Was There An Eclipse When Jesus Was Crucified

Was Jesus crucified during a solar eclipse? NASA shows one occurred in 33 A.D.

Based on both the Bible and certain scientific evidence, it could seem logical to speculate that a solar eclipse of the type that millions of people will witness on Aug. 21 occurred at the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. However, this is not the case. In the New American Bible, a translation of the Gospel of Luke 23:44-45 states unequivocally that “darkness fell over the entire land until three o’clock in the afternoon due of a solar eclipse,” and that “darkness fell over the entire land until three o’clock in the afternoon.” Two additional gospels make mention of the rapid onset of noon darkness.

Despite the fact that scholars continue to argue the exact year in which Christ was crucified, they are unanimous in their belief that it occurred between 26 and 36 AD, during the time period when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea.

When German experts examined earthquake data with biblical evidence — for example, that Jesus was crucified around Passover, around the 14th day of Nisan on the Jewish calendar — they concluded that the most plausible date for his execution would have been April 3, the year 33.

and 36 A.D., according to NASA charts showing the courses of some 5,000 years’ worth of solar eclipses, spanning from 2000 B.C to 3000 A.D — a period spanning from 2000 B.C to 3000 A.D.

  • But the line of totality of that eclipse — defined as the route followed by the shadow of the moon as it races across the Earth’s surface — passed across no part of the city of Jerusalem.
  • The route of another complete solar eclipse, which would occur on March 9, in the year 34, came nothing nearer.
  • Neither eclipse would have had much of an impact on the darkness of the skies over Judea.
  • According to all four Gospels, the crucifixion of Jesus took place during the festival of Passover.
  • The top priests and scribes were scrambling to figure out how they might put Him to death because they were terrified of the people.” Brother Guy Consolmagno, a research astronomer who also happens to be the director of the Vatican Observatory, explained that this is the crux of the matter.
  • A partial or complete solar eclipse, on the other hand, may only occur during the new moon phase, which is described as the moment when the moon is passing between the Earth and the sun, causing it to block the sun’s rays.
  • In an email to The Star, Consolmagno explained his position.
  • “It was the exact incorrect phase of the moon.” That would appear to be the conclusion of the matter.
  • A solar eclipse at Jesus’ crucifixion would have been impossible, according to Maderak’s calculations since the moon was on the wrong side of the Earth at the time of the holiday.
  • “I personally take the approach of not wanting to mix my science and my faith too much,” said Maderak, who will host two colleagues of Consolmagno from the Vatican on August 20 and 21, according to the Vatican’s website.
  • From a religious standpoint, Maderak explained that since God is omnipotent, “he has sort of a little discretion to override the rules of physics.” If this is something that occurred as a result of divine intervention, we may or may not be able to figure out how it happened, he added.

NASA offers historical maps of those areas as well. In 33 A.D., on what we now know as April 3, a partial lunar eclipse occurred, which some believe to be the day Jesus died. The original version of this story was published on August 7, 2017 at 2:00 p.m.

Was Jesus crucified during a solar eclipse? NASA shows one occurred in 33 A.D.

Based on both the Bible and certain scientific evidence, it could seem logical to speculate that a solar eclipse of the type that millions of people will witness on Aug. 21 occurred at the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. However, this is not the case. In the New American Bible, a translation of the Gospel of Luke 23:44-45 states unequivocally that “darkness fell over the entire land until three o’clock in the afternoon due of a solar eclipse,” and that “darkness fell over the entire land until three o’clock in the afternoon.” Two additional gospels make mention of the rapid onset of noon darkness.

  • Despite the fact that scholars continue to argue the exact year in which Christ was crucified, they are unanimous in their belief that it occurred between 26 and 36 AD, during the time period when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea.
  • When German experts examined earthquake data with biblical evidence — for example, that Jesus was crucified around Passover, around the 14th day of Nisan on the Jewish calendar — they concluded that the most plausible date for his execution would have been April 3, the year 33.
  • and 36 A.D., according to NASA charts showing the courses of some 5,000 years’ worth of solar eclipses, spanning from 2000 B.C to 3000 A.D — a period spanning from 2000 B.C to 3000 A.D.
  • But the line of totality of that eclipse — defined as the route followed by the shadow of the moon as it races across the Earth’s surface — passed across no part of the city of Jerusalem.
  • The route of another complete solar eclipse, which would occur on March 9, in the year 34, came nothing nearer.
  • Neither eclipse would have had much of an impact on the darkness of the skies over Judea.
  • According to all four Gospels, the crucifixion of Jesus took place during the festival of Passover.

