If Jesus Is God Why Did He Pray

If Jesus Is God, Why Did He Pray?

What was the purpose of Jesus’ prayer? As with any solution to a question of this nature, there are a plethora of compelling arguments to explain why the God-man, Jesus Christ, interceded. This is an issue that has been debated by many theologians throughout the history of the church. I believe the answer to this issue is rather straightforward: Jesus prayed because he felt a need to pray at the time.

1. Jesus prayed because God infused in him a spirit of prayer.

In Psalm 22, we see glimpses of numerous aspects of Christ’s life, not simply his crucifixion, which takes up a significant portion of the Psalm’s content. The beginning of Christ’s life of prayer began with his conception. Psalm 22 finds its ultimate completion in Christ, despite the fact that David is the protagonist of the tale. The Father prepared a body for Christ, which was fashioned in the womb of the Virgin Mary by the power of the Holy Spirit. It is apparent that, due to the natural limitations of his humanity, Christ’s early prayer practice was not as developed as it would be towards the conclusion of his life.

The more the amount of experience he had, the more his prayers would evolve in the light of his lessons learned, problems faced, and struggles faced.

  1. His actions of reason were united with the holy ideals developed in his heart by the Holy Spirit, which constituted the basis of his marriage.
  2. From conception, he had cultivated a faith habit that would later manifest itself in specific acts of faith when the circumstances demanded it in response to God and his Word.
  3. 22:9).
  4. But the Father provided him with the means to maintain his religious commitment from the time of his conception till his death.
  5. Because you are the one who stole me from the womb of my mother, I have relied on you since before I was born.
  6. (6:5–6) (Ps.
  7. Christ not only trusted in God from a young age, but he also relied on God before he was born.
  8. It is not just Psalm 22 that speaks of the actuality of Christ’s religious life beginning in the womb, but also Psalm 8: “Out of the mouth of newborns and infants, you have built power because of your opponents, to stop the adversary and the avenger” (Ps.

8:2). God the Father and his people have been able to have a highly personal discussion because of Christ’s person and activity in bringing us to this point in our spiritual journey.

2. Jesus prayed because of who he is in relation to the Father.

When Jesus talks of his Father’s business in his Father’s house in Luke 2, his first recorded words express his devotion to his Father and his commitment to him. “‘Father, into your hands I submit my spirit!'” are the last documented words of Jesus, which express his faith in his heavenly Father. He died after saying this, says Luke, “having breathed his last” (Luke 23:46). Anyone conducting research on Jesus’ prayer life must take into consideration the fact that he prayed to his Father in heaven on an ongoing and ardent basis, something that is particularly evident in the Gospel narratives.

  • When it came to praying to God, addressing him as “my Father” was nearly unheard of during the time of Christ.
  • “At that moment, Jesus exclaimed, ‘I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth.'” The words of Christ take precedence above all else.
  • Given the lack of precedent for loyal Jews addressing God as “Father” in prayer, the extraordinarily devoted Jew addressed to God as “Father” almost entirely in his recorded petitions, a phenomenon that has been seen before.
  • The Aramaic wordabba alludes to a bond between a father and a kid.
  • Jews, on the other hand, would have considered addressing God asabba to be insulting.

In the event that Jesus were not who he claimed to be, we would have good reason to join the Jews in accusing him of blasphemy: “This was why the Jews were seeking all the more to kill him, because not only was he breaking the Sabbath, but he was even calling God his own Father, making himself equal with God” (John 5:18).

The Prayers of Jesus

Based on the substance and form of Jesus’ prayers throughout his earthly ministry, this book instructs readers on the reasons for praying and the types of prayers they should say. Because of the uniqueness of the eternal relationship between the three persons of the Trinity, Christ addressed God as Father in virtually all circumstances, including the most dire: “‘My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will'” (Matthew 26:39). (Matt. 26:39).

Meanwhile, the physical manifestation of the Son opened up a whole new manner of communicating with the Father.

Finally, Jesus prayed to God because God had imbued him with a spirit of prayer, and also because of Christ’s position in connection to his Father, namely, that of being the Son of God, Jesus prayed to God.

There are other reasons as well, but they are the most important in terms of comprehending our Lord’s petitions.

On Christology and the Christian life, he has written several books and given numerous talks all over the world, including in China.

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If Jesus was God, how could He pray to God? Was Jesus praying to Himself?

QuestionAnswer It is necessary to recognize that the eternal Father and the eternal Son had an everlasting relationship before Jesus took on the form of a man in order to understand Jesus as God on earth praying to His Father in heaven. Please read John 5:19-27, especially verse 23, in which Jesus teaches that the Father sent the Son to save the world from sin (also see John 15:10). When Jesus was born in Bethlehem, He did not automatically become the Son of God. He has always been and will continue to be the Son of God from all eternity, and he will continue to be the Son of God indefinitely.

