In Which Of The Gospels Is The Fourth Trial Of Jesus Recorded

In which of the Gospels is the fourth trial of Jesus recorded? – Brainly.com

When asked why Georgia’s capital has changed throughout history, which option best explains the situation. A. The capital was relocated in order to ensure that it would be secure from Indian attack.s. B. The capital was relocated to guarantee that it remained in close proximity to the state’s population core. In order to ensure that the capital remained in the geographic center of the state, it was relocated. D. The capital was relocated in order to provide each area of Georgia the opportunity to serve as the state’s capital.

a.

Savannah, Augusta, Louisville, Macon, and Atlanta b.

Savannah, Augusta, Louisville, Milledgeville, and Atlanta d.

  • _1820/1850PLS HELP Why were people going along the California Trail in the first place?
  • MARKING THE MOST BRAINLIKE!
  • It will take several hours to complete this task.
  • Who knows what Rodrigo was thinking when he snapped these photos, but it’s a good guess.
  • A large number of photographs will be taken to capture the entire.family as well as the enjoyable activities that they have scheduled.
  • MARKING BRAINLIEST ON EVERYTHING IS APPROPRIATE!
  • Ann is photographing bookmarks for her cousin’s web company, which she is helping to run.

What sort of photography is most likely being practiced by Ann at this time?

QUICK!

lt;33 Zhang intends to capture landscapes as part of his project.

To see the online content, please click here.

Continue reading for answers to other questions.

a passage from the reading that describes Robert Kennedy’s stance on civil rights

The Four Gospel Accounts of the Trial of Jesus Before Pontius Pilate (King James Version)

Specifics are available upon request (Click forRevised Standard Version)