The top priests and scribes were scrambling to figure out how they might put Him to death because they were terrified of the people.” Brother Guy Consolmagno, a research astronomer who also happens to be the director of the Vatican Observatory, explained that this is the crux of the matter.

A partial or complete solar eclipse, on the other hand, may only occur during the new moon phase, which is described as the moment when the moon is passing between the Earth and the sun, causing it to block the sun’s rays.

In an email to The Star, Consolmagno explained his position.

“It was the exact incorrect phase of the moon.” That would appear to be the conclusion of the matter.

A solar eclipse at Jesus’ crucifixion would have been impossible, according to Maderak’s calculations since the moon was on the wrong side of the Earth at the time of the holiday.

“I myself take the perspective of not wanting to combine my science and my faith too much,” said Maderak, who will receive two colleagues of Consolmagno from the Vatican on August 20 and 21, according to the Vatican’s website.

From a religious standpoint, Maderak explained that since God is omnipotent, “he has sort of a little discretion to override the rules of physics.” If this is something that occurred as a result of divine intervention, we may or may not be able to figure out how it happened, he added.

NASA offers historical maps of those areas as well. In 33 A.D., on what we now know as April 3, a partial lunar eclipse occurred, which some believe to be the day Jesus died. The original version of this story was published on August 7, 2017 at 4:42 p.m.

Did a solar eclipse darken the skies during Jesus’ crucifixion?

FILE – In this file photo taken from downtown Denver on May 20, 2012, the annular solar eclipse can be seen as the sun sets behind the Rocky Mountains. The solar eclipse, which will traverse the United States in a diagonal route next month, will be a windfall for Missouri’s tourism industry. On August 21, 2017, certain localities will have a higher number of tourists than locals. Hotels and campsites are completely sold out, and some localities are prepared for record-breaking crowds of people who will gather to see around two minutes of near-darkness at the height of the day.

  • But, did a total solar eclipse indeed darken the skies during the Crucifixion, as some have speculated?
  • Although most attempts to calculate dates of historical events based on the timing of astronomical phenomena might be difficult, this one is straightforward!
  • Wait, wait, wait.
  • Because of this, some believe that Jesus’ crucifixion occurred during an eclipse.
  • According to Luke 23:44, “it was now around midday, and darkness fell over the entire area until three o’clock, for the sun’s light had vanished.” In fact, the New American Bible reads this as “as a result of the eclipse of the sun.” The Rev.
  • As Kurzynski explained, “we begin to get into the idea that there must be a natural explanation for everything in the Bible.” However, this is not a new question.
  • That does appear to be a reasonable natural explanation.
  • According to Consolmagno, the Gospels make it plain that Jesus was crucified during the Jewish holiday of Passover, which is usually observed during a full moon in the springtime.
  • In addition, the darkness that descended during the Crucifixion lasted much too long to represent a solar eclipse of any significance.

Not to mention that people were aware of eclipses and were capable of accurately forecasting them, according to Consolmagno, “thus it is clear that they recognized that the darkness described at the time of the Crucifixion could not have been an usual solar eclipse.” What do you think about a lunar eclipse?

  • According to the scientist-author, historians have narrowed in on the date of Jesus’ death as April 3, A.D.
  • And this raises a question about the lunar eclipse theory’s validity: The total lunar eclipse occurred that night, although it was most likely not visible from Jerusalem, where the Gospels claim that Jesus was crucified outside the city walls.
  • “Another option is that they were aware of a lunar eclipse that was due to occur that night, even if it was not visible,” he said.
  • It is possible that the blackness was produced by increased cloud covering rather than an eclipse, or that it was “a literary artifice to accentuate the seriousness of the situation,” according to Kurzynski, who believes it was the latter.
  • She believes the darkness “wasn’t simply creation’s way of feeling sorry for the Creator; it wasn’t just a warning; it was a symbol of God’s punishment.” Evangelist Anne Graham Lotz believes the darkness was a manifestation of God’s judgment.
  • According to Lotz, the Bible has several additional references to darkness, such as the plague of darkness mentioned in Exodus, which was one of the ten plagues God brought to Egypt in order to urge Pharaoh to release Jewish prisoners from slavery.
  • “It’s merely a symptom of the absence of God and the imposition of complete judgment.” “I believe that Christ’s judgment on the cross was far more significant than a solar eclipse, but we’ll find out when we get to paradise,” she remarked.