  1. Jesus, along with the Holy Spirit, was always considered to be a member of the trinity.
  2. John 10:30 is the passage in which Jesus teaches that He and His Father are one, which means that He and His Father are of the same substance and have the same essence (John 10:30).
  3. These three people have had, and continue to have, an enduring connection.
  4. While He was tempted by Satan, wrongly accused by mankind, rejected by His own people, and finally executed, He had to learn obedience (Hebrews 5:8) to His Father.
  5. (Mark 1:35, 6:46).
  6. It was through his prayers that He proved that He eventually surrendered to His Father’s will, which was for Him to die on the cross in order to pay the penalty (death) for our transgression of God’s rule (Matthew 26:31-46).
  7. No one has an issue with God the Son praying to God the Father or conversing with God the Father.
  8. In the Gospels, we see how the Son of God, in His humanity, carried out His Father’s purpose and in doing so, paid salvation for His people (John 6:38).
  9. It is our responsibility to follow Christ’s example of prayer.
  10. To execute His Father’s will, even in immaculate humanity, it is crucial to have a strong prayer life, as He demonstrated in this parable of the prodigal son.

Since Christ, as the God-man, required a thriving prayer life, so too should the disciple of Christ today, according to the Bible. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) Is it possible for Jesus, who is God, to pray to God? Was Jesus addressing himself in prayer?

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If Jesus is God why did He pray to theIf Jesus is God why did He pray to the Father to let this cup pass? Father to let this cup pass?

Considering that Jesus is God, why would He beg the Father to remove this cup from His hands?

Bible Answer:

The question “Why did Jesus pray to God the Father?” is one that many people have asked. As a result, it should come as no surprise that the following issue is also raised: “If Jesus is God, why would He beg the Father to let this cup pass?” Alternatively, we may rephrase the issue as follows: “If Jesus is God, why did He petition to the Father to remove this cup off His shoulders?” The information that follows provides answers to all three queries.

God Hides Himself

The majority of individuals are intrigued by mysteries, the uncommon, the strange, and the unknown. For this reason, mystery books, science fiction, the occult, and documentaries about the unknown are all extremely popular genres. However, when the subject of God is brought up, some individuals avoid discussing this enigma. A small number of individuals are convinced that God does not exist, despite the fact that they have not toured the entire universe in search of God. Do you suppose they didn’t take into consideration the fact that God cannot be seen?

  • You are, without a doubt, a God who conceals Himself.
  • It is not feasible to assert objectively that God does not exist in the universe.
  • Because if someone did see God, they would not be living to tell anyone about it, that is the explanation.
  • This means that we will never be able to fully comprehend our God.
  • God exists in three distinct persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
  • This riddle is complicated by the fact that Christ Himself disclosed that He is God, and the Jewish authorities recognized His claim.

According to the text, the Jews responded, “We do not stone You for doing a good service, but for blasphemy; and we stone You because You, being a man, make yourself out to be God.” 10:33 (John 10:33) (NASB) The Bible’s message is that there is only one God, and no other gods exist (Deuteronomy 6:4; Isaiah 43:10; 44:6-8; 45:6; James 2:19).

God, on the other hand, exists in three distinct persons: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. They are the creators of the universe. That is a riddle in and of itself.

Why Did Jesus Pray to God the Father?

Now, if Jesus was God, why would He pray to God in the first place? The fact that Jesus Christ was both a man and a divine being is the key to unlocking the door to understanding why Jesus prayed to God the Father. Jesus was both God and a human being at the same time. When it comes to His Son, who was born of a descendant of David according to flesh and blood, and who was confirmed the Son of God with authority by his resurrection from the dead, Romans 1:3-4 says, Romans 1:3-4 is a biblical passage (NASB) The same principle is expressed in Philippians 2:6-8.

  • The same reality is communicated in Hebrews 2:9-14 as well.
  • According to Hebrews 2:14, He had a physical body made of flesh and blood.
  • During His time among us, He went through the motions of daily life just like any other human being.
  • Christ gained an understanding of what it was like to be a human being.
  • “Why did Jesus pray to God the Father?” we must question ourselves now.
  • He had a praying experience similar to that of a human.
  • Scripture makes it very apparent that God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit are in constant communication with one another (Genesis 1:26).
  • It is a wonder how God, who is one, can converse with the other members of the Trinity while remaining one.
  • He was also a guy, for this reason.

Why Did Jesus Ask the Father to Let This Cup Pass?

Now, what was Jesus’ reasoning for requesting that the cup be removed from him? According to Matthew 26:39, this is exactly what He accomplished. And after a little distance, he dropped to his knees and pleaded, saying, “My Father, if it is possible, please take this cup away from me; nevertheless, not according to my desire, but according to yours.” Matthew 26:39 (KJV) (NASB) His thoughts appear to be on the severe suffering He would soon be experiencing as a result of the tortures and crucifixion He was about to undergo.

He had come to die on the cross in our place, and that is exactly what He accomplished.

Conclusion:

If Jesus is God, why would He petition to the Father to allow this cup to be removed from Him? He prayed because it is the only way for men to speak with their Creator. If Christ had not prayed, then He would not have been a genuine human being in the first place.

Another indication that He was a genuine man is the fact that He requested permission from the Father to let this cup pass. It was His body that perished on the cross when He died. However, when He rose from the dead, the resurrection demonstrated that He was God (Romans 1:4).

