Jesus Sought Me When A Stranger, Wandering From The Fold Of God

Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing – Wikipedia

“Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing”
Hymn
Written 1758
Text byRobert Robinson
Meter 8.7.8.7
Melody “Nettleton” by John Wyeth

It was written by thepastor and hymnodist Robert Robinson in the year 1758, when he was 22 years old, and it is a Christian hymn. ” Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing ” is a Christian song written by thepastor and hymnodist Robert Robinson. Come, Thou Fount of all blessing, and fill my heart with joy. Tune my heart so that it can shout Thy grace. Rivers of kindness that never end, begging for choruses of the most exultant praise Make a beautiful sonnet for me and sing it to me from the skies above with fiery tongues!

I will be sorrowful in spirit, till I am freed from body and sin; but, from what I do inherit, I will begin by singing Thy praises; here I will raise myEbenezer; here I have come because of Thy great assistance; and I expect, by Thy good pleasure, to arrive safely at home.

How His goodness continues to seek me.

  • I’m not sure how to say it well.
  • Allow Thy goodness to bind my wandering heart to Thee, like a fetter would.
  • I look forward to the day when I will be free of sin and see Thy beautiful face.
  • I’m going to sing about Thy omnipotent grace; My Lord, do not delay any longer; take my ransomed soul away; and send thy angels to transport me into the regions of eternal day and night.

Tunes

” Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing ” is a Christian hymn composed by thepastorandhymnodistRobert Robinson, who wrote the lines in the year 1758, when he was only 22 years old, when he was 22 years old. Let us come to Thee, O Fount of Every Blessing. Help me to prepare my heart to praise Thy grace. Rivers of kindness that never end, begging for songs of the most exultant thanksgiving Make a beautiful sonnet for me and sing it to me from the skies above with fiery lips. Thank you, Mount of Thy redeeming love, because I have set my sights on it.

  • How He continues to seek me despite His goodness.
  • I’ll be wrapped in flesh till death takes me away The fact is that I am not very good at announcing it.
  • Bring My wayward heart back to Thee with the help of Thy kindness.
  • I look forward to the day when I will be free of sin and see Thy beautiful face; then dressed in linen that had been blood cleansed I’m going to sing about Thy omnipotent grace, Lord.

Do not wait any longer, my Lord. Please send thy angels to transport my ransomed soul to the regions of unending day. It is the original text of the hymn “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” that you are viewing.

Recordings

  • A Mosquito Fleet song from the SwingsCloves EP in 2001, the arrangement, instruments, and vocals were all performed by Mosquito Fleet. A rendition of this hymn was sung by Catholic musician Audrey Assad for her “Good to Me” EP, which was released in 2013. Nancy Bryansings a version of this hymn on her albumNeon Angelfrom 2000
  • Christian artistFernando Ortegarecorded a version on his album HymnsMeditations in 1994
  • The David Crowder Bandcovered it on their 1999 albumAll I Can Say
  • Christian rock bandDavid Crowder also covered it on their albumAll I Can Say in 1999
  • Christian rock bandDa A cover version of the song has also been recorded by Jars of Clay and veteran Christian performer Scott Wesley Brown. On his Hark! Songs for Christmasalbum, Sufjan Stevens recorded a rendition of the song, which peaked at number 122 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was included in a scene at the end of the season four premiere episode of Friday Night Lights. It is also featured on the album ‘Sing-A-Long’ by Phil Wickham
  • It is also sung by Clark Davis in the filmLove Comes Softlyand is a recurring background music in the film
  • It has been covered by Leigh Nash in Hymns and Sacred Songs
  • And it is also performed by The Tabernacle Choir at Temple University. The hymn appears on the album ‘Sing-A-Long’ by Phil Wickham. The hymn was recorded by the band Eleventyseven on their Good Spells EP
  • Gospel recording artist Anthony Brown and therAPy covered the first stanza of the hymn in the song “Without You” on their sophomore albumEveryday Jesus
  • And the hymn was covered by the band Eleventyseven on their Good Spells EP. Adam Young, a pop singer, shared his rendition of the song on hisSoundCloud profile. Evangelical Christian music group MercyMer recorded the song for their album The Worship Sessions, which was released in 2012. Indie rock band from the United States When Kings Kaleidoscope released their debut EP, Asaph’s Arrows, they included a cover of the hymn. For doctrinal reasons, Christian hymnwriters like as Enfield altered some stanzas and words in order to cover this hymn in their repertoire. The song can be heard on their 2011 album, which is titled: Resolved Music: Vol. II
  • Resolved Music: Vol. III
  • An musical composition based on this song was created by Johnnie Vinson, and it had solos for both trumpet and the oboe. For his 2016 albumNever Lose Sight, Chris Tomlin recorded a cover version of the song under the title Come Thou Fount (I Shall Sing)
  • Pastor and producer Billy Wiginton created a version mixing modern pop and hip hop elements, which was released as a single in 2019
  • ShaneShane recorded a variant of this hymn on their 2016 CD Hymns, Vol. 1, which was titled Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing (Above All Else). Upon the conclusion of the original hymn, the song inserts the words (Above All Else)

Text

A reference to 1 Samuel 7:12, in which the prophecy Samuel raises a stone as a monument to the Lord, proclaiming, “Hitherto hath the Lord helped us,” is used as inspiration for the lyrics (KJV). The stone’s name is Ebenezer, which is an English transliteration of the Hebrew name Samuel, which means “Stone of Help.” The unusual wordEbenezer is frequently used in hymnal presentations of the lyrics, which is not surprising (verse 2). Various revised versions of the hymn appear in hymnals, with phrases frequently changed or the reference to Ebenezer replaced.

