Why Did Jesus Call The Pharisees, Hypocrites

Why did Jesus rebuke the scribes and Pharisees so harshly in Matthew 23:13–36?

QuestionAnswer Throughout Matthew 23, Jesus expresses his displeasure with the scribes and Pharisees, the religious establishment of the day. It is an outburst of anguish, denial or despair to use the wordwoe. This was not the first time that Jesus had some harsh words to say about the religious leaders of His day, however. What was the source of Jesus’ strong reprimand in this instance? Taking a closer look at each problem provides some insight. Jesus instructed His audience to respect the scribes and Pharisees because of their position of authority, but not to imitate them since “they do not practice what they teach.” But even if they bind big, unwieldy goods together and place them on the shoulders of others, they are unwilling to raise a finger to move the loads themselves.

The scribes and Pharisees were expected to know God and to assist others in learning about Him and following His teachings.

And they did not pursue God with a pure heart, as was the case with them.

The essential purpose of the Law, rather than the word of the Law, is emphasized in Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount.

  1. “Woe to you, professors of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites!” says the first woe.
  2. You will not allow those who are attempting to enter, and you will not allow those who are already inside” (Matthew 23:13).
  3. He longs for people to come to know Him and to be admitted into His kingdom (John 3:16–17; 10:10, 17; 2 Peter 3:9; 3:16–17).
  4. Clearly, His desire is for individuals to come to know life through Him.
  5. Even though they pretended to be pursuing God, the teachers of the Law and Pharisees were not sincere in their pursuit of Him.
  6. According to the second woe, Jesus blames the scribes and Pharisees for exerting great effort to acquire converts, only to lead those converts to be “twice as much” children of hell as the scribes and Pharisees were themselves (Matthew 13:15).
  7. The third admonition Jesus issues to the scribes and Pharisees refers to the religious leaders as “blind guides” and “blind idiots” (Matthew 23:16–17) in reference to their lack of discernment.

The fourth woe criticizes the scribes and Pharisees for their practice of faithfully paying the tithe but forgetting to truly care for the needs of the people they are supposed to be helping.

Once again, they were preoccupied with the text of the Law and obediently followed it with pride, but they were distracted from the more important matters of God.

In the sixth woe, Jesus goes into further detail about their hypocrisy.

They participate in religious activities but do not have hearts that are dedicated to God.

The Pharisees and scribes are deaf and blind, failing to comprehend that when the inner of a person is converted, the outer will be altered as well.

The “hypocrisy and wickedness” seen within graves is compared to the “hypocrisy and wickedness” found within religious leaders (verse 28).

When Jesus comes to the end of His seven-fold admonition, He tells the religious leaders that they are no different than their forefathers, who persecuted the prophets of old.

The ones who would shortly plot the assassination of the Son of God Himself, despite their haughty claims that they would not have done it (Matthew 26:4).

Those who adhered to the teachings of the Pharisees and scribes were prevented from following God.

Making a mockery of God’s followers was the religious leaders’ goal.

In Jesus’ heart, he desired that people come to know God and come into a right relationship with Him.

I invite you to take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in spirit, and you will find rest for your souls in me.

In the name of godliness, the religious leaders promoted deception (John 8:44); Jesus spoke sharply against them because He came to provide life (John 10:10).

Additionally, the wordwoe brings with it a sense of sadness.

The seven sorrows that Jesus pronounces on the religious leaders are grave pronouncements of coming calamity and tribulation.

The scribes and Pharisees are bringing God’s wrath down upon themselves, and they should be pitied for doing so.

“How do you want to avoid being damned to hell?” he inquires.

Afterwards, Jesus reveals His wish to gather the people of Israel into Himself for their own protection, if only they would cooperate (verse 37).

Jesus was not harsh in the sense of being cruel.

Rather, His acts were directed by love.

Jesus was adamant in his opposition to Satan’s deceit because He desired for people to come to know the truth and find life in Him. Questions about Matthew (return to top of page) What was it about the scribes and Pharisees that caused Jesus to reprimand them so sharply in Matthew 23:13–36?