Suggested Links:

Jesus Is the Son of God Is Jesus the same person as God in terms of character? Is it possible that Jesus is God if He said, “My Father is greater than I”? Is it true that just the human aspect of Jesus was crucified? What is the significance of Philippians 2:5-8? – Jesus existed as both God and man. Is Jesus the same person as God in terms of character? Is it necessary for me to believe that Jesus is God in order to be saved? What Jesus Taught His Followers About Prayer

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If Jesus is God, why does he pray to God and why does he say, “My God, why have you forsaken me?” – Evidence for Christianity

What is the significance of Jesus praying to God throughout the New Testament, as well as encouraging us to worship God? And why did Jesus cry out, “My God, my God, why have you left me?” if he is the Creator of the universe? Answer: When it comes to addressing what is sometimes called to as the doctrine of the “trinity,” I will have to admit that understanding what the Bible says on this subject is tough to come to terms with at first. In fact, it is not even “logical” in the traditional sense of the word according to human reasoning.

  1. There was a time when there was only one word, and that word was with God, and that word was God.” “The Word became flesh and lived for a time among us,” according to John 1:14, which is farther down the page.
  2. Consider the following scenario: Consider the following scenario: I claimed I am with my wife and I am my wife.
  3. However, at first look, it appears that this is what John has to say about Jesus.
  4. Jesus is the Supreme Being.
  5. Jesus, the Son, and God, the Father are one and the same person (John 10:30).
  6. The Father and the Son do not exist by themselves.
  7. Colossians 1:15-19 and Hebrews 1:1-4 are two passages that provide further detail on this topic.

In this context, to respond to your question, Jesus, despite the fact that he was God, surrendered to the other person of God, his Father, even though he was God (Philippians 2:6, John 12:49-50).

It is he who draws attention to himself, but it is the Father who draws attention to himself much more.

I believe that if you truly knew me, you would be familiar with my Father as well.” I’ll admit that it’s difficult for me to comprehend how it’s possible that Jesus is God and yet he prays to God the Father at first glance.

You may need to chew on this one for a few moments before it sinks in.

“My God, my God, why have you left me?” Jesus cried out from the crucifixion, evoking strong emotions in the listeners.

Furthermore, it may be problematic for someone who recognizes from the text that Jesus is God but does not comprehend the concept of the “trinity.” Is Jesus conversing with himself?

The response is a resounding no, period!

We have sinned.

(See Romans 6:23.) “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,” the Bible says.

If you examine at the tale of Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36-46), you will find that, despite his deity, Jesus battled with what his Father had asked him to do, nevertheless he said, “Not my will, but yours be done,” meaning “not my will, but yours be done.” It is stated in Isaiah 53:6 that “we have all gone astray, like sheep, each of us has turned to his own way; and the Lord has thrown on him the iniquity of us all.” While being killed for our sins on the cross, Jesus placed on his shoulders the weight of the entire world’s guilt.

At this time, the Son, the beloved of the Father, was rejected, and he was forced to bear the wrath and justice of the Father.

No. It is a scream of sorrow rather than a call for knowledge. This, in essence, is the message of the gospel. Dr. John Oakes has a Ph.D.

If Jesus Christ is the One God, Why Did He Talk and Pray to the Father?

Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) was a Swedish philosopher and theologian who opposed the conventional Christian idea of a Trinity of Persons in God (see: “Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.” If Jesus and the Father are not two distinct individuals of God, traditional Christians sometimes wonder, then why does the Bible mention that Jesus talked and prayed to the Father? William Blake’s painting, The Agony in the Garden (1757-1827) ” data-image-caption=”The Agony in the Garden, by William Blake (1757-1827)” data-image-caption=”The Agony in the Garden, by William Blake (1757-1827)” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” data-small-file=” src=” h=418″ alt=” “The Agony in the Garden,” by William Blake (1757-1827),” width=”605″ height=”418″ srcset=”h=418 605w,h=104 150w,h=207 300w,h=531 768w,1024w” sizes=”(max-width: 605px) 100vw, 605px” alt=”The Agony in the Garden, by William Blake (1757-1827)” width=”605″ height=”4 William Blake’s painting, The Agony in the Garden (1757-1827) Also, why does Jesus claim that the Father is aware of things that he is not aware of at times?

For what reason does it appear in the Gospel tale that Jesus has his own personality, knowledge, and desires, which are unique and even different from those of God the Father at times?

  1. The short explanation is that when Jesus prayed to the Father, he was actually speaking to himself. An entirely new understanding of who Jesus was at birth, as well as of the process he went through during his earthly ministry, is required to provide a satisfactory answer.

Let’s take a closer look at both of these responses and see what Swedenborg has to say about them in his own words. Why? Why? Because understanding Swedenborg’s eloquent response to these excellent questions dispels an entire swath of perplexity and confusion about the Gospel story—a perplexity and confusion that has bedeviled Christians for nearly two thousand years and introduced fallacy and chaos into traditional Christian doctrine. Everything begins to fall into place once we comprehend the true, infinitely loving, infinitely wise, and infinitely powerful nature of the One God, who is the Lord God Jesus Christ, and once we comprehend the true, infinitely loving, infinitely wise, and infinitely powerful nature of the One God who is the Lord God Jesus Christ.

As the fog of bewilderment begins to lift, this often gloomy and complex reality begins to make more sense to the observer.

The Simple Answer

In order to provide a straightforward solution to the issue of why Jesus interacted with and prayed to the Father, Swedenborg’s theology is not required. To do so, all that is required is common human experience: Jesus was speaking to himself at the time. People have a habit of talking to themselves. On sometimes, they will even say it aloud. Anyone who goes through life without talking to oneself or herself on several occasions—perhaps several times a day—is doing something wrong, in my opinion.