Mark 15(Verses 1-15)1 And straightway in the morning the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered him to Pilate. 2 And Pilate asked him, Art thou the King of the Jews? And he answering said unto them, Thou sayest it. 3 And the chief priests accused him of many things: but he answered nothing. 4 And Pilate asked him again, saying, Answerest thou nothing? behold how many things they witness against thee. 5 But Jesus yet answered nothing; so that Pilate marvelled. 6 Now at that feast he released unto them one prisoner, whomsoever they desired. 7 And there was one named Barabbas, which lay bound with them that had made insurrection with him, who had committed murder in the insurrection. 8 And the multitude crying aloud began to desire him to do as he had ever done unto them. 9 But Pilate answered them, saying, Will ye that I release unto you the King of the Jews? 10 For he knew that the chief priests had delivered him for envy. 11 But the chief priests moved the people, that he should rather release Barabbas unto them. 12 And Pilate answered and said again unto them, What will ye then that I shall do unto him whom ye call the King of the Jews? 13 And they cried out again, Crucify him. 14 Then Pilate said unto them, Why, what evil hath he done? And they cried out the more exceedingly, Crucify him. 15 And so Pilate, willing to content the people, released Barabbas unto them, and delivered Jesus, when he had scourged him, to be crucified. John 18(Verses 28-40)19(Verses 1-22)28 Then led they Jesus from Caiaphas unto the hall of judgment: and it was early; and they themselves went not into the judgment hall, lest they should be defiled; but that they might eat the passover. 29 Pilate then went out unto them, and said, What accusation bring ye against this man? 30 They answered and said unto him, If he were not a malefactor, we would not have delivered him up unto thee. 31 Then said Pilate unto them, Take ye him, and judge him according to your law. The Jews therefore said unto him, It is not lawful for us to put any man to death: 32 That the saying of Jesus might be fulfilled, which he spake, signifying what death he should die. 33 Then Pilate entered into the judgment hall again, and called Jesus, and said unto him, Art thou the King of the Jews? 34 Jesus answered him, Sayest thou this thing of thyself, or did others tell it thee of me? 35 Pilate answered, Am I a Jew? Thine own nation and the chief priests have delivered thee unto me: what hast thou done? 36 Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence. 37 Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice. 38 Pilate saith unto him, What is truth? And when he had said this, he went out again unto the Jews, and saith unto them, I find in him no fault at all. 39 But ye have a custom, that I should release unto you one at the passover: will ye therefore that I release unto you the King of the Jews? 40 Then cried they all again, saying, Not this man, but Barabbas. Now Barabbas was a robber.
Pontius Pilate by Giotto (1305) John 191 Then Pilate therefore took Jesus, and scourged him. 2 And the soldiers platted a crown of thorns, and put it on his head, and they put on him a purple robe, 3 And said, Hail, King of the Jews! and they smote him with their hands. 4 Pilate therefore went forth again, and saith unto them, Behold, I bring him forth to you, that ye may know that I find no fault in him. 5 Then came Jesus forth, wearing the crown of thorns, and the purple robe. And Pilate saith unto them, Behold the man! 6 When the chief priests therefore and officers saw him, they cried out, saying, Crucify him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Take ye him, and crucify him: for I find no fault in him. 7 The Jews answered him, We have a law, and by our law he ought to die, because he made himself the Son of God. 8 When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he was the more afraid; 9 And went again into the judgment hall, and saith unto Jesus, Whence art thou? But Jesus gave him no answer. 10 Then saith Pilate unto him, Speakest thou not unto me? knowest thou not that I have power to crucify thee, and have power to release thee? 11 Jesus answered, Thou couldest have no power at all against me, except it were given thee from above: therefore he that delivered me unto thee hath the greater sin. 12 And from thenceforth Pilate sought to release him: but the Jews cried out, saying, If thou let this man go, thou art not Caesar’s friend: whosoever maketh himself a king speaketh against Caesar. 13 When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth, and sat down in the judgment seat in a place that is called the Pavement, but in the Hebrew, Gabbatha. 14 And it was the preparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour: and he saith unto the Jews, Behold your King! 15 But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but Caesar. 16 Then delivered he him therefore unto them to be crucified. And they took Jesus, and led him away. 17 And he bearing his cross went forth into a place called the place of a skull, which is called in the Hebrew Golgotha: 18 Where they crucified him, and two other with him, on either side one, and Jesus in the midst. 19 And Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS. 20 This title then read many of the Jews: for the place where Jesus was crucified was nigh to the city: and it was written in Hebrew, and Greek, and Latin. 21 Then said the chief priests of the Jews to Pilate, Write not, The King of the Jews; but that he said, I am King of the Jews. 22 Pilate answered, What I have written I have written.
Matthew 27(Verses 1-26)1 When the morning was come, all the chief priests and elders of the people took counsel against Jesus to put him to death: 2 And when they had bound him, they led him away, and delivered him to Pontius Pilate the governor. 3 Then Judas, which had betrayed him, when he saw that he was condemned, repented himself, and brought again the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders, 4 Saying, I have sinned in that I have betrayed the innocent blood. And they said, What is that to us? see thou to that. 5 And he cast down the pieces of silver in the temple, and departed, and went and hanged himself. 6 And the chief priests took the silver pieces, and said, It is not lawful for to put them into the treasury, because it is the price of blood. 7 And they took counsel, and bought with them the potter’s field, to bury strangers in. 8 Wherefore that field was called, The field of blood, unto this day. 9 Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying, And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value; 10 And gave them for the potter’s field, as the Lord appointed me. 11 And Jesus stood before the governor: and the governor asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And Jesus said unto him, Thou sayest. 12 And when he was accused of the chief priests and elders, he answered nothing. 13 Then said Pilate unto him, Hearest thou not how many things they witness against thee? 14 And he answered him to never a word; insomuch that the governor marvelled greatly. 15 Now at that feast the governor was wont to release unto the people a prisoner, whom they would. 16 And they had then a notable prisoner, called Barabbas. 17 Therefore when they were gathered together, Pilate said unto them, Whom will ye that I release unto you? Barabbas, or Jesus which is called Christ? 18 For he knew that for envy they had delivered him. 19 When he was set down on the judgment seat, his wife sent unto him, saying, Have thou nothing to do with that just man: for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him. 20 But the chief priests and elders persuaded the multitude that they should ask Barabbas, and destroy Jesus. 21 The governor answered and said unto them, Whether of the twain will ye that I release unto you? They said, Barabbas. 22 Pilate saith unto them, What shall I do then with Jesus which is called Christ? They all say unto him, Let him be crucified. 23 And the governor said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified. 24 When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it. 25 Then answered all the people, and said, His blood be on us, and on our children. 26 Then released he Barabbas unto them: and when he had scourged Jesus, he delivered him to be crucified. Luke 23(Verses 1-25)1 And the whole multitude of them arose, and led him unto Pilate. 2 And they began to accuse him, saying, We found this fellow perverting the nation, and forbidding to give tribute to Caesar, saying that he himself is Christ a King. 3 And Pilate asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And he answered him and said, Thou sayest it. 4 Then said Pilate to the chief priests and to the people, I find no fault in this man. 5 And they were the more fierce, saying, He stirreth up the people, teaching throughout all Jewry, beginning from Galilee to this place. 6 When Pilate heard of Galilee, he asked whether the man were a Galilaean. 7 And as soon as he knew that he belonged unto Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who himself also was at Jerusalem at that time. 8 And when Herod saw Jesus, he was exceeding glad: for he was desirous to see him of a long season, because he had heard many things of him; and he hoped to have seen some miracle done by him. 9 Then he questioned with him in many words; but he answered him nothing. 10 And the chief priests and scribes stood and vehemently accused him. 11 And Herod with his men of war set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate. 12 And the same day Pilate and Herod were made friends together: for before they were at enmity between themselves. 13 And Pilate, when he had called together the chief priests and the rulers and the people, 14 Said unto them, Ye have brought this man unto me, as one that perverteth the people: and, behold, I, having examined him before you, have found no fault in this man touching those things whereof ye accuse him: 15 No, nor yet Herod: for I sent you to him; and, lo, nothing worthy of death is done unto him. 16 I will therefore chastise him, and release him. 17 (For of necessity he must release one unto them at the feast.) 18 And they cried out all at once, saying, Away with this man, and release unto us Barabbas: 19 (Who for a certain sedition made in the city, and for murder, was cast into prison.) 20 Pilate therefore, willing to release Jesus, spake again to them. 21 But they cried, saying, Crucify him, crucify him. 22 And he said unto them the third time, Why, what evil hath he done? I have found no cause of death in him: I will therefore chastise him, and let him go. 23 And they were instant with loud voices, requiring that he might be crucified. And the voices of them and of the chief priests prevailed. 24 And Pilate gave sentence that it should be as they required. 25 And he released unto them him that for sedition and murder was cast into prison, whom they had desired; but he delivered Jesus to their will.
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Trial of Jesus