Out of consideration for the religious importance of the event, Dvorak stated, “The basic line here is that people have been discussing this subject since Newton, and I expect they will continue to debate it for another 100 years.”

The Crucifixion Darkness: What Happened at the Death of Christ?

Many people will remember the “great eclipse” of 2017 for a long time. Some feel that it was a sign from God, and others do not. Many people think that a solar eclipse of a comparable magnitude heralded the Crucifixion and death of Jesus. What truly happened at Jesus’ death was both magnificent and well-documented—but it wasn’t just a simple solar eclipse, as many people believe. Many people believe that the Crucifixion occurred between 29 AD and 33 AD because of known solar eclipses in Judea during those years.

  • Some historians believe Jesus’ death was marked by a complete solar eclipse that happened in the year 29 CE, while others believe it was marked by a second total eclipse that occurred in the year 33 CE, which blocked the sun for four minutes and six seconds and commemorated Jesus’ death.
  • However, neither a “solar eclipse” occurrence nor the 29 ador 33 addates are consistent with the biblical narrative.
  • However, the darkness that descended at the time of Jesus’ death lasted three hours!
  • That was a total of three hours and thirty minutes!
  • Take note of an old story that corresponds exactly to the Gospel accounts.
  • According to Africanus, Thallus wrote the following: “.in the reign of Tiberius Caesar, with a full moon, there occurred a total eclipse of the sun from the sixth hour to the ninth—manifestly the eclipse of the sun of which we speak.
  • However, it was a darkness brought on by God, as the Lord happened to be suffering at the time” (The Ante-Nicene Fathers.
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325,p.

Take note of the fact that Thallus points out that the “eclipse” occurred during the period of a “full moon”—and that it was not a regular eclipse, but rather “a darkness produced by God”—and that it was not a typical eclipse at all.

The term aseclipsed, which is derived from ancient Greek, may not always refer to the fact that the moon has blotted out the sun.

When the earth lies between the moon and the sun, there is a full moon that happens.

As a result, it is impossible that the darkness that occurred at the moment of Jesus’ death was caused by an eclipse!

When the Savior of the universe died, the entire creation moaned, the temple curtain was torn in two, and numerous graves were opened (Matthew 27:51–53), indicating that He had been crucified.

Please see ” The Resurrection Was Not on Easter Sunday! ” for a more in-depth examination of the circumstances surrounding Jesus’ death on the cross. as well as Easter: The Untold Story

Was the Darkness of the Crucifixion Merely an Eclipse?

For those who have witnessed a total solar eclipse, the spectacle is awe-inspiring and unforgettable. Incredibly powerful because they are a multi-sensory event, from the tremendous changes in temperature and weather, to the sounds of nocturnal animal activity, to the visual changes of the steadily declining daylight and the brief darkness of totality, solar eclipses are a must-see. Lunar eclipses are equally captivating, as the Moon gradually transforms from its typical dazzling white look to a more dull reddish color as the eclipse progresses over the sky.

While this argument has been raised by a variety of persons in a variety of circumstances, we wish to challenge the rationale of those who believe that biblical events were not described in a supernatural manner.

The historical truth and the intertwining of God’s supernatural power with the development of physical laws, on the other hand, provide a complete narrative that is both investigative and descriptive in nature, allowing us to comprehend the unique events recorded in Scripture.

A Matter of Timing

When discussing the chronology of the crucifixion, it is important to remember the specifics that must be met in order for solar and lunar eclipses to occur. First and foremost, a solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, producing a shadow on the Earth as a result. The Moon’s phase is always a New Moon during solar eclipses, which indicates that the eclipse always occurs during the New Moon phase. A lunar eclipse, on the other hand, happens when the Earth passes between the Sun and the Moon, producing a shadow on the Moon’s surface.

  • Here is a chronology of the events leading up to and including the crucifixion to provide as a general summary.
  • It was then that darkness descended across the entire continent at the sixth hour (12 p.m.
  • At this moment, Jesus yelled out three of His recorded words from the cross: “My God, My God, why have You deserted Me?” “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?” “Father, ‘I surrender My spirit into Your hands,'” says Jesus in Mark 15:34.
  • (John 19:30).
  • After establishing the specifics of both the crucifixion timeline and the essential timings of eclipses, we may consider if a solar or lunar eclipse could be a potential explanation for the darkness that happened.
  • When it comes to solar eclipses, there is a distinct impact on the Sun and the amount of daylight available at the time of the event.
  • But we can be certain that the darkness surrounding Jesus’ death was not the consequence of a solar eclipse occurrence, as some have suggested.

