them whom they sought.

Then something strange happened: “When Jesus said, ‘I am he,’ they drew back and fell to the ground” (verse 6).

Perhaps explaining the mob’s reaction is the fact that the wordhehas been provided by our English translators.

Questions about John (return to top of page) What are the seven I AM statements in the Gospel of John?

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QuestionAnswer Seven utterances of Jesus, all starting with the phrase “I am,” are recorded in the Gospel of John. As we learn more about Jesus’ work in the world via his “I am” statements, we gain a better grasp of who he is. Moreover, they establish a connection between Jesus and God’s revelation in the Hebrew Scriptures. Moses had a revelation from God in the Old Testament: “I AM WHO I AM.” What you are supposed to tell the Israelites is: “The I AM has sent me to you”” (Exodus 3:14). Consequently, ” I AM ” is certainly recognized as a divine name in Judaism.

The following are the seven metaphorical “I am” statements that may be found in John’s gospel.

Throughout this chapter, Jesus sets a pattern that would be followed throughout the rest of the gospel of John: He makes a declaration about who He is, and then He backs it up with something he does.

While at the same time, He draws a comparison between what He can accomplish and what Moses had done for their ancestors: “Our forefathers ate the manna in the wilderness, and yet they perished.” In contrast, “here is the food that has come down from heaven, which anybody may eat and not perish” (verses 49–50).

  1. John’s gospel contains the second of Jesus’ “I am” declarations, which occurs just before He cures a man who was born blind (John 9:1).
  2. In Genesis 1:3, God says, “Let there be light,” and there is light.
  3. In the words of the doorman, I am the door (John 10:7 and 9, ESV).
  4. The picture of a sheepfold is used to frame Jesus’ remarks in this text.
  5. In the name of the Lord, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold through the door, but climbs in via a different entrance, that man is a criminal and an outlaw (verse 1, ESV).
  6. Jesus’ use of the pronoun “I am” conveys His deep love and concern for the listeners.
  7. In referring to himself as the Good Shepherd, Jesus clearly appropriated one of God’s Old Testament titles: “The Lord is my shepherd,” which means “the Lord is my protector” (Psalm 23:1).

Immediately prior to reviving Lazarus from the dead, Jesus made the “I am” remark that is recorded in John 11.

“The keys to death and hell” are in his possession (Revelation 1:18, NLT).

There is no resurrection or everlasting life apart from Jesus Christ.

A lot of significance is crammed into Christ’s tremendous “I am” statement.

“The very core of words is truth,” according to Scripture (Psalm 119:160, NLT), and here is Jesus stating that He is the truth—confirming His status as the Word of God (see John 1:1, 14).

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The real vine declares, “I am thee” (John 15:1, 5).

His body is the vine, and we are its branches.

It is worth noting that the Gospel of John has two further “I am” utterances by Jesus.

As a response to a complaint brought up by the Pharisees, Jesus provides the first case.

(See also John 8:58.) The verbs that Jesus used are diametrically opposed to one another: I am Abraham, not Abraham was.

The Garden of Gethsemane serves as the site of the second incident of Jesus referring to Himself by the moniker I AM.

They identified Jesus as “Jesus of Nazareth,” to which Jesus responded, “I am he” (John 18:4–5).

This might be explained, in part, by the fact that the wordhewas offered by our English translators, who may have been offended.

John 10:17–18 and John 19:11 both describe Jesus as using God’s covenant name on Himself to display His authority over His adversaries and to establish that His submission to them was fully voluntary.

Questions regarding John can be found at the following link:. I AM expressions are found in the Gospel of John seven times. What are they?

The 7 “I AM” Statements of Jesus: OT Background & NT Meaning

The gospel of John was written with the following goal in mind: “they are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ” (John 20:31). The historical context for John’s book is as follows: “The framework for Jesus’ conception of his own mission is influenced by the Scriptures, as mediated by the Jews” (D. A. Carson). The following are John’s two questions for the reader to consider: 1) Who is Jesus? Secondly, what am I supposed to do with his words/teachings? I WORK AS OT Background: Exodus 3:1-20, with a specific emphasis on verses 13-18.

