Why Did Jesus Die On The Cross Got Questions

Why did Jesus have to die?

QuestionAnswer When we raise a question like as “Why did Jesus have to die?” we must be careful not to imply that we are questioning God’s existence or deserving of salvation. To question why God couldn’t come up with “another way” to accomplish a task implies that the technique He has chosen is not the greatest course of action and that an other approach would be preferable. Usually, what we consider to be a “better” strategy is one that appears to be correct to us. It is necessary to realize that God’s ways are not our ways, and that His thoughts are not our ideas—that their level is higher than ours—before we can come to terms with whatever he does (Isaiah 55:8).

Specifically, “For I conveyed to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that Christ was buried, and that Christ rose from the dead the third day in accordance with the Scriptures,” the Scripture adds (1 Corinthians 15:3-4).

Most significantly, the Bible reveals why Jesus’ death and resurrection are the sole means of entry into the kingdom of heaven.

— In the case of sin, death is the penalty.

  • God, on the other hand, had no choice but to punish Adam and Eve for disobeying His instructions.
  • In the same way, neglecting sin would render the holy God unjust.
  • “Because the wages of sin is death,” says the Bible (Romans 6:23).
  • “All of our righteousnesses are like filthy rags” in comparison to His kindness, says the Bible (Isaiah 64:6b).
  • All have sinned and come short of the glory of God, says the Bible (Romans 3:23).
  • Everyone has earned death, which is permanent separation from God in hell, as a result of their sin.
  • — The pledge necessitated the killing of an innocent person.

To overcome the snake, God promised that He would send a Savior to the earth (Genesis 3:15).

In the lives of men such as Abraham and Moses, God reinforced His promise of the Sacrifice.

God’s perfect Son satisfied God’s perfect demand of God’s perfect law in the most perfect way.

He (Christ) was made sin for us so that we would be made righteous in God’s sight through Him (Jesus)” (2 Corinthians 5:21).

— The prophets foresaw the death of Jesus.

He was characterized by one prophet, Isaiah, as follows: “Who has trusted what they have heard from us?

Because he sprang up before him like a young plant, and like a root emerging from dry earth; he possessed neither shape nor grandeur that we should admire, nor beauty that we might desire him as a result of our admiration.

Certainly, he has bore our griefs and carried our sorrows, yet we still considered him to be afflicted, struck by God, and afflicted.

It is by his stripes that we have been cured of our iniquities.

He was troubled and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth; he was like a lamb being taken to the slaughter, and like a sheep being sheared before its shearers, in that he did not open his lips.

Moreover, they buried him beside the evil and with a wealthy individual upon his death, despite the fact that he had committed no violence and had spoken without lying.

He will see and be gratified because of the suffering of his soul; via his knowledge, the righteous one, my servant, will cause many to be regarded righteous, and he will bear their sins.

Three hundred years after Isaiah prophesied was given fruition in the person of the perfect Lord Jesus, who was born of the virgin Mary.

(See also John 1:29).

Demonstrators chanted, “Crucify Him!” Soldiers stomped on Him, ridiculed Him, and nailed Him on a cross.

He, on the other hand, did not remain in the grave.

What was the reason for Jesus’ death?

The punishment for our own transgressions would be to experience God’s wrath in the blazing furnaces of hell.

Jesus had to die because He is the only one who can atone for our sins, and hence He was the only one who could do it.

Learn more about the Lamb of God’s sacrificial death and how it may remove your sins if God is demonstrating your need for Him by clicking here! Questions regarding Salvation (return to top of page) What was the reason for Jesus’ death?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

Why did Isa/Jesus have to die?

Get our Question of the Week sent to your email every weekday. Get Answers Ministries has copyright protection for the years 2002-2022. All intellectual property rights are protected by law. Policy Regarding Personal Data Collection and Usage On January 4, 2022, this page was last modified.

Why was Jesus crucified?

