Why Did John The Baptist Baptize Jesus

Why was Jesus baptized? Why was Jesus’ baptism important?

QuestionAnswer Upon first inspection, it appears as if Jesus’ baptism serves no purpose whatsoever. Although John’s baptism was described as a baptism of repentance (Matthew 3:11), Jesus was sinless and hence did not require repentance. Even John was caught away by Jesus’ sudden appearance before him. In this passage, John recognizes his own guilt and recognizes that he, a sinful man in need of repentance, is unsuitable to baptize the immaculate Lamb of God: “I require your baptism, and will you come to me?” (See Matthew 3:14 for more information.) According to Jesus, it should be done because “it is appropriate for us to do this in order to complete all righteousness” (Matthew 3:15).

Among them were: The time had come for Jesus to begin His great mission, and it was only fitting that He be publicly acknowledged by His forerunner.

The fact that John baptized Him was a public declaration to everyone present that here was the One they had been waiting for, the Son of God, the One he had promised would be baptized “with the Holy Spirit and fire” had now arrived (Matthew 3:11).

According to Luke, both of John’s parents were descended from the Aaronic priestly dynasty (Luke 1:5).

  • The words of John the Baptist the day following the baptism have a distinctively priestly ring to them: “Behold, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world!” (See also John 1:29).
  • His baptism signified the baptism of sinners into the righteousness of Christ, dying with Him and rising free from sin and able to live in the newness of life that Christ has provided for them.
  • Jesus responded that it was legitimate to “fulfill all righteousness” by baptizing the innocent Son of God, when John expressed reluctance to do so (Matthew 3:15).
  • Furthermore, Jesus’ appearance to John demonstrated His acceptance of John’s baptism, bearing evidence to the fact that it had come from heaven and had been accepted by God.
  • Perhaps most significantly, the event of public baptism preserved for all future generations the perfect manifestation of the triune God who had been revealed in glory from heaven on that particular day.
  • Also depicted is the role played by the three persons of God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit in the salvation of people whom Jesus came to redeem.

At His baptism, the fullness of the wonderful reality of God’s kindness revealed through Jesus Christ is on display. Return to the previous page: Questions concerning the deity of Jesus Christ What was the purpose of Jesus’ baptism? What was the significance of Jesus’ baptism?

Why Did Jesus Need to Be Baptized?

QuestionAnswer First impressions are that Jesus’ baptism serves no purpose whatsoever. In Matthew 3:11, the baptism of John was described as a baptism of repentance; but, because Jesus was spotless, there was no need for him to repent. At Jesus’ appearance before John, even he was taken aback. As John confessed his own guilt, he realized that he, a sinful man in need of repentance, was unsuitable to baptize the pure Lamb of God: “I require baptization by you; would you come to me?” he inquired.

  1. The decision by John to baptize Jesus at the start of Jesus’ public ministry was appropriate for a variety of reasons.
  2. As predicted by Isaiah, John was the “voice screaming in the desert,” summoning mankind to repentance and prepare for the coming of their Messiah (Isaiah 40:3).
  3. (Matthew 3:11).
  4. In the Gospel of Luke, it is specifically stated that both of John’s parents were descended from the Aaronic priesthood lineage (Luke 1:5).
  5. A distinct priestly tinge permeates John’s statements the day following the baptism: “Look, the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world!” Jesus said this in John 1:29.
  6. In the same way, his baptism represented the baptism of sinners into the righteousness of Christ, dying with Him, rising free from sin, and being able to walk in the newness of life.
  7. Jesus said that it was proper to “fulfill all righteousness” when John hesitated to baptize the spotless Son of God (Matthew 3:15).
  8. Jesus’ appearance to John also demonstrated His acceptance of John’s baptism, bearing evidence to the fact that it had come from heaven and been accepted by God through His appearance to John.
  9. What’s more, the event of the public baptism preserved for all future generations the flawless manifestation of the triune God who had been unveiled in glory from heaven.
  10. Also depicted is the role played by the three persons of God, Father, Son, and Spirit, in the salvation of people whom Jesus came to redeem.
  11. He was baptized, and His baptism serves as a showcase for the wonderful reality of God’s grace revealed in Jesus Christ.

Go back to the previous page. Inquiries regarding the person and work of Jesus Christ Is it possible to know why Jesus was baptized? What exactly was the significance of Jesus’ baptism?

Why Was Jesus Baptized?

However, both Mark and Luke report this incident without posing any questions about it (Mark 1:9–11; Luke 3:21–22). Instead of recounting the details of Jesus’ baptism, John’s Gospel highlights the same result that has been emphasized in all of the other Gospels: that the Spirit of God descended on Jesus, anointing him as the Son of God (John 1:32–34). Among the Gospel writers, only Matthew brings up the subject of baptism by presenting an element of the account that the other writers do not include: John himself was hesitant to baptize Jesus.