  • 41:4 and 43:10-13.) John 6:20, 8:24, 28, 58, and 18:5 are examples of NT fulfillment.
  • God exposes Himself to His people, and He sends His Son to redeem them from exile and guide them into a new way of living.
  • He is the I Am, the eternal, unchanging, self-existent one, infinite and glorious in every way, and he is above and beyond all created things.
  • He is the Almighty.
  • Not a great teacher or a wonderful assistance to God, but the divine, eternal, pre-existent, infinite, and flawless Being Himself.
  • Because he is the God of Moses, he is considered to be greater than Moses.
  • The Jews were well aware that assuming this position entailed making such a claim, which is why they immediately began picking up stones to murder him (8:59).
  • He is the God of Israel, and he is the God of all the nations.

1) I Am the Bread of Life

OT Background readings: Exodus 16:3; Deuteronomy 8:3; Psalm 78:23–25 NT John 6:22-59, with a specific emphasis on verses 28-35, is a book of fulfillment. Synopsis: A discourse between Jesus and Jews who had followed him because of his miracles—including the most recent feeding of the 5,000—but had failed to recognize the reality that lay beyond the surface (he is the Divine Messiah). It is more vital than simply providing them with physical food to satisfy their bodily hunger that Jesus gives himself as the Bread of Life to satisfy deeper longings and an everlasting desire.

It is not a food of this world, but rather a bread of paradise.

We require more than just physical bread, and we require it from a source other than our own bodies.

– With this Old Testament backdrop in mind, Jesus sets out to provide food for God’s people, and he claims to be the “bread of life.” He emphasizes that the bread in the desert of Exodus was only a temporary sustenance, and that it served as a type of genuine and eternal food from heaven that God would provide later on in the story.

This loaf of bread is presently in front of the Jews. In the manna, we see Jesus, who has been sent by God, who has come down from heaven, who must be received by faith, who must be eaten/fully ingested, and who provides life to those who receive it.

2) I Am the Light of the World

Background from the Old Testament: Exodus 13:17-22 (see also Ex. 14:19-20); Isaiah 42:6 and 49:6; (both verses are in the four Servant Songs of Isaiah). John 8:12-30 is the NT fulfillment of the prophecy. In addition, see John 1:4-5, 3:19-21, 9:5, and 12:35-36. Synopsis: One of the most significant motifs in John’s Gospel is the concept of light. In the midst of darkness, the world seems lost and helpless (John 1:4-14). The darkness has no effect on its current state. Light must be allowed to penetrate and infiltrate.

John draws light from a rich OT history and demonstrates how Jesus is the light of the world.

The same way that the Israelites were guided and saved from the Egyptians during the Exodus by a pillar of fire (light) when they crossed the Red Sea, Jesus claims that people who follow him (light) will enjoy eternal life with him.

In other passages, such as John 12:35-36, 46, this light has to do with the salvation of the nations, and it is most likely the primary reference in those verses.

3) I Am the door or gate4) I Am the Good Shepherd

Ezekiel 34 and Jeremiah 23 are examples of Old Testament texts that refer to gates as doors (cf. Isaiah 40:11; Numbers 27:15-18; Micah 5:4) NT John 10:1-18 are examples of fulfillment. Synopsis: In John 10:1-18, Jesus combines two of the I Am statements into a single statement. He asserts that he is both the gateway through which the sheep enter and the Shepherd who knows the sheep and is willing to lay down his life in their defense. Unlike shepherding images, the metaphor of a door does not have a long OT history to draw on.

  • In addition to being the one who gathers the sheep and cares for them (shepherd), he is also the conduit via which they enter and are kept secure (door).
  • A reprimand against them was (in part) delivered through the boasts of being a good shepherd and Israel’s real shepherd.
  • They should have placed the needs of the people ahead of their own.
  • The Pharisees, on the other hand, are like the wicked shepherds in Ezekiel 34 and Jeremiah 23, leading their flocks astray with false theology, placing themselves above the flocks, and abusing the flocks.
  • 34:11-16, 22-24; Jer.
  • Jesus does not come to add to our loads, but rather to relieve us of them and carry them himself.
  • Jesus does not coming to devour the sheep, but rather to protect them.