QuestionAnswer There is an earthly cause for Jesus’ death, as well as a heavenly motive for his death. Simply expressed, the worldly explanation for this is that mankind is a bad bunch of people. God is good, and this is the heavenly reason for this. The reason Jesus was crucified on this world was because mankind is bad. Men of evil plotted against Him, falsely accused Him, and assassinated Him. The officials of Israel had a variety of motives for wanting Jesus to be put to death on the cross.

  • Because they were concerned that Jesus would garner an excessive following, the Roman authorities may descend on the nation, forcing them to lose their positions, they sought to prevent this from happening (John 11:48).
  • And when He claimed to be the Son of God, they felt He was blaspheming (Luke 22:66–71).
  • Because the Romans were in charge of carrying out Jesus’ crucifixion, he was crucified rather than stoned, hung, drowned, or otherwise punished.
  • It was customary to affix the accusations against the condemned to the cross of the condemned.
  • The Jewish leaders manufactured this claim in order to provoke the Roman governor into ordering Jesus’ execution.
  • The heavenly reason for Jesus’ crucifixion is that God is good.
  • Despite the fact that the act of crucifying Jesus was evil, the crucifixion was still God’s plan to atone for sin on the part of mankind.

In the case of the crucifixion, it was not a case of evil getting out of hand.

The powers of darkness were given divine authorization to carry out their plans (Luke 22:53).

God used the evil desires of evil men to accomplish the greatest good possible: the provision of salvation for all of mankind through the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

There is nothing in the Old Testament prophecy that mandates that the Messiah be crucified in order to save the world.

When Paul writes in Galatians 3:13, he is referring to the death of Christ and applying Deuteronomy 21:22–23.

John 19:37).

Leviticus 17:11).

John 19:36).

Every one of us has committed sins, and we are all deserving of death; however, Christ died in our place.

In order to be just and the one who justifies those who have faith in Jesus, he did this in order to demonstrate his righteousness at the present time, because he had forbeared in leaving the sins committed previously unpunished—he did it to demonstrate his righteousness at the present time in order to be just and the one who justifies those who have faith in Jesus.” After all is said and done, the reason that Jesus was crucified is the answer that each of us must come to understand and accept by faith: Jesus was crucified to pay the penalty for my sin, allowing me to be forgiven and restored to right standing with God.

Questions about Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What was the reason for Jesus’ crucifixion?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

See also:  Jesus I Know Paul I Know But Who Are You

What is the meaning of the cross?

QuestionAnswer To put it another way, the cross represents the death of Christ. It was used as an instrument of execution from around 600 BC until the 4th century AD, and it resulted in death by the most agonizing and excruciating of methods. Crucifixion was a kind of execution in which a person was either tied or nailed to a wooden cross and left to hang until they died. To die would be a lengthy and excruciatingly painful process; in fact, the word excruciating is derived from the Latin word for “out of crucifying.” As a result of Christ’s death on the crucified, the cross has taken on a wholly new significance in modern times.

Jesus Christ is the Lamb of God, who atones for the sins of the world via his sacrifice (John 1:29).

To fulfill this order, the Israelites were to slaughter a spotless lamb and smear the blood of that lamb on the doorposts of their dwelling places.

When Jesus arrived at John’s baptismal site, John immediately recognized Him and exclaimed, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who wipes away the sin of the world!” The Scriptures identify Him and God’s purpose for Him to be sacrificed as the Lamb of God (John 1:29), identifying Him and God’s plan for Him to be sacrificed as the Lamb of God.

  1. This is the overarching narrative of the Bible—the tale of redemption—and it may be summarized as Heaven and earth were created by God.
  2. However, as a result of Satan’s (the serpent’s) temptations, Adam and Eve sinned and fell out of God’s favour.
  3. To save His people from their sins, the Father sent his one and only Son into the earth in order for him to become human flesh and live among them.
  4. In His capacity as the sinless Son of God, He is able to give the spotless sacrifice that God needs.
  5. People who place their faith and confidence in Jesus alone for salvation are assured of eternal life as a result of His atoning sacrifice on the cross (John 3:16).
  6. The idea of “cross-bearing” has lost much of its original significance in modern times.
  7. We must remember, however, that Jesus is challenging His disciples to profound self-denial in order to follow Him.
  8. “It is those who would preserve their lives who will lose them, but it is those who risk their lives for my cause who will find them” (Matthew 16:25).
  9. Instead of me, it is Christ who now lives in me and gives me life.
  10. It is true that Christians are persecuted in some parts of the world, even to the point of death, for their religious beliefs.
  11. Those of us who are not subjected to such severe persecution nonetheless have a responsibility to remain true to Christ’s teachings.