The trial and crucifixion of Jesus took place at the time of the Passover festival, which takes place every year in the same month and on the same day of the month.

It is important to note that Jewish time is calculated according to a lunar calendar, with each month beginning on the New Moon and following the lunar cycle until the conclusion of the month.

This term is either interpreted as “month” in the sense of time, or as “New Moon” in the context of a physical description, depending on the context.

In this case, the New Moon (chodesh) is utilized in connection with a time period of waiting until the “third day” of the month, which is the third of the month.

While the time of month for the crucifixion entirely eliminates the likelihood of a solar eclipse, reasoning based on the length of time in darkness gives more evidence for a supernaturally inspired inception of the event.

When considering a solar eclipse, it is true that the entire spectacle might last up to three hours in duration.

The partial eclipse phase of a complete solar eclipse is a long process that begins with a gradual darkening and progresses to a point of maximum eclipse before gradually brightening after the maximum eclipse.

Those who have experienced a total solar eclipse will agree that the Earth does not go completely black until the eclipse’s greatest darkness phase, which lasts only a brief period of time.

The complete solar eclipse that crossed the United States in 2017 was barely two minutes and 40.2 seconds long at its longest point. 1 In reality, the greatest length of a total solar eclipse is less than seven minutes, which is the shortest imaginable. 2

Conclusion

When we arrive at the cross, the culmination of God’s plan, we witness God employing every aspect of the event to emphasize the amazing uniqueness of Jesus’ innocence, sacrifice, and love. For example, one of these aspects was God creating a huge, supernatural darkness to engulf the whole region and last until Jesus was killed. Neither a simple coincidence nor an everyday occurrence, this blackness was not to be dismissed as such. Instead, it contributed to demonstrating to those who were there at the crucifixion at the time, as well as to people who come to the cross today, the critical message of redemption that Jesus delivered to the world.

Endnotes

12 Jean Meeus (2003), “The Maximum Possible Duration of a Total Solar Eclipse,” Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 113:343–348, December. Jean Meeus (2003), “The Maximum Possible Duration of a Total Solar Eclipse.” Originally published on September 10, 2017. REPRODUCTION DISCLAIMERS: The reproduction of this material in part or in its full is permissible as long as the terms and conditions set out by the author and the publisher are followed. Prerequisites for Reproduction

Eclipses from Ancient Times – Part Three

The Eclipse of Augustus (14 CE) Tacitus mentions a lunar eclipse that occurred shortly after Augustus’ death, which has been identified as the eclipse that occurred on September 27, 14 CE. Tacitus writes: “While in the midst of a clear sky, the Moon was suddenly eclipsed; the soldiers, who were unaware of the reason, interpreted this as a portent of their future exploits: to their labors, they compared the eclipse of the planet, and prophesied ‘that, if to the distressed goodness should be restored her wonted brightness and splendor, the outcome of their struggle would be equally successful.’ When a result, they produced a clamorous racket by ringing on brazen metal and blowing trumpets and cornets; as she seemed brighter or darker, they exulted or wept, depending on the situation.” The Eclipse of the Crucifixion (33 CE) A Friday afternoon, some hours before the beginning of the Jewish Sabbath, was described as the day of Jesus’ crucifixion by the apostles and other writers.

  1. It is reported that Jesus was crucified during the time period in which Pontius Pilate served as Judea’s procurator (chief magistrate) (26-36 CE).
  2. According to the evidence, it happened on April 3, 33 CE, but some believe it happened on April 7, 30 CE.
  3. The eclipse of the crucifixion.
  4. Later, the occurrence was linked to a solar eclipse that was seen in Jerusalem at the same time.
  5. R.G.
  6. Ojeda.
  7. There is other evidence that the Moon looked to be red on that particular day.

At the time of his crucifixion, the Sun had become black; the stars had appeared, and people all over the globe had lit lamps from the sixth hour till dusk; the Moon had seemed as crimson as blood.” This might be the outcome of a dust storm brought on by the khamsin, a hot southerly breeze that is blowing.

This is due to the fact that, even though the Moon is mathematically in the Earth’s shadow, sunlight is refracted via the Earth’s higher atmosphere, where regular scattering will prevent blue light from penetrating.