Specifically, Jesus comes to search out and save the sheep, as well as to cure and nourish them. He will do so because he adores the sheep and believes they are his own. This is demonstrated and realized by his willingness to lay down his life for his sheep.

5) I Am the resurrection, and the life

Background from the Old Testament: Genesis 1-3; Isaiah 53:10 NT John 11:17-27 are examples of fulfillment. Synopsis: He does not merely talk about what he can accomplish or provide; rather, He talks about who He is, in the same way that past I Am declarations have done. He does not only offer bread (like Moses did), but he himself is the bread. He is not only a reflector of light; he is the light itself. In the same way, Jesus declares in John 11 that he is the resurrection and the life. Even though the OT context is less obvious here than in other remarks, the majority of commentators believe Genesis 1-3 is partially in mind.

  • The first Adam, on the other hand, chose sin, which resulted in the death of humanity and the destruction of the entire world.
  • 5:12-21; 1 Cor.
  • The death and decay brought about by Adam are replaced by the life and restoration provided by Jesus.
  • While many of the Jews desired goods from Jesus without first coming to trust in and embrace him, the offer of Jesus is just himself and his sacrifice.
  • These are unmerited and merciful gifts that can only be received through and through the person of Jesus.
  • He is the second Adam, giving resurrection and life when the previous Adam only provided us death.

6) I Am the way, the truth, and the life

Background from the Old Testament: Exodus 26:33; Leviticus 16NT John 14:6 has been fulfilled. Synopsis: It’s possible that Jesus is using this passage to contrast himself with the numerous different methods that God established for the Jews to approach and relate to him in the Old Testament. God could only be reached through transitory “routes” such as the sacrifices, the temple, the curtain, the tabernacle, and other forms of devotion. As the New Testament makes clear, these things did not, in and of themselves, purify or make individuals acceptable to God, but they did provide a means by which God’s people may walk in faith and follow in His footsteps (see Hebrews 8-9).

He is the only one who can lead us to the Father, but he is also the only one who can lead us to the entire revelation of the Father at the same time (truth).

Jesus is the only route and the only road to follow.

All of them pointed to him and accomplished limited things (such as making people ceremonially pure but not actually clean), and he is now here and able to complete salvation and redemption in their entirety.

7) I Am the true vine

OT Background: Two vineyard hymns are found in Isaiah 5:1-7 (the desolate vineyard) and Isaiah 27:2-6 (the bountiful vineyard) (the fruitful vineyard). NT Fulfillment: John 15:1-6 is a passage from the Gospel of John. Synopsis: In this last I Am declaration, Jesus refers to a vine, which is a typical Old Testament emblem for Israel (God’s people). However, Jesus states that the people of God now have life and fruit because they are in him, as described in Isaiah 27:2-6, but the terminology of the unfruitful branches is related to Israel as the barren vineyard in Isaiah 5.

The only one who can fulfill Israel’s purpose (since Israel has never been able to do so) and who can provide authentic, flourishing, and productive existence for God’s people is Jesus Christ.

The 7 “I Am” Statements of Jesus Explained

Throughout Jesus’ earthly mission, He spoke numerous things that challenged the minds of those who heard Him. In reality, He frequently used parables or, as we will see later in this piece, metaphors to communicate. He utilized metaphorical language to make connections between everyday items or concepts and Himself or His Kingdom, allowing people to have a greater understanding of His nature and mission. Throughout the book of John, Jesus declares, “I am _” seven times in the course of the narrative.

One crucial aspect to remember is that it is critical to read these “I am” utterances in their proper context in order to have an accurate grasp of what Jesus was truly communicating.

1. Jesus is the Bread of Life

“At that point, Jesus announced, ‘I am the bread of life.’ It is guaranteed that whomever comes to me will never go hungry, and that whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.” (See also John 6:35) In spite of the fact that Jesus had just fed many thousand people with only a few loaves of bread, some people were still demanding Jesus for a proof to show that He was from God. They reminded Jesus that God provided their forefathers with manna (food) from heaven when they were wandering in the desert in order for them not to perish (Exodus 16:35).