  1. The response of Jesus to John’s reluctance is informative, both in terms of addressing our question and in terms of exposing an essential feature of Matthew’s theological framework.
  2. 3:15).
  3. Something significant is taking place here.
  4. As a result, please allow me to provide this paraphrase: Jesus is carrying out his responsibilities as the obedient Son of God by exercising the needed righteousness of surrendering to God’s will to repent and turn from his sins (i.e., to live in the world wholeheartedly devoted to God).

How Does a Sinless Man Repent?

There are a few of parts to this that we need to examine in order to fully comprehend it. According to Matthew’s definition, righteousness is whole-person behavior that is in accordance with God’s will, nature, and upcoming kingdom. The apostle Paul uses this term in a variety of different contexts, but Matthew’s usage is more characteristic of the Old Testament notion of heartfelt, steadfast devotion to God. By consenting to John’s baptism, Jesus demonstrates to the world that he is the good and obedient Son of God who fully fulfills God’s desire.

  • It is an urgent invitation to realign our values, habits, affections, thinking, and conduct in light of a different worldview, one that is anchored in the revelation of God’s nature and impending rule (Matt.
  • In a nutshell, repentance implies “take up your cross and follow me!” Not in the sense of turning away from sin (which our repentance must involve, although Jesus’ does not), but rather in the sense of devoting himself to completely carrying out God’s purpose on earth.
  • In this way, whatever reservations we (and John) might have regarding why Jesus would be baptized by John are dispelled.
  • Consequently, he must adhere to the God-ordained message of life-dedication proclaimed by John in order to save his soul.
  • 1:18–2:23), and what he will continue to do in the following stories (Matt.
  • — Jesus is the culmination of all of God’s activities in the world.

He is the ultimate destination and culmination of all of God’s rescuing action. In order to fulfill God’s promise to send John as the ultimate herald of the King’s coming, Jesus now falls into line with this and submits himself to John’s baptism.

Jesus as the Last Adam

There are a few of components to this that we must examine in detail. According to Matthew’s definition, righteousness is whole-person action that is in accordance with God’s will, nature, and coming kingdom. Although Paul employs this term in a variety of contexts, Matthew’s use is more indicative of the Old Testament idea of heartfelt, steadfast devotion to God. The fact that Jesus submits to John’s baptism demonstrates that he is the good and obedient Son who fully carries out God’s desire.

  1. The appeal to “Repent, because the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Matt.
  2. Briefly stated: “Become a disciple!” is the meaning of repentance.
  3. In order to fulfill God’s promise to send John as the ultimate herald of the King’s coming, Jesus now falls into line with this and submits himself to John’s baptism.
  4. Because He is a virgin-born, divine-incarnate person who is the only one of his kind on this planet, Jesus yearns to be completely obedient to the Father (i.e., righteous).
  5. Using the term “fulfillment” of all righteousness refers to what Matthew has been arguing frequently from the beginning of his book (Matt.
  6. 4:14–16; 5:17).
  7. All of God’s rescuing action is directed toward and completed in him.

Why Did Jesus Need to Be Baptized?

There are a few of parts to this that we need to dissect in order to fully grasp it. First and foremost, “righteousness” in Matthew refers to whole-person behavior that is in accordance with God’s will, nature, and future kingdom. Although Paul employs this term in a variety of different contexts, Matthew’s use is more characteristic of the Old Testament idea of heartfelt, steadfast devotion to God. By submitting to John’s baptism, Jesus demonstrates that he is the good and obedient Son who faithfully fulfills God’s desire.

  • It is an urgent invitation to reorganize our values, habits, affections, thinking, and conduct in accordance with a different worldview, one anchored in the revelation of God’s nature and impending rule (Matt.
  • Reconciliation is just the act of saying, “Become a disciple!” Not in the sense of turning away from sin (since our repentance must involve this, but Jesus’ does not), but in the sense of devoting himself to completely carrying out God’s purpose on earth.
  • As a result, whatever reservations we (and John) may have regarding why Jesus would be baptized by John are dispelled.
  • As a result, he must bow to John’s God-ordained message of life-dedication, which he preaches.
  • 1:18–2:23), and what he would continue to do in the following chapters (Matt.

— Jesus represents the culmination of all of God’s labor in the world. He is the ultimate aim and the culmination of all of God’s rescuing activities on the earth. In order to fulfill God’s promise to send John as the final herald of the King’s coming, Jesus submits to John’s baptism.

The Baptism of Jesus

According to BibleStudyTools.com, the Baptism of Jesus is referenced in the Gospel Bible books of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, among other places. In this account, we observe that Jesus comes up to John and wants to be baptized with his disciples. After preaching the Gospel for three years and baptizing individuals who repent and seek to restore their connection with God while looking forward to the coming Messiah, John was ready to retire. John is taken aback by the fact that Jesus, the spotless Son of God, is seeking to be baptized, since he believes that he should be the one asking Jesus to baptize him!

When Jesus is baptized, it is a symbolic expression of His submission to His Father as well as the beginning of His earthly ministry.

Why Did Jesus Have to be Baptized?