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Why jesus called the pharisees hypocrites?

Julie Hintz posed the question. 5 out of 5 stars (28 votes) They were greedy and indulgent in their own self-indulgence. They presented themselves as righteous on the basis of their meticulous observance of the law, but in reality, they were not righteous: their outward appearance of righteousness concealed an inner world of immoral ideas and feelings. It seemed as though they were filled with malice.

Why did Jesus call the Pharisees hypocrites?

There are several reasons why Jesus referred to the Pharisees as hypocrites. They adhered to norms established by human beings/traditions of elders that were in conflict with God’s will.

Why Pharisees are hypocrites?

The Pharisees and others are hypocrites because they are able to precisely predict the weather but are unable to see the indications of the times around them. They are oblivious to the fact that judgment day is approaching.

What does Jesus call the Pharisees?

Jesus referred to the Pharisees and scribes as serpents and vipers, demonstrating that their teachings resulted in death rather than life for mankind. In Numbers Chapter 21, the people express their dissatisfaction with God and Moses.

Why were the Pharisees called Pharisees?

The Pharisee (or “separatist”) faction arose primarily as a result of a split within the group of scribes and sages. Their name is derived from the Hebrew and Aramaic words parush or parushi, which literally translate as “one who has been divided.” It might relate to their exclusion from Gentiles, sources of ritual impurity, or irreligious Jews, among other things. There were 30 questions that were connected.

What did the Pharisees teach?

As an alternative to mindlessly adhering to the letter of the Law, regardless of whether it was in conflict with reason or conscience, the Pharisees harmonised the teachings of Torah with their own beliefs or discovered their own concepts indicated or inferred by or implicit in it. They applied the spirit of the Law to the interpretation of the Law.

Who are Pharisees and Sadducees in the Bible?

As a result of the fact that we are unable to offer sacrifices at the Temple and must instead worship in synagogues, we adhere to the Judaism of the Pharisees today. The Sadducees were a rich upper-class group that was connected with the priesthood in ancient Israel. They were adamant in their rejection of oral law, and, in contrast to the Pharisees, their life centred around the Temple.

How many commandments did the Pharisees have?

Despite the fact that the number 613 is referenced in the Talmud, its main importance emerged in later medieval rabbinic literature, which included several works cataloguing or arranging the mitzvot in a logical manner. The most renowned of them was Maimonides’ list of the 613 commandments, which is still in use today.

What is a modern day Pharisee?

What is a Pharisee in today’s world?

Whenever we speak about modern-day Pharisees, we are referring to a specific approach to sin, or to doing things incorrectly. It was an approach that Jesus decried, but one that he observed everywhere among religious leaders of His day, including the disciples.

What is the difference between Sadducees and Pharisees?

The fundamental point of disagreement between the Pharisees and the Sadducees was their contrasting perspectives on the supernatural components of religious belief and practice. Put another way, the Pharisees believed in the supernatural – angels, devils, heaven, hell, and so on – whereas the Sadducees didn’t believe in anything supernatural at all. The majority of the Sadducees belonged to the aristocratic class.

What are Pharisees scribes?

It was the job of the scribes to write, and they were a bunch of ordinary individuals. Pharisees were well-known for being religious and political leaders in ancient times. Role. Their job and profession required them to write and do administrative activities on a regular basis. The Pharisees were a ruling class that exercised considerable influence over the imposition of the written scripture.

What is an example of hypocrisy?

A hypocrite is someone who professes to care about the environment while polluting on a consistent basis. a person who hypocritically practices their views or whose actions are inconsistent with their professed principles is referred to as a hypocrite.

What does hypocrisy mean biblically?

One who makes the false claim of possessing virtuous character, moral or religious convictions or values, or other such characteristics that one does not actually possess

What did Jesus say about the scribes and Pharisees?

I declare to you that until your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will not be permitted to enter the kingdom of Heaven. (See Matthew 5:20.)