The judicial process by which Jesus was convicted and sentenced to death following His arrest and trial, first by the Jewish Sanhedrin and later by Pontius Pilate, Roman Procurator of Judea, was known as the trial of Jesus. Despite the fact that all four Gospels are essentially in agreement, the story of Jesus’ trial given by the Synoptic Gospels (Mk 14.53–15.15; Mt 2657–2726; Lk 2254–2325) differs significantly from the version given by the Gospel according to St. John (18.12–19.16). In Mark and Matthew, the trial before the Sanhedrin is divided into two parts, with Peter’s denial occurring between them; in Luke, the denial occurs before his uninterrupted account of a single Sanhedrin trial; and in John, a description of the interview between Jesus and Annas, as well as of the interviews between Jesus and Pilate, but he does not include a description of the actual trial, except for a brief reference to Caiaphas, the actual high priest and son-in-law The wife of Pilate and her dream are only mentioned in Matthew’s account.

  1. Chronology.
  2. The Last Supper, which was likely the Passover dinner of Jesus and His Apostles, is described in the Synoptic accounts as taking place before the trial, on the 14th of the month of Nisan, and the death of Jesus on Friday, the 15th of the month of Nisan.
  3. Despite this, all four Gospels agree that Jesus died on a Friday and that the disciples had gathered for the Last Supper before being arrested.
  4. On the following day, Friday, which was the day of Jesus’ death, it took place on Nisan 15, which meant that it took place on Thursday.

Although the question remains open, one possible solution is the use of two calendars, according to which the Sadducees observed the Passover meal and feast (on the 14th and 15th of Nisan) on Friday and Saturday and the Pharisees observed the two days on Thursday and Friday (the 14th and 15th of Nisan).

  • Regardless of the outcome, given the precarious nature of the matter, the date of Jesus’ execution must be a Friday, either the 14th or the 15th of Nisan, under Pilate’s rule (a.d.
  • The only probable dates for the 14th of Nisan within this time frame are March 18, March 29, and April 3, 33 (all Sundays).
  • 29.
  • 29.
  • There are two alternative dates in the Synoptic story; the Johannine narrative prefers the year 33 a.d.
  • It is proposed that Jesus and His Apostles used the solar calendar that was also employed by the Qumran society, according to which the Passover always fell on a Wednesday, resulting in the Passover dinner being served on Tuesday evening.
  • However, despite the fact that this “chronology of three days” for the trial of Jesus has numerous advantages, including the agreement of many respected sources, it is still considered a minority viewpoint.

After assuming the substance of the Gospel stories to be historically credible and after making adjustments for the differences between each Evangelist, the following is a plausible reconstruction of the sequence of events: In the garden of Gethsemani, Jesus was apprehended at night by Jewish police (probably attached to the Jerusalem Temple guard) and taken first to Annas, who, despite the fact that he had stepped down as acting high priest in a.d.