It divides verse 2 into two parts, and the last half of verse 3 is appended to each part, resulting in two verses in the final version.

This piece of music is attributed to A.

Notes

  1. “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing,” says the narrator. Hymnary.org. Retrieved2020-02-09
  2. s^ What if Robert Robinson did indeed wander as he had feared? The Christian History Institute published a report in 2006 titled Lyrics from the Cyber HymnalArchived2011-10-07 @ the Wayback Machine A biography of John Wyeth published in the Cyber Hymnal (Archived 2011-08-16 at the Wayback Machine)
  3. Mark Dalbey, pcsnews.com, 2003
  4. Christian WorshipAppendix I: Worship that is Biblical, Reformed, and General Assembly RelevantArchived2010-01-18 at theWayback Machineon Worldwide ClassroomArchived2010-01-18 at theWayback Machineon Christian Worship The Methodist Publishing House, London, 1983, no.517
  5. Hymns and Psalms, Methodist Publishing House, London, 1983, no.517
  6. Frank Garlock is the editor (1997). Majesty Hymns, Majesty Music, p. 11
  7. Lyrics at igracemusic.com
  8. Center for Christian MusicArchived2007-08-11 atarchive.today
  9. Majesty Hymns, Majesty Music, p. 11
  10. Majesty Hymns, Majesty Music,

External links

  • Words, guitar chords, and lead sheet are included. Asahel Nettleton: The Forgotten Evangelist, by Jim Ehrhard
  • Asahel Nettleton: The Forgotten Evangelist, by Jim Ehrhard To download the music “Normandy,” click on the link below. MIDI file for the track ‘Nettleton’ may be downloaded here.

Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing – Lyrics, Hymn Meaning and Story

GodTube Staff”Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” is a Christian hymn penned by Robert Robinson, a preacher and hymnist who lived in the 18th century in England. He wrote the lines when he was 22 years old, in the year 1757. It is based on 1 Samuel 7:12, in which the prophet Samuel places a stone as a memorial, declaring, “Hitherto has the Lord aided us.” The lyrics, which focus on the topic of divine favor, are based on 1 Samuel 7:12. (KJV). Come, Thou Fount of all blessing, and fill my heart with joy.

  1. Rivers of kindness that never end, begging for choruses of the most exultant praise Make a beautiful sonnet for me and sing it to me from the skies above with fiery tongues!
  2. It is in spirit that I will be sorrowing, until I am freed from body and sin.
  3. When I was a stranger, Jesus sought me out.
  4. The mortal tongue will never be able to tell, I’ll be clothed in flesh till death takes me away.
  5. O to grace, what a terrible debtor I’m forced to be on a daily basis!
  6. I’m prone to wandering, Lord, I sense it, prone to abandoning the God I cherish; here’s my heart, O take it and seal it, seal it for Thy heavenly courts.
  7. After that, I was clothèd in blood soaked linen.

Immediately dispatch thy angels to transport me to the regions of unending day. SongwritersRobert Robinson and John Rutter wrote the hymn “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” in its original form. Public Domain has published this article.

The Story Behind Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing

This Christian song, penned by the 18th-century preacher and hymnist Robert Robinson, is known as “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing.” In the year 1757, he was 22 years old and had written the words in his journal. A reference to 1 Samuel 7:12 is included in the song’s lyrics to illustrate how God has aided them so far. “Hitherto hath the Lord helped us,” says the prophet Samuel as he raises a stone as a memorial to God’s assistance (KJV). Let us come to Thee, O Fount of Every Blessing. Help me to prepare my heart to praise Thy grace.

  • Thank you, Mount of Thy redeeming love, because I have set my sights on it.
  • Yet, from what I have inherited, I will begin by singing Thy praises; here I will raise my Ebenezer; here I have come because of Thy great assistance; and I expect, with Thy good will, to safely return home.
  • He interposed His precious blood to save me from peril when I wandered away from the flock of God.
  • It is impossible to tell with mortal mouth.
  • The tremendous debtor I’m forced to be on a daily basis, O to grace!
  • I sense that I’m prone to wandering, Lord, prone to abandoning the God I cherish; here’s my heart, O take and seal it, seal it for Thy heavenly courts.
  • Don’t be late, my Lord; don’t be late.
  • Immediately dispatch thy angels to transport me to the regions of eternal day.

Playlist of Live Performances “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing”

Come, Thou Fount of all blessing, and fill my heart with joy. Because there are so many different and contradicting accounts about this hymn, it will be essential to trace first its history, to the extent that it is known, and then to debate the topic of who wrote it and when. i. Its historical significance. This is what it looks like in detail: — The following entry in Robert Robinson’s handwriting can be found in a Church Book kept by Robert Robinson (q.v.) of Cambridge and now in the possession of the Rev.

  1. Wheatley of Norwich published a hymn beginning “Come, Thou Fount of every blessing” (Come, Thou Fount of every blessing) (1758).
  2. Robinson had written and published includes this entry, which is part of the list.
  3. 2.At this time, there has been no discovery of a publication that can be recognized as having been released by “Mr.
  4. A collection of hymns used by the Church of Christ at Angel-Alley, Bishopsgate, which was published in 1759 and is currently in the library of Drew Theological College in Madison, New Jersey, United States, is the oldest known printed text.
  5. 1 and is divided into 4 stanzas, each of which begins with: — “Come, Thou Fount of all blessing,” begins stanza one.
  6. “O, to grace how large a debtor,” says the third stanza.
  7. In 1777, the Hearers of the Apostles Collection of Hymns published in Nottingham; then in 1785, a Dublin Collection published in Dublin, this passage was duplicated.