It should be noted that this refracted light would be far weaker than straight sunlight from even a little fraction of the Sun, and therefore, without the use of a telescope, the blood red color associated with the eclipse would be completely invisible.

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On November 24, 29 CE, there will be a solar eclipse visible in Jerusalem, according to another idea.

In the fourth year of the 202nd Olympiad, there was a solar eclipse that was greater than any known before, and at the sixth hour of the day it became night, resulting in the appearance of stars in the heavens; and a great earthquake that broke out in Bithynia destroyed the majority of Nicaea, according to the Greek writer Phlegon:” In truth, the Bible makes reference of the Sun being turned into darkness earlier that day: ” The Sun shall be turned into darkness.” There is disagreement among experts as to whether this was a solar or a lunar eclipse, and there is also disagreement as to the date of the eclipse.

In any case, an eclipse that occurred on the night of the crucifixion would have been interpreted by believers as a supernatural sign, and it is believed to have influenced the change of heart of the Jews and Pilate towards the body of Christ, resulting in the placement of a military guard at the tomb.

Did Jesus die during a solar eclipse?

THE STORY BEGINS WITH THIS: an unexpected item in my local Kansas City Star: “Was Jesus executed as the sun was eclipsed?” According to NASA, one happened in the year 33 A.D.” I reside in the shadow of the totality zone for the eclipse that will take place on Monday. Assuming there are no clouds, I’ll be monitoring it and hoping to capture some images. And after the darkness has passed, in the midst of the amazement I will feel for the beauty of creation, I will almost certainly take a minute to reflect on Jesus’ death on the cross.

For around three hours, from about 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the whole region was enveloped in darkness.

For three hours, the area is in complete darkness as a result of the eclipse.

The eclipse, on the other hand, will span almost exactly three hours from beginning to end, from beginning to end.

Solar eclipse at the Crucifixion?

“Based on both the Bible and some scientific evidence, it could seem fair to believe that a solar eclipse like the one that millions of people will witness on Aug. 21 occurred during the crucifixion of Jesus Christ,” writes Eric Adler, a staff writer for the Kansas City Star. NASA not only keeps track of solar eclipses that will occur in the future, but they have also kept track of eclipses have occurred in the past 5,000 years. Whether or not the darkness reported in Matthew, Mark, and Luke was produced by an eclipse is hard to determine.

  • The majority of academics agree that it occurred somewhere between AD 30 and 33, with most experts currently leaning toward the AD 33 date.
  • Since the Bible states that there was an earthquake at the time of the crucifixion, they base their conclusion on earthquake evidence (Matthew 27:54).
  • However, it appears that the zone of totality remained close to Antarctica.
  • If the early date of crucifixion is correct, Jesus would have been killed a few months before that, in AD 30.

Theories about the darkness at the Crucifixion

It is very uncommon for Bible students to come up with several explanations concerning where the darkness originated during the crucifixion.

  • Heavy downpour clouds
  • Sandstorm obscuration
  • Thick clouds of rain
  • Ash from a volcanic explosion that is traveling

The difficulty with the hypothesis that the darkness was produced by a solar eclipse is that it coincides with Passover. Passover is celebrated on the first full moon of the month of Nissan, when the moon is on the other side of the earth, away from the sun.

A solar eclipse happens when the moon is between the earth and the sun, which occurs when the moon is between the earth and the sun. It would have required a miracle for a solar eclipse to occur on the holiday of Passover. “So what’s the problem?” would be the response from many Christian circles.

Shining son, glorious God

Is it just me, or should looking up at the eclipsed sun in all its splendor remind us of the beauty of God? Moses to God: “Please show me your glory.” God tells Moses: “You cannot see my face, since no one can see me and survive. There is a location near me where you may stand on a rock. When my glory passes that place, I will put you in a large crack in the rock and cover you with my hand until I have passed by…you will see my back. But my face must not be seen” (Exodus 33:20-23). (Exodus 33:20-23).

Yep, I’m quite sure.

The most famous solar eclipses in history

Hinode/XRT through the use of Live Science Since ancient times, people have interpreted the moon completely blocking out the sun for only a few minutes — the entire solar eclipse, as the moon’s shadow moves across the Earth, can last several hours — as omens that herald an impending miracle, the wrath of God, or the end of a ruling dynasty’s reign of violence. Listed below are some of the most famous eclipses, ranging from the earliest recorded eclipse, described on an ancient clay tablet in Ugarit in modern-day Syria, to an eclipse that was linked to a revolt in an ancient Assyrian city, to a total solar eclipse that will undoubtedly go down in history when it dazzles the entire world in 2017.