15, retained the title and continued to wield significant power; five of his sons, as well as a son-in-law (Joseph Caiaphas, a.d.

This interview is recorded only by John (Jn 18.12–14; 19–23), rather than by Caiaphas, to whom he only alludes (Jn 18.24), most likely because John considers it sufficiently described in the Synoptics and also because it serves as a background to his account of Peter’s denial, which he considers indispensable because it contains fulfillment of the denial prediction recorded in Jn 13.38.

If the passage in John 18.19–23 pertains to Annas, the preliminary investigation did not turn up any evidence of Jesus engaging in covert activities against Jewish or Roman authority during this time period.

He was subsequently brought before the Sanhedrin, which was presided over by Caiphas, the reigning high priest and the Sanhedrin’s ex officio president.

Despite the fact that Flavius Josephus, the mishnah, and the talmud all indicate that the Sanhedrin’s regular meeting place was either on the western slope of the Temple mount or in one of the Temple complex’s halls (some scholars speak of a meeting place on the Mount of Olives), the Gospels clearly state that the preliminary planning for Jesus’ arrest and conviction, as well as the trial itself and Peter’s denial, all took place in the house of the high priest (the house of It is possible to reconcile these evidence with the narrative that both Annas and Caiaphas resided in the same palace, which was located close the cenacle.

This would also explain why Jesus was taken to Annas first, rather than the other way around.

The objective of the trial was to condemn Jesus to death.

In Matthew 26.62, Jesus expresses his disinclination to defend Himself against these accusers, indicating that He understood the futility of attempting to defend Himself against individuals whose motives were evident.

Afterwards, the high priest himself demanded that Jesus state unequivocally whether He was indeed the Messiah, the Son of God, i.e., the divinely appointed leader of national restoration and inaugurator of the messianic era described in writings of the Prophets and more prominently in the expectations of later Judaism from the Machabeean period on.

  1. (110).
  2. Jesus’ response served as a death warrant for Him.
  3. According to Mark’s use of the word “v” (14.64), the Sanhedrin’s ruling was a real death sentence; the same word appears in Mt 27.3, where it is used to characterize Judas’ grief upon discovering that Jesus had been sentenced ().
  4. Even if these two latter comments are to be interpreted as forecasts post factum, they are explicit in their portrayal of the nature of the decision they are referring to.
  5. 90), but on the basis of blasphemy as defined by Sadducean legalists, whose influence predominated within the Sanhedrin at the time of Jesus’ trial.
  6. The allegations of blasphemy brought against Jesus in Mark 2.7 and John 10.33 demonstrate that this less benign viewpoint was prevalent at the time of their writing (cf.
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It is important to note that the Old Testament does not define blasphemy, although it does speak about it in general terms (Ex 22:27; Lev 24:11–16; Nm 15.30) According to Matthew 7.28: Mark 1.22; Matthew 2.6–8; the mutual antagonism of Jesus and the legalists persisted from the beginning of the Public Ministry onward.

It is therefore fair to say that the plan against Jesus was the climax of a protracted period during which the powerful legal parties had witnessed Jesus’ rising popularity and therefore decreasing power (see Mt 12:35–37 and Luke 19:47–50).

As a result of this long-standing animosity, it is possible that at least some of the judges at Jesus’ trial were less than completely impartial and were easily influenced by the decisive dialogue between Jesus and Caiphas to bring their attitude to a definitive expression through the imposition of the death penalty.

  1. This sentence of the Sanhedrin was only declaratory under Roman rule; the execution of it was left to the procurator, who, as representative of the Roman imperial court, reserved to himself thejus gladii (the right to fight).
  2. At most cases, the procurators were based in the port city of Caesarea in Palestine, but during festival seasons, they were required to stay in Jerusalem, where they established their court, known as the praetorium, in the palace of Herod.
  3. The Sanhedrists, who had condemned Jesus to death on religious grounds for blasphemy, brought before Pilate charges against Jesus that were of a political nature.
  4. Obviously, they could not expect Jesus to be executed unless and until he was found guilty of a capital offense under Roman law.
  5. Pilate reached the conclusion that Jesus was not guilty of any wrongdoing against Roman law after conducting a thorough investigation.

Finally, however, Pilate acceded to a Jewish threat that his release of Jesus would be reported to the imperial court in Rome as a failure to suppress a possible sedition (crimen laesae majestatis), because Jesus’ acknowledged claim to the title of Messiah, King of the Jews (Jn 19.12–15), and because Pilate was under pressure from the Jews to comply.

