Why Did Jesus Die

Why Did Jesus Die?

  • Jesus died in order for humanity to be cleansed of their sins and to be granted an eternity of life. (See also Romans 6:23 and Ephesians 1:7) Jesus’ death also demonstrated that a person may stay faithful to God even when confronted with the most difficult of circumstances. In Hebrews 4:15, the Bible says Just think about how the death of a single person can achieve so much
  • Jesus died for the sake of “forgiveness of our sins.” —Colossians 1:14 (NIV). Adam, the first human being, was born sinless and without flaw. He, on the other hand, decided to defy God. Adam’s disobedience, often known as sin, had far-reaching consequences for all of his descendants. “Many were made sinners as a result of the disobedience of one man,” according to the Bible’s explanation. Scripture reference: Romans 5:19. Jesus was likewise without flaw, yet he never committed a sin. As a result, Jesus has the potential to be “an atoning sacrifice for our sins.” (1 John 2:2
  • See also footnote ) Similar to how Adam’s transgression polluted the human family with sin, so Jesus’ sacrifice washed away the stain of sin from the hearts of those who put their faith in him. In a way, Adam sold the human race into the sin of disobedience. By freely dying on our behalf, Jesus repurchased humankind and claimed it as his own. Consequently, “if somebody does commit sin, we have a helper with the Father, Jesus Christ, who is righteous,” says the apostle Paul. — 1 John 2:1
  • Jesus died “so that everyone exercising trust in him could not be destroyed, but might have eternal life,” according to the Bible. —John 3: 16 Despite the fact that Adam was designed to live forever, his transgression resulted in the imposition of the sentence of death upon him. “Sin entered the world via Adam, and death entered the world through sin, and death spread to all mankind because they had all sinned,” the Bible says. In Romans 5:12, the Bible says In contrast, Jesus’ death not only wiped the stain of sin off the face of the earth, but it also revoked the death sentence for anyone who places their trust in him. The following is how the Bible summarizes the situation: “Just as sin reigned as king with death, so too could undeserved kindness reign as king with righteousness, leading to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord,” says the apostle Paul. – Paul in Romans 5:21. Humans, of course, still have a finite life span in the modern world. To the contrary, God promises to provide virtuous individuals perpetual life and to raise the dead in order for them to profit from Jesus’ sacrificial death as well. Scripture references: Psalm 37:29
  • 1 Corinthians 15:22
  • It was through his obedience to the point of death that Jesus demonstrated that a human may remain faithful to God in the face of any test or adversity. —Philippians 2:8 (NASB). The reason Adam disobeyed God even though he had a wonderful intellect and body is that he had a selfish yearning for something that was not his. (Genesis 2:16, 17
  • Genesis 3:6) Then there was Satan, God’s primary adversary, who stated that no human being would unselfishly follow God, especially if his or her life was on the line. Job 2:4 (Job 2:5) Even though he died in dishonor and agony, the ideal man Jesus followed God and remained devoted to him throughout the entire world. (See also Hebrews 7:26.) This absolutely put an end to the situation: A human being can stay faithful to God no matter what test or challenge is placed in front of him
  • Why did Jesus have to suffer and die in order to redeem human beings? What was God thinking when he didn’t just revoke the death sentence? It is written in God’s law that “the penalty of sin is death.” (See Romans 6:23.) Because God did not want to keep this commandment hidden from Adam, he informed him that the consequence for disobeying would be death. (Genesis 3:3
  • 3:4
  • 3:5) When Adam sinned, God, who “cannot lie,” stood by his word and did not punish him. (See Titus 1:2.) Not only did Adam pass on sin to his progeny, but he also passed on the penalty for sin – death. Despite the fact that wicked humanity deserve the sentence of death, God extended to them “the riches of his undeservedkindness,” according to the Bible. (See also Ephesians 1:7) It was both profoundly just and supremely merciful of God to make a provision to redeem mankind by sending Jesus as the perfect sacrifice. When did Jesus die, exactly? During the Jewish Passover, Jesus died at “the ninth hour,” which is the ninth hour from sunrise, or around three o’clock in the afternoon. (See footnote on Mark 15:33-37.) According to modern calendars, this date corresponds to Friday, April 1, 33 C.E., which is on a Friday. What was the location of Jesus’ death? When Jesus was executed, it took place at “the so-called Skull Place,” which is known as Golgothain Hebrew. (See also John 19:17, 18) This site was “outside the city gate” of Jerusalem in Jesus’ day. (Hebrews 13:12) It may have been on a hill, since the Bible says that some observed Jesus’ execution “from a distance.” (Mark 15:40) However, the present location of Golgotha cannot be determined with certainty
  • sHow did Jesus die? Although many believe that Jesus was crucified​—executed on a cross​—the Bible reports: “His own self bare our sins in his own body onthe tree.” (1 Peter 2:​24,King James Version) Bible writers used two Greek words to refer to the instrument of Jesus’ execution​— stau·rosʹandxyʹlon. Many scholars have concluded that these words refer to a beam or an upright stake made of one piece of wood
  • sHow should Jesus’ death be remembered? On the night of the annual Jewish Passover, Jesus instituted a simple procedure with his followers and commanded them: “Keep doing this in remembrance of me.” (1 Corinthians 11:24) Hours later, Jesus was put to death. Bible writers compared Jesus to the lamb sacrificed at the Passover. (1 Corinthians 5:7) Just as the Passover celebration reminded the Israelites that they had been freed from slavery, so the Memorial of Jesus Christ’s death reminds Christians that they have been freed from sin and death. The Passover, held on Nisan 14 according to the lunar calendar, was a yearly celebration
  • The early Christians likewise observed the Memorial once each year. Annually, on the date corresponding to Nisan 14, millions of people worldwidecommemorate Jesus’ death