There are seven instances of the phrase “said to himself” in the Protestant Bible and three more in the Apocrypha, according to a quick search on BibleGateway.

According to Swedenborg’s theology, “the Father” refers to the divine soul, whereas “the Son” refers to the divine body, which is the human incarnation of God.

” for more information.) What is the identity of Jesus Christ?

In Jesus’ parable of the wealthy fool, the Bible also provides an illustration of someone conversing with his or her own spirit: A parable followed, according to which “the land of a rich man yielded abundantly.” “And he pondered, ‘What should I do, since I have no place to keep my crops?'” he wondered aloud.” “I’m going to do this: I’m going to demolish my barns and replace them with larger ones, where I’ll keep all of my grain and other things,” he explained.

And I’ll say to my soul, ‘Soul, you’ve had plenty of food and drink for many years; relax, eat, drink, and enjoy yourself.'” (Luke 12:16-19, italics added) (Italics added) Consequently, the simple answer, which does not even require understanding Swedenborg’s theology, but only a common understanding of human nature (which is an image and likeness of God’s nature, see Genesis 1:26-27), is that Jesus was speaking to himself, and specifically, the Father within him, when he said these things.

The Complex Answer

The intricate solution does need the study of Swedenborg’s theology of the Incarnation (God becoming a flesh-and-blood human being), which has a strong biblical foundation.

Jesus’ dual nature while on earth

Mary was the mother of Jesus, according to the two Biblical stories of his conception and birth, which are found in Matthew 1:18-25 and Luke 1:26-38; 2:1-7, respectively. His father, on the other hand, was not Joseph. As a result, Mary conceived him “by the Holy Spirit,” and the child who would be born of her would be referred to as “the Son of God.” The unmistakable message is that God was Jesus’ biological father. Throughout addition, God is frequently referred to be the Father of Jesus in the New Testament.

  1. His human essence is limited, inherited from his human mother Mary
  2. His boundless divine essence was given to him by his heavenly Father.

These two natures were placed in him in such a way that his finite human nature from Mary served as his exterior self, and his infinite divine nature, which was God, served as his inner self, as shown in the diagram. Swedish philosopher Swedenborg expresses this clearly in his book Secrets of Heaven 1460: His inner aspects were divine, originating with Jehovah, his Father, and his exterior aspects were human, originating with Mary, his mother, who was his mother. Accord to Swedenborg’s theology, it was only because of his limited human nature, which he got from his mother, that Jesus was capable of being tempted by the devil.

The Devil would never be able to touch God’s divine essence on a personal level.

Why?” for more information).

This nature was given to him expressly so that he might confront the Devil on the Devil’s own turf—that is, the fallen human nature, which is vulnerable to sin.

Jesus’ victory over the Devil through temptation

Despite this, according to Hebrews 4:15, even though Jesus was tempted to sin in every manner that we are, he never truly sinned, unlike any other ordinary human being. According to Swedenborg, during Jesus’ earthly existence, every time the Devil approached him via his limited, human nature and tempted him, Jesus conquered the temptation and emerged triumphant in his battle against the Devil (or hell). This may be seen most clearly in Jesus’ temptation by the Devil in the wilderness following his baptism, which occurred after his baptism (Matthew 4:1-11; Mark 1:12-13; Luke 4:1-13).

According to Swedenborg, this was the most important and universal act of Redemption that Jesus performed during his earthly ministry during his lifetime.

If Jesus had not battled against and defeated the Devil, all people on the planet would have perished in eternal damnation, for we humans are incapable of overcoming the immense power of the Devil and hell on our own strength.

Jesus’ process of glorification

This triumph over evil occurred as part of a process that Swedenborg refers to as “glorification,” which is derived from the way the word “glorification” is used in the Gospel of John. Examples include John 7:39, John 12:23, 28, John 13:31-32, and John 14:13. While Jesus was alive, this process of glorification occurred in two fundamental stages that alternated in an alternating cycle throughout his life:

  1. The first state was one of emptying out, or expelling from himself, the finite human nature inherited from his human mother Mary
  2. The second state was one of being glorified, or uniting his human nature with his inner divine nature, which is referred to as “the Father” in the Bible
  3. The third state was one of being glorified, or uniting his human nature with his inner divine nature, which is referred to as “the Son.”

In True Christianity 104, Swedenborg defines the procedure, as well as the end outcomes, in the following way: He was in the process of being emptied out when he was glorified, and he was in the stage of union when he was glorified. The church acknowledges that the Lord existed in two phases during his time on earth: the first was referred to as being emptied out, and the second was referred to as glorification. There are several passages in the Bible that depict this previous condition of being empty out, particularly in the Psalms of David, but also in the Prophets and other writings.

  1. (Isaiah 53:12).
  2. He prayed to the Father while in this situation.
  3. He prayed to the Father, as evidenced by the following passages:.
  4. The following demonstrate that he carried out the Father’s instructions: John 4:34 and 5:30 are two passages that come to mind.
  5. As a matter of fact, when hanging on the cross, Jesus cried out: “My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?” (Matthew 27:46; Mark 15:34; Luke 21:42) Furthermore, it would have been impossible to crucify him if he had not been in this state.
  6. In this state, the Lord appeared to three of his disciples when he was transfigured before them.
  7. In it, he could be found every time he declared that the Father and he were one, that the Father was in him and he was in the Father, and that all things belonging to the Father were his.
  8. There are a number of other passages like this.