  • As a result, he issued the condemnatory order, confirming the death sentence and assigning crucifixion as the method of execution, which was the customary Roman method of punishing treason.
  • J.
  • and F.
  • In a.
  • t.
  • burkill, “The Competence of the Sanhedrin,”Vigiliae christianae10 (1956) 80–96.
  • winter, “Marginal Notes on the Trial of Jesus,”Zeitschrift für die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft und die Kunde der älteren Kirche10 (1956) 116–33.

a.

x.

ed.

pirot et al.

x.

ed.

pirot et al.

lÉgasse, The Trial of Jesus: Jesus’ Vision of God (The Trial of Jesus: Jesus’ Vision of God), 6:1485–87.

m.

sabbe, “The Trial of Jesus before Pilate in John and Its Relationship to the Synoptic Gospels,” J.

Denaux, ed., John and the Synoptics (Leuven 1992), 341–85.

P R Davies and R T White (Peterborough 1992), 341–85. (Sheffield, Eng 1990) Three-hundred-and-fifty-eighth edition, 355–81. R. Gordis, et al., “The Trial of Jesus in the Light of History: A Symposium,”Judaism20 (Winter 1971), 6–74.

What legal trials of Jesus led to His crucifixion?

The night before Jesus was sentenced to death by crucifixion, he was arrested and tried seven times in the Roman court system (some note six based on how these trials are counted). They were as follows: 1. The trial before Annas: The facts of Jesus’ first Jewish trial are found in John 18:12-14, 19-23, which are all found in John 18:12-14. Caiaphas, the high priest, was married to Annas, who was his father-in-law. Secondly, the trial before the High Priest, Caiaphas, is described in all four Gospels (Matthew 26:57-68; Mark 14:53-65; Luke 22:54, 63-65; John 18:24), with Matthew providing the most thorough account.

  • In this second trial, the religious leaders joined together and presented a large number of false witnesses in opposition to Christ.
  • The high priest screamed and ripped his clothing apart, arguing that Jesus had provided evidence sufficient to justify His own execution.
  • The trial before the Sanhedrin: This third Jewish trial is recorded in all three Synoptic Gospels (Matthew 27:1, Mark 15:66-71, and Luke 22:66-71), and it takes place “as soon as the day is light” (Luke 22:66).
  • 4.
  • Pilate determined that Jesus was not guilty of anything worthy of punishment and thus sent Jesus to King Herod.
  • The trial before Herod: This trial is only recorded in Luke’s account (Luke 23:6-12).
  • Jesus was ridiculed by Herod and his troops, and He was brought back to Pilate in a kingly robe as a result.
  • After that, Pilate claimed to have had nothing to do with Jesus’ sentencing, instead delegating responsibility for Jesus’ destiny to the people in the form of enabling them to choice between releasing Jesus or releasing an infamous felon named Barabbas, who had previously been imprisoned.
  • Crucify!” and opted to liberate Barabbas rather than Jesus.
  • In total, three Jewish trials were held, followed by three Roman trials, and the proceedings were concluded with an appeal to the Jewish people, which was approved by a Roman official.

According to Jewish legal norms, various laws were breached throughout the course of the trial, including the following: The Jews had no authority to execute a person, yet Pilate agreed based on their recommendation, 4) trials were not to be held at night, yet Jesus was arrested and tried at night, 5) and a representative was to be appointed, despite the fact that Jesus had no one to represent Him.

The Jews had no authority to execute a person, yet Pilate consented based on their recommendation, and the Jews had no representative.

Truths that are related: What is the source of Christ’s zeal?

Who has responsibility for the killing of Jesus Christ? What are the meanings of Christ’s last seven statements, and what are they about? What are some of the reasons why I should believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ? Return to the page: The Truth About Jesus Christ.

In which of the Gospels is the fourth trial of Jesus recorded?

Deportation is the activity of removing a foreign national from a country. An explanation:Federalism is a mixed-system of governance in which a central government and regional governments work together to ensure that a given country is adequately governed and controlled. In this arrangement, various levels of government rule the same individuals on different levels of authority. The constitution, however, provides that each tier has its own authority in particular topics of law, taxes, and administration, and that each tier has its own jurisdiction in the areas defined in the constitution.

It has something to do with the motto of USem, “E Pluribus Unum.” (meaning/emuem one /em/uem out of many /em/uem) /em in the sense that, despite the numerous colonies and tribes present across the United States, the country remains one and is correctly governed via the use of a system known as Federalism./em Participants for the night watch would be selected by a majority vote of all citizens, as explained in the answer.

