How Long Has Jesus Been Dead

How many years has it been since Jesus came and died on the cross.

As discussed below, a variety of approaches have been used to estimate the year of Jesus’ death, including information from the canonical gospels, information from the New Testament’s chronology of Paul the Apostle’s life correlated with historical events, and information from various astronomical models. Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea from 26 to 36 AD/CE, is credited with crucifying Jesus, according to the four gospels. According to the Jewish historian Josephus, who wrote in Antiquities of the Jews (c.

116 AD/CE), Pilate ordered Jesus’ execution.

In order to determine the year of Paul’s conversion, we must work backwards from the well-established date of his trial before Gallio in Achaea, Greece, (Acts 18:12-17) around 51-52 AD/CE, the meeting with Priscilla and Aquila, who may have been expelled from Rome around 49 AD/CE, and the 14-year period before returning to Jerusalem in Galatians 2:1.

Isaac Newton was one of the first astronomers to make an educated guess on the date of the crucifixion, and he proposed Friday, April 3, 34 AD/CE as the most likely date.

Schaefer in 1990 and was determined to be Friday, April 3, 33 AD/CE.

Pratt proposed the year 33 AD/CE as a possible solution.

April 3, AD 33: Why We Believe We Can Know the Exact Date Jesus Died

In our book, The Final Days of Jesus: The Most Important Week of the Most Important Person Who Ever Lived, Justin Taylor and I make an educated guess as to the date of Jesus’ crucifixion, but we do not argue for or against it. For a variety of factors, virtually all academics think that Jesus was executed in the spring of either AD 30 or AD 33, with the majority preferring the former. As a result of the astronomical data, the alternatives are reduced to AD 27, 30, 33, or 34). However, we would want to present our case for the date of Friday, April 3, AD 33, as the precise day on which Christ died in our place as atonement for our sins.

However, this does not rule out the possibility of understanding or importance.

No one makes this argument more forcefully than Luke, the Gentile physician who became a historian and inspired recorder of early Christianity. No other Gospel writer makes this point more forcefully than Luke.

The Year John the Baptist’s Ministry Began

Neither Justin Taylor nor I argue for or against a specific date for Jesus’ crucifixion in our book, The Final Days of Jesus: The Most Important Week of the Most Important Person Who Ever Lived. Jesus was killed in the spring of AD 30 or AD 33, according to virtually all academics, for a variety of different reasons, with the majority preferring the first. (According to astronomical data, the options are AD 27, 30, 33, or 34.) The date of Friday, April 3, AD 33, as the precise day on which Christ died for our sins, however, is something we wish to put out as evidence.

Although it is unknown and irrelevant, this does not rule out further investigation.

The Gentile physician turned historian and gifted biographer of early Christianity, Luke, is the Gospel writer who emphasizes this point the most emphatically.

The Year Jesus’s Ministry Began

Because the Gospels appear to suggest that Jesus began his ministry not long after John, the most likely date for Jesus’ baptism would be late in AD 28 at the absolute earliest, according to the calculations above. Nevertheless, it seems more likely that it occurred somewhere around the first half of the year AD 29, because a few months had probably gone between the beginning of John’s career and the beginning of Jesus’ ministry (and the year AD 30 is the latest possible date). As a result, Jesus’ career must have began somewhere between the end of AD 28 and the beginning of AD 30 at the earliest.

The most plausible dates for Jesus’ birth are 6 or 5 BC, which means he would have been roughly thirty-two to thirty-four years old in late AD 28 to early AD 30.

The Length of Jesus’s Ministry

To determine how long Jesus’ public ministry lasted, we must first determine how long Jesus’ public ministry lasted. If Jesus’ public ministry lasted two or more years, it appears that the spring of AD 30 cannot be considered as a plausible date for the crucifixion. The Gospel of John records that Jesus attended at least three (perhaps four) Passovers, which were held once a year in the spring and were as follows:

  • To determine how long Jesus’ public ministry lasted, we must first determine how long Jesus’ public ministry lasted. If Jesus’ public ministry lasted two or more years, it would appear that the spring of AD 30 is out of the question as a viable time for the crucifixion. Jesus attended at least three (and maybe four) Passovers, which were held once a year in the spring, according to the Gospel of John.

This would make a date of a.d. 30 all but impossible as the date of Jesus’ crucifixion, even if there were only three Passovers in all. As previously stated, the earliest possible date for the beginning of Jesus’ career, according to Luke 3:1, is late in the first century AD. The first of these Passovers (which occurred at the beginning of Jesus’ ministry; John 2:13) would happen on Nisan 15 in the year 29 (since Nisan is in March/April, around the beginning of a year), which would be the first of these Passovers in the year 29.

