Why Was Jesus Born In A Manger

Why was Jesus born in a manger?

QuestionAnswer During the Christmas season, it is typical to hear people declare that Jesus Christ was “born in a manger.” He couldn’t have been born in the manger since it wasn’t physically feasible, but that’s where Mary placed Him after His birth (Luke 2:7). Although we are not certain of the precise site of Jesus’ birth, we do know that it was in the vicinity of Bethlehem and that there was a manger, or feeding trough, nearby. God promised the Savior’s virgin birth immediately following mankind’s first transgression in the Garden of Eden, and He fulfilled that promise (Genesis 3:15).

This prophesy was fulfilled when the earthly parents of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, were summoned to Bethlehem for a census of the whole Roman area (Luke 2:1–5), which coincided with the birth of Jesus.

There was no space at the inn for Mary and Joseph because of the large number of people who had arrived in Bethlehem (Luke 2:7).

As a matter of fact, the Greek word for “inn” (kataluma) may be translated as “guest room.” This feature has prompted some to speculate that Jesus was not born in a stable or barn, but rather in a house with a lower level that served as a nocturnal refuge for the family’s animals.

  1. When Luke says that there was no room in thekataluma, he might be referring to the fact that there was no room on the top floor, which would have been crammed with other people sleeping.
  2. As soon as Jesus was delivered by the angel Gabriel, Mary His mother covered Him in clothes and put Him in a manger (Luke 2:7).
  3. In light of this, why was the Savior and King born in a facility that housed animals?
  4. God’s Son, without a doubt, merited a high-profile birth in the most opulent of settings.
  5. This humbling birth sends an incredible message to the entire universe: the transcendent God descends to come to us in human form.
  6. He is approachable, accessible, and available—no palace walls stand between us and Him, and no ring of guards stands between us and Him.

The King of kings arrived in the most humble of circumstances, and His first bed was a manger. Questions about Christmas (return to top of page) What was the significance of Jesus being born in a manger?

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I know Jesus was born in a manger, but why is that important and what does it mean?

When Jesus’ mother Mary gave birth to him, she placed him in a manger to keep him safe (Lk 2:7). The term “manger” is derived from the Latin verb munducare, which literally translates as “to eat.” A manger, also known as a crib, is a feeding trough or food box made of wood or stone that contains hay for bigger farm animals such as cattle, horses, and donkeys. Mangers were found in sites where livestock was housed, such as stables, corrals, or caves, and they were responsible for the care of the animals.

  • At any moment, the cattle can go up to a manger and then spend lengthy, leisurely hours chomping away at their cud, chewing and slowly re-chewing it.
  • At the time of Jesus’ birth, Mary would have been apprehensive about laying her child on the hard, cold stone floor.
  • An angel appeared to the shepherds and told them that they would discover their baby Messiah and Lord “lying in a manger” whenever they arrived (Lk 2:12).
  • It was not by chance that Jesus was born in a manger.
  • However, because Jesus is sleeping on the hay in the manger, we can go there for spiritual sustenance instead of physical food.
  • Jesus provides us with nourishment via Word and Sacrament, through his message and the Eucharist.
  • Jesus’ Word is unlike any other meal in that it has the ability to preserve our souls from destruction (Jas 1:21).
  • The newborn in the feeding trough is the Food of Life (John 6:35), the only genuine bread that has come down from heaven, and everyone who eats this bread will live forever (Jn 6:51).
  • The manger is a significant symbol of Jesus’ role as our source of sustenance.
  • It is now our turn to speak.
  • About Father Michael Van SlounFather Michael Van Sloun is a retired priest of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis who served in the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis for almost 40 years.

He is now a homilist, Bible study leader, retreat director, pilgrimage guide, and author of various publications, and he continues to share his faith with others. Rev. Michael A. Van Sloun was ordained in 2004. With permission, this image has been used.

Was Jesus Really Born in a Manger?

When Jesus’ mother Mary gave birth to him, she placed him in a manger for the first time (Lk 2:7). MUNDUCCARE, which translates as “to consume,” is the root of the term “manger.” When it comes to feeding bigger farm animals like cattle, horses, and donkeys, a manger or crib is a wooden or stone basin or food box that contains hay. Mangers were found in sites where livestock was housed, such as stables, corrals, or caves, and they were responsible for the care of the cattle. So that their animals would never go hungry, farmers made it a point to keep the feed in their mangers at all times.