They didn’t have to search anywhere else for spiritual food, fuel, or sustenance since HE was their source of energy! Simply putting their faith in Him would suffice.

2. Jesus is the Light of the World

“When Jesus spoke to the people for the second time, he said, ‘I am the light of the world.’ I promise you that whomever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will always have the light of life with them.” (See also John 8:12) Some religious people had just finished denouncing a woman who had been caught in adultery of being unfaithful. It was their intention to entangle Jesus as well, so they approached Him and asked Him what should be done with her. Rather unexpectedly, Jesus said, “Let him who among you is without sin cast the first stone at her” (let him who among you is without sin throw the first stone at her) (John 8:7).

Jesus assured her that He would not condemn her as well, and she was instructed to cease her sins.

He desired for His disciples to understand that they were not obligated to dwell in darkness, hopelessness, or servitude to sin.

3. Jesus is the Door

Then, when Jesus addressed the crowds again, he declared, ‘I am the light of the world.'” I promise you that whomever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will always walk in the light of life.” The Bible states in John 8:12 that After accusing a woman who had been caught in adultery, some religious leaders had just ended their speech. Were they also hoping to entangle Jesus in this way, they inquired as to His plan for handling the situation with her. Rather unexpectedly, Jesus said, “Let him who among you is without sin hurl the first stone at her” (let him who among you is without sin throw the first stone at her) (John 8:7).

In response, she was advised that Jesus would also not judge her, and that she should cease her sinful behavior.

He desired for His followers to understand that they were not obligated to dwell in darkness, hopelessness, or servitude to sin as a result of their faith in Him.

4. Jesus is the Good Shepherd

“I am the good shepherd,” says the good shepherd. “The good shepherd gives his life for the sake of his sheep.” (See also John 10:11) Sheep and shepherds were well-known and accepted ideas in Jesus’s time and place of origin (which is probably why Jesus chose this metaphor). Sheep recognize the voice of their shepherd in the same way that we recognize the voice of our dog or cat (John 10:3-5). Sheep need safety, pasture, food, and water, and it is the shepherd’s responsibility to manage and protect their flock in these areas.

See also:  Why Did Jesus Want To Be Baptized By John

For the sake of doing good and pleasing His Father by bringing people back to Him, He would lay down his life for them.

Similarly to how sheep believe and follow their shepherd, so too may we trust and follow Jesus, not only for our eternal salvation, but also for our physical well-being, sustenance, and healing of our spirits. Jesus is the kind shepherd who cares for us.

5. Jesus is the Resurrection and the Life

“I am the resurrection and the life,” Jesus declared to her. Even if a person dies while believing in me, that person will live; and whomever lives while believing in me will never die.” (See also John 11:25-26.) These stunning confessions were made by Jesus to a distraught sister whose brother had recently passed away. According to her, Jesus would have prevented her brother’s death if He had been present. Fortunately, she wouldn’t have to wait until the final resurrection to see her brother again since the one who personified the resurrection was there in front of her, brimming with strength and ready to take action immediately.

We learn from this scripture that even though we may die physically, we will continue to live spiritually in the presence of the Lord in the hereafter.

As a result, he gives physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual life to those who are dead in their sins.

6. Jesus is the Way, the Truth, and the Life

‘I am the resurrection and the life,’ Jesus declared to her. A believer will live even if he or she dies, and a believer will never die if he or she lives and believes in me. 25-26 in John 11:25-26 These stirring statements were spoken by Jesus in response to a devastated sister, whose brother had recently passed away. According to her, Jesus would have saved her brother’s life if He had been present. But she wouldn’t have to wait until the final resurrection to see her brother again since the one who personified the resurrection was there in front of her, brimming with strength and ready to take action right then and there.

As a result, many others came to trust in Him.

Those who are living when Jesus returns to completely establish His Kingdom on the planet, on the other hand, will be those who continue to live and never physically die because they are alive.