Why Jesus sometimes talked and prayed to the Father as if to a separate being

So during his whole earthly existence, Jesus alternated between two states: first, he was in one state, then another, and so on.

  • In one stage, Jesus was more present in and conscious of his finite human nature than he was when he was with Mary. This was the state in which he was susceptible to temptation. Additionally, he had a sense of detachment from the Father, who he perceived as his own inner divine essence when in this state. During this condition, Jesus prayed to the Father as though He were praying to a distinct being
  • During the other state, Jesus was more present in and conscious of his infinite divine essence, which was God the Father. Then he declared that he and the Father are one (John 10:30), that those who have seen him have also seen the Father (John 14:8-9), and that the Father inside him is responsible for his actions (John 14:10).
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He experienced these alternate states of feeling separated from the Father (his own divine soul) when he was more conscious of his finite human side, and feeling one with the Father when he was more conscious of his infinite divine side throughout his lifetime on earth, culminating in his final and greatest temptation, on the Cross, when he exclaimed (quoting the first verse of Psalm 22), “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matthew 27:46; Mark 15:34; Luke 21:42)

Jesus’ full union with the Father

According to Swedenborg, this was the final time Jesus was submerged in his finite human nature by Mary before he was raised to the Father. In winning the final and most difficult temptation, he entirely removed from himself the remaining remnants of his finite human inheritance from Mary, and he was perfectly joined with the divinity of the Father that was within him. Immediately following the Resurrection, and especially after the Ascension to the Father, there was nothing left of that finite human maternal heredity; he had become entirely divine, to the point that Swedenborg refers to him as “the Lord God Jesus Christ.” One last paragraph from Swedenborg’s True Christianity 102 serves as an illustration of this: According to some, the Lord, in his human appearance, was not only the Son of Mary, but also continues to be so today.

Although this is a mistake on the part of the Christian world, it is a necessary one.

As the Lord carried out the deeds of redemption, he separated himself from his mother’s human nature and united himself with a human nature from his Father’s.

According to the following passages, the fact that he never refers to his mother as his mother, and instead refers to his father as his father, indicates that he put off his human nature and put on a divine nature from his father—a divine human nature—instead of referring to his mother as his mother.

  • It is still early in the morning for me” (John 2:3-4).
  • ‘Woman, have a look at your son,’ he remarked to his mother.
  • His mother and siblings were waiting outside for him one day, and they wanted to see him.
  • According to the Bible (Luke 8:20-21; Matthew 12:46-49; Mark 3:31-35).
  • Other scriptures refer to her as his mother, although the Lord himself does not refer to her as such.
  • The difference is that when the process of glorification was completed, which means after his resurrection, he was both completely divine and completely human at the same time.

Another prominent word Swedenborg uses to describe the resurrected and exalted Jesus Christ is “the Divine Humanity,” which means “the Divine Humanity of God.” To summarize the complicated response to all of these good concerns, it is as follows: When Jesus spoke and prayed to the Father as if he were speaking to a distinct entity, he was doing so from the limited, human nature that he inherited from his mother Mary.

However, at the time of his Resurrection and Ascension, Jesus had lost all traces of his limited nature and had become infinite.

Nevertheless, isn’t the orthodox Christian belief of the Trinity derived from the Bible?

We welcome you to read the articles linked below and to browse the other articles on this website in order to get answers to these queries.

  • If Jesus was God, how could God be present in Heaven? It is important to understand what it means to be at the right hand of God. What is the nature of God? What is the identity of Jesus Christ? What about the Holy Spirit, you ask? Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three persons in one. Where may one find a biblical justification for not believing in the theory of the Trinity
  • What does Jesus appear to us like? Is it possible to see God face to face? The Logic of Love: Why God took on the form of Jesus
  • Heaven, Regeneration, and the Meaning of Life on Earth are all topics covered in this book.

How could Jesus pray to God if He is God? Was Jesus praying to Himself?

One of the most important passages in the Bible, Hebrews 2:17, explains how Jesus could pray to God the Father. “As a result, he had to be treated the same as his siblings in every way.” Praying is one of the most essential responsibilities that everyone has. The fact that Jesus was both completely human and completely divine meant that it was only natural that He should pray to His heavenly Father. There are a variety of reasons why Jesus prayed to the Father while still a human being. First and foremost, everyone is called to worship God.

  1. Jesus, in his capacity as our high priest, intercedes on our behalf on behalf of God’s people (Hebrews 2:17).
  2. It is recorded in John 11:41-42 that Jesus was praying to God the Father for yet another reason.
  3. I was aware that you were constantly aware of my presence, but I stated this in order for the others who were standing about to think that you had sent me.” As a result, one of the reasons Jesus prayed to the Father was for the benefit of people who were in His immediate vicinity.
  4. Sometimes the Bible says little more than “Jesus prayed,” but other times we get a glimpse of something more significant.
  5. Within the framework of a prayer, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all revealed in perfect communion with one another.
  6. He prayed to God the Father because it was the right thing to do.
  7. Truths that are related: Is Jesus Christ the Son of God?
  8. What is the theological idea of the hypostatic union and how does it manifest itself?
  9. What do you think are the most compelling arguments supporting the deity of Jesus Christ?