5.Madan’sPsalmsHymns, 1760; G.

In modern compilations, the text is generally the 1759 text with the omission of stanzaiv., as in Madan’sPsalmsHymns, 1760, which is the 1759 text with the removal of stanzaiv., as provided inLyra Britannica, 1867, page 479.

The right to write.

The following is the evidence in each case: (1) In memory of Robert Robinson.

The third edition of A Collection of Hymns suited to Public Worship, published in 1778, includes the addition of his name to the hymn, and it has since been reproduced in practically every collection in which writers’ names are listed from that period until the present.

Dyer, in hisMemories of the LifeWritings of S.

Rippon, the compiler ofthe well-known BaptistSelection of Hymns (1787), in which he acknowledges that one or two hymns in thatSelectionwere by Robinson and names “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing” as one of those hymns written by Robinson.

See also:  Why Did Jesus Eat With Sinners

Rippon lists it as No.

4.It is included in Benjamin Flower’s ed.

iv, p.

5.The Rev.

Robinson claims it as his own in Selected Works of the Rev.

It is intended for the Countess of Huntingdon.

Wesley’s HymnsSacred Poems, published in Dublin in 1747.

There are a number of hymns taken from Cennick and Wattsc, as well as one by “Mrs.

B.” and this song after it.

“Diana Bindon, 1759,” is written on the title page of this book in the same handwriting as the previous page.

The date is printed on this as “Nov.

The Wesley publications listed on the first leaf date all the way back to the year 1756.

This hymn is in 5 stanzas, with i.-iv.

beginning, “If Thou ever didst discover,” from Charles Wesley’s hymn “Jesu, help Thy fallen creatures,” from hisHymnsSacred Poems Sedgwick carried on a long controversy in theNotes and Queriesand other periodicals, in 1858-9, based solely on this evidence (we write with the Diana Bindon manuscript and D.

  1. by the Countess.
  2. His writings reveal that, having committed himself, he considered it beneath him and destructive to his character to admit his mistake.
  3. In the preceding description, much of what appeared in the letter and was found in the S.
  4. has been ignored, and just the most basic facts have been provided.
  5. It is most likely that the original text is that given in theAngel Alley Collection(see above, i.
  6. 5).

252, i. “Father, Source of Every Blessing” and “Jesus, Source of Every Blessing” are also other titles for the same poem. “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing,” p. 252, i. -John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing

Come, Thou Fount of every blessing, and fill me with joy. There are so many different accounts about this hymn that it is important to trace first its history, to the extent that it has been documented, and then to debate the topic of who wrote it. i. It has a long and distinguished past. For example, here’s what it looks like: — The following entry in Robert Robinson’s handwriting can be found in a Church Book kept by Robert Robinson (q.v.) of Cambridge and now in the possession of the Rev. William Robinson of Cambridge, Robert Robinson’s biographer:— “Mr.

(1758).

Robinson includes this entry, which is a part of the list of works.

2.This hymn has not yet been discovered in any publication that can be confirmed as having been produced by “Mr.

The first known printed version is found in A Collection of Hymns used by the Church of Christ at Angel-Alley, Bishopsgate, published in 1759 and now housed in the collection of Drew Theological College in Madison, New Jersey, United States of America There are four stanzas in all, the first of which begins with: — “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing,” begins stanza one of the hymn.

  1. “O, to grace, what a huge debtor,” says Stanza iii, in the third line.
  2. In 1777, the Hearers of the Apostles Collection of Hymns published in Nottingham; and in 1785, a Dublin Collection published in Dublin, this passage was reproduced.
  3. 5.Madan’sPsalmsHymns, 1760; G.
  4. 6.
  5. 2.
  6. The following evidence is presented in each case:— Robert Robinson’s first name is (1) His entry in the Cambridge Church Book, which he enumerates alongside his many productions, as indicated above, is written in his own handwriting.
  7. (3) Mr.

Robinson (1796), states that among Robinson’s papers was a letter from Dr.

4.

Rippon lists it as No.

Robinson’s Miscellaneous Works, edited by Benjamin Flower and published in Harlow in 1807, vol.

346; it is also included in the Robinson’s Miscellaneous Works anthology edited by Benjamin Flower and published in Harlow in 1807.

Robert Robinson, published in 1861, the Rev.

II.

One hundred and twenty one sheets of writing paper are bound together with an edition of John Wesley’s HymnsSacred Poems, published in Dublin in 1747.

On either side of it are copies of hymns written by Cennick and Watts, as well as one by “Mrs.

B.” and this one.

“Diana Bindon, 1759,” is written on the title page of this book in the same handwriting as the first page of the book.

The date is inscribed on this as “Nov.

The Wesley publications listed on the first leaf date all the way back to 1756.

“Hymn by the Countess of Huntingdon,” the title of the composition reads.

being the same, with slight differences in the text, as that noted above as being in theCollection of Hymns used by the Church of Christ in Angel Alley, Bishopsgate, 1759; and stanza v.

Sedgwick’s manuscript correspondence in front of us), contending throughout that “Diana Bindon” was a personal friend of Lady Huntingdon, and that she had copied her manuscript directly from another ms.