If Jesus’ ministry corresponded with at least three Passovers, and if the first Passover occurred in AD 29, this suggests that he could not have been executed in ad 30, as previously thought.

Assuming, however, that John the Baptist began his career in AD 29, it is reasonable to assume that Jesus began his mission in late AD 29 or early ad 30. The Passovers in the book of John would thus take place on the following dates:

Nisan 15 AD 30 John 2:13
Nisan 15 AD 31 Either the unnamed feast in John 5:1 or else a Passover that John does not mention (but that may be implied in the Synoptics)
Nisan 15 AD 32 John 6:4
Nisan 15 AD 33 John 11:55, the Passover at which Jesus was crucified

Jesus Was Crucified on the Day of Preparation for the Passover

It is also mentioned by the apostle John that Jesus was crucified on “the day of Preparation” (John 19:31), which corresponds to the Friday before the Sabbath of the Passover week (Mark 15:42). Earlier in the day, on Thursday evening, Jesus had a Passover meal with the Twelve (Mark 14:12), which is referred to as his “Last Supper.” Passover always falls on the fifteenth day of Nisan (Exodus 12:6), according to the Pharisaic-rabbinic calendar that was generally used in Jesus’ day. According to this calendar, Passover begins on Thursday after sundown and finishes on Friday after nightfall.

33, the year in which the crucifixion is most likely to have occurred, the most likely date for Jesus’ crucifixion is April 3 in the year a.d.

Accordingly, we created the following chart in The Final Days of Jesus to indicate the dates for Jesus’ final week in the year a.d.

April 2 Nissan 14 Thursday (Wednesday nightfall to Thursday nightfall) Day of Passover preparation Last Supper
April 3 Nissan 15 Friday (Thursday nightfall to Friday nightfall) Passover; Feast of Unleavened Bread, begins Crucifixion
April 4 Nissan 16 Saturday (Friday nightfall to Saturday nightfall) Sabbath
April 5 Nissan 17 Sunday (Saturday nightfall to Sunday nightfall) First day of the week Resurrection

Conclusion

The computations in the preceding section may look difficult, but in a nutshell, the reasoning goes as follows:

HISTORICAL INFORMATION YEAR
Beginning of Tiberius’s reign AD 14
Fifteenth year of Tiberius’s reign:Beginning of John the Baptist’s ministry AD 28
A few months later:Beginning of Jesus’s ministry AD 29
Minimum three-year duration of Jesus’ ministry:Most likely date of Jesus’s crucifixion AD 33 (April 3)

While this is, in our opinion, the most plausible scenario, it should be noted that many people think Jesus was killed in the year AD 30, rather than the year AD 33, as we have said. If, on the other hand, the beginning of Tiberius’ rule is set at the year AD 14, it becomes nearly difficult to fit fifteen years of Tiberius’ reign and three years of Jesus’ ministry between AD 14 and AD 30, as is the case. As a result, some have speculated that Tiberius and Augustus shared co-regency (combined rule) during the last few years of Augustus’ reign.

As a result, we believe that Jesus was most likely crucified on April 3, AD 33, as previously stated.

Because of this, when we celebrate Easter and walk with Jesus every day of the year, we may be certain that our faith is founded not just on subjective personal confidence, but also on solid historical evidence, which makes our faith a perfectly rational faith.

Crossway’s executive vice president and publisher for books, Justin Taylor, holds this position.

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There has been much speculation concerning the day and year of Christ’s crucifixion and death, owing to the absence of clear day-to-day linkage in the stories of the four Gospels. We know that Jesus died on Preparation Day because it is mentioned in each of the four Gospel narratives. But was it a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday when that happened?

In addition, what hour did Jesus die? There has even been discussion over the year in which he passed away. To figure out the day of Jesus’ death on the cross, we must piece together the evidence from his four Gospels and our understanding of his historical period and cultural context.

Cultural Information to Keep in Mind

1. The gospel writers were more concerned with depicting Jesus as a person than they were with the precise chronology of his appearance. Dates have become increasingly important in today’s environment in order to provide proper news coverage. However, the Gospel authors were more concerned with the events themselves than they were with the precise date of the occurrences. They were attempting to introduce Jesus to a variety of audiences rather than providing a thorough biography. It was the day before the Sabbath that was designated as the Day of Preparation.

This is the day on which Jews prepared meals and completed all of the tasks that were prohibited from being completed on the Sabbath but that still needed to be completed.