If Jesus is God, who/where does Jesus pray to?

The Westminster Shorter Catechism provides the basis for most of what follows. The Holy Trinity The three distinct Persons of the Trinity are the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit (each have their own consciousness, will etc). They are all connected by a common essence (that is what makes each Person to be God). The substance of God must never be confused with the three Persons, each of whom is God in their own right. God’s essence is not a person; otherwise, we’d have four distinct individuals who are God, each with their own essence.

  • The Bible teaches that there is only one essence and three persons.
  • It’s similar to the concept of a definition.
  • For instance, what exactly is a chair?
  • What do you think about four legs and a square top?
  • and so on till the end of time.
  • So, let us move on from chairs and consider what a rock is.
  • What exactly is a human being?

Is it necessary for a person to be three feet tall?

As you can see, in all of these cases, we are attempting to determine which collection of qualities constitutes the entity we are attempting to describe.

You will discover that defining the essence of anything, even a chair, is incredibly difficult.

If you take away a portion of the definition (the essence), you get something completely different.

God As a result, apply this to God.

As far as being a Spirit is concerned, it means to be a Spirit who is infinite and everlasting in His being, intelligence and power as well as holiness, justice, goodness and truth in a very little way.

However, scanning the Bible yields at the very least the summary that has been provided.

And it is just these three individuals that possess these attributes.

These attributes are at the heart of what it is to be God, and they are the core of who he is.

In the same way that if any item possesses ALL of the features of a chair, we declare that object to be a chair.

And it is for this reason that I can state unequivocally that neither you nor I am God.

However, the Father, Son, and Spirit are individually endowed with every one of the attributes listed above.

They are on an equal footing in terms of power and glory.

When Calvin taught what the Bible has to say about the matter (see hisInstitutes, Book 1 Ch13), it was revolutionary at the time. Today, you can find the same response in any decent Systematic Theology (egCharles Hodge, Louis Berkhoff).

If Jesus is God, why does the Bible talk about Him praying to God?

As a result of the Bible’s affirmation that Jesus is God, it is sometimes puzzling to discover that Jesus addresses God in prayer. It is the case that Jesus was both a genuine man and God, as evidenced by all allusions to him being weary or hungry, weeping, lacking understanding, and so on. Jesus was both a true man and God. God the Son, the second Person of the Trinity, took on Himself the entirety of mankind, with the exception of our sinful nature, when He was conceived in the Virgin Mary.

  • Scripture passages that indicate Jesus’ limitations are related to His human condition.
  • Many others think that even His miracles and supernatural knowledge were made possible by the Holy Spirit, rather than being achieved by switching back and forth between His divine and human natures as some believe.
  • During His time of suffering as the penance for the sin of the world, He was expressing from His human awareness the awful feeling that He was being separated from His heavenly Father.
  • In the midst of this immense mystery, we can only see glimmers of truth that are incomprehensible to human beings.

If Jesus is God, then who did He pray to?

It is an often asked question: If Jesus is God, to whom did he pray? The solution may be found in comprehending the Trinity and the incarnation of Jesus, both of which are discussed more below. The theology of the Trinity holds that there is only one God who exists throughout all of time and space. The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are the three distinct people that make up this one God. It is not three gods, but rather one God who is being worshipped. Each is a unique individual, yet they are all, at their core, divine beings in their natural state.

Time is divided into three parts: the past, the present, and the future.

However, while they are diverse in their own right, they all have the same nature or essence.

The Incarnation

In Christian teaching, the theory of the incarnation states that Jesus, who is the second member of the Trinity, took on human nature and therefore became a man. As stated in the Bible, Jesus is God manifested in flesh: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. and the Word became flesh and lived among us” (John 1:1, 14); and, “For in Him all the whole of Deity resides in physical form” (Hebrews 1:1, 14); and (Col.

2:9). As a result, Jesus has two distinct personalities. He is both God and man at the same time. Despite the fact that Jesus is fully human, He also possesses a heavenly character.

GOD MAN
He is worshiped (Matt. 2:2,11; 14:33; 28:9)He is prayed to (Acts 7:59; 1 Cor. 1:2)He was called God (John 20:28; Heb. 1:8)He was called Son of God (Mark 1:1)He is sinless (1 Pet. 2:22; Heb. 4:15)He knew all things (John 21:17)He gives eternal life (John 10:28)The fullness of deity dwells in Him (Col. 2:9) He worshiped the Father (John 17)He prayed to the Father (John 17:1)He was called man (Mark 15:39; John 19:5).He was called Son of Man (John 19:35-37)He was tempted (Matt. 4:1)He grew in wisdom (Luke 2:52)He died (Rom. 5:8)He has a body of flesh and bones (Luke 24:39)

Jesus, being a man, had a need to pray. In his prayers, He was not praying to himself, but to God the Father, who was listening.

If Jesus was God, how could He pray to God? Was Jesus praying to Himself?

