Jesus Jesus What A Wonderful Child

Jesus, What a Wonderful Child- a Christmas devotional for Dec. 30, 2017

Like part of my spiritual practices, I plan to reflect on a hymn or song every day throughout the Twelve Days of Christmas, much as I did during the Advent season. In conversation with my spiritual director, I decided to give space for both “the mind stuff” and “the heart stuff.” I’m not sure where all of these reflections will lead me, but I’m going to try to leave room for both “the head stuff” and “the heart stuff.” Some days may be more of one or the other than others. Invite you to join me as we create space to listen and be present in order to sense what God could be up to.

Happy Sixth Day of Christmas, everyone!

It all started in Washington, where we said our goodbyes to family before travelling back to our hometown of Nebraska.

There is never enough time to fit these excursions in.

Photographs from a Baby Shower held this past week, with a perfect phrase playing in the background to remind us that it is, indeed, chilly outdoors.

sizes=”(max-width: 442px) 100vw, 442px”> Pictures from a Baby Shower this past week— with a fitting phrase in the background— it is certainly chilly outside.

In fact, it’s so cold that several congregations have decided to cancel worship services for tomorrow out of an excess of caution, for concern that worshippers would be exposed to potentially hazardous weather and temperature conditions.

The fact that I won’t be stepping in on piano and organ tomorrow is a disappointment, since I was looking forward to a great jazzy and gospel postlude improvisation on “Jesus, What a Wonderful Child.” Beyond my desire to continue playing the piano and organ, though, I feel it was the correct decision.

  • Now, with regards to the song “Jesus, What a Wonderful Child,” the hymnal has the chorus of the song as well.
  • Jesus, Jesus, so holy, gentle, and peaceful; fresh life, and new hope will be brought by the infant.
  • There are two verses to this song, one for each stanza.
  • Find out more about them and any recordings or performances of them online that you may listen to and join in the celebration.
  • Warm-up exercises will include tapping my foot and singing along to this song, which will be a lot of fun.
  • That upbeat and joyous song is just what I’ve been looking for to help me get through the last few days of vacation and the last few days of family reunions around the Christmas table.
  • So, once more, Merry Christmas!

“Jesus, What a Wonderful Child,” African American traditional, arr. Jeffrey Radford (Pilgrim Press, 1992), and in Evangelical Lutheran Worship (Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 2006), page 297.

Handbell World

Like part of my spiritual practices, I plan to reflect on a hymn or song each day throughout the Twelve Days of Christmas, much as I did during the Advent season. In conversation with my spiritual director, I decided to leave space for both “the mind stuff” and “the heart thing.” I’m not sure where all of these reflections will lead me, but I’m going to try to make time for both “the head stuff” and “the heart stuff.” One or the other may predominate on some days. Invite you to join me as we create space to listen and be present in order to sense what God may be up to.

  1. On this Sixth Day of Christmas, may you be blessed!
  2. After bidding goodbye to family in Washington, the journey continued to Nebraska via a flight back to the Midwest.
  3. When it comes to these excursions, there is never enough time.
  4. Pictures from a Baby Shower held this past week, with a perfect statement in the background to remind us that it is truly chilly outdoors.
  5. sizes=”(max-width: 442px) 100vw, 442px”> Pictures from a Baby Shower this past week— with a fitting phrase in the background— The midwest is experiencing some frigid weather this weekend, if you haven’t already heard about it.
  6. This evening, a number of members of my congregation joined them.
  7. I was particularly looking forward to a great jazzy and gospel postlude improvisation on “Jesus, What a Wonderful Child,” which I will not be doing.

Even though the actual temperature is around -20 degrees Fahrenheit, and the windchill is maybe even lower, it is not safe to have people outside at this time of year.

A fantastic chant goes something like this: “Jesus, Jesus, what a magnificent kid you are.” It will be the kid who will bring fresh life and new hope, Jesus, Jesus, who is so holy, humble, and mild.

It is a song with many verses.

Find out more about them and some recordings or performances of them online that you may listen to and participate in the celebration.

Warm-up exercises will include tapping my foot and singing along to this song, which will be a lot of fun for me!