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What the Gospels Say about Jesus’ Burial

The Gospel of Matthew contains the most detailed account of Jesus’ death and burial (Matthew 27:31-62). In this tale, we learn about Joseph, a wealthy man from Arimathea “who had himself become a follower of Jesus,” according to one piece (Matthew 27:57 b). In Matthew 27:58-61, it is said that Joseph approached Pilate and begged for permission to bury Jesus’ body. “The next day, the day after Preparation Day, the chief priests and the Pharisees went to Pilate,” we are told in Matthew 27:62. Joseph followed out this plan on Preparation Day.

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In the Jewish calendar, it was Preparation Day (i.e., the day before the Sabbath).” (Matthew 15:42 a.) … Consequently, Joseph purchased some linen material, brought the corpse down from the casket, wrapped it in the linen, and buried it in a tomb dug into the rock.

Jesus died on the Day of Preparation, as confirmed by Luke and John: “Then he carried it down, wrapped it in linen fabric, and buried it in a tomb cut into the rock, in which no one had yet been lain.” As it happened, it was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was about to begin” (Luke 23:54).

What Day Did Jesus Die? Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday?

Over the years, academics have developed a variety of hypotheses about what occurred during the days of the week preceding up to Jesus’ death on the cross. These versions each offer a different day for Christ’s death, such as Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday.

  • A number of theories on what transpired during the days leading up to Christ’s death have been proposed by scholars throughout the years. They all claim that Christ died on a different day, either Wednesday or Thursday or both.

What Time Did Jesus Die?

Over the years, historians have developed a variety of hypotheses about what took place during the days of the week preceding up to the Crucifixion.

These scenarios each offer a different day for Christ’s death: Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday.

Timing of Jesus Death in Mark, Luke, and John

  • The Gospel of Mark 15: 33:34, 37 “At midday, darkness descended across the entire region, lasting until three o’clock in the afternoon. Also, about three o’clock in the afternoon, Jesus said, “Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?” in an obnoxiously loud voice. (which translates as ‘My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?’). “Jesus breathed his last with a piercing scream.”
  • Matthew 23:44-46 ” It was now around midday, and darkness descended upon the entire region until three o’clock in the afternoon since the sun had ceased shining. And the temple’s curtain was split in two by the earthquake. I put my spirit into your hands,’ Jesus said with a resounding voice, calling out to the Father. At the moment he stated this, he exhaled his final breath.” (See also John 19:14-16.) “It was approximately midday on the day of Passover preparations, and it was the day of Passover preparations. ‘Your king has arrived,’ Pilate said to the Jews. They, on the other hand, cried out, “Take him away!” Take him away from me! ‘Put him to death!’ ‘Do you want me to crucify your king?’ Pilate was the one who inquired. ‘We do not have a monarch other than Caesar,’ the leading priests responded. Eventually, Pilate gave him over to them, and they crucified him.”

What Year Did Jesus Die?

During this video, Doug Bookman, a New Testament professor at Shepherds Theological Seminary, shows why biblical academics have reached an agreement about the year Jesus died. “It all boils down to this. Pilate served as prefect of Judea and Samaria from 26 A.D. to 36 A.D., according to the evidence we have. So that’s our view out the window. The following question is: On what day of the week did Passover occur during the year that Jesus died? In the opinion of the majority, it occurred on Thursday or Friday.

Given all of this, the vast majority of researchers will agree that it leads to one of two conclusions: ” Theory 1: Jesus died about the year 30 A.D.

“At this point, the argument becomes pretty technical,” says Bookman of the situation.

I am convinced that the year 33 A.D.

3 Significant Events Shortly After Jesus’ Death

According to Matthew 27:51-54, “At that point, the curtain of the temple was ripped in two from top to bottom.” Matthew 27:51-54 The ground trembled, the rocks cracked, and the tombs burst into flames. Many pious persons who had died were brought back to life by the power of the Holy Spirit. They emerged from the graves following Jesus’ resurrection and proceeded to the holy city, where they appeared to a large number of people. They were startled and cried, “Surely he was the Son of God!” when the centurion and others with him who were guarding Jesus witnessed the earthquake and everything that had transpired.

When the temple curtain was split in two, it divided the temple’s worshippers from the Ark of the Covenant and its summit – the Mercy seat, which was reserved for God’s meeting with the High Priest just once a year in exchange for an atonement sacrifice.

In Leviticus 16, after two men died while attempting to approach God in the wrong way, the Lord gave Moses specific instructions on how to approach God without dying.

The fact that the curtain was torn “from top to bottom” represented that it was torn by God himself, rather than by the efforts of any human being.2.