ClarifyShareReport Asked Anonymous on July 1, 2013 (via GotQuestions) The responses from the community are arranged according to how many people voted for them. The greater the number of votes, the higher the position of an answer on the list. The realization that the eternal Father and the eternal Son had an everlasting relationship before Jesus assumed upon Himself the role of God on earth and prayed to His Father in heaven is necessary in order to comprehend Jesus as God on earth praying to His Father in heaven To see the rest of this answer, you must first log in or sign up.

  • Vote for it, share it, and report it.
  • Either to ask for assistance or a favor, or to get directions or instructions.
  • He demonstrated what type of relationship He had with the Father via his actions.
  • ‘And I knew that thou always hearest me: but I spoke it because of the people who were watching, so that they may believe that thou hadst sent me.’ “Father, the hour has come; honor thy Son, so that the Son may also glory thee,” says the Father.
  • His close relationship with the Father is unlike anything else on the face of the earth.
  • Although He was not yet manifested in flesh, it is believed that He was coexisting with the Father in a very close and personal connection even before His birth.
  • Rotimi EWEDEMI is a Bible scholar who is extremely interested in the Bible.
See also:  Who Was Jesus Book

We will know the truth if we adhere to the teachings of the Bible.

The fact is that Jesus is referred to as Mighty God in Isaiah 9:6 and 7 and as Almighty God in Revelation 1:8.

The one who would come to be known as Jesus on the earth was brought down from heaven via Mary’s womb through the power of the holy spirit of God.

Before Jesus descended from heaven, he was subject to his Father, who granted him life in John 5:26 after he had been granted life by the Father.

Furthermore, according to 1Corinthians 15:25-28, Jesus will continue to submit himself to the Father even beyond the Millennium rule.

The things he said or did were things that his Father told him to say or do.

Furthermore, in John 14:28, Jesus stated that his Father was greater than himself, and in John 17:3, Jesus identified his Father as “the one real God.” “Now to the King everlasting, immortal, unseen, the only wise God, be honor and glory for ever and ever,” Paul said in his letter to the Corinthians.

(1 Timothy 1:17 King James Version) The Bible also tells us that God raised Jesus from the grave in Acts 2:24 and 32, which we may read about here.

Here are a few illustrations: God’s command to Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the command of God our Saviour and Lord Jesus Christ, which is our hope; and to Timothy, my own son in the faith: Grace to you and peace to you from God our Father and Jesus Christ our Lord” (1 Timothy 1:12; 1 Timothy 1:13).

“Paul, a servant of God and an apostle of Jesus Christ, according to the faith of God’s elect, and the acknowledging of the truth which is after godliness” “Paul, a servant of God and an apostle of Jesus Christ, according to the faith of God’s elect, and the acknowledging of the truth which is after godliness” (Titus 1:1-2KJV).

Scriptures such as Daniel 7:13-14 affirm the uniqueness of God and Jesus.

The following, however, was also part of his prayer: “I do not pray for them alone, but also for those who will believe in me through their word; that they all may be one, as thou, Father, art in me and I in thee, that they too may be one in us; that the world may believe that thou hast sent me.” Moreover, I have given them the glory that thou hast given me, in order that they may be one, even as we are one: I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the whole world may know that thou hast sent me and hast loved them as much as thou hast loved me.” John 17:20-23 (KJV) (KJV).

  1. Consequently, the “oneness” of Jesus with the Father does not indicate that they are the same person; rather, it refers to their shared purpose and understanding.
  2. It is obvious from the above that, despite the fact that Jesus is divine, his godhood is subordinate to that of God the Father.
  3. The Son of God was resurrected from the dead by God the Father.
  4. Responses received on November 09, 20138 Vote for it, share it, and report it.
  5. We can comprehend the Bible if we walk in the Spirit, rather than in the comprehension of our fleshly intellect, which is what we should do.
  6. For example, a parable is a fantastic example of using earthly wisdom to gain insight into heavenly matters.
  7. Alternatively, you may argue that the Spirit of God is similar to water in that it moves and flows from its head.

Similar to how blood is the life of the body, God’s word serves as the life of the Spirit.

There you have it, the Trinity all rolled into one.

Likewise, when the Spirit of God enters a container, the Spirit takes on the shape of the container’s contents.

As God’s Spirit streamed from his throne into the water during Jesus’ baptism, a dove appeared in the sky above them all.

They have the same spirit, but they manifest themselves in different ways, which allows them to connect with one another.

The Holy Spirit is still seated on the throne of God, and rivers of live waters are still flowing into the hearts of men and women who have accepted Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior, even today.

3 answers received on March 12th, 2014.

John Spinuzzi is a well-known figure in the world of sports.

Keep in mind that God has stated that His methods are higher than ours.

Scripture, on the other hand, indicates that our experience of God is limited to three distinct aspects: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

God, according to the Book of Revelation, has seven spirits, which leads me to believe He is far more complex than we can comprehend.

In light of this, we come to the conclusion that Christ is the Right Arm, or the creative part, of the triune God.

Son = the source of inspiration The Holy Spirit is a channel of communication.

It is reasonable to expect that because that creative part is so much higher than our arms/hands, it will be able to communicate at a much higher level than the human hand.

Your arm doesn’t “want” to endure pain, but if you force it to – say, in order to save your beloved child from the fire – it will obey you, even though the pain is great and is wanting “you” to let it get away from the pain.

Is your arm “you”?