How did Jesus interact with the Pharisees?

Jesus rebuked the scribes and Pharisees for their love of making a show of how pious they were by wearing extra broad phylacteries and wearing excessively long tassels on their prayershawls, among other things. Because Jesus sees beyond the façade to the true person, he detects conceit, a sense of self-righteousness, and a lack of willingness to change in these Jewish leaders.

Are scribes and Sadducees the same?

Much of the Jewish holy literature was most likely written by scribes. Although the Pharisees and the Sadducees were two Jewish schools of thought, Josephus refers to them as philosophies, although ideologies could be a better term. They were social-interest groups with religious ideology and a vision for the future of the Jewish state of Israel.

See also:  What Does Jesus Do For Us

What is a true Pharisee?

Pharisees are defined as those who follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. The term “Pharisee” literally translates as “separated one.” In order to study and teach the law, the Pharisees isolated themselves from society; yet, they also isolated themselves from the general populace since they regarded them to be religiously unclean, as well.

What does Sadducees mean in the Bible?

:a member of a Jewish political party of the intertestamental era, which was composed of a traditional governing elite of priests and which rejected teachings that were not found in the Law of Moses (such as resurrection, retribution in a future life, and the existence of angels)

Who is the gentiles in the Bible?

Non-Jewish person, sometimes known as a Gentile. The word derives from the Hebrew word goy, which literally translates as “nation,” and was used to refer to both the Hebrews and any other country.

The plural noun goyim, especially when combined with the definite article ha-goyim, “the nations,” denoted countries of the globe that were not of Hebrew origin.

What is God’s law?

God’s moral rules are the third category. These have to do with justice and judgment. They are founded on God’s own holy essence as revealed in the Bible. This makes these ordinates holy, just, and unchangeable in their nature. According to 1 Corinthians 6:9-11 (which is included in the New Testament and deals with God’s moral law), those who do not follow God’s moral rule will not enter the kingdom of God.

What is the new law of Jesus?

This is the New Commandment of John 13:34–35, which states that the disciples are to love one another as much as he had loved them personally. These commandments are frequently seen as the foundation of Christian ethics.

What were the 613 laws of the Pharisees?

THE 613 MITZVOT (Mitzvah Vote)

  • It is comforting to know that there is a God. (Exodus 20:2)
  • Not to worship any other gods. Knowing that He is one (Exodus 20:3)
  • To understand that He is one. (Deuteronomy 6:4)
  • To have a heartfelt devotion to Him. (Deuteronomy 6:5)
  • To be terrified of Him. The commandment to purify His Name is followed by the instruction not to desecrate His Name, to worship Him in the manner He has prescribed while refraining from desecrating holy artifacts.

What was wrong with the Pharisees?

They were greedy and indulgent in their own self-indulgence. They presented themselves as righteous on the basis of their meticulous observance of the law, but in reality, they were not righteous: their outward appearance of righteousness concealed an inner world of immoral ideas and feelings. It seemed as though they were filled with malice.

What do the Sadducees and Pharisees have in common?

The Sadducees, who were descended from the nobility and the priestly class, only accepted the rules of Moses and refused to believe that there had been any subsequent prophets who had revealed the word of God to the people of Israel. Pharisees, on the other hand, were laypeople who adhered to the commandments of Moses as well as the prophets who came after him in the Hebrew Bible.

How did the Sadducees worship?

Their high social standing was bolstered by their priestly obligations, which were prescribed by the Ten Commandments. The priests were in charge of offering sacrifices in the Temple, which served as the major place of worship in ancient Israel, according to tradition. As part of this, he presided over sacrifices at the three festivals of pilgrimage to Jerusalem each year.

The “Hypocrisy” of the Pharisees

A casual reader of the New Testament, without a thorough understanding of the Scriptures and a working knowledge of extra-biblical sources from the Second Temple period, might conclude that the majority of the Pharisees were hypocrites and that the Pharisees as a movement were, in fact, a “brood of vipers,” as Jesus described them. It is because of this widespread Christian perception that the term “Pharisee” has become synonymous with the term “hypocrite” in the English language. Any Christian would think that the Pharisees were Jesus’ adversaries.