According to Jesus’ response: “Truthfully, really, I say to you, unless one is born again of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.” ESV translation of John 3:5 “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit,” Peter instructed them. 2:38 (Acts 2:38) In accordance with this, baptism now saves you, not as a removal of filth from the body, but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, not as a removal of dirt from the body.

6:4 (Romans 6:4) And Jesus appeared to them and said, “Come, follow me.” “Everything in heaven and on earth has been handed to me as a result of this revelation.

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In fact, from now until the end of the ages, I will be with you at all times.” Matthew 28:18-20 (NASB) According to Alfred Edersheim’s The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah (Book II, Chapter XI2) and the lecture notes of Dr.

Image courtesy of Unsplash/Linus Nylund

Why was Jesus baptized?

  • But John attempted to dissuade him by asking, “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” (I need to be baptized by you.) — Matthew 3:14 (NASB) It’s an excellent question: What was the reason why Jesus Christ needed to be baptized? That’s essentially the question that came out of the lips of John the Baptist when Jesus stepped forward to be baptized in the Jordan River, according to the Bible. He was well aware that Jesus was the Messiah, the world’s rescuer. Consequently, John said, “Do you come to me if I need to be baptized by you?” John raises an important argument, which I agree with. What sin did Jesus do that necessitated his repentance, if John’s baptism was a baptism of repentance, remains unknown. There wasn’t one to be found! He was just amazing! He has never committed a sin! If someone needed to be baptized between John and Jesus, it was very definitely John who needed to be baptized. “Let it be so now
  • It is fitting for us to do this in order to complete all righteousness,” Jesus said in response to John’s protest (v. 15). As a result, John cooperated. However, the response “to accomplish all justice” does not really provide us with a satisfactory resolution, does it? What did Jesus intend to say? There are at least three options to consider in this case. First, it is possible that Jesus was baptized in order to connect with people whom he had come to rescue. In the words of theologian Albert Barnes, “When John appeared on the scene, the crowds gathered to hear him speak and to be baptized with him.” There was an unparalleled movement towards God that occurred over the entire country. Then Jesus realized.that he, too, ought to identify himself with this march toward God.” It was John’s baptism that signaled the people’s decision to move away from sin and toward God. Jesus desired to be identified with this turning point. Doesn’t that make sense, to say the least? Possibility2: Jesus was baptized in order to commemorate the beginning of his public mission on earth. After all, because John would be transferring authority to Jesus as soon as he was ready to begin his ministry, what better site to do so than near the Jordan River, where John had been working for a long time to assist people in turning away from their sin and preparing themselves for Jesus’ arrival? This is another alternative that makes sense. Jesus was baptized in order to ceremonially wash himself before to being filled with the Holy Spirit, according to possibility number three. Until recently, the only man permitted by God to enter the Holy of Holies, the most sacred place in the temple where God’s Spirit resided, was the Jewish high priest. The high priest would also always wash his hands before entering the Holy of Holies as part of a ritual washing before entering the Holy of Holies. The situation was different in Jesus’ case because heaven was about to open above the Jordan River, and the Holy Spirit was going to leave heaven and come down to meet Jesus up close and personally. It is possible that Jesus was baptized in order to prepare himself for the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, similar to how he was washed in the Jordan River. All three of these alternatives make a great deal of sense to me right now. And there’s a high probability that when Jesus was baptized, he had all three of these things in mind. But there’s one more thing I don’t want you to overlook. The Holy Spirit descended on Jesus in the form of a dove, according to all four Gospel writers — Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John — who all recorded this event. But allow me to pose this question to you: Exactly what was Jesus up to when the Holy Spirit fell upon him is unknown. The incident did not take place when he was being baptized. Jesus had already completed his baptism and was on his way out of the water when we arrived. Only the book of Luke provides us with a detailed account of what Jesus was doing. Observe closely the passage in Luke 21: “During the time when everyone was being baptized, Jesus was also baptized. “And as he was praying, heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended on him in the form of a dove,” the Bible says. Was Jesus doing anything specific when the Holy Spirit fell upon him? He was PRAYING at the time. Prayer was a top priority for Jesus, according to Luke’s narrative, which makes this very obvious to us. Consequently, Jesus prayed before and often during the most significant times of his career, as well as thereafter. After praying all night, he decided on his twelve disciples (v. 6:12). During the time he was praying, Peter made the excellent confession that “Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God” (v. 9:18). He was meditating before teaching his students the Lord’s Prayer for the first time (11:1). “Father, forgive them, for they have no idea what they are doing,” Jesus pleaded as he hung on the cross. And, just before he died, he prayed, “Father, I entrust my spirit into Your hands,” he said. Does it seem to you that Jesus may have done so, at least partially, to persuade you and me that we, too, should be praying before and even during our most significant times in life? Yes, I believe so. For Jesus, communicating with the Father was of the utmost importance. It should also be a primary priority for you and me, as it should be for everyone. Prayer was the gasoline that propelled Jesus’ most effective ministry, and it will continue to be the fuel that propelled ours. First Christian Church in Victorville is led by Dane Davis, who is also its Lead Pastor. Visit our website for additional information, and come to worship with us tomorrow at 10 a.m.