And he did so not just on the basis of the flimsy evidence presented here, but also in the face of direct testimony to the contrary that he had received personally, as well as a definite denial from Lady Huntingdon’s biographer, which he had received in private.

Much of what appeared in the correspondence and was found in the S.

has been left out of the preceding description, and just the most basic facts have been provided.

In Madan’sPsalmsHymns (1760), he gives three stanzas of eight lines each, which is the accepted text and the one that is in widespread use throughout all English-speaking countries.

3), 1759, which is in four stanzas each (see above, i.

5). -Dictionary of Hymnology, John Julian (1907) “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing,” p. 252, i. “Father, Source of Every Blessing” and “Jesus, Source of Every Blessing” are also other titles for the same poem. -John Julian, Appendix, Part II of the Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Album-specific Resources:

“Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing” is one of our most well-known hymns, yet we can be tripped up by the lyrics from time to time. After all, what exactly is a “Ebenezer”? And who cares about the thees and thous? Robert Robinson (1735-1790), a barber’s apprentice who had lost his father and fallen in with a rowdy crowd, wrote the passage after hearing the preaching of Anglican evangelist George Whitefield. Robinson was 22 years old at the time of his writing. The melody “Nettleton” is an American folk song that was named after Asahel Nettleton, a 19th-century Connecticut preacher who was born in the town of Nettleton.

However, the first verse not only asks the Lord to assist us in our praise, but it also expresses the human proclivity to turn away from God: Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing, tune my heart to sing Thy grace; never-ending streams of mercy beg for songs of the highest praise.

I’m fixated on the mountain, which I praise as the mountain of Thy redeeming love.

All human beings were created for a specific purpose, similar to that of an instrument: to “sing” God’s “grace” with “loudest praise” (or, as the Westminster Catechism puts it, “to glorify God and to enjoy Him for all eternity”).

Every time we perform, just as musicians must tune their guitars or violins before each performance, we, as human instruments of God’s will, must beg for God’s assistance, in the form of “streams of compassion,” in order to “teach” us how to realign with His aim of “redeeming love.” The name “Ebenezer” first appears in the second stanza, which reads as follows: Here I raise my Ebenezer; I’ve come here because of Thy great assistance; and I expect, via Thy good pleasure, to reach my destination safely.

When I was a foreigner, straying away from the flock of God, Jesus sought me out and interposed His precious blood to save me from imminent peril.

The Hebrew term “Ebenezer” literally means “stone of aid,” and it is translated as “stone of help.” In the song, the concept is that as we recall how God has helped us, we will be inspired to greater praise, particularly because Jesus “sought” us while we were “strangers” and “wandering” away from God.

The third stanza builds on the topic of “wandering” by emphasizing it three times: O to grace, what a big debtor I am compelled to be on a daily basis!

I sense that I’m prone to wandering, Lord, prone to abandoning the God I cherish; here’s my heart, O take and seal it, seal it for Thy heavenly courts.

We do this since we are “prone to stray.” It goes without saying that this type of union with God will not be realized until we reach the heavenly realms, in those “courts above.” It turns out that there is a last line that is not usually sung, which looks forward to “that day” when we will finally join paradise.

How I’ll praise Thy royal grace, adorned in a robe of blood-washed linen.

With our voices, we recreate the “tune” we are seeking for our hearts as we sing this hymn together as a congregation, raising a “Ebenezer” to recall God’s kindness in Christ.

God’s orchestra, led by the “Ebenezer” of Jesus Christ, is the church, whose songs and life declare the praise and glory of the Almighty.

With the second rendition, you’ll hear a “Shape Note” arrangement, which is sung slowly in four parts and begins with merely a melody and ends with the less usual final verse.

Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing

Robert Robinson is the author of the following words: It is also credited to Asahel Nettleton. Music:Nettleton |Wyeth’s Repository of Sacred Music, Part Secondby John Wyeth; it is also attributed to Asahel Nettleton. Bring on the blessings, O Thou Fount of Every Blessing, Tune my heart so that it can shout Thy grace. Streams of mercy that never cease to flow, beckon for melodies of the highest praise. Make a sonnet for me, and sing it to me from above, in the language of fire. Exalt the majesty of the mountain!

  • 2.
  • However, I will begin with Thy praises from what I have inherited.
  • I’ve arrived to this place because of Thy amazing assistance; And I pray that I will arrive at my destination safely, according to Thy good pleasure.
  • When I was a foreigner, wandering from the flock of God, Jesus sought me out.
  • How His goodness continues to seek me.
  • 4.
  • Allow Thy goodness to bind my wandering heart to Thee, as though it were a fetter.

5.

After that, I was dressed in blood-washed linen.

1.

Allow me to tune my heart to sing Thy grace; streams of compassion that never cease, call for songs of the most exultant worship.

Exalt the majesty of the mountain!

2.

When I was a foreigner, straying away from the flock of God, Jesus sought me out and interposed His precious blood to save me from imminent peril.

O to grace, what a wonderful debtor I am compelled to be on a daily basis!

Lord, I sense that I’m prone to wandering.

Allow me to tune my heart to sing Thy grace; streams of compassion that never cease, call for songs of the most exultant worship.

2.

Allow that grace, Lord, to bind my wand-ringing heart to Thee, like a fetter might.

As a stranger, a stranger from God’s family, Jesus sought me out; He interposed His precious blood to save my soul from danger; Rescued thus, from sin and danger, Purchased by the Saviour’s blood, May I walk on earth as a stranger, As God’s child and an heir of God;

Come Thou Fount: What Does it Mean?