  • Because there were no rooms available at the inn when Mary and Joseph arrived in Bethlehem, the couple was obliged to seek accommodation elsewhere, most likely in a cave where animals were already camped out.
  • Instead, she had to make do with what she could find, and the manger proved to be a convenient substitute: the hay was soft, the box was elevated and off the ground, and the walls were tall enough to keep her kid snugly contained within the manger.
  • Their hurry led them to the feeding trough where they discovered the youngster and feasted their eyes on him (Lk 2:16).
  • In spiritual terms, it is extremely important.
  • We may approach Jesus at any moment and never be hungry since he has a limitless supply of nutrition available.
  • To consume Jesus’ message (Jer 15:16; Ez 3:1; Rev 10:9-10), we must take time to chew on it, deeply ponder its significance, swallow and digest it, and weave it into the very fabric of our being.
  • What’s more is that the newborn in the feeding trough is the Food of Life (John 6:30), the actual bread that has come down from heaven, and whoever consumes this bread will live forever (John 6:35).
  • A person’s spiritual well-being is dependent on his or her regular reading of the Scriptures and participation in the Sacrament of Holy Communion.
  • After that, the shepherds dined on grub.
  • We need to feed our spirits with the birth of Jesus on the first Christmas day.
  • Paul and Minneapolis for more than 40 years.

In his current role, he preaches the religion as well as leading Bible studies, serving as a retreat director, guiding pilgrimages, and writing articles. Rev. Michael A. Van Sloun was appointed to this position in 2004, and This is a licensed use.

What is a Manger?

It is described as “a trough or box in which fodder is spread for cattle or the location where horses and cattle are fed” in Webster’s 1828 dictionary. To begin with, the term itself is derived from the Latin word meaning chew or consume. A manger would have been situated in a stable, where cows and horses were housed and fed, during the period of the New Testament. Mangers were made of clay mixed with straw, or of stones placed in mud, depending on the region. At times, mangers were carved from natural rock outcroppings to accommodate livestock.

Did Mary Lay Jesus in a Manger after He Was Born?

“And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped Him in swaddling cloths and placed Him in a manger, because there was no room for them at the inn,” according to Scripture. So, sure, Mary did place her newborn baby, Jesus, in a feeding trough when he was first born. In terms of physical appearance, a manger appears to be “tailor-made” to support a newborn, with a rounded base and inclined sides to accommodate the infant’s weight. By wrapping your infant up in a swaddling cloth, you can reduce the perceived discomfort of feeding time at the trough.

Joseph and Mary did not come from an affluent background.

In light of this, it’s noteworthy to consider the fact that, despite the fact that Joseph and Mary were unable to provide a lamb, they did, in fact, bring the “Lamb of God” into the world (Luke 1:35), the Lamb of God who would atone for the sins of all mankind (John 1:29,36).

What Is Significant about Where Jesus Was Born?

Every one of the more than three hundred predictions concerning our Lord Jesus that can be found throughout the Old Testament was fulfilled by our Lord Jesus himself. One prophecy mentions the location of the Messiah’s birth: “the house of David.” “But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little to be among the tribes of Judah, from you shall come forth for Me One who is to be Ruler in Israel, Whose coming forth is from old, from ancient days,” according to Micah 5:2. When the three wise men from the east arrived in Jerusalem, they were perplexed as to where the newborn King of the Jews had gone.

As the prophet Isaiah wrote, “And you, O Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a Ruler who will shepherd My people Israel,” the wise men responded.

He was born in Bethlehem as a fulfillment of prophecy, and as Jesus stated in Matthew 5:17, “Do not believe that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them, but to fulfill them.” His birth in Bethlehem serves to draw all men’s attention to Himself.

What Is the Nativity Story and Its Importance for Us?

Every one of the more than three hundred predictions concerning our Lord Jesus that can be found throughout the Old Testament was fulfilled by our Lord Jesus Himself. According to a prophesy, the Messiah would be born in one of the following places: However, according to Micah 5:2, “But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little to be among the clans of Judah, from you shall come forth One who is to be Ruler in Israel, Whose coming forth is from old, from ancient days,” They inquired, “Where is He who has been born King of the Jews?” when the wise men from the east arrived in Jerusalem.