Why Was Jesus Baptized and Did He Need to Be?

According to the Bible, Jesus was completely without sin. Jesus was personally tempted, according to the story of his life (Matthew 4:1-11), yet he did not succumb to his wicked urges, as recorded in the Bible. Thus, it is difficult to comprehend why Jesus was immersed in water at the outset of his worldly ministerial career. Even John the Baptist was taken aback by Jesus’ desire to baptize him, and he expressed amazement at the request. John, who had expected to be baptized by Jesus, was perplexed as to why Jesus needed to be baptized as well.

Jesus didn’t leave John, or any other future Christians, hanging without providing an explanation.

We can find the solution to this issue in the words of Jesus himself: “Jesus was baptized because it was essential for the completion of all righteousness” (Matthew 3:15). As the final atonement for sin and death, Jesus fully and completely took our place in every manner.

When Was Jesus Baptized?

Several passages from the Gospels, including Matthew 3:13-17, Mark 1:9-11, and Luke 3:21-22, describe Jesus’ baptism. Matthew’s Gospel has a more in-depth description of Jesus’ baptism. “After that, Jesus traveled from Galilee to the Jordan River to be baptized by John.” When he refused, John tried to dissuade him by asking, “Do you want to come to me and be baptized by you?” ‘Let it be so at this time; it is lawful for us to do this in order to complete all righteousness,’ Jesus responded. After that, John agreed.

  1. At that time, the heavens were opened, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and settling on his shoulder.
  2. It appears in all three narratives that Jesus’ baptism was a critical initial step in the beginning of his ministry, which would last nearly three years and finally lead him to his death on the cross.
  3. Jesus’ baptism took occurred at a time when John had already begun baptizing people for the sake of repentance, at which point the timing was appropriate.
  4. He preached a message of repentance, baptism, and the need of bearing virtuous fruit in the lives of those who heard him.

Why Was Jesus’ Baptism Important?

The fact that Jesus did not need to repent or turn away from sin was evidenced by his baptism, which served as a sign to John and subsequent generations of believers that he was the promised Messiah. This affirmation brought John’s goal to prepare the way for the Messiah to a successful conclusion. The story of Jesus’ baptism is a magnificent depiction of the loving unity of the Trinity — the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. This point in his life marked the beginning of his ministry, during which he was totally immersed in the human experience as the spotless lamb of God sent to rescue the world.

The baptism of Jesus does not have to be difficult to understand, even if it may raise some concerns.

But his baptism serves to affirm him as the Messiah and to reveal his readiness to assume human form in order to be the ultimate atonement for all sin and death.

When Jesus was nearing the conclusion of his life, he directed his followers to go and make disciples in all nations, baptizing them in the names of God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit (See:Matthew 28:19).

In his career, Jesus stressed the importance of baptism for individuals who place their trust in God from the beginning to the very end of his life.

Why Did John the Baptist Baptize Jesus?

In contrast to John’s baptism, Jesus’ baptism acted as a symbol to John and subsequent generations of believers that he was the Messiah, rather than repenting or turning away from sin. With this assurance in place, John’s task to prepare the way for the Messiah was completed. A magnificent depiction of the loving unity of the Trinity – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit – is seen in the story of Jesus’ baptism. As the immaculate lamb of God sent to rescue the world, Jesus was totally immersed in the human experience at this point in his life, which marked the beginning of his public ministry.

For the same reasons that we believers need to be baptized, Jesus did not need to be baptized as a child.

In the life of every believer, Jesus provided an example for a critical step: baptism.

In his career, Jesus stressed the importance of baptism for people who place their trust in God from the beginning to the very conclusion of it.

What Does Baptism Symbolize?

The New Testament contains a wealth of wisdom and guidance that can assist us in better understanding the purpose of baptism. Baptism is performed for the purpose of sin forgiveness (See:Acts 2:38). In order to be baptized, we must first repent, which means we must turn away from our sinfulness, and then accept the forgiveness that Jesus provided through his death and resurrection. Baptism is a representation of our religious beliefs (See:Acts 8:12-13). A new believer (someone who has demonstrated faith in Jesus) is baptized after repenting and being immersed according to the model we see in the New Testament.

  • Baptism is a representation of being buried with Jesus and raised to life with him (See:Romans 6:3-4).
  • It is also the means by which we are raised up into new life in Jesus after our baptism.
  • However, Jesus recognized that he needed to be baptized, which is why he asked John to perform the ceremony.
  • He demonstrated that baptism is something that all believers must do as a step in their faith journey.

How Did God Respond to Jesus’ Baptism?

God’s affirmation of Jesus’ baptism was reported in Matthew’s Gospel as a tremendous act of God. The heavens opened as soon as Jesus was baptized and climbed out of the water to face the people. “The Spirit of God began to descend like a dove and alight on him,” says the narrator. ‘This is my Son, whom I adore; with him I am pleased,’ a voice from the heavens said” (Matthew 3:13-17). Immediately following Jesus’ baptism, the Holy Spirit fell upon him. A indication that Jesus’ ministry was being enabled by the Holy Spirit and that it would usher in peace between humans and God was signified by this event.