7. Jesus is the Vine

“I am the vine, and you are the branches,” says the speaker. “If a man continues in me and I remain in him, he will yield great fruit; separate from me, you will be unable to do anything.” (See also John 15:5) Having a clear understanding of this critical notion allows believers to live fruitful and triumphant lives in their faith. A vine, Jesus says, and His disciples are branches on the vine of his life. In order for us to bear fruit (which, according to verse 8, gives much glory to the Father), we must be firmly rooted in and linked to Jesus.

We must stay completely reliant on Him and refrain from acting on our own initiative. Why? Because we can’t achieve anything—at least nothing of permanent significance—without His help.

Tying it All Together

In Exodus 3:13-14, Moses and God were having a discourse about something important. The people of Israel were about to be delivered, and God had just told Moses to go and tell them that they were about to be delivered. But Moses was unsure how the people would accept that God had sent him: “Then Moses said to God, ‘Indeed, when I come to the children of Israel and say to them, “The God of your fathers has sent me to you,” and they say to me, “What is His name?” what shall I say to them?” And God said to Moses, ‘I AM WHO I AM.’ And Moses obeyed.

As John illustrated, the “I AM” of Exodus was now literally standing in front of the people, ready to be their Shepherd, their Door to the Father, their Life, their Vine, their Light, their Bread of Life, and their Truth, as well as their Vine, Light, Bread of Life, and Truth The “I AM”—the God of the NOW—stands ready to be whatever we require Him to be in our lives at any given time.

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7 “I Am” Statements of Jesus

Rev. Margaret Minnicks is a Bible teacher who has been ordained. She publishes a lot of articles that are Bible lessons in disguise. Jesus made seven declarations about who He was and what He stood for. The New Testament has four gospels, which are as follows: Three of the four gospels are synoptic gospels, which means they are written by the same author. That indicates that they have a common point of view when it comes to their books and what they have written about Jesus, for example. The synoptic gospels are comprised of the following books.

Gospel of John

The gospel of John, the final gospel, is distinct. Instead of presenting a synoptic perspective of Jesus, John focused on the person of Jesus in his gospel. As recorded in Mark’s gospel, Jesus is said to have responded to an inquiry regarding His identity by making seven “I am” assertions about himself. Jesus made a point of emphasizing who He was. Even though Jesus made the statements during His time on earth, they are still relevant today since Jesus continues to be who He claimed to be at the time of His declaration.

Throughout the Gospel of John, Jesus communicated His identity to those who were listening to His words and conversations.

Jesus is the Bread of Life, and he is the source of our sustenance.

1. “I Am the Bread of Life”

A total of three times during his ministry, Jesus declared, “I am the bread of life.” That was the very first “I am” declaration, and it was also the one that was repeated the most frequently. In John 6:35-51, Jesus made a public declaration about who He was. “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me will not go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never thirst,” Jesus said to them ” (John 6:35). “I am the source of all nourishment” (John 6:48). “”I am the live bread that has been given to you from on high.” If somebody consumes this loaf of bread, he will live indefinitely.

Despite the fact that Jesus had just fed five thousand men, in addition to women and children, with just two barley loaves and five tiny fish, the crowds demanded that Jesus do another miracle to show that He was who He claimed to be.

That would have been a metaphor, whereas He used the analogy of bread to describe Himself.

By stating that, He was underlining the fact that He was more than just bread to satisfy someone’s hunger; He was the bread that provided sustenance.

He claimed to be the bread of life, the living food, and the bread that was presented then and now as the body of Jesus, or the bread of life. Jesus is the Light of the World, and he shines brightly at our darkest moments.

2. “I Am the Light of the World”

The Bible says that Jesus declared, “I am the light of the world,” in verses 8 and 9 of John 9. That simply implies that Jesus shines a light into every situation that is dark. According to the book of Genesis, the first thing God created was light, which was then followed by everything else. He said, “Let there be light, and there was light.” And there was light. God’s Son, thousands of years later, said that He was light. It is important to note that Jesus did not just state that He was a light that would illuminate a room or even a street corner.

  1. In other words, He was more than just a light bulb that might occasionally fail, as ours do from time to time.
  2. Because He is the light, no matter where He is, there is no darkness.
  3. If they were without sin, Jesus instructed them to be the first to cast a stone.
  4. As a result, Jesus told them that they did not have to live in darkness since He was the light of the world, and that He was able to bring light into their lives if they would just follow Him and believe in Him.