In a recent worship service at relate, we sang Come Thou Fount, a hymn that has for many years served as a reminder to me of one of the Bible’s most fundamental messages: that the grace of God alone is sufficient to overcome the seriousness of my self-inflicted sin. I realized on Saturday as I was prepared for it that in order for the other men to appreciate the depth of the language, I would have to guide them through the antiquated terms and phrases that are no longer in use today in 2013. It is my hope and prayer that, if we comprehend the things about which we are singing, we would be able to delight in the love that God displays in his redeeming plans rather than simply enjoying a lovely tune as we have done so far.

Teach me some melodic sonnets, chanted by burning tongues in the sky above me, please.

I’ve set my sights on it, the mountain of God’s redemptive love.

What God has done for us is to be reflected upon, and we are to return in kind, with’songs of the most resounding praise.’ One of the lines of the Lord’s Prayer, “Your kingdom come, Your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven,” reads: “Your kingdom come, Your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.” The phrase “Teach me some lovely sonnet sung by burning tongues above.” When we get together as Christians, we want to be a reflection of the angels’ adoration!

  1. We are assured, at the conclusion of the sentence, that we are “stuck upon” the mountain of God’s redemptive love, which is a magnificent certainty.
  2. Verse 2 is a proverb.
  3. When I was a foreigner, straying away from the flock of God, Jesus sought me out and interposed his precious blood to save me from imminent peril.
  4. We shall have no understanding of what an’Ebenezer’is if we do not first examine what an’Ebenezer’is.
  5. This is a scriptural concept, therefore let’s look at 1 Samuel 7:12 to see how it works.
  6. God desires to point His chosen people back to Himself and His faithfulness on a consistent basis.
  7. In verse 3, the debtor is praised for his greatness.
See also:  What Did Jesus Say About The Old Testament Laws

Allow thy goodness to tie my wandering heart to thee, like a fetter would do.

This last verse is one with which I really relate.

‘O to grace, how big a debtor, everyday I’m forced to be’ is a song that expresses how we find ourselves in urgent need of God’s grace on a day-to-day basis.

Nothing “will be able to separate us from God’s love for us in Christ Jesus our Lord,” as God promises, will be able to separate us from His love for us in Christ Jesus our Lord (Romans 8:39).

Instead, He will transform us into more like Jesus.

Beautiful thoughts about a glorious Saviour who deserves to be remembered. Soli Deo GloriaJack

Come Thou Fount

He was eight years old when his father, Robert Robinson (1735-1790), died away. As he grew older, he became increasingly difficult for his mother to manage, and at the age of fourteen, she sent him to London to work as an apprentice barber. Robert subsequently began to live a life of drinking and gambling as a result of his experiences. With a group of his pals, Robert attended a church service while in a drunken stupor when he was 17 years old, with the intention of making mockery of the proceedings.

  1. George Whitfield was the preacher, and he was addressing the congregation on the wrath of God.
  2. While he did not dedicate his life to the Lord that night, he was tormented by the words of Whitfield for the next few years.
  3. Several months later, he received a call to enter the ministry.
  4. Asahel Nettleton created the music for this piece in 1813.

Verse 1

Come, Thou Fount of all blessing, and fill my heart with joy. Allow me to tune my heart to sing Thy grace; Streams of kindness that never cease to flow, Call for songs of the most fervent adoration. Make a beautiful sonnet for me and sing it to me from the skies above with fiery tongues! Exalt the majesty of the mountain! I’ve set my sights on it, Mount of Thy redeemed love. Thoughts for Consideration: The hymn writer prays to God to tune his heart so that he might sing of His grace in song. He realizes the crookedness of his own heart and knows himself as a sinner in desperate need of God’s instruction and correction.

When you do, do you recall the Lord’s never-ending mercies and implore Him to reclaim ownership of your heart from your sinful nature?

Verse 2

Until I am freed from body and sin, I will be in mourning in spirit; but, from what I do inherit, I will begin by singing Thy praises; here I will erect my Ebenezer; here I have come because of Thy great assistance; and I trust, by Thy good pleasure, to arrive safely at my home. Thoughts for Consideration: The believer is well aware that life is full of difficulties, persecution, afflictions, and distresses, among other things. Despite this, there is always reason to be optimistic! Take, for example, what Paul wrote to encourage the believers in Corinth in 1 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Does the fact that you have sinned cause you to be discouraged?

Listen to the words of the Psalmist, who wrote in Psalm 42:5,”What is the cause of your despondency, O my soul? And what has caused you to grow uneasy within me? “Have faith in God, and I will again thank Him for the assistance of His presence.”

Verse 3

When I was a foreigner, wandering away from the flock of God, Jesus sought me out and, in order to save me from danger, He offered His precious blood. How His goodness continues to seek me. The mortal tongue will never be able to tell, I’ll be clothed in flesh till death takes me away. I’m not sure how to say it well. Thoughts for Consideration: As a drunken man set on insulting God’s people, Robert Robinson was the one who began God’s drawing of him. He had a similar experience to that of Saul of Tarsus on the way to Damascus: a sovereign God intervening in the lives of sinners and bringing them back to Himself via the cross.

Take a minute to express your gratitude to God for all that He has done for you through Christ!