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Photograph courtesy of Getty Images/gldburger In addition to being a writer and a minister, Pamela Palmer is the founder of upheldlife.com, a website where she publishes devotionals and religious resource pieces on a weekly basis to encourage people to keep religion at the center of their lives.

She works in pastoral ministry, where she has the opportunity to be a little part of many people’s emotional and spiritual journeys, while also being a small part of her own.

Pamela married the guy who was meant to be her husband, and they had two lovely children. She has been published on herviewfromhome.com, and you can follow her at upheldlife.com or on Facebook.com/upheldlife. She can also be found on Twitter @upheldlife.

The baptism of Jesus (Matthew 3:13-17) – The identity of Jesus – CCEA – GCSE Religious Studies Revision – CCEA

As stated in Matthew’s Gospel, God approved Jesus’ baptism in a dramatic way. The heavens opened as soon as Jesus was baptized and climbed out of the water to the surface. “The Spirit of God descended like a dove and landed on him,” says the narrator. ” ‘This is my Son, whom I adore; with him I am pleased,’ a voice from heaven declared” (Matthew 3:13-17). Following Jesus’ baptism, the Holy Spirit fell on him. A indication that Jesus’ ministry was being enabled by the Holy Spirit and that it would usher in peace between people and God was signified by this action.

Image courtesy of Getty Images/gldburger.com Pamela Palmer is a writer, chaplain, and the founder of upheldlife.com, a platform on which she publishes weekly devotionals and religion resource materials to encourage people to maintain faith at the center of their lives no matter what they face.

She works in pastoral ministry, where she has the opportunity to be a little part of many people’s emotional and spiritual journeys, while also learning from them.

The author’s work has been published on herviewfromhome.com, and you can keep up with her work at upheldlife.com or on Facebook at upheldlife.com/facebook.

Background

In the desert, John the Baptist preached, exhorting people to repent of their sins and to be baptized as a token of their repentance (Matthew 3:11–13). They needed to prepare for the possibility of a more powerful someone pursuing him. There are several parallels between John the Baptist and the Old Testament prophet Elijah. They’re both like this:

  • In the desert, John the Baptist preached, exhorting people to repent of their sins and to be baptized as a token of their repentance (Matthew 3:13–14). A larger person was on his trail, and they needed to be prepared. There are several parallels between John and the prophet Elijah of the Old Testament. They are both:

Because of these resemblances, we can deduce something crucial about Jesus’ identity. According to Jewish tradition, Elijah was anticipated to come to earth a second time in order to proclaim the arrival of the Messiah. In light of this, what does it indicate about Jesus if John was Elijah who came back to earth – i.e., a second Elijah? The baptism performed by John consisted of a complete immersion in the Jordan River. Baptism was not a novel concept at the time. A monastic sect known as the Essenes may have utilized baptism at their monastery at Qumran as a form of ceremonial cleansing, according to archaeological evidence.

Some Bible scholars believe that John may have had some sort of link to this particular group.

Understanding the text

As recorded in Matthew, when Jesus requested John to baptize him, John was hesitant to accept the invitation. This might be due to one or more of the following reasons:

  • Despite the fact that baptism is intended to cleanse a person of sin, Jesus is God’s son and therefore sinless
  • Jesus is the greater person John has been telling people about, so John does not consider himself worthy to baptize him
  • Baptism is intended to cleanse a person of sin, yet Jesus is God’s son and therefore sinless
  • Baptism is intended to cleanse a person of sin

There were a number of notable events that occurred at the time of Jesus’ baptism:

  • Heaven was opened
  • God’s spirit fell on Jesus
  • God’s word was heard
  • And the world was transformed.

A door was opened in heaven, and God’s spirit fell onto Jesus, and God’s voice could be heard.

The Baptism of Jesus Christ

From Galilee to the Jordan River was the first leg of Jesus Christ’s journey during the early years of His ministry. The preaching and baptizing of John the Baptist took place in the vicinity. Jesus approached John and requested to be baptized. John was adamant about not doing it since he believed that Jesus should be the one to baptize him. He inquired as to why he was required to be baptized by Jesus. The Savior taught that in order to be faithful to the commands of Heavenly Father, he needed to be baptized first.

Afterwards, when Jesus had been baptized, he immediately ascended out of the water; and John looked up and saw that the heavens had been opened vnto him, and that the Spirit of God had descended like a dove and had fallen upon Jesus.

3:44–46, page 802 of the LDS edition of the King James Bible, according to the JST.) Baptism is modeled after Jesus Christ, who established the standard for us.

Baptism is a covenant or pledge made to Heavenly Father in which we agree to do the following:

  • “enter into God’s flock”
  • “be called his people”
  • “ready to bear one another’s burdens”
  • “comfort those who are in need of comfort”
  • “stand as witnesses of God at all times and in all things and in all places”
  • “serve him and fulfill his commandments” (SeeMosiah 18:8–10 for further information.)