It’s just the upbeat and joyous song I’ve been looking for to help me get through the last few days of vacation and the last few days of Christmas family reunions.

Consequently, Merry Christmas to you again!

“Jesus, What a Wonderful Child” is a traditional African American song, arranged by Jeffrey Radford (Pilgrim Press, 1992).

Composer:Spiritual Arranger:Hurlbutt, Patricia Octaves:3-5 Level:3 Rating:Medium Copyright:2020
Season:Christmas
Classification:Church or Concert, Concert, Spiritual
Technique:Mallet, Echo, RT (Ring Touch), Sk (Shake), LV (Let Vibrate), Martellato
Voicing:Handbells, No Choral

Jesus What A Wonderful Child Chords

D is the original key. Tempo:104 DG7DA7 DG7DA7 What a great youngster DBm7E7A7 is, Jesus, Jesus, what a wonderful child. Jesus, Jesus, how modest, meek, and kind he appears to be DD7 GG dim7Won’t you take a moment to listen to the angels sing about fresh life and new hope for everyone He brings? D/AADEm7D/FGlory, glory, and much more glory – – – ry GD/AA7DA7 – – – ry GD/AA7DA7 – – – ry GD/AA7DA7 – – – ry GD/AA7DA7 Greetings to the newly minted KingDG7DA7 What a great youngster DBm7E7A7 is, Jesus, Jesus, what a wonderful child.

DBm7 The virgin Mary E7A7 has been selected to be His mother.

There were three wise men who arrived from far away GG dim7.

in order to view the baby where He was lying GD/AA7DA7 In a hay-filled manger was born Jesus.

Jesus, Jesus, O What a Wonderful Child

Vicki Hancock Wright’s arrangement of the classic spiritual, which is filled with enthusiasm, is a crowd-pleaser. This gospel jewel, which has been arranged for SATB and children’s choirs, will be a highlight of any Christmas service. The lyrics include the phrase “The Light of the World Is Jesus,” which has been adapted to a new music that demonstrates the growing interplay between children and adults in the chorus. It all comes together in a lively, rhythmic finale thanks to a vivid key shift and optional tambourine that gives it that gospel feel.

See also:  Where You Go I Ll Go Jesus Culture

In combination with the Keep on Singing: Short Stories, Tall Tales, and Truths – Elementary curriculum, this arrangement can be used.

A minimum of ten (10) copies of digital download anthems must be purchased.

Product Name Qty
Jesus, Jesus, O What a Wonderful Child (Print)$2.10
Jesus, Jesus, O What a Wonderful Child (Download)$2.10
Jesus, Jesus, O What a Wonderful Child Demonstration MP3$1.99
Jesus, Jesus, O What a Wonderful Child Split Track MP3$9.99
Jesus, Jesus, O What a Wonderful Child Accompaniment MP3$9.99
Jesus, Jesus, O What a Wonderful Child Anthem Orchestration$25.00

Jesus, oh what a wonderful child — Hymnology Archive

I. The first recording and publication of the work In 1941, at the age of nineteen, Philadelphia singer Margaret Wells Allison(1921–2008) began her gospel career by accompanying a group known as the Spiritual Echoes. However, just a few years later, she had an idea for her own group, which she formed in 1947. Her sister Josephine Wells McDowell joined her in forming a new gospel quartet, The Angelic Gospel Singers, in 1944. Ella Mae Norris and Lucille Shird were members of the Spiritual Echoes at the time of their recruitment.

Over the course of five years, from 1949 to 1954, the ensemble produced 50 tracks on 78-rpm recordings, which were released in the United States (25 2-sided discs).

Horace Clarence Boyer described their overall sound as being “the old-fashioned southern style of church music, gospel, and hymns,” with “percussive attacks, pitch sliding from one note to the next, vocal interjections by each member of the group, and repeated repetition of any portion of the song that struck a spiritual chord,” among other things.