Why Did Jesus Die: Helping Your Kids Understand the Gospel

Your children may wonder, “Why did Jesus die?” You should prepare them for this possibility. As a parent, you have an excellent chance to assist your kid comprehend the significance of Jesus’ resurrection narrative by answering this essential question with your child.

The Background on Why Jesus Died

First and foremost, make certain that your youngster knows the earthly reasons for Jesus’ arrest, beating, and crucification. People were terrified when Jesus declared himself to be God. And despite the fact that Jesus demonstrated time and time again that he was God, some people refused to believe it. As a result, several influential Jewish leaders began devising strategies for assassinating Jesus. The Roman commander Pilate eventually ordered Jesus’ arrest, and he was sent to the Roman prison.

Jesus Came to S.A.V.E. Us

Now you can get to the spiritual cause for Jesus’ death on the cross for our sins. If your youngster is having trouble remembering the answer to their inquiry “Why did Jesus die,” here is a helpful acronym to help them remember — S.A.V.E.

S – Sin Separated Us From God

All of us have sinned and fallen short of God’s glory, according to what the Bible says (Romans 3:23, ESV). There have been times when everyone has done something wrong. Lying, cheating, and being nasty to others are just a few of the things that come to mind. We’ve done harm to ourselves, others, and God as a result of our sin. We are separated from God, who is flawless, as a result of our sins. Despite the fact that God did not intend us to be separated from Him, our terrible choices and sinful nature resulted in that happening.

But don’t give up hope!

A – A Way to God Was Made

Instill in your kid the belief that, despite our sin, God has a plan to reconcile us back to Himself via Christ. Because the penalty of sin is death, it was necessary to offer a sacrifice in order to put things right. There was just one problem: there was nothing we could do to make things right between God and us. God, on the other hand, understood just what to do in order to resolve the situation. It was for this reason that Jesus came to Earth. So that He might offer Himself as the sacrifice that reconciles us to God, He lived a faultless and sinless life.

His sacrifice makes it possible for us to be rescued since He paid the penalty for our sin on our behalf.

And as a result of His sacrifice, we now have.

V – Victory Through Jesus

Explain to your kid that, despite our sin, God has a grand plan to bring us back to Himself through the cross. A sacrifice had to be made in order to put things right since death is the cost of sin. There was just one problem: there was nothing we could do to make things better between God and ourselves. To God’s credit, he understood exactly what needed to be done in order to resolve the situation. As a result of his arrival on Earth, Jesus So that He might offer Himself as the sacrifice that reconciles us with God, He lived a faultless and sinless life.

It is only by His sacrifice that we may be rescued since He paid the penalty for our sin.