Great American Total Solar Eclipse

NASA TV, courtesy of Live Science A complete solar eclipse (when the moon passes directly between Earth and the sun) is predicted to occur on August 21, 2017, marking the first time in over four decades that the United States will witness one. According to Space.com, a sister site of Live Science, the shadow created by the moon will be 70 miles broad (110 kilometers wide) and will darken sky from Oregon to South Carolina during the so-called Great American Total Solar Eclipse. During the majority of solar eclipses, the moon only blocks out a portion of the sun, which is referred to as a partial solar eclipse.

The route of the majority of total eclipses passes across bodies of water or remote areas of the world.

Anyone planning to witness the summer eclipse should keep in mind that they should never gaze directly at the sun without adequate eye protection, save during the brief time of totality when the moon has passed fully between the sun and the Earth.

Ugarit eclipse

Live Science obtained this image from Anton Ivanov/Shutterstock.com. According to an examination of a clay tablet unearthed in 1948, the Ugarit eclipse occurred on May 3, 1375 B.C., and darkened the sky for 2 minutes and 7 seconds. It was one of the first solar eclipses to be documented in history. Then, in 1989, a research published in the magazine Nature showed that the eclipse had truly happened on March 5, 1223 B.C., as previously believed. A historical dating of the tablet, as well as an interpretation of the tablet’s text, which cites the planet Mars’ visibility during the eclipse, helped to establish the new date.

In Ugarit, a port city in northern Syria, Mesopotamian historians reminisce about how the sun was “put to shame” during this total eclipse.

Assyrian eclipse

Image courtesy of the United States Army’s Live Science. The sun was entirely obscured for 5 minutes in 763 B.C., during the reign of the Assyrian kingdom, which occupied what is now Iraq. Ashur, today known as Qal’at Sherqat (as depicted on the image), in Iraq, was engulfed by an uprising at this time period, and early documents from this period mention both events in the same section, indicating that the ancient people connected the two events in their thoughts.

Early Chinese eclipse

Live Science obtained this image from Ed Lemery/Shutterstock.com. Chinese historians recorded an epic total eclipse that lasted for 6 minutes and 25 seconds in 1302 B.C., during which the sun was completely eclipsed. Because the sun was considered to be a symbol of the emperor, an eclipse was seen as a warning to him. According to a 2003 research published in the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, after an eclipse, a monarch would eat vegetarian meals and perform rituals to save the sun from the eclipse.

Pang, determined the date of the eclipse, which was June 5, 1302 B.C., by analyzing writings on ancient turtle shell pieces (known as oracle bones).

Earthlings would be able to see “huge stars” during the solar eclipse since the moon’s shadow would be blocking out the sun’s rays during the daytime.

Crucifixion of Jesus

Stephanie Pappas is a writer for LiveScience. It is said in the Christian gospels that the sky darkened for many hours after Jesus’ crucifixion, which historians interpreted either as a miracle or as a harbinger of doom in the near future. Later historians utilized astronomy to calculate the date of Christ’s death, based on the description of the eclipse in this passage. Some historians believe that the crucifixion happened during a complete solar eclipse that lasted 1 minute and 59 seconds in the year 29 C.E.; others believe that a second total eclipse, which blocked the sun for 4 minutes and 6 seconds in the year 33 C.E., marked Jesus’ death.

The birth of Mohammed

Image courtesy of Emkaplin/Shutterstock.com via Live Science. In the Koran, there is mention of an eclipse that occurred before to Mohammed’s birth. Historians eventually linked this to a complete eclipse that occurred in 569 C.E. that lasted 3 minutes and 17 seconds. Additionally, the sun was obscured for one minute and forty seconds following the death of Mohammed’s son Ibrahim. The world’s earliest Muslims, on the other hand, did not think that the eclipse was a sign from God. Instead, according to Islamic literature known as the Hadiths, Mohammed said that “the sun and the moon do not experience eclipse because of the death or the life of any person.” Here’s what you’ll see: The Ulugh Beg Observatory in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, which was erected in the 1420s and is regarded to be one of the major observatories of the Islamic world, is located in the city of Samarkand, the capital of Uzbekistan.

King Henry’s eclipse

Photograph courtesy of Neil Thompson on Flickr, courtesy of Live Science A total solar eclipse lasting 4 minutes and 38 seconds occurred on the day that King Henry I of England, the son of William the Conqueror, died in A.D. 1133, coinciding with the death of the king. In his manuscript “Historia Novella,” William of Malmesbury describes how the “hideous gloom” stirred the hearts of the people of England. Following the death of the monarch, a fight for the throne engulfed the realm, resulting in civil war.