Even if we are never called upon to make the ultimate sacrifice, we must be prepared to do so out of love for the One who rescued us and sacrificed His life to save us from our sins. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What exactly is the significance of the cross?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

What does it mean that Jesus died for our sins?

QuestionAnswer Simply said, no one would have everlasting life if Jesus had not died on the cross as a sacrifice for our sins. “I am the way, the truth, and the life,” Jesus himself declared. “There is no other way to the Father but through me” (John 14:6). Using this remark, Jesus states the purpose of His birth, death, and resurrection: to offer a road to heaven for sinful humans, who would otherwise be unable to reach it on their own. At the time of God’s creation of Adam and Eve, they were without flaw and lived in a virtual paradise known as the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:15).

  1. Genesis 3 goes on to detail how Adam and Eve were deceived and tempted by Satan’s falsehoods and temptations.
  2. (Genesis 2:16-17; 2:20-21).
  3. God has proclaimed that those who sin shall perish, both physically and spiritually, according to His Word.
  4. In His generosity and mercy, God provided a way out of this predicament through the spilt blood of His perfect Son on the cross, which was the only way out.
  5. When it came to being deemed “sinless” or “right” in the sight of God, the Law of Moses established a method for the people to do so: by sacrificing animals as sacrifices for each sin they committed.
  6. As a result of His coming and death, Jesus was able to fulfill His mission as the ultimate and last sacrifice, the perfect (without blemish) offering for our sins (Colossians 1:22; 1 Peter 1:19).
  7. “This is done in order that what was promised, which is delivered through faith in Jesus Christ, may be given to those who believe” (Galatians 3:22).
  8. Our salvation is secured by our faith in the spilt blood of Jesus Christ, which atones for our sins and grants us eternal life.

Questions regarding Salvation (return to top of page) What does it imply that Jesus died in our place because of our sins?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

Was Jesus crucified on a cross, pole, or stake?

QuestionAnswer The cross is, without a doubt, the most well-known and adored symbol in all of Christianity. It may be found on the walls of our churches and cathedrals, in our jewelry, in our literature and in our music, as well as in various commercial logos. The empty cross represents the labor done there by our Savior, who voluntarily went to his death in order to pay the penalty for our sins on the cross. “It is completed,” among Jesus’ final words before His death, were “it is finished” (John 19:30).

It is no surprise that the cross has come to represent all that is central to the greatest tale ever told—the story of Christ’s sacrificial death on the cross.

The Greek term for “cross” is isstauros, which literally translates as “a pole or a cross used as an instrument of deadly punishment.” In the Greek language, the wordtauroo, which is translated as “crucify,” literally means “to be fastened to a pole or a cross.” The same verb was also employed outside of the Bible in the context of building up a fence with stakes, which is a common practice today.

  1. In spite of the fact that the Greek word stauroscan may mean either “pole” or “stake,” many academics believe that Jesus died on a cross in which the upright beam protruded over the shorter crosspiece.
  2. The Romans were not particular about how they executed their victims on the cross.
  3. Jesus might have been crucified on any of these items, and the perfection and fullness of His sacrifice would not have been diminished in any way.
  4. Certain religious groups, most notably the Catholic Church, disagree.
  5. In their New World Translation, however, they state that Jesus died on a “torture stake” rather than on a crucifixion, which is incorrect.
  6. Some indirect evidence in the New Testament are used to argue against the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ belief that Jesus died on a “torture stake,” according to the Witnesses.
  7. The way of Jesus’ death is revealed to Peter: “‘When you are old, stretch out your hands, and someone else will clothe you and carry you to a place you do not want to go,'” Jesus says.
See also:  How To Believe In Jesus

By displaying outspread arms on a crosspiece, Peter (who history has it was crucified) exemplifies how the Roman practice of crucifixion was typically carried wide.