3. “I Am the Door”

There is one feature that all doors, regardless of how they are constructed, have in common. Doors give an entry into something, and they provide an exit from something as well. Throughout John 10:9, Jesus communicated to his followers that He was the gateway into their good things and the exit out of their terrible things. Regardless of the circumstances, Jesus was and continues to be the pathway for all of humanity. Jesus is the only door that can be opened since no one else or nothing else can.

The following statement was given by Jesus after He had already spoken about thieves and robbers.

Jesus is the only way to reach His heavenly Father and get eternal life.

Jesus is the Good Shepherd who takes care of us and protects us from harm.

4. “I Am the Good Shepherd”

“I am the good shepherd,” Jesus declares in John 10:11 and 10:14, referring to himself. Take note that he did not refer to himself as a shepherd. He referred to Himself as the good shepherd in the Bible. A good shepherd is always concerned about his sheep, no matter what. Shepherds used to sleep outside with their flocks all year long in biblical times. They were well-versed in their flock, and their flock was well-versed in them. Shepherding is described in Psalm 23 as providing for and protecting the sheep.

Today, we may declare, in the same way that the sheep did, “The Lord is my Shepherd, and I am thankful for him.

I will not be in want.” The reason for this is that the shepherd provides for our needs by providing us with everything we require, as well as protecting and keeping us out of harm’s path. Because of Jesus, who is both the resurrection and the life, we have the opportunity to live again.

5. ” I Am the Resurrection and the Life”

It was Martha who informed Jesus that her brother would not have died if He had been at Lazarus’s side sooner. When Jesus spoke to her, he said something profound that should provide us peace when our loved ones pass away. At the heart of it, Jesus was reminding Martha that it didn’t matter if He wasn’t present when her brother was sick since He was standing right in front of her at that exact time, proclaiming Himself to be both resurrection and life. The rest of the story surrounding this remark in John 11:25 is well known to us.

Some believe that Jesus grieved (John 11:35) at Lazarus’ death, but in reality, He wept over Martha and the others’ unbelief in his resurrection.

Those who did not believe it were proven wrong by His reviving His companion from the dead.

6. “I Am the Way, the Truth and the Life”

It was Martha who informed Jesus that her brother would not have died if He had arrived at the hospital sooner. After her death, Jesus spoke to her in a very meaningful way that should provide comfort to us when our loved ones pass away. At the heart of it, Jesus was reminding Martha that it didn’t matter if He wasn’t present when her brother was sick since He was standing right in front of her at that precise time, representing both resurrection and life. John 11:25 contains the remainder of the tale that surrounds this statement.

  1. Jesus grieved (John 11:35), according to some, for Lazarus’ death, but He sobbed more because of Mary, Martha, and the other disciples’ disbelief.
  2. People who were skeptical were proven wrong by His reviving His companion from the grave.
  3. The rest of the sayings were restricted to a single type of metaphor.
  4. (See also John 14:5) Jesus answered with the words, “I am the only way, the only truth, and the only life.
  5. Jesus is the genuine vine, and he is the source of all life.

7. “I Am the True Vine”

The real vine is the subject of the entire chapter of John 15. “I am the genuine vine,” Jesus declares in John 15:1 and John 15:5, respectively. There was no specific occasion for Jesus to declare this, unlike the other “I am” utterances that he had made previously.

He was emphasizing the fact that He is the vine, and we are the branches in general at the time. He went on to say that in order to yield fruit, we must be in Him at all times. The seven “I Am” declarations made by Jesus.

Why John Recorded the “I Am” Statements

God revealed Himself to Moses in the burning bush in the book of Exodus, telling him that He was “I Am.” As a result, John sought to emphasize his views by drawing attention to Jesus’ “I am” words, which served to demonstrate who Jesus was. Jesus, like God, was the physical manifestation of the things He pointed out. While He was physically present before the people in the form of a person, He was also the Bread, the Light, the Door, the Good Shepherd, the Resurrection and the Life, the Way, the Truth, and the Life, as well as the True Vine.

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