In order to redeem us from our sin, Jesus died on the cross. In addition, we have. as a result of His sacrifice With author and Focus on the Family President Jim Daly, embrace the chaos of parenting and find home, faith, and family.

E – Eternal Life for Those Who Believe

Discuss the following with your kid about John 3:16: As the Bible says, “For God so loved the world, that He gave His one and only Son, that whomever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” God’s love for us was so great that he sent his Son, Jesus, to die in our place. This was God’s grand design, and it was executed wonderfully! We are saved when we acknowledge Jesus as our Lord and surrender our hearts to Him. This implies that we shall spend the remainder of our lives with God, which is exactly what He desired all along.

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That is the motivation for the tale of Jesus’ resurrection.

And He rose from the dead again because there is nothing in the universe that is more powerful than He.

“Why Did Jesus Die” Activity for Your Kids

In the case that your kid prefers to learn visually and/or kinetically, it may be good to engage in an activity with them to help them picture the problem of sin and God’s cleaning power as shown in the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection. Find a transparent glass or bottle and fill it halfway with water to get started. Demonstrate your understanding to your youngster that this water represents their soul and how it should be. Inquire if they would be willing to drink this pure, clear water (they will probably say yes).

  • Shake the bottle of water to dislodge any dirt that has accumulated.
  • Inform them that, as a result of our sin, this is what our soul looks like before Jesus enters the picture.
  • Finally, bring them back into the house.
  • However, because Jesus died on the cross for our sins, this is not the case!
  • Remove the filthy water from the bottle and replace it with fresh, clear water to complete the process.

2 Reasons Jesus Died on the Cross

What was the reason for Jesus’ death? From a historical standpoint, the solution appears to be obvious on the face of it. The Jewish leaders conspired against him, Judas betrayed him, Herod and Pilate tried him, and the Roman troops killed him on the order of the Emperor. His death was the result of the actions of a number of persons and organizations. ‘Wicked men put him to death by nailing him on the cross,’ says the gospel writer Luke (Acts 2:23). However, there is another point of view to consider.

In order to get to the essence of the question of why Jesus died, we must consider the situation from God’s perspective. From a theological standpoint, we may identify two primary explanations for this phenomenon.

1. Jesus Died to Bring Us Near to God

For the first time in history, Christ died for sins, the righteous for the unjust, and thereby brought you closer to God. (See 1 Peter 3:18) The fact that Jesus died for the purpose of reconciling us to God means that we were a long distance from God previous to his death. As far as this is concerned, the apostles Paul and Peter agree: “You who were formerly a long distance off have been brought close through the blood of Christ” (Eph. 2:13). Our sin has to be dealt with in order for us to be brought closer to God: “Christ died for our sins” (1 Pet.

  1. When it comes to human disobedience and the repercussions of such disobedience, the Bible does not mince words.
  2. 7:11), while Paul writes in Romans 6:23 that “the wages of sin is death.” All people are guilty before God; our transgressions separate us from him, whose nature is characterized by pure holiness and unfailing justification.
  3. “Christ died for sins, the righteous for the unjust,” the Bible says, in order to bring us closer to God (1 Pet.
  4. If “the unjust” are all of us, then “the righteous” are none other than Jesus Christ.
  5. 5:21)—our sin—in order for us to experience compassion.
  6. Examples include Jesus paying the price for our salvation by “giving his life as a ransom in the place of many” (Luke 23:43).
  7. Jesus made us right with God by taking on our sins on his own body (1 Pet.

“Through the shedding of his blood, God offered Christ as a sacrifice of atonement,” according to Romans 3:25, so extinguishing God’s anger against our sinfulness.

Paul reminds us that Jesus’ death on the cross in our place was of the utmost significance and was carried out in line with the Scriptures (1 Cor.

In this way, his death satisfies the requirements of the old covenant offerings, including those for sin, Passover lamb, and the scapegoat on the Day of Atonement.

53:5).

The truth is that God sent his Son out of love, and the Son chose to lay down his life of his own volition: “God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself” (2 Cor.

As a result, all three persons of the Trinity are completely involved in our redemption: “Christ offered himself to God via the everlasting Spirit” (Christ offered himself to God through the eternal Spirit) (Heb.