As Thomas famously stated, “Unless I see the nail imprints on his hands and place my finger where the nails were, and plunge my hand into his side, I will not believe.” Thomas was referring to his famous moment of doubt (verse 25).

If Jesus had been nailed to a stake or a pole instead of a cross, just one nail would have been required.

What is often overlooked in debates about the cross’s form is the significance of the cross to us.

According to Matthew 16:24–25, “anyone seeks to save his life will forfeit it, but whoever forfeits his life for my sake will find it.” The cross, stake, or pole used as a means of execution.

It is only by denying ourselves and giving up our life for the cause of Christ that we may call ourselves “Christians.” The extreme form of losing one’s self in order to follow Christ may be being martyred for one’s faith, but even in the most peaceful of political environments, we must be willing to lose one’s self in order to be His followers, which may entail crucifying one’s own self-righteousness, one’s own self-promotion, and one’s own selfish ambitions.

Those who are unwilling to do so are deemed “unworthy” of His presence (Matthew 10:38).

We have reason to think He did.

If we overlook Thomas’s remarks in John 20:25, we could be on to something.

Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) Is it possible that Jesus was crucified on a cross, pole, or stake?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

How long was Jesus on the cross?

QuestionAnswer Jesus was nailed on the cross for almost six hours. “He was ridiculed by the top priests, the teachers of the law, and the elders.” The critics pointed out that he had saved others, but that he was unable to save himself! He’s the king of Israel, after all! Allow him to come down from the cross at this time, and we will believe in him. He places his faith in God. ‘Let God rescue him now, if he so desires, for he has declared himself to be the Son of God,'” Matthew 27:41–43. The crucifixion was a way of carrying out the death punishment in the ancient Roman Empire for people judged guilty of a deadly charge.

  • In order to destroy Jesus and keep their authority, the Jewish theocrats planned a strategy to persuade Roman authorities that Jesus had to be slain, which they executed (Mark 14:1; cf.
  • The Jewish authorities accused Christ of inciting revolt and establishing Himself as King, charges that he denied and denied again.
  • Crucifixion was intended not just to kill, but also to deter others from engaging in illegal activity.
  • The cross had a stigma attached to it, and Jewish law stated that it was a curse (Galatians 3:13; 5:11).
  • Following their nailing to a cross, some persons may be able to survive for several days afterward, depending on the circumstances.
  • The Jewish calendar is used by Matthew, Mark, and Luke to keep track of time.
  • In accordance with Jewish tradition, Mark writes, “They crucified him and divided his clothing among themselves, casting lots for them to choose what each should receive.” When they crucified Jesus, it was the third hour, according to Mark 15:24–25 (New International Version).

Matthew, who also used the Jewish method of timekeeping, states that “from the sixth hour to the ninth hour, there was darkness over all the country” (Matthew 6:6-9).

That is, from 12:00 noon to 3:00 P.M., there was complete darkness.

Then, at the conclusion of that period, “after Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he surrendered his spirit” (Matthew 27:50).

For a total of six hours, Jesus had been hanging on the cross, beginning at roughly 9:00 a.m.

The Gospel of John includes the information that Jesus’ trial before Pontius Pilate was taking place at “around the sixth hour,” according to Roman time (John 19:14, ESV).

As a result, using the Roman system, “around the sixth hour” equals approximately 6:00 a.m.

Then, according to the Jewish calendar, “the third hour” is 9:00 a.m.

“the sixth hour” is equivalent to 12:00 p.m.

The night has come.

Jesus is put to death.

Putting everything together, Jesus’ trial came to a close about 6:00 a.m. Approximately three hours later, his crucifixion began, and He died approximately six hours after that. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What was the length of Jesus’ time on the cross?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

Why did Jesus have to experience so much suffering?