  • The quartet was accompanied by a softly swinging piano and electric organ on the original recording; Margaret Allison was the pianist, while Doc Bagby, who was uncredited as the organist, was most likely responsible for the organ work.
  • The songwriter credit on the original 78-rpm record was given simply as “Carney,” while the composer credit was given to “H.
  • Carney.” The formal registration of the sheet music with the Library of Congress, dated November 28, 1950, was filed under the name Harry Bagby, with the alias “H.
  • The song was therefore ascribed to Bagby, at least originally, but the story behind it has evolved through time to reveal a different story altogether.
  • Additional recordings by the Angelic Gospel Singers are included in Part II.
  • They ultimately re-recorded their Christmas song and released it as a 45-rpm single in 1968 (No.
  • On the album Nashville Nativity: A Christmas Gospel Collection, Vol.

Allison,” and it was credited to “M.

Margaret Allison’s unique piano stylings set the same framework as before; this time, the vocals were provided by her and her sister, as well as Thomas Mobley, who had previously performed with her.

In 1982, the Angelic Gospel Singers signed a recording contract with Malaco Records, based in Jackson, Mississippi, which would last until 1985.

(MAL 4404, 1985).

Allison’s well-known piano was accompanied by an electric organ, an electric bass, a moderate electric guitar, and drums, resulting in a musical style that was almost unchanged.

The members of the group at the time were reportedly Margaret Allison, Josephine McDowell, Bernice Cole, and Pauline Turner, as well as Darryl Richmond (bass) and John Richmond (drums), according to the records (guitar).

Allison was either forced to sell the rights to the song in a deal she could not have fully appreciated at the time, or she was forced to sell them in a deal she could not have fully appreciated at the time because Bagby was in a position of authority over a relatively young group that was unfamiliar with the legalities of the recording industry.

  • Whatever transpired between them, by 1968 Allison had plainly decided that Bagby did not deserve any credit, and his name was deleted from any further recordings (Bagby died in 1970).
  • A New Creation: Leader’s Edition, where it was referred to as “Sing!” A New Creation: Leader’s Edition” (Grand Rapids: Faith Alive, 2002).
  • Allison’s granddaughter, Monica Allison, described the scenario from her grandmother’s point of view, as follows: Nana stated at the time of the writing that she was unaware of the concept of masters or, as she put it, “any of the legal crap,” and that she was just concerned with the music.
  • The Dixie Hummingbirds and her were planning to perform together, and they had cooperated on the arrangement, she informed me at the time.
  • An entire song would come to her, and she’d continue to play until she got the tone she was looking for.
  • Between then and now, the song had become very popular among gospel choir members, albeit it was rarely given fair credit.
  • This challenge has been worsened by the fact that the song is more commonly associated with the first line of the chorus than than the final, making it more difficult to trace its origins.
  • Charles G.
  • It was titled “Jesus, oh what a lovely kid,” and the song was lengthened to seven minutes by the addition of a gospel vamp.

The song first featured on an album by Luther Barnes and the Red Budd Gospel Choir, It’s Christmas Time Again(Atlanta International Records AIR 10150, 1989), and was attributed as “Public Domain, Arranged by Luther Barnes.” It is also known by the variant title “It’s Christmas Time Again.” An whole new verse and vamp were added to Barnes’ version, which was imbued with a 1980s-style funk vibe.

1994).

Publication in hymnals, number four.

The song was first published in a hymnal in 1995, in The New Century Hymnal, where it was referred to as a “African-American traditional.” It was arranged by Jeffrey Radford (1953–2002), music director at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, and was published under the title “African-American traditional.” Unlike the other versions, this one had an unique modification on the last line: “Glory, glory, glory, let the skies ring,” which has no known precedent and might have been added by the hymnal’s editors.

See also:  What Does Jesus Mean To You

Robert L.

Radford’s arrangement, as well as the traditional attribution, were included in various collections, including This Far by Faith(1999), Sing!

Oddly enough, when the song was published in the PresbyterianGlory to God(2013), the harmonization was credited to Radford, but the arrangement was credited to Horace Clarence Boyer, 2000, the same scholar who had written about the song in 1995 and knew its source, and yet the hymnal’s commentary stated, “Specific sources for the words and music of this piece from the African American heritage remain uncertain.” Because of the predictable lyrics, it’s possible that the song was inspired by an existing Christmas carol.” “This text comes out of the African American tradition, possibly from the twentieth century,” wrote editor Carl P.