9:14). According to Graham Cole, the Father is the architect of the atonement, the Son is the executor, and the Spirit is the applier of the atonement.

2. Jesus Died to Reveal God’s Character

It is not the case that we were completely ignorant of God before to Christ’s death. His providential care for the world indicates his affection for it. Furthermore, his promises to Abraham demonstrate his compassion for the entire world. However, it is at the cross that we witness the culmination of his agreements with Israel, as well as the last and dramatic demonstration of his love and justice. As stated in two passages from the book of Romans, God “demonstrates his own love for us in this: Christ died for us even while we were still sinners” (Rom.

  1. God’s love for us is established beyond any reasonable question by Christ’s death.
  2. would likewise generously give us all things” no matter what life throws our way (Rom.
  3. Jesus also died in order to illustrate the justice of God: “God offered Christ as a sacrifice of atonement.
  4. Our Lord’s death on the cross demonstrates not only his love, but also the severity with which he regards our sin.
  5. He forgives us because he loves us.
  6. We sense God’s love, but we also see the severity with which he views our sin when we look to the cross.

Boasting in the Cross

There are a plethora of different reasons why Jesus died. These include the conquest of evil, the establishment of the new covenant, and the setting of an example of self-sacrificial love for us. However, there are two key reasons for this: to bring us closer to God and to display God’s nature. What would have happened to us if God had not sent his Son to die in our place? We would be “darkened in our perception of God and estranged from the life of God” if the cross were not present (Eph. 4:18).

I’m inclined to develop another phrase: “Jesus’ death is for all time, not simply for the holiday of Easter.” According to Leon Morris, the cross “dominates the New Testament” in terms of its significance.

The cross of our Lord Jesus Christ is our only thing to boast about, and I pray that everyone of us would join Paul in declaring, “I will never boast about anything save the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Gal.

Why did Jesus die?

God must deal with the injustice that has resulted from sin. Consider the following scenario: a criminal appears before a judge, and the judge simply absolves the criminal of a crime such as murder, rape, or theft on the grounds that the judge adores the criminal. What would the general public think of such a judge? According to the Bible, “Shall not the Judge of all the world do what is right?” (Genesis 18:25).

It is a natural consequence of selfishness that the innocent will die as a result of their actions (Romans 6:23). Instead of inflicting death on the wrongdoer, Jesus, the Judge, assumed the consequences of man’s sin on the part of God. Death was the result of this action.

How does Jesus’ death save us?

According to Martin Luther, because He could not die as God, He took on human form in order to die. When Christ died on the cross, he acknowledged man’s rebellion against himself. He accepted the unfairness of man against man despite the fact that he was completely innocent. The death of Christ brings about reconciliation, or the reconnection of all people with God and his creation. According to Romans 3:25, “.whom God put out as a propitiation” for our sins, Jesus Christ. “Propitiation” is defined as “anything that appeases a deity” in its literal sense.

The phrase may signify anything from “accepting harm” to “forgiving” to “showing mercy.” As sinners, we have transgressed God’s flawless law and are thus without legal standing.

If a husband says something harsh to his wife and she does not respond, but instead allows the word to fall on her heart and break her spirit; if she forgives and treats her husband as if he had simply spoken words of praise, she bears the burden of his sin against her and pays the price for it.

  1. The Bible does not claim that Jesus made a sacrifice for our sins, but rather that He “is” a sacrifice for our sins (Romans 3:25, 1 John 2:2; 4:10).
  2. There are several such examples in the Bible that demonstrate how God Himself endures our wickedness in order to restore us to fellowship with Him.
  3. In this narrative, the father, who represents our heavenly Father, welcomed his son back into his house and into his heart, despite the fact that the son had taken items that could not be replaced by the father.
  4. The cross is a timeless message to all of humanity.
  5. Christianity not only acknowledges God’s brutality on the cross, but it also focuses on the reconciliation that was achieved as a result of the crucifixion.
  6. Christianity is centered on the loving favor God has bestowed upon each and every person who accepts the redemption provided by the cross.

We may never fully comprehend the peace, love, and pleasure that flow from the cross, but we are blessed to be able to experience them.

Why did Jesus have to die in order to forgive us?