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That is exactly what happened, for the same year that the monarch died the next day after St Andrew’s Mass-day, on December 2 in Normandy,” according to a NASA announcement.

Einstein’s eclipse

Featured image courtesy of Neil Thompson via Live Science. A total solar eclipse lasting 4 minutes and 38 seconds occurred on the day that King Henry I of England, the son of William the Conqueror, died in A.D. 1133, coinciding with the event. In his manuscript “Historia Novella,” William of Malmesbury describes how the “hideous gloom” stirred the hearts of the people of the time. Immediately following the death, a fight for the throne engulfed the country, resulting in civil war and widespread anarchy.

That is exactly what happened, since the monarch died the following day after St Andrew’s Mass-day, on December 2, in Normandy, according to a NASA statement.

Could a solar eclipse have occurred when Christ died?

I was reading about the gloom that surrounded Christ’s death at the time. Are solar eclipses of the sun truly impossible to see under a full moon? Is it true that a solar eclipse of the sun cannot be seen during a full moon?

Bible Answer:

This is an essential subject since historians are unanimous in their belief that there was darkness at the time of Jesus Christ’s death. A detailed examination of the period of Christ’s death indicates that He died on April 3, A.D. 33, according to the Bible. We also know from Scripture that there were three hours of darkness during the time of the flood (noon to 3 pm). This is much too long for a solar eclipse to be visible. And it was now around the sixth hour, and darkness fell over the entire region until the ninth hour, with the sun being concealed by cloud cover.

If we explore for natural occurrences that may explain this occurrence, we will find that it can only occur when the moon crosses between the sun and the earth on a certain day.

Because the Bible also informs us that Jesus died on a Friday, right before the Jewish holiday of Passover, this could not have happened (John 19:14-16).

A solar eclipse cannot occur while the moon is fully illuminated. In addition, there is another reason why a solar eclipse cannot account for the darkness. According to astronomical data, there was no solar eclipse on that date anywhere near the city of Jerusalem, despite popular belief.

Solar Eclipse

In order for a solar eclipse to occur, the moon must pass directly between the sun and the earth. When this occurs, the moon is referred to as a “new moon” for the first time. When the moon passes between the sun and the earth, as seen in the illustration, the sun’s rays are obstructed and a portion of the world is darkened as a result of the eclipse.

Full Moon

It is only when the moon is directly behind the earth that a full moon occurs. The term “full moon” refers to the fact that the moon appears in the night sky as entirely lighted and completely spherical. This implies that the moon must be behind the earth, else the light reflected from the moon would not be seen on the surface of the planet.

Conclusion:

The fact that a solar eclipse did not occur on the day of Jesus’ death has previously been brought to our attention. Because the moon was in the incorrect position at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, an eclipse could not have happened during his execution. Natural occurrences are unable to explain what occurred. Because of the Creator’s agony and final death, the cosmos reacted in kind. A miraculous occurrence happened, which serves as a testament to Jesus’ deity.

The Eclipse & the Crucifixion of Jesus

There is rising enthusiasm in the United States about the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see a complete solar eclipse on August 21, 2017, which will be the first such opportunity on American territory in 38 years. Air transportation, hotel reservations, and auto rentals have all witnessed a spike in demand in towns that are located along the line where the eclipse will be total, according to industry reports. It has also piqued people’s interest in how the next eclipse can provide light on the historical incident of the “darkness” that arrived unexpectedly when Jesus was hanging on the Roman cross, which will take place on August 21.

Perhaps, therefore, this is a good opportunity to investigate any possible connections between the two topics.

The Science of an Eclipse

It is possible to see a solar eclipse when the moon passes between our planet and our star, obstructing the sun’s light from reaching the earth either partially or completely. As can be seen in the diagram below, there is a distinction between a partial eclipse (which is seen by those who are in the “penumbral” shadow) and a total eclipse (which is seen by those who are in the “umbral” shadow). A partial eclipse is seen by those who are in the “penumbral” shadow, whereas a total eclipse is seen by those who are in the “umbral” shadow.