One of the reasons was that it was one of the few business centers in the area at the time.

The Trial of Jesus Christ

Defining deportation as the act of expelling an alien from a certain nation To explain further, the term “federalism” is a mixed-system of governance in which a central government works with a regional administration to ensure that a given country is properly controlled. Different levels of government administer the same individuals under this arrangement. The constitution, however, specifies that each tier of government has its own jurisdiction in particular areas of law, taxes, and administration, and that each tier has its own jurisdiction in these areas.

It is also a first in the world.

The expression “meaning/emuem out of many” means “out of many one/em/uem” in this context.

It was one of the few business centers in the area at the time, which was one of the reasons.

Matthew Mark Luke John
Last Supper, first day of the feast of unleavened bread. (Matthew 26:17) Last Supper, first day of the feast of unleavened bread. (Mark 14:12) Last Supper, first day of the feast of unleavened bread. (Luke 22:7) Last Supper, the day before the Passover. (John 13:1)

The Last Supper is the starting point for the tale of Jesus’ trial, according to all four Gospels. The first day of the feast of unleavened bread, also known as the first day of the Passover, is the day on which this event occurs according to the three synoptic Gospels (Matthew 26:17,Mark 14:12,Luke 22:7). Passover was the supper served during the Last Supper, according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke (Matthew 26:19,Mark 14:16,Luke 22:15). The Gospel of John, on the other hand, does not mention that the disciples enjoyed the Passover with Jesus.

It is instead on the day before Passover, according to him, which puts his chronology one day ahead of the other Gospels. (See also John 13:1 and John 18:28) The Prophecy of Peter’s Refusal to Believe

Matthew Mark Luke John
Jesus tells Peter that he will deny him three times before the cock crows. (Luke 22:34) Jesus tells Peter that he will deny him three times before the cock crows. (John 13:38)
They leave for the Mount of Olives.(Matthew 26:30) They leave for the Mount of Olives. (Mark 14:26) They leave for the Mount of Olives. (Luke 22:39) They leave the room. (John 14:31)
Jesus tells Peter he will deny him three times before the cock crows. (Matthew 26:34) Jesus tells Peter he will deny him three times before the cock crows twice. (Mark 14:30)

Again, according to all four Gospels, Jesus, in response to Peter’s assurance that he would never abandon his master, prophesied that Peter would betray him three times that very night (Matthew 26:34,Mark 14:30,. Luke 22:34,John 13:38). In each of the four Gospels, the period at which this prophecy was given appears to be different. Following Mark’s lead, Matthew places it after the Last Supper, on the road to the Garden of Gethsemane. According to both Luke and John, it took place after supper, just before Jesus and his disciples left for the Garden.

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In the Garden of Eternal Happiness

Matthew Mark Luke John
Jesus and the disciples arrive at Gethsemane. (Matthew 26:36) Jesus and his disciples arrive at Gethsemane. (Mark 14:32) Jesus and his disciples arrive at Gethsemane.(Luke 22:40) Jesus and his disciples arrive at the garden.(John 18:1)
Jesus prays, his disciples sleep. (Matthew 26:36-46) Jesus prays, his disciples sleep. (Mark 14:32-42) Jesus prays, his disciples sleep. (Mark 14:32-42) Jesus prays, his disciples sleep. (Mark 14:32-42)
Judas arrives with soldiers from the chief priests and elders.(Matthew 26:47) Judas arrives with soldiers from the chief priests and elders. (Mark 14:43) Judas arrives with soldiers. (Luke 22:47) Judas arrives with soldiers from the chief priests and elders. (John 18:3)
Judas kisses Jesus. (Matthew 26:49) Judas kisses Jesus. (Mark 14:45) Judas kisses Jesus. (Luke 22:47)
Jesus arrested. (Matthew 26:50) Jesus arrested.(Mark 14:46)
One of his disciples cuts off an ear of one of the high priest’s servants. (Matthew 26:51) One of his disciples cuts off an ear of one of the high priest’s servants. (Mark 14:47) One of his disciples cuts off an ear of one of the high priest’s servants.(Luke 22:50) Peter cuts off Malchus’ ear. (John 18:10)
Jesus heals the ear. (Luke 22:51)
Incident with the young man. (Mark 14:51-52)

The events in the Garden of Gethsemane are mostly consistent across the four Gospels. Jesus withdraws to pray alone, and his exhausted followers fall asleep as a result of their exhaustion. This sequence is repeated several times before Judas appears with a group of soldiers. What these soldiers were, whether they were temple guards, members of the Roman guard, or simply a gang of armed men, is not evident from the Gospels, but John does employ language that may be interpreted as implying that Judas was followed by Roman troops.