  1. Matt.
  2. In response to this rumor, King Herod “assembled all the leading priests and scribes of the people” and “asked them where Christ would be born” (Matthew 2:11).
  3. The wise men responded, “In Bethlehem of Judea, for it is stated in the prophecy, ‘And you, O Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a Ruler who will shepherd My people Israel,'” the wise men said.
  4. He would not have been the Messiah if Mary’s baby had been born in a different place.
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What is the significance of Jesus being born in a manger?

Every one of the more than three hundred predictions concerning our Lord Jesus that are contained throughout the Old Testament was fulfilled by our Lord Jesus. One prophecy mentions the location of the Messiah’s birth: “But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little to be among the clans of Judah, from you shall come forth for Me One who is to be Ruler in Israel, Whose coming forth is from old, from ancient days,” says Micah 5:2. In Jerusalem, when the three wise men from the east arrived, they inquired, “Where is He who has been born King of the Jews?” (Matthew 2:2; Mark 2:15) In response to this rumor, King Herod “assembled all the leading priests and scribes of the people” and “asked them where the Christ would be born” (Matthew 2:11).

“In Bethlehem of Judea, for it is stated by the prophet, ‘And you, O Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are by no means least among the rulers of Judah; for from you shall come a Ruler who will shepherd My people Israel,'” the wise men said.

His birth in Bethlehem is a fulfillment of prophecy, and as Jesus stated in Matthew 5:17, “Do not believe that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.” His birth in Bethlehem serves to direct the attention of all men to Himself.

Why Was Jesus Born in a Manger?

S. R. Morris contributed to this article. This will serve as a sign for you: You will discover the child wrapped in swaddling cloths, lying in a manger. ” (Luke 2:12). Is it possible that you’ve pondered why Jesus was born in a manger? Perhaps this isn’t the case. Perhaps it never occurred to you to consider whether or not that particular segment of the Christmas narrative had any importance. Is it a little footnote in the Christmas tale, or something more significant?

It is unclear what to make of the fact that a large number of people had traveled to Jerusalem in preparation for the census, and that there was no space available at the inn. What was God’s reasoning for allowing His Son to be born in a manger?

A manger?. Really?

The shepherds were informed by the angel that “this shall be a sign unto you.” The angel answered their key question before they ever had the opportunity to ask it: How will we know what he looks like if we get to Bethlehem? What are we going to do to identify him? “This will serve as a sign for you,” the angel stated. The term “sign” derives from the Greek word o (smiin), which means a supernatural marvel, symbol, or wonder, and is rendered as “sign” in English. The shepherds were informed, in essence, by an angel that God’s Son would be born in Bethlehem that night, and that they would be able to recognize him by the presence of a sign, a wondrous wonder: He would be discovered laying in a manger.

But why would God allow that?

“This shall be a sign unto you,” the angel informed the shepherds. He answered their first question before they ever asked it: “How will we know what he looks like?” The angel responded before they had posed the question. When and how will we be able to identify him? “This will serve as a sign for you,” the angel explained. o (smi)n is a Greek word that means “supernatural marvel, token, or wonder.” The term “sign” originates from the word o (smi), which means “sign.” The shepherds were informed, in essence, by an angel that God’s Son would be born in Bethlehem that night, and that they would be able to identify him by the presence of a sign, a marvelous wonder: He would be discovered laying in a manger.

What about the baby’s clothes?

The shepherds were informed by the angel that He would be wrapped in swaddling garments. It sounds lovely, doesn’t it? Wrong! “Swaddling garments” was derived from the Greek word v (spargan), which literally means to swaddle or wrap a newborn in strips. I’m confident that the pieces of fabric that Mary used to swaddle baby Jesus were the best that they could find for their financial situation. It was impossible for them to shop because there were no malls or name-brand businesses nearby. Because Joseph was a lowly carpenter, Jesus was clothed in “swaddling cloths” to protect him from the elements.

In addition, it was maybe a “sign” or indicator of the nature of God He was.

But what would that mean?

‘He will be wrapped in swaddling cloths,’ the angel informed the shepherds.’ Isn’t that adorable? Wrong! “Swaddling clothing” were derived from the Greek word v (spargan), which literally means to swaddle or wrap a newborn in strips. When Mary wrapped infant Jesus in a piece of fabric, I’m confident that it was the best that they could afford. Neither malls nor name brand stores were readily available for people to shop in. Jesus was wrapped in “swaddling cloths” since Joseph was a lowly carpenter.