“As Jesus rose from the dead on the third day after he died, he defeated the power of death and the permanence of the grave.”Gill continued: “I apprehend that these saints continued on earth until our Lord’s ascension, and then joining the retinue of angels, went triumphantly with him to heaven, as trophies of his victory over Isaiah 26:19 says, “But your dead will live, LORD; their bodies will rise— let those who dwell in the dust wake up and cry for joy— your dew is like the dew of dawn; the earth will give birth to her dead.” This occurrence described in Matthew also fulfills that prophecy.3.

Despite the fact that this verse in Matthew glosses over such a remarkable occurrence, the resurrection of Jesus is told in greater depth later in Matthew 28 (as well as in Mark 16, Luke 24, and John 20).Photo Credit: Unsplash/Joshua Earle

I don’t understand why the death of Jesus almost 2,000 years ago makes any difference to me right now.

If Jesus’ death had been merely a terrible occurrence that brought an average man’s life to an end, you would be correct in assuming that it would make little difference to us today. After all, what if Jesus was more than just an ordinary mortal? Consider the possibility that He is, in fact, who the Bible claims He is: the divine Son of God, sent from heaven to redeem us from our sins. So, what if His death wasn’t just a terrible accident, but rather a crucial element of God’s everlasting plan to make our redemption possible?

  1. In fact, when Jesus died on the cross, this is exactly what occurred.
  2. Specifically, the Bible states that this individual “was delivered into your possession as a result of God’s predetermined plan and foreknowledge” (Acts 2:23).
  3. What Jesus did on the cross 2,000 years ago is still relevant today, just as the individuals who signed our nation’s Declaration of Independence more than 200 years ago accomplished something that is still relevant today.
  4. He died because God loves us and wants us to spend eternity with Him in the presence of the Father in heaven.

Died Like Jesus? Rare Remains Suggest Man Was Crucified 2,000 Years Ago

In what appears to be a unique piece of physical proof of the crucifixion, the technique used to killJesus Christ has been discovered. According to the Bible, scientists have discovered incisions on the heel of a man who was buried around 2,000 years ago in northern Italy that imply he was nailed to a wooden cross before he died, which they believe was in accordance with the Bible. After discovering the skeletal remains of a man lying on his back with his arms by his sides and his legs outstretched while excavating a site in Gavello, a town in Italy’s Po Valley about 60 miles from Venice, archaeologists determined that the man had died in the Po Valley.

  1. When experts from the universities of Ferrara and Florence examined the remains more thoroughly, they discovered a lesion on one of the heel bones as well as an unhealed fracture on the other.
  2. That is, it is possible that the man’s feet were nailed to a hard surface (such as a wooden cross) just before he died, as evidenced by the nail marks on his feet.
  3. This image is courtesy of the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti ed Ambiente for the Provinces of Verona, Rovigo, and Vicenza.
  4. As recorded in the Bible, Jesus was crucified in Jerusalem, which was then under Roman administration, at the outset of the Christian period, somewhere between the years A.D.
  5. 30.
  6. According to the findings of the new study, Romans mostly reserved the protracted and excruciating mode of death by crucifixion for slaves, but they also used it on revolutionaries (such as Jesus), foreigners, criminals, military deserters, and other misfits from society on rare occasions.
  7. In addition, his diminutive build implies that he may have been an undernourished slave, and his burial was devoid of the traditional rituals associated with ancient Roman funerals—which would make sense if he had been executed.

“However, the marginalization of his interment implies that he was most likely a dangerous or defamed character in Roman society.” The crucified man’s heel bone, complete with the iron nail that punctured their bone, was discovered in 1968.

Greek archaeologist Vassilio Tzaferis discovered a 7-inch nail still attached to a small piece of olive wood inside the heel bone of a man who was discovered in one of the tombs.

In the case of the Gavello remains, the authors of the current research acknowledge that their conclusions are not as definitive as they would have liked.

They have also discovered no indication that the wrists of the condemned were affixed to the cross, as was typical practice throughout the Roman era of crucifixion.

Because to the poor state of the bones, the researchers were unable to conduct radiocarbon dating procedures on the remains.

Although the bones were discovered among layers of Roman-era remains, the researchers were able to properly deduce that the individual was executed around 2,000 years ago, which placed his killing roughly within the same time period as Jesus’ crucifixion.

How Long Was Jesus in the Tomb?