Daw Jr.

Glory hallelujah to the newborn King,” published as early as 1949, are both possible antecedents to the song.

Other Precursors This song, which was recorded in 1950 and was practically a completely new song at the time, should not be confused with idioms that were familiar to Margaret Allison and/or Harry Bagby at the time of its recording.

in collaboration with C. MICHAEL HAWN for the Hymnology Archive and The Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology. 20th of January in the year 2021

Footnotes:

  1. In addition to Viv Broughton’s Black Gospel: An Illustrated History of the Gospel Sound(1985), pp. 74 and 112, Horace Clarence Boyer’s How Sweet the Sound: The Golden Age of Gospel(1995), pp. 112
  2. Library of Congress,Catalog of Copyright Entries: Published Music, Ser 3, Vol. 4, Pt. 5A, No. 2 (June–December 1950), p. 435:Archive.org
  3. Sher “Jesus, Jesus, O what a wonderful child,”Glory to God: A Companion(2016), p. 130
  4. Jeannette Robinson Murphy, “The true negro music and its decline,”Independent55 (23 July 1903), 1723–1730:HathiTrust
  5. Hall Johnson, “Glory hallelujah to de new born King,”Thirty Spirituals(NY: G. Schirmer, 1949), pages 80–82
  6. And Carl

Related Resources:

On page 435 of the Library of Congress’ Catalog of Copyright Entries: Published Music, Ser. 3, Vol. 4, Pt. 5A, No. 2 (Washington, DC: Copyright Office, July–December 1950), the following is written: ” Archive.org On page 74 of Black Gospel: An Illustrated History of the Gospel Sound (New York: Sterling, 1985), Viv Broughton writes: Angelic gospel singers are described in detail in Horace Clarence Boyer’s How Sweet the Sound: The Golden Age of Gospel (Washington, DC: ElliottClark, 1995), pp. 111–113.

  1. Forman’s New Century Hymnal Companion, ed.
  2. Anderson, “Jesus, Jesus, oh what a lovely kid,” p.
  3. Anderson’s “Jesus, Jesus, oh what a magnificent child” is quoted.
  4. McNiel’s Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K.
  5. 13–14.
  6. “RIP: Margaret Allison of the Angelic Gospel Singers,” by Bob Marovich, published in the Journal of Gospel Music on July 31, 2008:JGM.
  7. Daw Jr.’s “Jesus, Jesus, O what a magnificent kid,” in Glory to God: A Companion (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2016), p.

History of Hymns: ‘Jesus, Jesus, Oh, What a Wonderful Child’

Written by C. Michael Hawn “Jesus, Jesus, Oh, What a Wonderful Child” (“Glory to the Newborn King”) is a song about the birth of Jesus. Margaret Wells AllisonWorshipSong, 3060, Margaret Wells AllisonWorshipSong What a lovely child, Jesus, Jesus, oh what a great child. Jesus, Jesus, so holy, gentle, and peaceful; fresh life, and new hope will be brought by the infant. “Glory, glory, glory!” sings the angel, and it’s a beautiful song. Allow the sky to resound. The hymn “Glory to the Newborn King” is classified as “Traditional African American” in the majority of hymnals, and as a “African American Spiritual” in a few others.

This name does not appear in any spiritual collections, including the monumentalLyrics of the Afro-American Spiritualedited by Erskine Peters, which contains a section titled “Lyrics of the Afro-American Spiritual” (Westport, CN, 1993).

James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938), an African American poet and scholar, discusses the historical and social context of the Christmas holiday in the antebellum South: Johnson goes on to say that such a celebration “destroyed in the minds of the slaves any idea of connection between the birth of Christ and his life and death” (Johnson, 1969, p.