One might speculate that the “sign” for the shepherds was not just to help them identify God’s Son among the throngs in that Jerusalem suburb known as Bethlehem. In addition, it was maybe a “sign” or indicator of the type of God He was.

Yes, this is a sign for us.

While He is the Creator of all the ends of the world (Isaiah 40:28), He also provides mercy to those who are lowly in spirit (1 Peter 5:5). Although He dwells in a brightness that no one can approach (1 Timothy 6:16), only those who are pure in heart will be able to see Him (Matthew 5:8). The fact that we have fallen into His hands is a terrifying thought (Hebrews 10:31), but His gentle mercies are over all of His handiwork (Psalms 145:9). His throne is surrounded by ten thousand times ten thousand and thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of thousands of (Matthew 18:12).

He sees us as grasshoppers in His eyes (Isaiah 40:22), but He is concerned about us (1 Peter 5:7).

What a thought!

Though we are all dirty rags (Isaiah 64:6), even though we are incapable of doing good because we have become so accustomed to doing evil (Jeremiah 13:23), even though we have all gone astray and turned to our own ways (Isaiah 53:6), He stands at the door and knocks. As it is written: “Behold, I am at the door, knocking; if any man hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him, and we will dine together, and he with me.” (1 Thessalonians 3:20) As a part of the Christmas story, this sign is extremely significant, and it teaches us a great deal about the sort of God we serve.

Take another look at it.

“Why Jesus Was Born in a Manger” is a devotional piece I wrote contemplating why God would allow His Son to be born in the manner He did. As another Christian writer once said, “The story of Bethlehem is an exhaustless theme.”

S. R. Morris has copyright protection for the year 2010.

Jesus was not born in a stable, says theologian

Christmas nativity scenes across the world depict the birth of Christ, which may be the most famous Bible tale of all: Jesus was born in a stable because there were no rooms available at the inn when his parents went to give birth to him. Christian scholar Rev Ian Paul, on the other hand, has suggested that the entire tale of Jesus’ birth may be based on a misunderstanding of the New Testament, resurrecting an old belief that Jesus was not, in fact, born in a stable. “I apologize for interfering with your Christmas preparations before the Christmas lights have even been turned on,” writes Rev Paul, a theologian and former Dean of Studies at St John’s Theological College in Nottingham, on his personal blog.

  1. For a “Inn” or any other establishment where visitors are welcomed, a completely separate term, pandocheion, is used.
  2. His family was in Bethlehem, and if he did have family there, the norms of first-century Palestine compelled him to remain with them rather than with strangers, which was the sole reason they traveled there for the census.
  3. It’s possible that the place was already crammed with other relatives who had come before them.
  4. There would typically be hollows in the ground filled with straw in the family living space where the animals would feed,” says the author.
  5. This is hardly a novel way of looking at things.
  6. Because of his suffering, he was denounced to the inquisition and admonished by them, albeit he was not really burnt, tortured, or imprisoned as would have happened to other heretics.
  7. “In the Christmas tale, Jesus is not depressed and lonely, lying in a manger far away from us and requiring our sympathy.

If this occurred in a busy family house, the message is still intact. In his opinion, the fact that it took place in an isolated stable “only serves to demonstrate that the decline was from a respected human to a despised human.”

What Is the Meaning and Significance of the Manger?

It is typical to hear people say around Christmas time that the Lord Jesus was “born in a manger.” However, because we are saying things so freely at this period of time, we may not realize the significance of what we are saying at the moment. Moreover, if we state that Jesus was “born in a manger,” we must realize that this refers to the place where Mary placed Him after His birth (Luke 2:7). We aren’t certain of the exact site of Jesus’ birth, but we do know that it was close to Bethlehem and that there was a manger nearby.

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The Story of Jesus Is the Story of the Bible

God promised mankind in Genesis 3:15, following man’s first transgression, that he would come and offer redemption to the world. The birth of Jesus in the little town of Bethlehem was prophesied by the Prophet Micah hundreds of years after the first gospel was delivered by the Apostle John (Micah 5:2). It was the earthly parents of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, who were summoned to Bethlehem for a census of the entire Roman realm that the prophecy of Micah 5:2 came to pass (Luke 2:1-5). The moment had come for the birth of the Lord Jesus Christ at Bethlehem (Luke 2:6).