QuestionAnswer Throughout His trials, torture, and crucifixion, Jesus endured a great deal of pain (Matthew 27; Mark 15; Luke 23; John 19). His bodily anguish was as follows: Isaiah 52:14 states that “there were many who were shocked by Him—His appearance was so mangled beyond the resemblance of any man, and his form was distorted beyond the likeness of any human.” ‘All of the disciples left him and fled,’ says the author of the Gospel of Mark (Matthew 26:56). Because “God made him who had no sin to be sin for us,” his suffering was spiritual: “God made him who had no sin to be sin for us” (2 Corinthians 5:21).

When Jesus cried out, “My God, my God, why have you left me?” he was referring to his own guilt.

Jesus’ horrific bodily pain was exacerbated by the fact that He had to bear the blame of our crimes and die in order to pay our punishment (Romans 5:8).

He was detested, and we did not hold him in high regard, as if he were someone from whom men would conceal their faces.

The purpose of Jesus’ suffering is indicated in this passage: “for our trespasses,” “for our healing,” and “to bring us peace.” During a conversation with his followers, Jesus stated that His suffering would be certain: “The Son of Man will suffer many things and will be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and teachers of the law, and he will be murdered and will be resurrected to life on the third day” (Luke 9:22; cf.

  • 17:25).
  • God’s plan for the salvation of the world included Christ’s suffering on the cross.
  • My heart has turned to wax and has completely melted away inside of me.
  • Several dogs have surrounded me, and I’m being pursued by a group of terrible individuals who have wounded both my hands and my feet.
  • It is them that split up my clothes among themselves and draw lots for my apparel.” It was necessary for Jesus to suffer in order for this and other prophesies to be fulfilled.
  • When Adam and Eve were given clothes of animal skin to conceal their shame (Genesis 3:21), the notion of the innocent dying for the wicked was established.
  • In later times, this notion was codified in the Mosaic Law, which states: “It is the blood that atones for one’s life” (Leviticus 17:11; cf.
See also:  What Did Jesus Say About Animals

Pain was necessary for Jesus because sacrifice included suffering, and Jesus was “the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (See also John 1:29).

It is through the “precious blood of Christ, a lamb without blemish or flaw” that we are redeemed (1 Peter 1:19).

At Calvary, mankind was given the opportunity to do his worst to the Son of Manas, who was transformed into the Redeemer of mankind.

“Now is the time for judgment on this world; now will be the time for the prince of this world to be cast out” (John 12:31; cf.

Jesus suffered and died in order to provide salvation for everyone who would believe in him.

Because Christ took on all of our pain, the cup of suffering was not taken away from Him. Other options were out of the question for us to be saved. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) Why did Jesus have to go through so much pain and suffering?

Subscribe to the

Get our Question of the Week emailed to your inbox every weekday morning! Got Questions Ministries is a trademark of Got Questions Ministries, Inc., registered in the state of California in the year 2002. All intellectual property rights are retained. Policy Regarding Personal Information The information on this page was last updated on January 4, 2022.

What time was Jesus crucified? What time did Jesus die on the cross?

Answer The gospel authors make a number of references to the period of Jesus’ crucifixion in their writings. When we put all of these allusions together, we may obtain an approximation of when time of day Jesus died. The New American Standard Bible (NASB) will be used in this article since it provides a literal translation of the time references given in the original Greek. We know that Jesus was arrested in the middle of the night and brought before Pilate the next morning. “Now when the morning came, all the chief priests and elders of the people conspired together against Jesus, deciding that He should be put to death; and they tied Him, carried Him away, and handed Him to Pilate the governor,” Matthew 27:1–2.

Pilate, on the other hand, had to make the final call.

Pilate saw he was achieving nothing and that a riot was about to break out.

Then he freed Barabbas for them.

” When it was at the ninth hour, Jesus cried out in a loud voice and said, ‘Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?’ (Who is like God?) in other words, ‘My God, My God, why have You abandoned Me?’ In fact, when they heard it, several of the people who were gathered there immediately began to exclaim, ‘This man is asking for Elijah.’ So one of them dashed to the side of the road and, taking a sponge, filled it with sour wine, placed it on a reed, and handed it to Jesus to drink.