  • As a result, only two Christmas-related spirituals are included in the two collections of 120 spirituals published by Johnson and his brother J.
  • Helena Island (South Carolina).
  • As such, he believed that Africans enslaved in the Americas viewed Jesus as strong Savior, as shown, for example, in the song “Ride On, King Jesus,” rather than as a helpless child.
  • This author has remarked on various times that works created by African Americans throughout the nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century are frequently referred to as “traditional” for a variety of reasons, including the fact that they were written in English.
  • As a result, the author is no longer known.
  • Throughout the 1960s, this was the case.
  • Margaret Wells Allison (1921-2008), a South Carolina native who came to Philadelphia when she was four years old, was the organization’s founder and head.

Because of her little piano training throughout her primary school years, she was given the opportunity to perform at the B.

Oakley Memorial Church of God.

Allison’s pastor advised that she start her own gospel group, and she did so in 1944, creating the Angelic Gospel Singers, which continued to sing until Allison’s death in 2005.

A suggestion from their publicist was that they should create their own sound by recording a song that no one else had previously recorded.

The single recording from 1949 was a huge commercial success (Cummings, 2011, n.p.).

The Angelic Gospel Singers were a hallmark group among Pentecostal Christians in the United States, and by 1949, they were well-known across the gospel music community.

“Glory to the New Born King,” writes Boyer, “became as popular in evangelical music circles as ‘White Christmas’ is in the commercial music world, despite the fact that its early success was not obvious” (Boyer, 1995, pp.

A listing of the Angelic Gospel Singers’ records suggests that they released a single record in 1952 that had the songs “Glory, Glory to the Newborn King” on one side and “Jesus Christ Is Born” on the other (Angelic Gospel Singers,Wikipedia, n.p.).

2008, n.d.) (Manovich, 2008, n.d.) The hymn “Glory to the Newborn King” and the song “Jesus, Jesus, Oh, what a lovely child” were once thought to be the same, with the latter perhaps being a later rendition (McIntyre, 2013, n.p.).

See also:  How Did Jesus Christ Die

While not including “Glory to the Newborn King,” an additional 1997 performance, “The Angelic Gospel Singers!

According to reports, the song was first extensively recognized and recorded after Mariah Carey included it on her albumMerry Christmas(1994).

When you listen to Carey’s performance on the audio (), you can hear how much she values Pentecostal performance practice.

Choir (a worldwide denomination located in Jacksonville, Florida), which demonstrated the song’s crossover potential to larger audiences ().

Mariah Carey delivers a slightly modified rendition of the song, saying, “He provides fresh life, new hope, and new joy.” During the repetitions of the refrain, Allison inserts a single soloistic verse between them.

The following are Mariah Carey’s textual variants, which are included in brackets: The angels announced his arrival.

The Virgin Mary has been selected as his mother, and Joseph has been chosen as his earthly father.

An improvised bridge, written by Carey in a more contemporary Pentecostal style, has also been added, with the following words: Oh Jesus, Jesus, Mary’s baby, Lamb of God, Heavenly Child,Jesus, Jesus, I Love Him; Oh Jesus, Almighty God, King of kings; Oh Jesus, Oh Jesus, Oh, oh, oh, Jesus; Oh Jesus, Oh Jesus, Oh, oh, Jesus; Oh Jesus, Oh Jesus, Oh, Exceptional, exceptional individual Oh, oh, Oh Jesus, Oh Jesus, Son of God;Oh Jesus, Glory, Glory, Glory to the new born King, yes;Oh Jesus, Glory, Glory, Glory to the new born King, yeah;Oh Jesus, Glory, Glory, Glory to the new born King, yeah; The vocal arrangement for various hymnals was composed by Jeffrey Radford (1953-2002), a Chicago-born musician who studied organ under Robert Wooten, Sr., the director of the Wooten Chorale.

  1. Radford was a member of the Wooten Chorale from 1982 to 1992.
  2. Jeremiah Wright to build the music department.
  3. 78-79).
  4. The angels’ hymn, ‘Glory, glory, glory,’ has a rising melody that reaches a climax on a D.” (McIntyre, 2013, n.p.).
  5. It is noteworthy that, with the exception of This Far by Faith(1999), it does not feature in any conventional African American hymnals, which may be due to the song’s early relationship with Pentecostal traditions.
  6. a New Creation(2001) includes the refrain with Radford’s vocal parts and an accompaniment by Horace Clarence Boyer.
  7. The author was unable to discover any additional connections between Bagby and this song.