“enter into the fold of God”; “be called his people”; “ready to bear one another’s burdens”; “comfort those who are in need of comfort”; “stand as witnesses of God at all times and in all things, and in all places”; “serve him and fulfill his commandments” (SeeMosiah 18:8–10 for further information.)

Why Was Jesus Baptized?

Transcript of the audio We finish the week with a question from Bob, a podcast listener who writes in to pose a basic question, but one that is also quite well-thought-out and insightful. Simply simply, why did Jesus insisted on being baptized by John the Baptist rather than anybody else?

Matthew as Our Guide

Transcript of the Audio This week’s show concludes with a question from Bob, a podcast listener who writes in to pose a basic question, but one that is also quite well thought-out. Simply put, why did Jesus insisted on being baptized by John the Baptist rather than by anybody else.

New Identity

To begin with, John makes it abundantly clear that his baptism of repentance heralds the birth of a people of God in preparation for the coming Messiah, and that in doing so, he imbues this people with a distinctive identity that is not identical with their Jewishness, but rather with their repentance. Matthew 3:9 demonstrates this. “And do not dare to claim to yourself, ‘We have Abraham as our father,’ because I tell you, God is able to bring up children for Abraham from these stones,” he says to the Pharisees who had followed him out to the river.

It implies that there is no redemption and no security in identifying your ancestors as descendants of Abraham.

He has the ability to create saints on his own, if he so desires, out of rocks.

For example, they do not rely on their race or religious heritage by declaring, “We have Abraham as our father,” as the Pharisees did.

Fitting

Now, when Jesus enters the scene, John exclaims, “Wait a minute.” “Do you come to me if I need to be baptized by you?” “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” (See Matthew 3:14 for more information.) In other words, he makes it quite obvious that Jesus does not require this baptization. He is under no need to repent. He is not required to confess any of his misdeeds. So, what brings you here today? “Jesus fulfilled all of the requirements of righteousness that would have been needed of mankind before the court of God.” Answering the question, Jesus says only one thing, and it is quite significant.

  • It is appropriate.
  • It is appropriate.
  • It is appropriate to fulfill all of the requirements of righteousness.
  • Moreover, the fact that he chose to participate in the baptism of repentance despite the fact that he had no crimes to repent of is indicative of the fact that the righteousness he desired to accomplish was the righteousness that was demanded not of himself but of every sinful man.

Securing Righteousness

Now, when Jesus enters the scene, John exclaims, “Wait a minute!” “Do you come to me if I need to be baptized by you?” I inquire. (Matthew 3:14; Mark 10:45) In other words, he makes it quite obvious that Jesus does not require this sacrament. He is exempt from the requirement to confess his sins to anybody. He is under no need to confess his misdeeds to anybody. In that case, what brought you here? “Jesus fulfilled all of the righteousness that would have been demanded of men in the presence of God.” In response, Jesus says only one thing, yet it is extremely significant.

  • It’s a good match.
  • It’s a good match.
  • It is appropriate to carry out all of the righteous.
  • Because taking part in a baptism of repentance even though he had no crimes to repent of is a component of this, it demonstrates that the righteousness he sought to accomplish was the righteousness demanded not only of himself, but of all sinful men.

Why Was Christ Baptized?

It had been hundreds of years since the Jews had seen such a strong prophet as John the Baptist, and the Jews were thrilled to see him again. It is quite simple for modern readers to overlook this fact. John was regarded as a major figure. His admonition was straightforward: “Repent.” “Make ready the path of the Lord.” According to the Bible, he was visited by large crowds of people from all throughout Judea. They had come to him in order to receive his baptism of repentance. They arrived to the conclusion that “we are sinners.” “We have angered the Almighty!” It must have been moving to witness such a large number of people openly confessing their sins.

Jesus had traveled from Galilee and had requested that John baptize him as well. Jesus was, is, and always will be God, according to the Bible. He is without flaw. It’s backwards to have Jesus beg John to baptize him. The baptist’s own words made it plain that he knew what he was talking about.

“I need to be baptized by you, and yet you are coming to me?” (Matthew 3:14)

Everything is wrong, or at least everything appears to be wrong. The baptism of John is unnecessary for Jesus. Despite this, his first documented act is found in all four Gospels, making this his first recorded act. The fact that this is happening indicates that something significant is taking place. In our capacity as readers and followers of Christ, we must inquire as to the reason for his actions. Why would he come from Galilee to Judea in order to be baptized by John if he has nothing to repent of personally?

  • Us.
  • Because we require baptism, Jesus went to be baptized by John, not because he himself required it.
  • This is a watershed moment.
  • He went to John to be baptized in repentance, not for himself, but for the rest of us who were in need of it.
  • When Jesus was baptized in the Jordan River, he descended and took on the sin of the entire world.
  • He began his public engagement by putting himself in the shoes of sinners to symbolize their plight.
  • And it is from that moment on that Jesus begins the work of the Cross on the cross.
See also:  How Did Jesus Pray

Yes, the suffering is vital, but Christ did not begin his work of redemption until he was brought before Pilate on the day of his death.