Verse 4

O to grace, what a terrible debtor I’m forced to be on a daily basis! Allow Thy goodness to bind my wandering heart to Thee, as though it were a fetter. I’m prone to wandering, Lord, I sense it, prone to abandoning the God I cherish; here’s my heart, O take it and seal it, seal it for Thy heavenly courts. Thoughts for Consideration: The hymn writer is well aware that he has a proclivity to become separated from God. He prays that God would keep him, that He will bond him to Himself by His mercy, and that He will keep him safe.

This gives us solace when we are troubled by the waywardness of our own hearts.

Verse 5

I look forward to the day when I will be free of sin and see Thy beautiful face. After that, I was dressed in blood-washed linen. I’m going to sing about Thy omnipotent grace; Come, my Lord, do not be delaying any longer, Please remove my ransomed soul from this world. As soon as possible, dispatch thy angels to transport Me to the regions of unending day. Thoughts for Consideration: The hymn writer, who is tired of his own sin yet longs to meet the Lord, petitions His sovereign God to take him home to be with Him.

Are you prepared for the Lord to take you to your heavenly home?

St. Paul’s Indy: Fount of Every Blessing

At St. Paul’s, our processional hymn was “Come thou fount of all blessing,” which we sang this past Sunday. I had difficulty singing it since I was instantly reminded of my father, who was also named John, and who passed away on July 3rd. Come, thou font of all blessings, and tune my heart to sing thy praises. The never-ending streams of mercy scream out for melodies of the highest praise. Make a beautiful sonnet and sing it to me from the heavens above, please. Exalt the majesty of the mountain!

  1. (First stanza) As you can see, my father was a wellspring of every good thing.
  2. My father’s existence may be called counter-cultural and perhaps even a little archaic in an era when individuals are increasingly concerned with their own well-being.
  3. He was distinguished by something considerably more essential; he was distinguished by goodness, which is, in my opinion, the far larger accomplishment.
  4. He treated everyone with decency and worked hard to ensure that everyone had a voice.
  5. Although his health was deteriorating and he became increasingly irritated and agitated, he maintained his gentlemanly demeanor for the majority of the time, something he prized beyond nearly everything else in his life.
  6. John the Evangelist stated this in a sermon a few years ago: “You might find it beneficial to conduct an inventory of your life.” Consider the material items with which you have been entrusted — cash, real estate, family treasures, trinkets, and so on.
  7. Recognize and appreciate their significance, and express your heartfelt gratitude.

Allow yourself to be free of all of the things that you would consider to be your “possessions,” both material and intangible.

This is referred to as “an oblation” in the old church’s lexicon, which means that you are living your life as an offering of thankfulness.

I’m not sure if my father ever did a life inventory, but he was surely aware of where he might discover the actual wealth in his possession.

Oh, that we could all learn from his example, realizing our true treasure and spending our lives as a wellspring of goodness for others around us.

I’ve found my greatest treasure; I’ve arrived here thanks to your assistance; and I expect, by your good will, to return safely to my home.

When I was a foreigner straying away from the flock of God, Jesus sought me out and interposed his precious blood to save me from imminent peril. (Stanza 2 – second stanza)

Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing

Tune my heart to sing Thy grace, O Thou fount of every blessing, who has come to bless me.– Robert Robinson “Tune my heart,” says a beautiful prayer to the Source of ALL blessings: “Tune my heart.” My guitar can sound like nails on a chalkboard when it is out of tune, and the song that is meant to be beautiful can sound more like nails on a chalkboard. Something isn’t quite right. So I come to a halt. And I take the time to gently return each string to its proper position so that the song can be enjoyed once more.

  • I lose sight of His goodness.
  • And when I lose sight of the fact that I am His beloved daughter, I begin to work hard to prove my worth.
  • I’d never perform a song on a guitar that wasn’t in tune, but I’m willing to live with a heart that is out of tune far too often (and for far too long).
  • Fearful.
  • Ashamed.
  • I have suffered as a result.
  • To keep singing His praises over and over again.

We are not allowed to sing it too often or too loudly.

While we were still sinners, Love gave Himself up for us and walked out of the grave, allowing us to taste the sweetness of mercy and belonging for the first time.

Would you, Lord, please assist us in singing it?

I’m in desperate need of the truth that it carries.

I love that song.

Rocks to remind me of how God has been a source of strength for me.

Because if I don’t have Him, I have absolutely nothing.

In our hearts, he waits with open arms, ready to transform us if we will only surrender them to him.

If we asked Him to tune our hearts so that they could sing His grace today, what might happen?

If you’re coming, O Fount of Every Blessing, tune my heart to sing thy grace; streams of kindness, never-ending in their generosity, beg for songs of the highest praise.

Exalt the majesty of the mountain!

I’m raising my Ebenezer here; I’ve come here with thy assistance; and I hope, with thy good pleasure, to reach my destination safely.

To grace, you have no idea what a terrible debtordaily I’m forced to be!

I sense that I’m prone to wandering, Lord; I sense that I’m prone to abandoning the God I adore; here’s my heart, O take and seal it, seal it for thine heavenly courts.

In the She Reads Truth shop, you can purchase an exclusive hand-lettered print featuring lyrics from “Come, Thou Fount”! Listen to “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing” from the She Reads Truth |Hymns Spotify playlist by clicking the button below.