  1. said one viewer of aJerusalem Perspective video clip posted on YouTube.
  2. He further instructed us not to refer to anyone as “Rabbi,” as we only have one instructor in our group.
  3. 12:34; 23:23), and he stated that “they have already earned their reward” (Matt.
  4. (Matt.

A casual reader of the New Testament, without a thorough understanding of the Scriptures and a working knowledge of extra-biblical sources from the Second Temple period, might conclude that the majority of the Pharisees were hypocrites and that the Pharisees as a movement were, in fact, a “brood of vipers,” as Jesus described them.

  1. However, this popular Christian misunderstanding of the New Testament is a catastrophic error that has frequently resulted in awful results for the Jewish people throughout the course of the previous two millennia.
  2. 23:2)?
  3. “The scribes and Pharisees sit on Moses’ seat, therefore obey and observe all they say to you (in Hebrew, “their rulings, commandments,” which means “their rulings, commandments”).
  4. The Oral Torah of the Pharisees was followed by Jesus personally.
  5. 8:10), but he also spoke a blessing before eating, which was a Pharisee-invented innovation.
  6. (Source: Safrai, “Counting the Omer: On What Day of the Week Should It Be Done”) Do you know if Jesus observed Shavuot (Pentecost)?.” The identity of the person who forewarned Jesus of Herod’s intention to murder him is unknown.
  7. In Acts 5:33-39, it is revealed that someone intervened to spare the lives of Jesus’ followers by encouraging tolerance in the Sanhedrin when Peter and the other apostles were brought before it.

In the Sanhedrin, who was it that came out on Paul’s side against the Sadducees and said things like, “We find nothing wrong with this man.” “What if he has received a message from a spirit or an angel?” (See Acts 23:6–9).

(See Shmuel Safrai’s “Insulting God’s High Priest” for further information.) After James was lynched by the deceitful Sadducean high priest Hanan (Annas), according to Josephus, the Pharisees lodged a formal complaint with the Roman ruler in Jerusalem.

when a similar confrontation took place between the Pharisees and Annas the Younger, who was most likely Caiaphas’ brother-in-law.

He accused them of having violated the Torah and sentenced them to death by stoning” (Antiq.20:200-203).

(David Flusser, “.to Bury Caiaphas, Not to Praise Him”) (Caiaphas was buried, not praised.

As Jesus himself (Matt.

With the exception of the tale concerning the guard at Jesus’ tomb, the Pharisees are not even mentioned by name in the context of Jesus’ trial as reported in the first three gospels (Matt.

.to bury Caiaphas, not to exalt him” (Flusser, “.to bury Caiaphas, not to exalt him”).

It was more stinging than Jesus’ own self-criticism.

14 b, chap.

Sot.

5, halachah 7).

The last kind is the only one that is valued (to God).

“Do not be like slaves who serve their masters in order to obtain a reward; rather, be like slaves who do not serve their masters in order to gain a reward,” said Antigonus of Socho, a philosopher who lived around the beginning of the second century B.C.

Compare the following line fromDerech Eretz Rabbah2:13 (ed.

“They preach, but they do not practice,” Jesus said of the Pharisees, who were the religious conservatives of Jesus’ day, as well as the Bible instructors and preachers of his community.

Those of us who are serious and committed disciples of Jesus are the hypocrites of our generation.

It is important to note that Jesus did not blame the Pharisees for donating their garden herbs (Matt.

According to Jesus’ words, the Pharisees’ criticism is “in-house” criticism, that is, constructive criticism motivated by love and respect.

Throughout the New Testament, the phrase “brood of vipers” appears three times in Matthew’s Gospel and once in Luke’s, all of which are in the book of Revelation.

According to Matthew, John the Baptist’s scathing admonition was directed at the “Pharisees and Sadducees” (the religious establishment) (Matt.