So That We Might Be Free It should be emphasized that all four Gospels agree that the Holy Spirit fell upon Jesus immediately after his baptism.

When Jesus was alive before the Jordan, he was virtually indistinguishable from the other carpenters of his day.

There seems to be practically nothing worth writing down about his life prior to the Jordan Expedition.

However, following the Jordan, his life took on a remarkable turn.

Even his own family members were perplexed by his behavior.

“I have come down from heaven not to do my will but to do the will of him who sent me.”(John 6:38)

Every thing is incorrect, or at least everything appears to be incorrect. Baptism by John isn’t required for Jesus. But, despite that, this is the first documented act of his life in all four Gospels combined. The fact that this is happening indicates that something significant is taking place. When we read about something or see something that someone else has done, we have to ask ourselves, “Why do they do it?” Because he has nothing to repent of, he makes the journey from Galilee to Judea in order to receive John’s baptism.

  1. Us.
  2. Because we need it, Jesus went to be baptized by John, not because he himself needed it.
  3. A watershed moment has occurred.
  4. He went to John to be baptized in repentance, not for himself, but for the rest of us who were in need of forgiveness.
  5. According to Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus took on the burden of all mankind’s sin and bore it all the way down to the depths of the Jordan.
  6. An anticipation of the Cross, his first act serves as a foreshadowing of what is to come (Jesus of Nazareth, Doubleday 2007, 18).
  7. It is much too common for us to recognize solely Christ’s suffering when we ponder the Cross.

At the Jordan, Jesus made it very apparent that not only is his death for us, but also his life.

Something happened after that, and it was a turning point.

His appearance was not thought to be particularly noteworthy.

It is just hardly mentioned by the Gospel authors.

Inexplicable, even at the time Even his own family members were perplexed by his actions and behavior.

It was reported by those who knew him that he was the “son of a carpenter. Why don’t you ask him what his mother’s name is? (See Mark 3:21 for further information.) It was Jesus who claimed to have been present during it all.

St. John the Baptist

Born between the years 10 BCE and 0 BCE EJudaeaIsrael died between the ages of 28 and 36. Frequently Asked Questions

Who was St. John the Baptist?

The Baptist, also known as St. John the Baptist, was a Jewish prophet of priestly origin who lived during the first decade of the first century CE in Judaea, Palestine, near Jerusalem and died between 28 and 36 CE; his feast day is June 24. He is revered in the Christian church as the forerunner ofJesus Christ and is commemorated on June 24. When John the Baptist reappeared from a time of desert seclusion in the Lower Jordan River Valley, he was hailed as a prophet by the locals. He had a circle of followers, and Jesus was one of them who received the process of baptism that he instituted.

Sources of information about John

According to the New Testament, the four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), The Acts of the Apostles, and the Jewish historianFlavius Josephus’sThe Antiquities of The Jews are the major sources for information regarding John’s life and activities. When utilizing these works to recreate historical events, it is necessary to take into consideration the recognized trends of each author. In John, all four Gospels recognize the beginning of the Christian era, and each attempts, in its own way, to reconcile John’s preeminence in time, Jesus’ acceptance of his message, and the administration of a baptism of repentance by his hands (elements that suggest subordination to John) with the author’s belief in Jesus as the Messiah and Son of God, among other things.

  1. In order to further enhance Mark’s story, Matthew and Luke have considered The Gospel of Matthew strongly identifies John as a new or returning Elijah, herald of the kingdom of God, according to the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 3).
  2. In both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, Luke avoids making the connection between Jesus and Elijah, although he does depict John as Jesus’ forerunner and as the herald of the period of fulfillment of prophecy in the Old Testament.
  3. A succession of scenarios depicting the births of Jesus and John, each beginning with an angelic announcement, a conception, a miraculous birth, a circumcision, songs welcoming the infant and forecasting his future, and an infancy are shown in tandem.
  4. Recognize the name of Saint John the Baptist, who was the forerunner of Jesus.
  5. John the Baptist.
  6. is a publishing company that publishes encyclopedias.
  7. Because the Gospel of John downgrades John the Baptist from an Elijah figure to a model Christian preacher, a simple voice, the Gospel of John does not provide any narrative of Jesus’ baptism.
  8. As a result, the Gospels are largely concerned with the relationships between John and Jesus.

Josephus’ narrative, when compared to Christian versions, aimed to put Jewish religious occurrences in Hellenistic categories and to downplay any political factors that were inimical to Roman imperial power.

Life and work

After making concessions for the tendencies of each of these sources, the following information about John appears to be quite reliable. He was born somewhere inJudaea (at least 530ce) to Zechariah, a priest of the order of Abijah, and his wife, Elizabeth, who was perhaps a relative of Mary, the mother of Jesus. Zechariah was a priest of the order of Abijah. His formative years were spent in the Judaean desert, where monasticcommunities, such as theEssenes (a stringent Jewish sect that flourished from approximately the 2nd centurybce to the 1st centuryce), and solitary hermits frequently trained the young in their own ideals, according to their own beliefs.