Then you’ll notice something that will serve as a sign for you: a baby wrapped in swaddling garments and lying in a manger (Luke 2:10-12).

In case the shepherds had any misgivings, the angel reassured them by stating that the truth that had been declared had been confirmed.

The manger is referenced three times in this tale (Luke 2:7, 12:12, and 16), indicating the significance of this location.

The Angel, the Shepherds, and Sinners Today

To the shepherds, Jesus’ presence in the manger was a sign that good news had arrived for them and all humanity, according to the explanation given by the angel. The animal feeding trough acted as the Savior’s cradle, allowing the shepherds to think that He was exactly like them in every way. Jesus was on his way to be with them, joining them in their humbling state of being. Despite the fact that Jesus was wealthy, He came to earth as a poor man for sinners in order that we can become wealthy by His poverty.

After then, the Good Shepherd would make His home among the sheep.

God cared for the world to such an extent that He gave His only born Son in so that everyone who believe in Him may be saved (John 3:16).

God’s self-sufficiency provides no place for the immoral self-obsession to which fallen beings are so prone to succumb in their fallen state.

God the Father was prompted to send God the Son, the Lord Jesus, into the world as a result of his love for mankind and his charity toward sinners. The manger illustrates that the Lord is concerned about people since He was sentenced to death as a result of their sins and died in their place.

Why Jesus Came into the World

In 1 Timothy 1:12-16, Paul tells the young Timothy that the Lord’s grace is trustworthy and deserving of his whole confidence and acceptance. The Lord Jesus came into the world in order to redeem sinners, including the worst of the worst, Paul himself. The temptation to believe that Paul is exaggerating his case is strong; after all, he cannot really mean that he is the worst conceivable sinner, can he? Many others have expressed similar sentiments to Paul. Paul, on the other hand, claims that he was granted compassion so that Christ, in him as the first among equals, would demonstrate His patience as an example to all who would come to faith in Him for eternal life.

The reason for this might be that they have had difficulties in their connection with their father, and as a result, God the Father is viewed in the same light as they do their biological father.

However, we are confronted with the idea that, no matter what has happened in our lives, there is still hope of acceptance from God, because God has saved the worst and used them as instruments to proclaim the gospel to the known world, as was the case with the Apostle Paul, who was one of the worst.

  • Jesus came into the world under the threat of death in order to redeem sinners of all stripes, no matter how serious their transgression.
  • Not only does the Bible conclude with God in His glory, but it also concludes with the redeemed clothed in the glory of God and the Lord dwelling among them.
  • Instead, we will join the angels in singing, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among all whom he pleases!” (See Luke 2:14 for more information.) Jesus was delivered by his mother, Mary, and placed in a manger after being wrapped in clothes (Luke 2:7).
  • The fact that Jesus was born in a manger demonstrates that he was born in humility to his parents.
  • Furthermore, the fact that Jesus was born in a manger emphasizes the fact that there is no area where the Lord Jesus cannot be found, nor can any ring of guards prevent us from approaching Him.

Image courtesy of iStock/Getty Images Plus/jchizhe.com. Dave Jenkins and his wife, Sarah Jenkins, are in a happy marriage. He is a writer, editor, and public speaker who resides in the lovely state of Oregon.

Jesus Born in a Bethlehem Manger: Significance & Meaning

Christmas is pronounced “Christ-mas,” and it refers to the celebration of Christ’s birth. The true meaning of Christmas is not found in the actual date of Jesus’ birth, the decorations, or the gifts themselves. Christmas is about the spirit of Jesus Christ’s adoration, which is shown via food and gifts. When you catch a sight of Jesus, it inspires genuine worship and allows God’s peace and blessing to flow through you. Christmas is a celebration of God’s ardent pursuit of mankind, which began in the Garden of Eden.

  1. It is through the story of Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem’s manger that we can see how God works to accomplish His purposes in the world.
  2. Beautiful memories and traditions may be created throughout the Christmas season.
  3. What was the reason for Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem?
  4. The answers to these questions may be found in the Bible, and they reveal the actual meaning of Christmas.
  5. It is the manner in which God’s Kingdom functions.
  6. Is it possible for us to learn Jesus’ ways in order to have our weariness and heavenly burdens lifted?
  7. He even goes so far as to impose a burdensome government decree and a census in order to bring about the fulfillment of His promises of salvation.