Another factor that is sometimes disregarded is the fact that Satan attempted to exploit God’s flawless justice as a justification for why God should not redeem sinners by claiming that God is unjust. Satan accused God of being a self-serving Judge who only saved man for the benefit of God alone. As a result, Jesus’ death was required in order to provide an answer to this issue before the entire cosmos (Rev. 12:10, 5:9, 12). As a result of His sacrifice on the cross, Jesus showed to the entire cosmos that He, as a part of the Godhead, was fully selfless even to the point of death.

  • He died as a result of our sins being imputed to him.
  • It was determined that this curse resulted in endless loss.
  • According to Matthew 26:38, “My soul is very miserable, even to death” (Matthew 26:38).
  • What better argument could be put up to demonstrate selflessness than this one?
  • It is possible for sinners to achieve this justification and therefore become safe to be saved (Romans 5:17).
  • When we confess our faults to God and ask Him to eradicate sin from our lives, He will give us the capacity to become safe to rescue ourselves and others (1 John 1:9, John 3, 1 John 3:9).
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Further Reading

  • Because of its spiritual insight and practical application, the book, Desire of the Ages, has been hailed as one of the finest books ever written about the life of Christ by many readers. Some of the chapters from this book that chronicle our Savior’s life, death, and resurrection are linked below
  • Others are linked at the bottom of this page. A Servant of Servant
  • A Servant of Servant “In Memory of Me” is a phrase that means “in remembrance of me.” “Do not allow your heart to be troubled.” Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas, Jesus was at Gethsemane. In Pilate’s Courtroom, Judas is sentenced to death. In Joseph’s Tomb, “The Lord Has Risen” “Why Weepest Thou?” the angel asks at the foot of the cross.

Why did Jesus have to die?

Because of its spiritual insight and practical application, the book, Desire of the Ages, has been hailed as one of the finest works ever written about the life of Christ by numerous scholars. We have included links to a handful of the chapters from this book that chronicle the life, death, and resurrection of our Lord and Savior. Servant of Servant; one who serves others; one who serves others. “In Memory of Me” is a phrase that means “remembering me.” ‘Do Not Allow Your Heart to Be Distressed.’ Prior to the Court of Caiaphas, Jesus was at Gethsemane.

In Joseph’s Tomb, “The Lord Has Risen” “Why Weepest Thou?” the angel asks at the foot of the Cross.

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Why Did Jesus Have to Die for Us?

It was customary in ancient Israel to sacrifice animals in order to satisfy the debt owing them for their crimes, which was documented in the Old Testament. God’s rules dictated which sorts of offerings were necessary to atone for various sins, and which types of sacrifices were not required. The vast majority of living sacrifices were to be faultless animals with no blemishes or flaws. God’s Son Jesus came to earth in the New Testament to reconcile us with God by making the greatest sacrifice: his own life.

  1. Consequently, Jesus lived a sinless life on our behalf.
  2. “God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world could be saved through him,” according to John 3:17.
  3. Thus, Jesus became the ultimate sacrifice, forever meeting the demands of God’s justice on the basis of his own life and death.
  4. And in Jesus’ resurrection, we witness God’s victory over death, pointing us in the direction of the promise of eternal life in God’s presence (John 11:25).

Why Did Jesus Die?

According to EveryStudent.com The death of Jesus Christ by crucifixion was reserved for the most heinous of criminals. In Jesus’ case, it appeared that almost everyone contributed in some way. All of the Jewish religious leaders, the Gentile Roman government, and an enraged mob of people demanded his execution. Why? It all began in a small village in Israel, not far from the capital city of Jerusalem. Having reached the age of thirty, Jesus began to teach others about life and God. He drew a large number of people to him.

  1. He welcomed not only the wealthy and powerful, but also prostitutes, the poor, the sick, and those who were marginalized in society.
  2. “He who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will be illuminated by the light of life,” Jesus says.
  3. As a result of what they witnessed.
  4. He started with a handful of fish and a few loaves of bread and worked his way up to feeding a 4,000-person hungry crowd.
  5. At sea, Jesus stood and ordered the wind and rain to cease, bringing about a brief respite from the storm.