Only Luke mentions that Jesus healed the man (whom John refers to as Malchus), which would make this the final known healing miracle performed by Jesus.

Adding to the story is an unexplained occurrence involving a young guy who was following Jesus (Mark 14:51-52).

Some have speculated that this young man may be the author of Mark’s Gospel, however there is no evidence to support this theory in the text.

Matthew Mark Luke John
Jesus taken to Caiaphas. The scribes and elders were assembled. (Matthew 26:57) Jesus taken to Caiaphas. The scribes and elders were assembled. (Mark 14:53) Jesus taken to Caiaphas’ palace. (Luke 22:54) Jesus taken to Annas, the father-in-law of Caiaphas. (John 18:13)
Peter follows Jesus to the high priest’s palace. (Matthew 26:58) Peter follows Jesus to the high priest’s palace. (Mark 14:54) Peter follows Jesus to the high priest’s palace.(Luke 22:54) Peter and another disciple follow Jesus to the high priest’s palace. (John 18:15)
False witnesses claim that Jesus said he would destroy the Temple. Jesus silent. High priest asks Jesus if he is the Christ. Jesus answers in the affirmative. High priest tears his clothes, pronounces death sentence. Jesus beaten. (Matthew 26:59-68) False witnesses claim that Jesus said he would destroy the Temple. Jesus silent. High priest asks Jesus if he is the Christ. Jesus answers in the affirmative. High priest tears his clothes, pronounces death sentence. Jesus beaten. (Mark 14:55-65)
Peter’s first denial, accused by a certain damsel. (Matthew 26:69-70) Peter’s first denial, accused by a maid. (Mark 14:66-68) Peter’s first denial, accused by a maid.(Luke 22:56-57) Peter’s first denial, accused by the maid who kept the door.(John 18:17)
Annas sends Jesus to Caiaphas. (John 18:24)
The cock crows. (Mark 14:68)
Peter’s second denial, accused by another maid.(Matthew 26:71-72) Peter’s second denial, accused by another maid. (Mark 14:69-70) Peter’s second denial, accused, possibly, by a man. (Luke 22:58) Peter’s second denial, accused. by unnamed people. (John 18:25)
Peter’s third denial, accused by unnamed people. (Matthew 26:73-74) Peter’s third denial, accused by unnamed people. (Mark 14:70-71) Peter’s third denial, accused by another man.(Luke 22:59-60) Peter’s third denial, accused by a servant of the high priest. (John 18:26-27)
The cock crows. (Matthew 26:74) The cock crows again. (Mark 14:72) The cock crows. (Luke 22:60) The cock crows. (John 18:27)
Jesus looks at Peter. (Luke 22:61)
Peter leaves the palace and weeps. (Matthew 26:75) Peter weeps. (Mark 14:72) Peter leaves the palace and weeps. (Luke 22:62)
Jesus is beaten. In the morning, the council asks Jesus if he is the Christ. He answers in the affirmative. (Luke 22:63-71)

The Jewish council, led by Caiaphas, the high priest, is depicted in all four Gospels as bringing Jesus before them for trial. (Joseph reveals that Joseph Caiaphas was the high priest from 18 to 36 CE, according to the Book of Joseph). The time of the incident, on the other hand, is a bit different according to the Gospels. Both Matthew and Mark indicate that Jesus was brought before the Jewish council, which was convened the same night he was caught, and was found guilty. (2:57 in Matthew 26, 53 in Mark 14:53).

  1. The fact that Peter’s three denials occur before Jesus’ trial by the Jewish Council is significant since all three of Jesus’ other Gospels put Peter’s vows at the same time as his trial.
  2. John acknowledges that Jesus was brought before Caiaphas in the middle of the night.
  3. It was Annas, Caiaphas’s father-in-law, who presided over this hearing (John 18:13).
  4. It is important to remember that Annas was the father of a high priestly family, one of which included Joseph Caiaphas, who was John’s son-in-law.
  5. Consequently, he was able to maintain power over the high priesthood long after he had been ousted.
  6. He does, however, allude to Jesus being carried to Caiaphas in the past tense (John 18:24), which may imply that John is presenting the events in this chapter somewhat out of chronological order, as is possible.
  7. We do not have to infer, however, that Jesus was put on trial by a formal gathering of the Sanhedrin.
  8. When it comes to Peter’s three accusers, there is a little inconsistency in the information provided.
  9. Matthew and Mark refer to his second accuser as another maid (Matthew 26:71-72; Mark 14:69-70), although Luke appears to infer that it was a male (Luke 22:58).
  10. According to Matthew and Mark, the third allegation was leveled by a group of people who were standing on the grounds of the palace (Matthew 26:73-74,Mark 14:70-71).
  11. The third accuser is a solitary man, a relative of the servant who was wounded by Peter in the Garden, according to John (John 18:26-27).