Why was Jesus born in Bethlehem?

To adore Christ is to celebrate “Christ-mas,” which is pronounced “Christ-mas.” The essential meaning of Christmas is not found in the precise day of Jesus’ birth, the decorations, or the presents. At the heart of Christmas is an attitude of reverence for the birth of Jesus Christ. You will experience genuine worship when you catch a sight of Jesus, which will result in the outpouring of God’s peace and blessing on you. Christmas is a celebration of God’s ardent pursuit of humans, which began on the first Christmas Day.

  1. Bethlehem’s manger, where Jesus was born, serves as a visual representation of how God works to accomplish His goals in the world.
  2. When it comes to Christmas, there might be some wonderful memories and traditions.
  3. In Bethlehem, why was Jesus born?
  4. Christmas’s ultimate significance is revealed via answers to these questions found in the Bible.
  5. In God’s Kingdom, this is the way things are run.

Is it possible for us to learn Jesus’ ways in order to have our fatigue and heavenly loads lifted? God is in full command of the situation. His plans to bring about the fulfillment of His promises of a Savior include even the employment of an onerous governmental decree and census.

Why was Jesus born in a manger?

There are several portrayals of Jesus’ birth, known as the nativity, that show Him in a stable or barn. The Bible, on the other hand, does not mention that Jesus was born in a stable or a barn. Mary did indeed wrap the infant in swaddling clothes and place him in a manger, as is often believed. A manger is a type of feeding dish for livestock. A manger is not the same as a stable or a barn, which are both used to house animals. Because a manger, also known as a feeding trough, is commonly seen in a stable or barn, it is possible that Jesus was born in one.

  • However, Jesus was not born in a manger; rather, He was deposited in a manger, which is an animal feeding trough, after He was born.
  • According to an old narrative preserved in a second-century manuscript, Mary gave birth to Jesus in a cave, or grotto, near Bethlehem.
  • It was completed in 327 A.D., and it was constructed over the grotto, or cave, that is assumed to represent the traditional location where Jesus was believed to have been born.
  • The Latin inscription on the wall reads: “Here, of the Virgin Mary, was Jesus Christ born.” The grotto, or cave, where it was believed that Jesus was born — Photograph by David Kim.
  • Perhaps this was due to the fact that the city had become overrun by out-of-towners as a result of the census.
  • When you look at the manger, you are reminded of the difficult and lowly conditions surrounding Jesus’ birth.
  • Some believe that it has the effect of simulating the mother’s womb and soothing the newborn.
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A manger, Luke tells us.

Unlike a hospital, there were no white linens on the bed.

A manger is a type of feeding dish for livestock.

God brings His Son into our midst of brokenness, into the manger scenes of our life, in order to teach us a lesson about God’s character.

Neither Plan A nor Plan B are viable options.

But that is the way things are right now.

We pick up the parts of our life and strive to put them back together again.

It’s this that causes many to wonder: “If God were working in my life, surely THIS couldn’t be occurring.

“And in MY life?” you might wonder.

It is into the reality of brokenness in our world that the hope of God and the light of the world first begin to show His life and His mission on earth.

God sends His Son into the same areas of brokenness, into the manger scenes of our lives, to bring us back to life.

We would like God to take away all of our flaws and difficulties from us.

When Jesus Christ appeared for the first time, He did not appear in the way that some had anticipated.

God, on the other hand, first appeared to us as a Baby in the Manger, and then as the Lamb of God, who would finally give His life on the cross.

It is the manner in which God’s Kingdom functions.

God’s Lamb, He came in the form of a humble servant to eventually lay down His life as a sacrifice for sin.

Is it possible for us to learn Jesus’ ways in order to have our fatigue and heavenly loads lifted?

Jesus urges you to follow in His footsteps and to bring your troubles to Him as well.

All who toil and are burdened should come to me, and I will give them peace.

Assume my yoke upon you, and learn from me, because I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls in my presence. As a result, my yoke is easy to bear and my burden is light.” Jesus said in Matthew 11:28-30, “If you love me, keep my commandments” (ESV)

Come and Behold Him!