“Who is this, that even the wind and the seas bow down to him?” the men in the boat inquired. 3On several occasions, he was able to bring the dead back to life. It’s no surprise that Jesus drew large crowds and that word about him spread.

So Why Was Jesus Crucified?

As Jesus taught the masses, he was also critical of the religious authority in power at the time. They made a show of their authority, insisting on strict adherence to their stringent rituals, rules, and cultural customs. “They bind together huge loads that are difficult to carry and place them on people’s shoulders,” Jesus remarked of them. 4 “You hypocrites!” he said, in a direct challenge to their position. Isaiah accurately saw your future when he declared, “This nation respects me with their lips, but their hearts are distant from me; in vain do they worship me, teaching the laws of men as doctrines.” 5 In the case of the Sabbath, for example, they were very rigid.

  • It was more limiting than it was soothing in its effects.
  • In response, Jesus instructed the guy to take up his mat and walk.
  • “It is the Sabbath, and it is not permissible for you to be carrying your mat,” the Pharisees told him when they spotted him.
  • He did not take a break on the Sabbath.
  • 6

Jesus Was Clear about His Deity.

Knowing Jesus, according to him, was to know God. 7To behold him was to behold God. 8Believing in him was the same as believing in God. 9To accept him was to accept God as well. 10To despise him was to despise God. 11And to honor him was to worship God, for he was the embodiment of holiness. Following Jesus’ popularity, the Jewish Pharisees and Sadducees determined that they needed to get rid of him in order to restore control over the people’s hearts and minds. They captured Jesus and took him before the high priest, who questioned Jesus, “Are you the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?” (Are you the Son of the Blessed?) I am,” Jesus said, and you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of Power, descending on the clouds of sky to meet you.

And they all agreed that he was a murderer who deserved to die.

This means that both Jewish and Gentile people took part in Jesus’ murder.

He thought that Jesus should be freed from his imprisonment.

“Crucify him!” they cried out in unison. “Put him to death!” Pilate acceded to the demands of the throng. The judgment was death by crucifixion, the form of torture and execution used by the Roman authorities.

Jesus Knew This Would Happen

Jesus was completely unsurprised by all of this. Jesus informed his followers several times previous to his crucifixion that he was going to be arrested, beaten, and crucified, and he was right. His predictions included the possibility of a resurrection three days after his burial. By physically returning to life, Jesus would be able to demonstrate what he had declared about his deity. The soldiers grabbed Jesus and beat him after making a wreath of long thorns and pressing it into his head to serve as a false crown for him.

  • In many cases, forty lashes were enough to bring down a person.
  • He died of gradual asphyxia and heart failure while hanging there.
  • Death on the cross was not only a natural result of Jesus’ miracles and teachings; it was also a deliberate act.
  • Jesus had previously demonstrated that he has complete control over nature, illness, and even death.
  • Jesus might have walked away from the crucifixion at any point, given the circumstances.
  • Jesus made the decision to die.
  • “I choose to lay it down of my own own.” 14 The decision to do so was deliberate on his part.
  • Intentional.

Why Did Jesus Allow His Crucifixion?

We operate in ways that are diametrically contrary to God’s methods to varied degrees. Take a short look at the news on any given day and you’ll see things like racism, murder, sexual abuse, lies, greed, corruption, terrorism, war, and so on. As individuals, we have a proclivity for causing havoc in our own and other people’s lives. God views us as lost and blind, and he holds us accountable for our actions. Consider how horrified and devastated we are to learn that a 6-year-old child has been taken from her home and is being sexually abused.

  • But then, all of our sin is an affront to a holy God, isn’t it?
  • We don’t even live up to our own expectations, let alone those of another person.
  • So, what would a God who is absolutely holy see?
  • 15It is for this reason that God instructs the Israelites in the Old Testament to sacrifice a lamb once a year for the atonement of their sins.
  • However, this was just a momentary reprieve.
  • It was Jesus who paid for our sin on the cross, rather than us, so that we may be forever forgiven and enjoy everlasting life.

Jesus was fully aware of every sin you have ever done or will commit while he was hanging on the cross. It was Jesus who bore the penalty for our sins on our behalf.