Volume 45: Come Thou Fount (I Will Sing) – Chris Tomlin

  • Chris Tomlin’s song “Come Thou Fount (I Will Sing)” Come, Thou font of all blessings, we pray. Help me to prepare my heart to praise Thy grace. Streams of kindness that never stop flowing Call for songs with the most fervent adoration Teach me how to write a beautiful sonnet. Sung by blazing tongues in the sky I’m praising the mount that I’ve set my sights on. The mountain of Thy atoning love I’m going to raise my Ebenezer here. I’ve arrived here with Thy assistance, and I want to be accepted by Thy good pleasure. Arriving safely at your destination When I was a stranger, Jesus sought me out. Having strayed from the path of God He is the one who will save me from harm. His precious blood was offered as a sacrifice. How Your goodness continues to seek me Your kindness never fails me, O Lord. I’ll be here till the day that death takes me away. I’m going to sing, oh, I’m going to sing Oh, to grace how huge a debtorI am compelled to be on a daily basis Let Thy goodness bind me like a chain. Bind my straying heart to Thy bosom. Lord, I sense that I’m prone to wandering. Predisposed to abandoning the God I adore Here’s a picture of my heart Lord, please take it and seal it. It is sealed for Thy heavenly courts. How Your goodness continues to seek me Your kindness never fails me, O Lord. I’ll be here till the day that death takes me away. I’m going to sing, oh, I’m going to sing How Your goodness continues to seek me Your kindness never fails me, O Lord. I’ll be here till the day that death takes me away. I’m going to sing, oh, I’m going to sing I’ll be here till the day that death takes me away. I’m going to sing, oh, I’m going to sing Lord, I sense that I’m prone to wandering. Predisposed to abandoning the God I adore Here’s a picture of my heart Lord, please take it and seal it. It is sealed for Thy heavenly courts. Take my heart, Lord, and seal it in your hands. It is sealed for Thy heavenly courts. “Suppose one of you owns a hundred sheep and loses one of them,” Jesus says in Luke 15:4. Do you suppose he leaves the ninety-nine in the open land and pursues the lost sheep until he locates it?” The Bible says in Ephesians 2:8-9, “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not your own doing
  • It is a gift from God—not by works, so that no one can take credit for your salvation.” The tale of the lost sheep has always had a special place in my heart. You’re probably familiar with the story. One of the sheep has gone missing, and the shepherd goes in search of it to ensure that it does not remain lost. Oh, how I cherished hearing that the shepherd was none other than Jesus, and that I was the foolish, wandering sheep who was completely unaware of the perils that surrounded me or even that I was in need of salvation. During my childhood, this fable provided me with a visual representation of God’s grace. Years later, as a mother, I was able to witness first-hand the overwhelming dread of losing sight of my child in a crowded environment for myself. Even more terrifying was the fact that we were on a family vacation in Mexico, in a very crowded beach town, and we didn’t know a word of the language of the people there. Adalai was just three years old at the time. I’ll never forget the heart-pounding, breathless seconds when we didn’t know where she was or what had happened to her. Numerous family members joined us in our hunt for her, and just as we were about to approach the police station on one of the city’s busiest streets, someone called out to say that they had discovered her. I felt delighted and enraged at the same time. Who thought that two feelings could exist in the same person at the same time?! Without saying anything to Ray or me, Adalai had drifted out to be with other members of our family who were not related to us. Adalai was in a horrible way since we were reacting in fear rather than joy because we were experiencing conflicting emotions of relief and living out probable dread at the same time. She has never strayed away from us since that day, thanks to the terror we instilled in her heart. Come Thou Fount’s opening lines, in which the author describes himself as “prone to wandering,” immediately bring to mind the episode with Adalai that occurred in Mexico. I understand that God is flawless and incapable of sin, and that, in His sovereignty, He would be aware of my whereabouts at all times. However, I believe that during my wanderings, God must have sought me out in a manner similar to how we searched for Adalai in that distant city. He would not rest until He had re-integrated me into the fold of his people. He want for me to become a member of His family. With the addition of a gorgeous chorus to this song, which he has dubbed “I Will Sing,” Chris Tomlin has transformed it into something very special. This is what the lyrical addition says: How Your goodness continues to seek me Your kindness never fails me, O Lord. I’ll be here till the day that death takes me away. I’m going to sing, oh, I’m going to sing The fact that Christ followed me and poured out His grace onto me, covering my sins in His kindness, will be etched in my memory forever. I will continue to talk about the wonderful things God has done for me until the day I die. I hope you will find this newly revised hymn to be an inspiration to you on this day in particular. If you are prone to wandering, we pray that you will be drawn back into the eternal arms of our heavenly Father. He will track you down. He will be merciful to you and will forgive you if you repent. He will eternally mark you as His own. You will never be let down by His kindness. Amen
See also:  When Does Jesus Die

Thousand Tongues – Come Thou Fount

It is I, Chris Tomlin, who will sing “Come Thou Fount (I Will Sing).” Come, Thou font of all blessings, and fill the earth. Help me to prepare my heart to sing Thy praises! There are never-ending torrents of kindness. Call for the most rousing praise songs possible. I’d like you to teach me how to write a beautiful sonnet. Fire-breathing tongues sang in the sky Applaud the mount on which I’m centered. The heights of Thy redeemed affection So, I’m putting my Ebenezer on the table. Thy assistance has brought me here, and I pray that Thy good pleasure has brought me.

  1. Going astray from the path of the Lord He will come to my aid in times of need.
  2. How Your generosity continues to pursue me.
  3. From now till the day I am no longer alive My voice will be heard, oh my voice will be heard!
  4. Please bind Thy kindness around my neck.
  5. Lord, I sense that I am prone to wandering.
  6. .and this is where my heart is.
  7. It will be sealed for Thy heavenly courts.

Your kindness never fails me, O God.

How Your generosity continues to pursue me.