So, Yeshua the Messiah is God, and is the way God creates and reaches us.

He is the fulness of God in that He is fully connected to and subservient to the Command Center, the Father.

Hope this helps, especially those of you who are Muslims and think that true Christ followers have more than one God. God is one God. He is just much more complicated than we give Him credit for. March 07 20142 responses Vote for it, share it, and report it.

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ClarifyShareReport Asked Anonymous, on July 1, 2013 (via GotQuestions) According to the number of votes received, the community’s responses are organized in a hierarchical structure. The greater the number of votes, the higher the position of an answer on the ranking list. The realization that the eternal Father and the eternal Son had an eternal relationship before Jesus took upon Himself the role of God on earth and praying to His Father in heaven is necessary in order to comprehend Jesus as God on earth praying to His Father in heaven To see the rest of this answer, you must first log in or sign up for an account.

san francisco joe franklin Communication with God for the purpose of getting something done is prayer.

What kind of relationship He has with the Father was demonstrated by him.

‘And I knew that thou always hearest me: but I said it because of the people who were watching, so that they would believe that thou had sent me.’ In the words of Jesus: “Father, the hour has come; exalt thy Son, that thy Son may exalt thee as well.” Now, O Father, glorify me with thine own self in the glory with which I shared with thee before the world was created.

The fact that the Lord Jesus is not praying to himself is plainly demonstrated in this passage of Scripture.

1 response on November 9, 2013 Increase the number of votes by sharing this page.

For the sake of clarity, I’d want us to explore the following background information before I respond directly to this enticing question: Jesus said in John 17:17 that the truth is found in God’s word, which is found in the Bible.

Isaiah 9:6 and 7 refer to Jesus as Mighty God, while Revelation 1:8 refers to his Father as Almighty God.

Jesus and Yahweh are both divine beings, that is undoubtedly the case.

In order to complete a task, he was dispatched by his Father.

Before Jesus came down from heaven, he was subject to his Father.

In fact, Jesus referred to the Father as “my God” in revelation 3:12.

As recorded in John chapters 6-8, Jesus explicitly emphasized that his FATHER was greater to him, and that he never did or said anything on his own initiative.

As previously stated, Jesus defined himself as the Faithful and True Witness in Revelation 3:14.

As a further example, in John 14:28, Jesus stated that his Father was greater than himself, and in John 17:3, Jesus identified his Father as “the only real God.” “Now, to the King everlasting, immortal, unseen, the only wise God, be honor and glory for ever and ever,” Paul said in his letter.

In the King James Version of 1 Timothy 1:17, the author says: Acts 2:24,32 tells us that God raised Jesus from the grave, which is also confirmed by the Bible.

Paul that God is our Lord Jesus Christ’s Father and that God the Father is always implied to be a different personality from Jesus Christ.

(KJV).

“To Titus, my own son after the common faith: Grace, compassion, and peace to you from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ our Saviour,” the Apostle Paul writes (Titus 1:4 KJV).

Yes, according to Jesus’ words in John 10:30, he and the Father are the same.

Consequently, the “oneness” of Jesus with the Father does not suggest that they are the same person; rather, it indicates a shared goal and understanding.

It is obvious from the above that, despite the fact that Jesus is divine, his godhood is subordinate to that of the Father.

response(s) received on November 09, 2013 Increase the number of votes by sharing this page.

It is possible to comprehend the Bible if we walk in the Spirit, rather than in the comprehension of our fleshly intellect.

Using a parable as an example, we may learn about spiritual matters by using our earthly understanding.

The Spirit of God is sometimes described as being like water, in that it moves and flows from its source.

The same way that blood is the life of the body, the word is the life of the Spirit.

The shape and form of everything it comes into contact with is known to water.

Flowing forth from the throne of God into Mary’s womb, the Spirit of God assumed the form of a human person.

All of this occurred at the same time that God’s Spirit was speaking from his throne, as well as in the shape of a man being baptized and the form of a dove, among other forms.

In this way, Jesus may communicate with God.

The spirit of God is like a river that runs from God, and people who trust in him drink from that river and are filled with his Holy Spirit as a result.

John Spinuzzi is a well-known figure in the Italian community.

It’s important to remember that God has stated that His methods are superior to ours.

God’s character is revealed in Scripture, however, as being restricted to three aspects of God’s nature: his fatherhood, sonship, and Holy Spirit.

Given that the Book of Revelation refers to God as having seven souls, I believe He is far more complex than humans can comprehend.

This view leads us to the conclusion that Christ is the Right Arm, or the creative portion, of the Trinity.

Messages from the Holy Spirit It is possible to think of God’s artistic core and creative hand as being analogous to our physical bodies.

If you place your hand on anything sharp or hot, it may retreat before you have time to give it any conscious thought, and it will then communicate with you by saying “Hot!” to explain why it reacted that way.

Because your child is more important than your suffering, your command center will override the recoil response and keep you safe.

Yes, but the mind must have complete control over the rest of you, don’t you think?

All things were created THROUGH Him, according to the book of John (Yeshua).

It is my hope that this is of assistance to those of you who are Muslims and believe that real Christ followers worship more than one God.

God is one and the same. The fact is that He is far more complex than most of us give Him credit for. Responses received on March 7, 20142 Increase the number of votes by sharing this page.

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