DaVinci’s Last Supper

You’ve probably seen the iconic artwork by Leonardo da Vinci depicting the “Last Supper,” in which Jesus sits at a long table with the disciples seated next to him on each side of him on either side of the table. The supper that Jesus shared with his followers the night before he was captured and killed was shown by Da Vinci in this painting. As part of that “Last Supper,” Jesus promised his followers that his blood would be shed “for the remission of sins” for all people. 17 On the cross, Jesus, who had done no sin, paid the penalty for our sin.

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We weren’t deserving of him taking our position in the world.

The Bible tells us that “God demonstrates his love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” 18

Our Response to the Crucifixion of Jesus

What is it that he expects of us? In order to make amends and gain our forgiveness? No. We will never be able to repay Jesus for all he has done for us. What he demands of us is straightforward. to put their faith in him He urges us to embrace his dying on our behalf, as well as his total and unconditional forgiveness, as a gift from him. Surprisingly, many people do not want to go through with it. They desire to put up an effort to win their salvation. They must earn their way into paradise.

  • In response to their rejection of everything Jesus has done for them, Jesus stated they will die in their sin and face judgment.
  • Moreover, everlasting life and an intimate, personal contact with God are also available now, while we are living on the earth.
  • Jesus was not simply absorbing the consequences of our wrongdoing.
  • He was extending far more than just forgiveness to those who needed it.
  • This is analogous to a wealthy billionaire not only canceling a debt owed to him, but also transferring ownership of his whole estate to the individual who was unable to pay the amount back in full.
  • It is entirely up to us whether or not we accept the gift of a connection with him that he is presenting to us.

His Offer to Us

Anyone who would invite Jesus into their lives and accept his free gift of forgiveness and eternal life will establish a relationship with him that will last for the rest of their lives. Following Jesus’ crucifixion, they buried him in a tomb and stationed a trained Roman guard of soldiers at the tomb to keep watch over him. Why? Jesus had stated on several occasions that he will rise from the dead three days after his his body. Everything he had declared about himself will be proven correct.

  • After then, Jesus appeared physically to the disciples several times, first to a throng of 500 people, then to individuals.
  • Each of them was murdered for it, in separate parts of the world from one another, because they were so sure of Jesus’ identity.
  • “We have come to know and believe in the love that God has for us,” says the apostle John in his book of Revelation.
  • Whoever lives in love is a part of God.
  • Here’s how you can do it.
  • Please accept my apologies.
  • You have complete control over my life.
  • Amen.” In the case of someone who has only recently asked Jesus into their lives, his crucifixion signifies that you have accepted his gift, that you have been forgiven, and that you have an eternal connection with him.

Footnotes: (1) John 8:12; (2) Matthew 9:35; (3) (3) 4:41 (Matthew 4:41) (4) Jesus said in Matthew 23:4 (5), Matt 15:9 (6), and John 5:18 (7) John 8:19 (eighth) John 12:45 (eighth) John 14:9 (ninth) (9) John 12:44 and 14:1 are two of the most important passages in the Bible (10) 9:37 (Matthew 9:37) (11) 15:23 (John 15:23) John 5:23 (12) (13) Mark 14:61,62 (KJV) (14) 10:18 (John 10:18) (15) Acts 10:43 (16) Romans 6:23 (17) John 1:29 (18) Matthew 26:28 (19) Romans 5:8 (20) Acts 10:43 (20) Paul writes in Romans 6:23 that (21) 14:6 (John 14:6) (22) (23), John 5:24 (24), John 17:25,26 (23) 1John 4:16,17 (24)

7 Reasons Christ Suffered and Died

John Piper’s recent book, The Passion of Jesus Christ: Fifty Reasons Why He Came to Die, argues that God’s plans for the world are incomprehensible, and that Jesus’ death serves those goals. “Infinitely more significant than who killed Jesus is the issue of what God accomplished for sinners like us by sending His Son to die,” he goes on to state. What a need it is for us to comprehend–and share–the divinely ordained reasons that motivated Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection. The following are seven of them: 1.