From now till the day I am no longer alive My voice will be heard, oh my voice will be heard!

Lord, I sense that I am prone to wandering.

.and this is where my heart is.

It will be sealed for Thy heavenly courts.

It will be sealed for Thy heavenly courts.

Do you suppose he leaves the ninety-nine in the open country and pursues the lost sheep until he locates it?

The tale of the lost sheep has always had a special place in my heart and mind.

In order to ensure that the sheep does not become separated from the flock, the shepherd goes in search of it.

During my childhood, this fable served as a reminder of God’s mercy.

It was even more terrifying since we were on a family vacation in Mexico, in a very crowded beach town, and we couldn’t communicate because we didn’t know any of the language.

Those heart-pounding, breathless seconds when we had no idea where she had gone will stay with me forever.

I was overjoyed and enraged at the same time.

Without saying a word to Ray or I, Adalai had walked out to be with other members of our family.

She hasn’t strayed far from us since that day, thanks to the terror we instilled in her.

As I understand it, God is flawless and incapable of sinning.

However, I believe that during my wanderings, God must have sought me out in a manner similar to the way we searched for Adalai in that distant city.

That I belonged in His family was something He wanted for me to experience.

The following is the lyrical addition: How Your generosity continues to pursue me.

From now till the day I am no longer alive My voice will be heard, oh my voice will be heard!

To the very end of my days, I will tell people about the wonderful things God has done for me.

Please feel drawn back into the eternal arms of our heavenly Father if you are prone to wandering like I am.

He’ll go after you till you’re dead. He will be generous to you and will forgive you if you ask for forgiveness. In exchange, He will permanently mark you as His. You will never be let down by His kindness. Amen;

Description

Chris Tomlin’s “Come Thou Fount (I Will Sing)” Come, Thou Source of All Blessings. Prepare my heart to shout Thy praises. Never-ending rivers of kindness Call for songs of the most fervent adoration. Teach me how to write a melodic sonnet. Sung by blazing tongues over the horizon Praise be to the mount on which I’ve set my sights. The heights of Thy redeemed love I’m going to raise my Ebenezer. I have arrived here with Thy assistance, and I want to be accepted by Thy good will. Arrive at your destination safely.

  • Having strayed from God’s fold He is the one who will save me from harm.
  • How Your goodness continues to seek me.
  • I’ll be here till the day that death will take me away.
  • Oh, to grace how huge a debtorI’m forced to be on a daily basis Allow Thy goodness to bind me.
  • I sense that I’m prone to wandering, Lord.
  • Please, Lord, take it and seal it.
  • How Your goodness continues to seek me.

I’ll be here till the day that death will take me away.

How Your goodness continues to seek me.

I’ll be here till the day that death will take me away.

I’ll be here till the day that death will take me away.

I sense that I’m prone to wandering, Lord.

Please, Lord, take it and seal it.

Take my heart, Lord, and seal it with your seal.

“Suppose one of you owns a hundred sheep and loses one of them,” says Jesus in Luke 15:4.

You’re familiar with the story.

Oh, how I cherished hearing that the shepherd was none other than Jesus, and that I was the foolish, wandering sheep who was completely unaware of the dangers surrounding me, let alone that I was in desperate need of salvation.

Years later, as a mother, I was able to witness firsthand the terrifying feeling of losing sight of my child in a crowded environment.

Adalai was just three years old when this happened.

Numerous family members joined us in our hunt for her, and just as we were about to approach the police station on one of the city’s busiest streets, someone called out that they had found her.

Who knew that two feelings could exist in the same person at the same time?

Adalai was in a horrible way since we were reacting in fear rather than joy because we were experiencing mixed emotions of relief and living through the prospective dread.

Come Thou Fount’s opening lines, in which the author describes himself as “prone to wandering,” immediately bring to mind the episode with Adalai in Mexico.

In my wanderings, I believe God must have sought me out in a manner similar to the way we searched for Adalai in that distant city.

He wished for me to become a member of His family.

How Your compassion never fails me.

I’m going to sing, oh, I’m going to sing.

I will continue to tell others about the wonderful things God has done for me until the day I die.

If you are prone to wandering, we pray that you will be drawn back into the eternal arms of our heavenly father. He will go after you. He will be gentle and forgiving towards you. He will permanently mark you as His. You will never be let down by his kindness. Amen;

Lyrics

Welcoming thee, O Fountain of All Blessings Help me to prepare my heart to praise Thy grace. Streams of kindness that never stop flowing Call for songs with the most fervent adoration Teach me how to write a beautiful sonnet. Sung by blazing tongues in the sky Greetings in the name of God! I’ve made up my mind about it. In the name of Thy atoning love I have been blessed by Thy love up to this point. Thou hast led me to this point in my life. And I am confident that Thy hand will carry me home.

  • When I was a stranger, Jesus sought me out.
  • His precious blood was offered as a sacrifice.
  • I’m confined in what I can do.
  • Bind my straying heart to Thy bosom.
  • Predisposed to abandoning the God I adore Take my heart, and seal it with your mark of approval.
  • Oh, the day when I will be free of sin and behold Thy beautiful face will come.
  • I’m planning on singing Thy awe-inspiring grace.
  • Bring all of Thy promises to fruition.
  • Robert Robinson and Martin Madan wrote the lyrics to “Until I’m home with Thee at last.” Melody is a pseudonym (NETTLETON) David L.
  • ThousandTongues.org is a trademark of ThousandTongues.org.

Leave a Comment

(You may leave a comment by clicking here.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.