In addition to this diagram, which was given by NASA, there are several crucial features concerning the August 21 eclipse, which are relevant to all total solar eclipses:

  1. The period of time during which the sun is completely hidden lasts no more than 7 minutes and is frequently less than 3 minutes. On August 21, the sun will be completely hidden for a total of 2 minutes and 40 seconds in Carbondale, Illinois, and for shorter time in all other locations in the United States. When a complete eclipse begins (i.e., when the sun’s rays are hidden) and continues until the sun’s rays are no longer obstructed, the total time span is less than 3 hours. During an eclipse, the moon changes from being a “old” moon to being a “new” moon, and as a result, only a crescent is seen from the perspective of a person on the planet. It takes around 15 days for the moon to reach half of its circumference around the earth, at which point it is considered “full.” Because of this, an eclipse never happens during a “full” moon
  2. Instead,

Eclipses have captivated mankind for thousands of years. The Loughcrew Cairn L Megalithic Monument in Ireland contains a chiseled-in-stone depiction of the first documented eclipse, which dates back 5000 years. This is known as a “petroglyph.” The strange feeling that happens during an eclipse has given rise to all kinds of “spiritual” connotations over the years, as may be discovered by conducting a search on the internet. According to NASA, when there is an eclipse, “the brighter stars and planets are visible.” Animals have the ability to alter their behavior.

The cows have returned to the barn.

Both the light intensity and the temperature of the air have decreased significantly.” Something truly extraordinary is taking place, and the general public has reacted with alarm.

DarknessJesus’ Crucifixion

Unsurprisingly, some have linked the “darkness” that occurred during Jesus’ hours on the cross with an eclipse, and it is to this that our attention is now being drawn, along with other factors. The occurrence is described in the Gospel of Luke (23:44f) as follows: “And it was now about the sixth hour, and darkness descended over the entire area until the ninth hour, the sun being veiled.” The remark of darkness and the sun being hidden would certainly suit the description of an eclipse-like phenomena.

  1. When Thallus published his history of the Eastern Mediterranean in the year 52 A.D., he was writing about a period that included the Trojan War and up to his own time.
  2. For example, Julius Africanus, who was commissioned by Roman Emperor Severus (222-235) to construct the emperor’s library at the Pantheon in Rome and subsequently converted to Christianity, is a notable example.
  3. 221 Julius Africanus wrote, “Thallus, in the third book of his history, explains away this darkness as an eclipse of the sun—unreasonably, in my opinion.” More on why Africanus uses the word “unreasonably” later in the chapter).
  4. Our knowledge of his life is limited to pieces reported by three other writers: Julius Africanus, Origen, and Philopon, all of whom lived in the first century AD.
  5. He is reacting to a Christian opponent, Celsus, who says the following: “However,” Celsus continues.
  6. In his book Against Celsus (2.33), Origen writes: ….
  7. 2.59) (Against Celsus, Origen, 2.59).

But, to return to the original point, could the darkness that occurred at Jesus’ crucifixion have been caused by an eclipse? There are at least two compelling arguments for concluding that it could not have happened:

  1. A complete eclipse lasts little more than 7 minutes, although the darkness during the crucifixion is said to have lasted from the “6 thhour” (noon) to the “9 thhour” (noon), according to tradition (3:00 p.m.). Even if we assume that these are approximate timeframes, the length of an eclipse cannot account for the duration of the eclipse.

The second rationale, on the other hand, is significantly more persuasive:

  1. In the Jewish calendar, the crucifixion of Jesus took place during the Passover (Unleavened Bread) Feast, which took place on the 15th of the month of Nisan. Because the ancient Jews used a lunar calendar to keep track of time, the first of Nisan would have been considered a “new” moon (the only time an eclipse could occur). However, the 15th of Nisan—the day on which Jesus was crucified—would have been a “full” moon, which means that the moon would have been between the sun and the earth, rather than on the other side. The reason for this is that Africanus deemed Thallus’ hypothesis that the darkness was caused by an eclipse “unreasonable.

If it wasn’t an eclipse, and it couldn’t have been an eclipse, what explanation could be offered for what was taking place? One option comes from some who believe that God’s approach of protecting his Son as he began to bear on himself the sins of the world was a deliberate act on his part. Others have suggested that it was a sign of judgment and grief, citing Amos 8:9f, where comparable incidents are used as instances for their claim. The opportunity to witness a total solar eclipse on August 21 in the United States (particularly in Nebraska) will provide people with a sense of wonder during the approximately 3 minutes of darkness and may provide a brief taste of what those who were in Jerusalem on that day 2000 years ago felt and experienced for three hours.

van Voorst (page 23).

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