It’s also worth noting that Matthew and Mark state that Jesus was wrongly accused of having spoken against the Temple (Matthew 26:60-61, Mark 14:57-58), although John recounts that Jesus did, in fact, speak these things (John 20:21-22). (John 2:19). Jesus in the presence of Pilate

Matthew Mark Luke John
Jesus taken to Pilate in the morning. (Matthew 27:1-2) Jesus taken to Pilate in the morning. (Mark 15:1) Jesus taken to Pilate. (Luke 23:1) Jesus taken to Pilate.(John 18:28)
Judas returns the money to the priests and hangs himself. The money is used to buy the potter’s field. (Matthew 27:3-10)
Pilate asks Jesus if he is the King of the Jews. Jesus replies in the affirmative. (Matthew 27:11) Pilate asks Jesus if he is the King of the Jews. Jesus replies in the affirmative. (Mark 15:2) Pilate asks Jesus if he is the King of the Jews. Jesus replies in the affirmative. (Luke 23:3) Pilate asks Jesus if he is the King of the Jews. Jesus replies in the affirmative (John 18:33-37)
Jesus accused by the Jews. He does not answer. (Matthew 27:12-14) Jesus accused by the Jews. He does not answer. (Mark 15:3-5)
Pilate sends Jesus to Herod. (Luke 23:7)
Herod questions Jesus. He does not answer. (Luke 23:9)
Jesus dressed in a robe and mocked. (Luke 23:11)
Herod returns Jesus to Pilate. (Luke 23:11)
Pilate offers Barabbas or Jesus. The Jews choose Barabbas. (Matthew 27:15-24) Pilate offers Barabbas or Jesus. The Jews choose Barabbas. (Mark 15:6-15) Pilate intends to release Jesus. The Jews ask for Barabbas instead. (Luke 23:13-25) Pilate offers Barabbas or Jesus. The Jews choose Barabbas. (John 18:39-40)
Pilate washes his hands. (Matthew 27:25)
Jesus whipped, turned over to be crucified (Matthew 27:26) Jesus whipped, turned over to be crucified (Mark 15:15) Jesus turned over to be crucified.(Luke 23:25) Jesus whipped, dressed in a robe and a crown of thorns and mocked. After further interrogation, Pilate hands him over to be crucified. (John 19:1-16)

As previously stated, all four Gospels agree that Jesus was brought before the Roman ruler, Pontius Pilate, following his trial before the Jewish council. According to John, this was done as a result of the Jews losing their right to the execution of their enemies (John 18:31). This argument has traditionally been difficult to support, and the Bible itself appears to be in direct conflict with it. For example, early in the book of Acts, we are told of Stephen’s execution at the hands of the Jewish council.

When Pilate hears that Jesus is a Galilean, he sends him to Herod, the tetrarch of Galilee, which is a twist in the tale that Luke adds to the story (Luke 23:6-7).

Starting from this point on, all four Gospels follow a similar narrative, with the exception of John, who provides a more thorough account of Jesus’ examination by Pilate.

First and foremost, the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke claim that Jesus was brought before Pilate by Jews themselves (Matthew 27:12-14,Mark 15:3-5,Luke 23:1-2).

Because Jesus was killed the day after Passover, according to the three synoptic Gospels, there was no need for the Jews to be worried about ritual contamination on that day.

(Luke 23:16-18).

Finally, it is worth noting that Luke states that Herod was the one who clothed Jesus in a royal robe and made a mockery of him (Luke 23:11), whilst John believes that Pilate was the one who did so (John 19:26–27).

Throughout the trial, Matthew keeps a careful eye on Mark, even to the point of uttering some of the same words as Mark on occasion.

Conclusion The fact that all four Gospels follow a similar general framework suggests that they may be recounting a historical event, which would support this theory.

The following are the contents of the 1997 Curt van den Heuvelto Christianity page.

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