Sunday morning, according to the Gospels, was the day on which the women learned that Jesus’ tomb had been emptyed of all of his belongings. “On the first day of the week, very early in the morning” (Mark 16:2), “on the first day of the week, very early in the morning” (Luke 24:1), or “early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark” are all descriptions given by the Gospels of how the women arrived at Jesus’ tomb on Sunday morning (John 20:1). The women arrived at the tomb at the crack of dawn on the “first day of the week” (or Sunday), only to discover it was empty.

  • On what day of the week was Jesus executed and buried in the tomb?
  • Those who think that Jesus was killed on Wednesday use Matthew 12:40 as their source.
  • Those who believe in a Wednesday crucifixion argue that because of this remark, Jesus spent exactlythree days and three nights – or 72 hours – in the tomb.
  • However, if we look at the other 20 instances in the New Testament where Jesus and the apostles make references to the amount of time he would remain in the tomb, we are obliged to infer that they were referring to a literal three-day stay in the tomb.
  • 16:21, 17:23, 20:19, 26:61, 27:40, and 64; Mark 9:31, 10:34, 14:58, and 15:29; Luke 9; 13:32, 18:33, 24:7, 21, and 46; John 2:19, 20; Acts 10:40; 1 Corinthians 15:4.
  • Those who believe in a Wednesday crucifixion ignore the inaccuracy of the time references in these verses and read them in a literal sense, as if they were written in exactly 72 hours, according to Matthew 12:40.
  • “The Son of Man is going to be betrayed into the hands of mankind,” Jesus says in Matthew, who adopted the phrase “three days and three nights” to refer to the period of Jesus’ burial.
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Assuming that the term “three days and three nights” in 12:40 refers to exactly 72 hours, this presents an internal conflict with Matthew 17:23, which is a separate passage.

The amount of time that transpired between being murdered and then rising “on the third day,” as reported in 17:23, is more than the amount of time that elapsed between being buried and rising, as detailed in 12:40.

Something occurring “on” the third day means that it occurs in less time than it would have taken if the event occurred at the moment at which three literal days had elapsed.

If the period between his death and resurrection was “on the third day” (or less than three literal days), how could it be possible that it was “after three days” (or 72 hours) between his burial and resurrection?

Nonetheless, proponents of a Wednesday crucifixion maintain that Matthew 12:40 should be taken literally.

But, do we have to or should we take Matthew 12:40 at its value?

Rather than forcing our current ideas of time exactness on an old figure of speech that did not include them, we could as well be imposing our modern sense of precise time-telling on an ancient Jewish figure of speech that did not have them.

Does the Bible contain any instances in which the phrase “after three days and three nights” does not always refer to exactly 72 hours?

The events described in this chapter take place in the hamlet of Ziklag, and David and the Amalekites are at the center of the story.

When David arrived at Ziklag, he came face to face with an Egyptian who happened to be the slave of an Amalekite.

According to the narrative, the Egyptian had not eaten or drunk for “three days and three nights” prior to his death (verse 12).

This is more likely to happen in less than 72 hours.

On the other hand, this period is equivalent to “three days and three nights.” It is very plausible, and perhaps even probable, that we are not dealing with a complete 72-hour period in this case.

There are several other passages in which variations of the word “three days” are used, including the following ones: “for three days” = “on the third day” in Genesis 42:17–18; “three days later” = “in the next three days” in 2 Chronicles 10:5, 12; and “for three days” = “on the third day” in Esther 4:16–5:1 (“for three days” = “on the third day”).

  1. However, even if the New Testament passages given above are not accurate in terms of modern time-telling standards, they still demonstrate the fact that Jesus remained in the tomb for a long enough amount of time that there could be no doubt that he had died.
  2. Proponents of a 72-hour burial, on the other hand, argue that the length of time Jesus spent in the tomb was an indication that he was the promised Messiah.
  3. While the apostles made broad statements about the amount of time Jesus had been dead and buried, they never utilized a chronological measurement to back up their claims.
  4. Therefore, the event of Jesus’ death and resurrection is what establishes him as our Savior, and this is a reasonable conclusion.
  5. Keeping in mind that the term “three days and three nights” is a cultural statement rather than a scientific expression, we should have no difficulty comprehending Matthew 12:40.

Since our salvation does not rely on knowing exactly when Jesus was laid to rest in the tomb, we have no need to be anxious about that. That Jesus died and was raised to become our Savior is what is most crucial to remember (1 Corinthians 15:3-4).

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QuestionAnswer The death of Jesus and the subsequent resurrection of Jesus are the most significant events in human history since the beginning of time. God used the death of Christ to reconcile people who had been “alienated” from Him because of sin and “presentedholy in his sight, without blemish and free from accusation” (Colossians 1:21–22) those who had been “alienated” from Him because of sin. And God has compassionately “given us new birth into a live hope” as a result of Christ’s resurrection (1 Peter 1:3).