In the lower Jordan valley, he was active in the area extending from “Aenon near Salim” (near modern Nblus) to a point east of Jericho.

His objective was to reach out to people from all walks of life and all levels of Jewish society.

Certain issues about the significance of John’s message are still being contested, including the following: It is possible that John is referring to God himself, a human messiah, or a transcendent divine person when he states in Matthew 3, “He who comes after me is mightier than I.” As he also said, “I baptize you with water.; he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire”; this second baptism might represent the judgment that the one who is coming would bring upon the world.

  • Penitentfasting, which went above and above the requirements of Jewish Law, as well as specific prayers were common among John’s disciples.
  • Despite the fact that John had an inner circle of followers, unlike past prophets, baptism was not a requirement for membership in this group.
  • As a sacrament, in the Christian sense, it was hardly regarded as a means of delivering forgiveness, nor as a means of replacing Judaism and separating a new people, consisting of Jews and Gentiles, who would be prepared for God’s future reign.
  • It is also unprovable that it was a rite signifying man’s reunion with divinity and return to his heavenly home—a sacrament of salvation and rebirth—or that it was a religious ceremony.
  • In the same time and place as John’s baptism, numerous more baptizing groups were discovered, but none of these different and little-known baptisms can be proven to have been inspired by John’s baptism.
  • Rather than anticipating admittance into the kingdom of God, John’s baptism most likely meant an anticipatory surrender to the future global judgment, which was depicted as a coming second “baptism” by the Holy Spirit in a river of fire.
  • St.
  • Photos courtesy of Thinkstock/Photos.com Herod Antipas, the king of Galilee and central Transjordan, imprisoned John sometime after he baptized Jesus in the Jordan River.

After divorcing his first wife, the daughter of KingAretas IVof theNabataeans, an adjacentArabpeople, Herod married (illegally, according to Jewish Law) Herodias, the divorced wife of his half brother, after divorcing his second wife, the daughter of KingAretas IVof theNabataeans, an adjacentArabpeople.

Aretas’s triumph against Herod in 35–36, a victory widely seen as divine vengeance on Herod for the death of John, was almost definitely preceded by John’s execution.

It seems likely that John’s disciples were able to collect and bury his remains, and that they honored his grave. The customary burial location in Sebaste (formerly Samaria), near the town of “Aenon by Salim,” has been documented since the year 360.

How, and why, did St. John the Baptist baptize Jesus? — GetReligion

The following information on John appears to be reasonably reliable after making accounts for the biases of each of the sources mentioned above. It is believed that he was born somewhere in Judea (most likely in the town of En Kerem, which has been in existence from at least 530ce) to Zechariah, a priest of the order of Abijah, and his wife, Elizabeth, who may have been a relative ofMary, Jesus’ mother. His formative years were spent in the Judaean desert, where monasticcommunities, such as theEssenes (a rigorous Jewish sect that flourished from approximately the 2nd centurybce to the 1st centuryce), and solitary hermits frequently trained the young in their own ideals, according to his own account.

In the lower Jordan valley, he was active in the region extending from “Aenon near Salim” (near modern Nblus) to a point east of Jericho.

Those at all ranks and positions of Jewish society were addressed by his mission.

Several issues about the significance of John’s message are still being discussed, including the following ones: In Matthew 3, John declares, “He who comes after me is mightier than I,” which might allude to God himself, a human messiah, or a transcendentdivine figure of power.

Fasting and special prayers were common among John’s disciples, who went above and beyond the requirements of Jewish Law.

The baptism of John was not an admittance ritual into the inner circle of disciples, as had been the case with prior prophets.

As a sacrament, in the Christian sense, it was hardly regarded as a means of delivering forgiveness, nor as a means of replacing Judaism and separating a new people, consisting of Jews and Gentiles, who would be ready for God’s future reign.

It is also unprovable that it was a rite signifying man’s reunion with god and return to his heavenly home—a sacrament of salvation and rebirth—or that it was a religious ritual.

In the same time and place as John’s baptism, numerous more baptizing groups were discovered, but none of these diverse and little-known baptisms can be proven to have been inspired by John’s baptism.

As a result, John’s baptism most likely indicated not so much an expected admission into the kingdom of God as it did an anticipatory surrender to the future global judgment, which was depicted as a coming second “baptism” by the Holy Spirit in a river of fire.

John the Baptist, taken from an Armenian evangelistic source (1587).

Herod Antipas, the king of Galilee and central Transjordan, imprisoned John some time after he baptized Jesus.

After divorcing his first wife, the daughter of KingAretas IVof theNabataeans, an adjacentArabpeople, Herod married (illegally, according to Jewish Law) Herodias, the divorced wife of his half brother.

Aretas’s triumph against Herod in 35–36, a victory often seen as divine vengeance on Herod for the death of John, was almost definitely preceded by John’s beheading.

Most likely, John’s supporters were successful in recovering and burying his remains, as well as honoring his tomb. Traditional burial grounds in Sebaste (formerly Samaria), near the town of “Aenon by Salim,” have been documented since the year 360 AED.

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