Apparently, this information was inserted for dramatic effect by the author of Matthew, who then repeated it twice more in the mouth of Jesus.

The refrain of Jesus’ remarks, (“they are receiving their reward/payment”), is repeated three times throughout the passage (Matt.

The implication is that such hypocrites will not be rewarded in the World to Come—and may perhaps be excluded from the World to Come altogether!

In the opinion of the Pharisees, the three most essential commandments were almsgiving, prayer, and fasting, in that order, with the most important commandment being almsgiving (tsedakah; almsgiving).

In passing, we learn something about Jesus’ theology, despite the fact that his main argument is that one should not be ostentatious while giving to the poor, praying, or fasting: The three commandments that Jesus emphasized were the same three commandments that were so essential to the Pharisees.

He fasted and gave charity (Acts 10:2, 4) as well as prayed a lot (Acts 10:30).

23:9)?” for further information on Jesus’ admonition to his disciples not to be addressed as “rabbi” (my teacher).

Read Shmuel Safrai’s “Jesus and the Hasidim” and “Sabbath Breakers” for more reading, as well as David Flusser’s “.To Bury Caiaphas, Not to Praise Him” and David Bivin’s “Rabbinic Literature: A Spiritual Treasure” for additional reading.

Woes of the Pharisees – Wikipedia

An uninitiated reader of the New Testament who does not pay close attention to the Scriptures and who is unfamiliar with extra-biblical materials from the Second Temple era would conclude that the Pharisees were a “brood of vipers” and that the Pharisees as a movement were a “brood of vipers.” In the English language, the term “Pharisee” has come to be synonymous with the term “hypocrite” as a result of this prevalent Christian belief.

  • Many Christians believe that the Pharisees were Jesus’ adversaries, and they are correct.
  • Recall that Jesus was pleased with the tax collector’s bowing prayer and scolded the Pharisee’s haughty prayer, as recorded in Matthew 23.
  • He also instructed us not to refer to anyone as “Rabbi,” as we only have one instructor in our school.
  • 12:34; 23:23), and he stated that “they have already earned their reward” (Matt.
  • (Matt.

An uninitiated reader of the New Testament who does not pay close attention to the Scriptures and who is unfamiliar with extra-biblical materials from the Second Temple era would conclude that the Pharisees were a “brood of vipers” and that the Pharisees as a movement were a “brood of vipers.” In the English language, the term “Pharisee” has come to be synonymous with the term “hypocrite” as a result of this prevalent Christian belief.

  1. It is a dreadful mistake, however, that has been repeated over the period of two millennia and has frequently ended in horrifying results for the Jewish people.
  2. The Pharisees and their scribes are the correct answer to this question.
  3. Do and observe all they say (in Hebrew, “their judgments and precepts,” which means “their commands”).
  4. It is a parallelism between the Greek verbs (to do) and (to maintain), and they both allude to following the biblical precepts as they were interpreted by the Pharisees (the Oral Torah).
  5. For example, not only was it his usual to utter a blessing after eating, as prescribed by the Torah (Deut.
  6. The blessing of Jesus and the Oral Torah is described by David Bivin in “Jesus and the Oral Torah: Blessing.” As Shmuel Safrai pointed out, the regulations of the Pharisees were also implemented in other aspects of everyday life.
  7. According to Josephus’ Antiquities 18:15, “all prayers and sacred ceremonies of divine worship are done in accordance with theirexposition,” while the Sadducees “subject to the formulae of the Pharisees, because else the people would not bear them” (Antiquities 18:17).
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Do you believe Jesus observed Shavuot (Pentecost)?.” The identity of the person who forewarned Jesus of Herod’s desire to murder him is unknown.

When Peter and the other apostles were brought before the Sanhedrin (Acts 5:33-39), who was it that urged tolerance on their behalf, thereby saving the lives of Jesus’ disciples?

Who was it in the Sanhedrin who came out on Paul’s side against the Sadducees, declaring, “We find nothing wrong with this man”?