  • We can, however, figure it out with a reasonable degree of precision.
  • It is believed that Herod the Great died in 4 BC, which corresponds to the death of Herod the Great, who served as procurator of Judaea from 47 BC to 4 BC.
  • It is possible to identify the year in which Jesus died based on a variety of different criteria.
  • In the year AD 14, Tiberius was proclaimed emperor.
  • Pontius Pilate is believed to have governed Judea between AD 26 and AD 36.
  • There is also an argument for a more recent date (April 7, AD 30), which is based on the fact that John the Baptist’s ministry began more recently (and an assumed co-regency of Tiberias and Augustus).
  • Even while a great deal has transpired on the international stage since Christ’s time, nothing has ever surpassed the scope and significance of what occurred in AD 33—the death and resurrection of the Savior of the world.

7 Clues Tell Us *Precisely* When Jesus Died (the Year, Month, Day, and Hour Revealed)

When it comes to the killing of Jesus, how detailed can we be? Is it possible to pinpoint the precise date? We are in the midst of our yearly commemoration of Jesus’ death and resurrection, which began on Easter Sunday. All of us are aware that something like this occurred in Jerusalem during the first century. That distinguishes Jesus from mythological pagan deities, who were said to have lived in places and at times that no one could pinpoint precisely.

When it comes to the killing of Jesus, how detailed can we be? Is it possible to pinpoint the precise date? We have the ability to do so. And here’s how to do it.

Clue1: The High Priesthood of Caiaphas

When it comes to the killing of Jesus, how particular can we get? How can we find out what day it is precisely? Now is the time for us to reflect on Jesus’ death and resurrection, which takes place every year around this time. This occurred in Jerusalem during the first century, as we all know. That distinguishes Jesus from mythological pagan deities, who were said to have lived in locations and at times that no one could pinpoint. When it comes to the killing of Jesus, how particular can we get?

We have the ability to accomplish this.

Clue2: The Governorship of Pontius Pilate

All four gospels agree that Jesus was killed on Pontius Pilate’s orders, according to the New Testament (Matthew 27:24-26,Mark 15:15,Luke 23:24,John 19:15-16). Due to information from other sources, we know when he served as governor of Judea — from A.D. 26 to 36 — and hence can restrict the time period down by several years. Nevertheless, how are we going to narrow the scope to a single day and year?

Clue3: After “the Fifteenth Year of Tiberius Caesar”

The beginning of John the Baptist’s ministry is specified in the Gospel of Luke as follows: In the fifteenth year of Tiberius Caesar’s reign.the word of God came to John the son of Zechariah in the desert, where he remained for forty days. This specifies a certain year, namely A.D. 29. Because all four gospels represent Christ’s ministry beginning after that of John the Baptist (Matthew 3, Mark 1, Luke 3, and John 1), we may trim a few more years off our estimated time frame for his birth. The death of Christ has to take place within a seven-year time span: between A.D.

36.

Clue4: Crucified on a Friday

There is unanimous agreement among the four gospels that Jesus was crucified on a Friday (Matthew 27:62, Mark 15:42, Luke 23:54, and John 19:42), immediately before a Sabbath, which was just before the first day of the week (Luke 23:54; John 19:42). (Matthew 28:1,Mark 16:2,Luke 24:1,John 20:1). Due to the fact that Friday was designated as “the day of preparation,” we know it was a Friday. This means that it was the day on which Jews made the preparations they required for the Sabbath, as they were not permitted to work on that day.

According to the Jewish Encyclopedia: Friday is referred to as ‘Ereb Shabbat’ since it is the day before Shabbat (The Eve of Sabbath).

In Josephus’ Antiquitiesxvi.

The day is referred to as “Yoma da-‘Arubta” in Yer. Pesaim iv. 1 of the Jewish calendar (Day of Preparation). There were still a significant number of Fridays between A.D. 29 and 36, despite the fact that six days of the week were eliminated. Is it possible to figure out which one it is?

Clue5: A Friday at Passover

There is unanimous agreement among the four gospels that Jesus was crucified on a Friday (Matthew 27:62, Mark 15:42, Luke 23:54, and John 19:42), immediately before a Sabbath, which was shortly before the first day of the week (Luke 23:54, John 19:42). (Matthew 28:1,Mark 16:2,Luke 24:1,John 20:1). Due to the fact that Friday was designated as “the day of preparation,” we know it was a Friday. This means that it was the day on which Jews made the preparations they required for the Sabbath, as they were not permitted to work on Friday.