This Christmas season, we are invited to come and witness the glory of God as it is shown in the face of Christ. Give yourself to the lights of Christmas and allow them to pull you to Jesus, the light of the world, whose light shines brightly in the midst of darkness (John 8:12) Put your ears to the music of Christmas, and you’ll hear the statement of heaven and the multitude of angels who came to the shepherds and declared: “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!” (See Luke 2:14 for more information.) Christmas candy canes are a good reminder of the Great Shepherd, who will lead and guide His people with the shepherd’s staff, much as a shepherd would (Psalm 23).

  • Allow the Christmas tree and the gifts beneath the tree to serve as a reminder to you that God loves the world so much that He gave His Son, Jesus, who died on the cross, a tree and gifts (1 Peter 2:24).
  • Luke 2:11 (NIV) (ESV) Subscribe to my newsletter to receive updates and information that is uplifting.
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Read the Christmas Bible Story

26 In the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was dispatched by God to a place in Galilee named Nazareth, 27 where he was to be married to a man whose name was Joseph, who was from the family of David, and who was a virgin. The virgin’s name was Mary, by the way. He approached her and said, “Greetings, O beloved one; the Lord is with you!” 29 29, but it caused her much distress, and she struggled to determine whether or not it was a greeting of some way. The angel told her, “Do not be terrified, Mary; you have received favor with God.” 30 31 And behold, you will conceive in your womb and give birth to a son, whose name you will give to him as Jesus.

  1. And the Lord God will grant him the throne of his father David, 33 and he will reign over the family of Jacob for all time, and there will be no end to his kingdom.” 34 “How will this be possible, given that I am a virgin?” Mary inquired of the angel.
  2. 36 And behold, your relative Elizabeth, who is in her old age, has also conceived a boy, and this is the sixth month of her pregnancy with him, despite the fact that she was thought to be barren.
  3. 38 At that point Mary declared, “Behold, I am the Lord’s servant; grant me everything you command according to your word.” And the angel withdrew from her presence.
  4. (ESV) 18 As a result, the birth of Jesus Christ took place in the following manner.
  5. She was divorced discreetly by her husband Joseph, who, being a decent guy and hesitant to place her in a bad light, decided to do so.
  6. 22 All of this occurred in order to bring about the fulfillment of what the Lord had foretold through the prophet: The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, who will be named Immanuel, according to the scriptures (which means, God with us).
  7. And he gave himself the name Jesus.
  8. 2 This was the first registration made during Quirinius’ tenure as governor of Syria, and it was the only one.
  9. Joseph also traveled from Galilee, through the town of Nazareth, to Judea and the city of David, which is known as Bethlehem because he belonged to the family and lineage of David, 5 to be registered with Mary, his betrothed, who was expecting a child.
  10. 7 And she gave birth to her firstborn son, wrapped him in wrapping cloths, and placed him in a manger because there was no room for them at the inn where they were staying.
  11. They were stricken with great terror when an angel of the Lord came to them, and the glory of the Lord shined around them as they were surrounded by his splendor.

12 And this will serve as a sign for you: you will come across a baby lying in a manger, wrapped in swaddling clothes.” 13 And immediately there appeared with the angel a throng of the heavenly army, praising God and exclaiming,14 “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!

17 And when they saw it, they immediately shared the saying that had been shared with them about this kid.

19 But Mary kept all of these things in her heart as a treasure, contemplating them over and again.

Upon being circumcised at the conclusion of the eight-day period, he was given the name Jesus, which had been given to him by the angel before he was conceived in the mother’s womb.

5 They informed him that they were in Bethlehem of Judea since the prophet had written: “In Bethlehem of Judea, because thus it is prophesied by the prophecy: 6-” ‘And you, O Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are not to be included among the rulers of Judah; for it is out of you that a king will come who will shepherd my people Israel.” 7 After that, Herod secretly called the wise men and inquired of them as to what time the star had appeared.

He then despatched them to Bethlehem, instructing them to “seek hard for the infant, and when you have found him, bring me news so that I, too, might come and adore him.” 9 After listening to the king’s speech, they continued their journey.

10 When they saw the star, they were overjoyed and filled with a wonderful sense of accomplishment.

They then presented him with presents, including gold, frankincense, and myrrh, which they had opened from their riches. And after being warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they decided to take a different route back to their own country. Matthew 2:12 – 12:12 (ESV)

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