Several mainstream hymnals from the twenty-first century have added the refrain since then. The original stanza sung by the Angelic Gospel Singers is clearly soloistic in nature and, as a result, is not included in any hymnal collection.

Sources

“Angelic Gospel Singers,” according to Wikipedia: How Sweet the Sound: The Golden Age of Gospel Music (Horace Clarence Boyer, How Sweet the Sound: The Golden Age of Gospel Music) (Washington, D. C.: Elliott and Clark Publishing, 1995). “Angelic Gospel Singers: Margaret Allison is still singing ‘Touch Me, Lord Jesus,'” says Tony Cummings in Cross Rhythms magazine (April 3, 2011),. The Books of African American Spirituals, Vol. 2 (James Weldon Johnson and J. Rosamond Johnson), is a collection of spirituals written by African Americans (New York: The Viking Press,1969).

“Jesus, Jesus, Oh, What a Wonderful Child,” by Dean McIntyre, published by Discipleship Ministries (September 5, 2013),.

Hymnal Companion: Evangelical Lutheran Worship (Paul Westermeyer, Hymnal Companion: Evangelical Lutheran Worship) (Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 2010).

Michael Hawn, D.M.A., F.H.S., is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and Adjunct Professor at Southern Methodist University’s Perkins School of Theology, as well as the Director of the Doctor of Pastoral Music Program at the university.

Jesus Oh What a Wonderful Child

Jesus, what a wonderful child you are. is the eleventh and final tune fromMariah’s debut Christmas album, Merry Christmas, which was released in November. Columbia Records released the song on November 1, 1994, and it became a hit. Additionally, Maria and Walter Afanasieff worked together to create the music.

Background

“Jesus, Oh What a Wonderful Child” is a Christmas song in the style of Black Gospel music that has no documented origin. Traditional African American origins are claimed by several collections (includingWorshipSong) for this particular song. In at least one source, Sister Margaret Allison of the Angelic Gospel Singers, an African American recording and performance group in the early 1950s, is credited with writing the song, however this cannot be verified. “Glory to the Newborn King,” Allison’s original song recorded with the Angelics on Gotham Records, may have evolved into “Jesus, Oh, What a Wonderful Child” over the course of her career.

Also recorded by Gladys Knight, and sung by the Three Mo’ Tenors on their PBS television special, this song is a favorite of many people.

Lyrics

Jesus, Jesus, Jesus Oh, what a great child you have. Jesus, Jesus, Jesus So gentle, meek, and mildHe provides fresh life, new hope, and new joyWon’t you take a moment to listen to the angels sing? Glory, glory, and more glory Greetings to the newly minted King Jesus, Jesus, Jesus Oh, what a great child you have. Jesus, Jesus, Jesus So gentle, meek, and mildHe provides fresh life, new hope, and new joyWon’t you take a moment to listen to the angels sing? Glory, glory, and more glory Greetings to the newly minted King The angels sang a song of praise for him.

His mother was the virgin Mary, and his earthly father was Joseph, both of whom were saints.

They were led by a guiding light in the sky.

Jesus, Jesus, Jesus Oh, what a great child you have.

Glory, glory, and more glory Greetings to the newly minted King Oh, my Jesus.

Heaven’s blessing on you, kid.

King of kings, the most powerful person on the planet Oh, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus Oh, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus Exceptional, exceptional individual Oh, oh, Jesus, how I love you.

WooJesusOh, Jesus, wooJesus JesusJesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus Jesus, Jesus, and more Jesus Jesus, Jesus, and more Jesus Oh, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus Jesus, Jesus, and more Jesus Jesus, Jesus, and more Jesus Jesus OhOh, JesusOh, JesusOh, JesusOh, JesusOh, JesusOh, JesusOh, JesusOh, JesusOh WooJesusJesusJesusJesus JesusJesusWhoa

Trivia

  • This song was first published on November 1, 1994
  • The author of this song is now unknown
  • It was written by This song was written and produced by Mariah and Walter Afanasieff.

References

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