  • This is according to the Jewish Encyclopedia: As a prelude to Shabbat, Friday is referred to as Ereb Shabbat (First Friday) (The Eve of Sabbath).
  • In Josephus’ Antiquitiesxvi.
  • The day is referred to as “Yoma da-Arubta” in Yer.
  • 1.
  • There were still a significant number of Fridays between A.D.
  • Which one are we going to pick?
  • Monday, April 18, the year 29
  • Friday, April 7, the year 30
  • Tuesday, March 27, the year 31
  • Monday, April 14, the year 32
  • Friday, April 3, the year 33
  • Wednesday, March 24, the year 34
  • Tuesday, April 12, the year 35
  • And Saturday, March 31, the year 36

As you can see, there are just two candidates remaining on the table: Jesus was crucified on either April 7th, A.D. 30 or April 3rd, A.D. 33, depending on the source. Which one was it, exactly? The year A.D. 33 is generally accepted as the date. There are a significant number of people that support the A.D. 30 date in today’s world. Do the gospels provide us the option of choosing between the two?

Clue6: John’s Three Passovers

During Jesus’ career, the Gospel of John mentions three separate Passovers: the first, the second, and the third.

  • Jesus’ first public appearance was during the Passover Seder, which was described in John 2:13, towards the beginning of his career. 2nd Passover: This event is mentioned in John 6:4 and takes place in the midst of Jesus’ career. Passover3: This is mentioned in John 11:55 (and has been referenced several times thereafter), and it occurs near the conclusion of Jesus’ career.
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That implies that Jesus’ ministry had to have lasted at least a couple of years longer than that. An in-depth examination would disclose that it lasted around three and a half years; yet, even if we believe that it began immediately before Passover1, the inclusion of two additional Passovers demonstrates that it lasted at the very least more than two years. That indicates the A.D. 30 deadline has passed. A ministry of at least two years cannot be accommodated in the period available between the fifteenth year of Tiberius Caesar (A.D.

The numbers don’t add up in this case.

Is it possible to be any more specific?

Clue7: “The Ninth Hour”

Jesus died about “the ninth hour,” according to the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke (Matthew 27:45-50,Mark 15:34-37,Luke 23:44-46). The “ninth hour” is what we would refer to as 3:00 p.m. in our modern day. This permits us to narrow down the time of Jesus’ death to a very particular point in history: approximately 3:00 p.m.

on Friday, April 3, A.D. 33, on the third day of the first month of the first century. Of course, there are a slew of thorough counter-arguments that I haven’t had time to address in this article. However, this is the general thrust of the situation. This is the exact moment it occurred.

What Now?

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The original version of this item published on April 10, 2013, at the Register.

We are in the End of 6000 years Since Creation

Please consider joining mySecret Material Club if the information offered here appeals to you. The Secret Information Club, if you’re not aware with it, is a free service that I provide only through electronic means. On a range of intriguing issues related to the Catholic faith, I send out material to subscribers. If you sign up, you will receive information about what Pope Benedict has stated regarding the book of Revelation as one of the very first things you’ll get. Many intriguing things have been spoken by him!

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According to the Register, this piece was first published on April 10, 2013.

  1. The six days of creation represent 6000 years since the beginning of time to the time when Jesus Christ comes to establish His reign on Earth. The seventh day is the Sabbath, which represents the 1000 years during which Jesus Christ will reign on earth
  2. This is known as the Millennium Reign.

See the Genesis 7-day creation prophesy for more information (God 7000 years plan)

We are in the End of 6000 years since creation

The time span between Adam and Abraham is considered to be 2000 years. It is anticipated that it will take another 2000 years to go from Abraham to Jesus. It will take another 2000 years from the time of Jesus till His return. As a result, the time span between Adam’s creation and Jesus’ final return to the planet is 6000 years. Christ will return after 6000 years and govern for 1000 years, ending the millennium (the Millennium Reign). Because of God’s design, the world and heaven both reach the end of their allotted 7000 years, and immediately after this first earth and heaven pass away, a new earth and heaven are formed with Jesus Christ reigning eternally on the earth and in the heavens.

When is the end of 6000 years since creation?

The temporal span between Abraham and Jesus is considered to be 2000 years. But what time period should we choose for Jesus? Do you want to know the date of His birth or the date of His death? The whole Bible message is centered on Jesus’ death on the cross. Take a look at what the gospel is. The crucifixion was the place where mankind was saved, the evil kingdom was conquered, and the church was birthed, all at the same time. Take a look at what the church is like. We measure time in relation to or from Jesus’ death on the cross, rather than in relation to His birth.