  • The rest, on the other hand, replied, ‘Let us wait and see whether Elijah will arrive to save Him.’ And Jesus cried out with a loud voice once again, this time yielding up His spirit.
  • Consequently, Jesus died “about the ninth hour,” according to Matthew.
  • Mark 15:25 provides more detail, stating, “It was the third hour when they crucified Him,” and the rest of the tale is consistent with Matthew and Luke’s accounts of the hours of darkness and the death of Jesus.
  • It was at the ninth hour when darkness descended from the sixth hour until the ninth hour, and Jesus died at about that time.
  • Considering that a new day begins at midnight, the third hour would be 3:00 a.m., according to current reckoning.
  • As a result, the third hour when Jesus was crucified would have been three hours after sunrise, or around 9:00 a.m.
  • All of this is rather clear, except for the fact that John appears to record something entirely different.

It was approximately the sixth hour on the day of preparation for the Passover.” It was now the day of preparation for the Passover.

There are a number of plausible answers to the apparent disparity in the data.

If this is the case, the sixth hour would be approximately 6:00 a.m.

A.

605).

Andrew Kostenberger also notes that when referring to time in John 1:39, John appears to be referring to late afternoon (4:00 PM), rather than the traditional sunup-to-sundown frame of reference (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, “John,” Baker Academic, 2004, p.

As a result, it appears that the “Roman time” option is doubtful.

An early copyist of John, according to one view, mistyped the Greek numeral digamma (6 instead of 6) when writing the text (the Greek numeral gamma, or3).

606).

Even though Kostenberger does not necessarily agree with the notion, he speculates that John may be making a theological argument rather than seeking to provide a literal indicator of the time (op cit, p.

The choosing of the Paschal lamb would generally take place at midday on the day before Passover, according to tradition.

This approach, on the other hand, has its own set of chronological challenges.

Given that Jesus had previously eaten the Passover with His followers, it appears that the dinner itself had already taken place at that point in time.

538) and Carson (p.

The day was commonly split into three-hour blocks before the invention of watches and other exact timekeeping technologies, and people frequently approximated and rounded off the time.

(noon).

The nearest quarter or half hour is frequently used, even in current times when digital clocks can determine time to the second.

Alternatively, it is probable that John and Mark “rounded off” the timings as a matter of tradition.

“More than likely, we are in risk of requiring a level of accuracy in both Mark and John that could not have been accomplished in the days before watches,” Carson says.

“If the sun was moving toward the center of the sky, two separate observers may readily have peered up and determined that it was ‘approximately the third hour’ or ‘about the sixth hour,'” the author writes” (p.

Considering all of the evidence, it appears that Jesus was crucified at some point in the morning and died at some point later in the afternoon.

In this particular topic, the gospel authors were not excessively concerned with accuracy. In contrast, they were significantly more concerned with the theological ramifications, which they meticulously documented.

In what year did Jesus die?

QuestionAnswer The death of Jesus and the subsequent resurrection of Jesus are the most significant events in human history since the beginning of time. God used the death of Christ to reconcile people who had been “alienated” from Him because of sin and “presentedholy in his sight, without blemish and free from accusation” (Colossians 1:21–22) those who had been “alienated” from Him because of sin. And God has compassionately “given us new birth into a live hope” as a result of Christ’s resurrection (1 Peter 1:3).

We can, however, figure it out with a reasonable degree of precision.

It is believed that Herod the Great died in 4 BC, which corresponds to the death of Herod the Great, who served as procurator of Judaea from 47 BC to 4 BC.

It is possible to identify the year in which Jesus died based on a variety of different criteria.

In the year AD 14, Tiberius was proclaimed emperor.

Pontius Pilate is believed to have governed Judea between AD 26 and AD 36.

There is also an argument for a more recent date (April 7, AD 30), which is based on the fact that John the Baptist’s ministry began more recently (and an assumed co-regency of Tiberias and Augustus).

Even while a great deal has transpired on the international stage since Christ’s time, nothing has ever surpassed the scope and significance of what occurred in AD 33—the death and resurrection of the Savior of the world.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.