  • The death of Christ did not only precede His resurrection; it was also the price that was paid in order to achieve it.
  • With Jesus’ suffering and death, God’s anger was finally appeased and fulfilled.
  • The price of forgiveness has been fully and completely paid.
  • All that remained was for God to publicly declare his approval, and that was all that remained.
  • “If Christ has not been risen, your faith is worthless, and you are still in your sins,” states the Bible (1 Corinthians 15:17, ESV*), the point is not that the resurrection is the price paid for our sins, but rather that our faith is meaningless and we are still in our sins.
  • 2.
  • In addition to being a proof of God’s love (see John 3:16), the death of Jesus Christ is also the highest expression of Christ’s personal love for everyone who accept it as their treasure.

It is my own sin, not the sin of the world, that separates me from God.

Then I see Christ enduring and dying on the cross.

“Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her,” the Bible says in Ephesians 5:25.

Is it possible for me to become a member of the “church”?

My heart has been persuaded, and I have chosen to appreciate the beauty and abundance of Christ as my treasure.

3.

What a ridiculous notion it is to believe that our good acts would one day offset our negative ones.

Even our excellent actions are flawed because we do not perform them in a manner that is pleasing to God.

Second, this is clearly not the manner in which God rescues us.

There is no redemption to be found in balancing the books.

Not balanced, but wiped away, must be the record of our wrongdoings (even our flawed good actions), as well as the just consequences that each of us receives for each of them.

He put up with my damnation.

And faith in Him is the only way for me to reach God.

To serve as the foundation for our justification and to bring our obedience to a close, so that we may be declared righteous.

Being pardoned indicates that I am guilty and that my crime is not recorded as a crime against the state.

The judgement of justification does not automatically transform a person into a just person.

(The moral transformation that occurs as a result of placing our faith in Christ is not justification.

The verdict is in: Just!

We have not complied with the law in the tribunal of God.

Yet, miraculously, the Bible states that God “justifies the ungodly” who put their confidence in His favor because of Christ (Romans 4:5).

However, forgiving our sins does not imply that we have been declared virtuous.

Specifically, I assert before God that I have no personal righteousness that derives from the law, but only the righteousness that comes through trust in Christ (Philippians 3:9).

Christ’s death served as the foundation for our forgiveness and perfection.

To get for us all of the things that are beneficial to our lives.

No, not because I enjoy logic, but rather because I enjoy having my genuine needs satisfied.

The link between the two parts is intended to ensure that the second half will be completed without a hitch.

God’s absolute commitment to provide us with everything is more certain than His Son’s death on the cross.

He will provide us with everything that is beneficial to us.

All of the things we require in order to achieve everlasting happiness.

It is through him who empowers me that I am able to achieve everything” (Philippians 4:12-13, emphasis added).

Because of Christ’s suffering and death, we have assurance that God will provide us with all we require to carry out His plan, to bring Him glory, and to experience everlasting pleasure.

In order to draw us closer to God.

God in His fullness.

If forgiveness merely provides relief from guilt without also opening the door to God, then forgiveness is not good news.

If redemption just liberates us from slavery and does not bring us closer to God, it is not good news at all.

Because we wish to go out of hell, there is no conclusive evidence that we have received a new heart.

The fact that we desire these things because they bring us closer to God’s pleasure is proof that we have been transformed.

The Bible says, “Christ likewise suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unjust, in order that he may bring us to God” (1 Peter 3:18).

7.

When we are at our happiest, we do not want to die.

What we actually desire in those situations isn’t death, but respite from our suffering.

We’d like to see the end of the discomfort.

The yearning of the human heart is to live and to be content with one’s existence.

“He has implanted eternity in the heart of man” (Ecclesiastes 3:11).

We were designed to live indefinitely.

The antithesis of eternal life is not annihilation, as many people believe.

Probably more than anyone else, Jesus spoke of it, and He made it clear that rejecting the eternal life He offered would result not in annihilation but in the misery of God’s wrath: “Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God will remain on him” (John 3:36).

“These will be sent away into eternal torment, but the righteous into eternal life,” Jesus said (Matthew 25:46).

We shall be transformed in such a way that we will be capable of experiencing levels of bliss that were before unfathomable to us in this life.

“What neither the human eye nor the human ear has seen, nor the human heart has dreamed. God has prepared for those who love him” (1 Corinthians 2:9). Christ suffered and died as a result of this. Why wouldn’t we embrace Him as our treasure and live for the rest of our lives?

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