  1. Take a look at the reality behind Christmas Day The reason why Jews do not celebrate Christmas on December 25th but do so with great fervor on Passover (importance).
  2. Ex 12:2 (King James Version): This month will mark the beginning of the month for you, and it will also mark the beginning of the calendar year for you.
  3. In Exodus 12:5, your lamb must be without blemish, a male of the first year; ye must take it from among the flocks of sheep or from the herds of goats.
  4. It was at this period that Israel was freed from Egyptian servitude.
  5. A symbolic representation of the lamb who takes away the sins of the world (John 1:29) and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the cross, which freed humanity from slavery.
  6. Furthermore, the 70-week period between Israel and Jerusalem begins before the final seven weeks of the great tribulation.
  7. See the church age in the prophesy of Daniel’s 70-week period.

That the old has come to an end and a new has begun.

As a result, while counting the remaining 2000 years, we begin from the moment Jesus (God) was crucified.

The Bible is quiet regarding the day Jesus was crucified, although it does provide some hints as to what happened that day.

We can get to the year 2028 if we take the year 28 AD as the year in which Jesus died on the cross and add the remaining 2000 years to that date (the year for the end of 6000 years since creation).

2000 years have passed since the beginning of time.

This corresponds exactly with the year 2028, which is the year in which the fig tree generation will come to an end.

Take the year 33 AD as the year Jesus died on the cross and add the remaining 2000 years, we arrive at the year 2033, according to the Gregorian calendar.

2000 years have passed since the beginning of time.

As a result, the end of the 6000-year period since the beginning of time will occur between the years 2028 and 2033, and Jesus Christ will return for the Battle of Armageddon and to establish His 1000-year reign.

The five-year gap between 2028 and 2033 is represented by the year 2028.

Though the date of Jesus’ death on the cross is debatable, May 14th, 1948, is generally accepted as the date on which Israel became a sovereign nation and the day on which the fig tree sprouted is set.

How many years are remaining to the end of 6000 years since creation?

It is thought that it took 2000 years from Abraham to Jesus. Which time period do we choose for Jesus, though? Do you want to know the date of His birth or the date of his death? Throughout the whole Bible, Jesus’ death on the cross is emphasized. Take a look at what the gospel is all about! As a result of Jesus’ death on the cross, mankind has been rescued, and the evil dominion has been conquered, resulting in the establishment of the church. Take a look at what the church is all about We measure time in relation to or from Jesus’ death on the cross, rather than in relation to His conception.

Take a look at the facts about Christmas Day Why Jews do not celebrate Christmas day, but do so with great fervor at the festival of Passover (importance).

For instance, in Ex 12:2, the Bible says This month will mark the beginning of the month for you, and it will also mark the beginning of the year.

If your lamb is without blemish, it must be a male of the first year; you must take it from of the flock of sheep, or from the flock of goats, according to Ex 12:5.

When Israel was released from Egyptian captivity, this was the period in which this occurred.

It will come to pass when they ask you, What do you mean by this service?

A symbolic representation of the lamb who takes away the sins of the world (John 1:29) and Jesus Christ’s death on the cross, which freed mankind from captivity When the Messiah is cut off from the world, according to the 70-week prophecy of Daniel, time is said to have stopped.

There is a time lapse between the two periods, which is the period of church history.

After Jesus’ death on the cross, a chasm opens out.

As soon as Jesus dies, time comes to a complete halt.

Since Jesus was crucified, it is projected that it will take 2000 years for Him to return again.

It is widely agreed by biblical academics and other historians that Jesus died on the cross somewhere between 28 and 33 AD.

As a conclusion During the year when Jesus was crucified, It has been 28 years since Jesus was crucified, and it has been 6000 years since the beginning of time.

In the year 2028, the fig tree generation will have reached the end of its lifespan, which corresponds precisely to this date.

Take the year 33 AD as the year Jesus died on the cross and add the remaining 2000 years, we arrive at the year 2033, which is the year the world will be in.

during the past two millenniums The year 2033 will mark the conclusion of the 6000-year period since creation (33 AD plus 2000 years).

In light of the fact that the end of 6000 years since creation will take place between the years 2028 and 2033, the rapture and the beginning of the great tribulation are likely to take place between the years 2021 and 2026, respectively.

I said that there may be a +5-year error margin in the calculated years of fig tree development for the reason that there could be an error margin of +5.

Though the date of Jesus’ death on the cross is debatable, May 14th, 1948, is widely accepted as the date on which Israel became a sovereign nation and the day on which the fig tree sprouted is set.

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