They are Pharisees of the Sanhedrin.

According to Josephus, the Pharisees lodged a formal protest with the Roman governor after James was hanged by the devious Sadducean high priest Hanan (Annas).

when a similar confrontation took place between the Pharisees and Annas the Younger, who was most likely Caiaphas’ brother-in-law.

In response to the illegal execution of James, the Pharisees, whom Josephus describes as “the inhabitants of the city who were considered to be the most tolerant and were strict in the observance of the commandments,” were successful in having the high priest Annas the Younger deposed from his position.

  • This is testified to by Jesus himself (Matt.
  • With the exception of the tale concerning the guard at Jesus’ tomb, the Pharisees are not even mentioned by name in the context of Jesus’ trial as told in the first three Gospels (Matt.
  • .to bury Caiaphas, not to exalt him” (Flusser, “.to bury Caiaphas, not to exalt him” It was well known among the Pharisees that hypocrisy was a dangerous thing.
  • As a result, they made fun of themselves by claiming that there were seven types of Pharisees (Jer.
  • 14 b, chap.

5, halachah 7), which were as follows: “The shoulder Pharisee” is a Pharisee who carries his good works on his shoulder (so that they can be seen by others); the “wait-a-bit” Pharisee is a Pharisee who (when someone has business with him) says, Wait a little; I must do a good work; the “reckoning” Pharisee is a Pharisee who when he commits a fault and does a good work crosses off one with the other; the Show me my sin, and I will perform an equivalent good deed (implying that he was not at fault); the Pharisee of dread, such as Job; the Pharisee of love, such as Abraham; the Pharisee of fear, such as Job; the Pharisee of love, such as Abraham The last type is the only one that is very valuable to me (to God).

Judaism in the First Centuries of the Christian Era: The Age of the Tannaim, by George Foot Moore, 2:193 (original Hebrew: ; English translation by George Foot Moore).

When comparing the two statements, consider the advice given by Antigonus of Socho, a sage who lived at the beginning of the second century B.C.: “Do not be like slaves who serve their master in order to receive a reward; rather, be like slaves who do not serve their master in order to receive a reward” (Mishnah, Avot 1:3).

  • Higger, 284) with Antigonus’s saying: (osin me-ahavah, those who doout of love).
  • Conservative Christians now recognize that hypocrisy is their biggest threat, just as the Pharisees saw that hypocrisy was their greatest threat in the first century CE.
  • When there are no principles and standards to which one is held accountable before God, hypocrisy is impossible.
  • According to Jesus’ words, the Pharisees’ criticism is “in-house” criticism, that is, constructive criticism motivated by love and respect for one another.
  • Throughout the New Testament, the phrase “brood of vipers” appears three times in Matthew’s Gospel and once in Luke’s, all of which are in Matthew’s Gospel.
  • Luke’s gospel (Luke 3:7) records John the Baptist’s address to a “crowd” of people who had come to him at the Jordan River, in which the word appears.
  • 3:7).

Luke’s Gospel, as well as Mark’s, present evidence that this forceful statement was employed by the fiery John the Baptist, rather than by Jesus himself.

6:2, 5, 16).

The fact that Jesus’ doctrine was similar to or identical to that of the Pharisees, rather than being a denunciation of them, is demonstrated by this trio.

During his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus teaches this trio of parables.

Please take note that the centurion, Cornelius, was a devout believer in the God of the universe (Acts 10:2, 22).

(Acts 10:30).

23:9)?” for further information on his admonition to his disciples not to be addressed as “rabbi” (my teacher).

Read Shmuel Safrai’s “Jesus and the Hasidim” and “Sabbath Breakers” for more reading, as well as David Flusser’s “.To Bury Caiaphas, Not to Praise Him” and David Bivin’s “Rabbinic Literature: A Spiritual Treasure” for other resources.

Context and background

It is referenced twice in the accounts of Matthew and Luke, both of which occur about the same time. They are mentioned in Matthew after Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, where he teaches in the Temple, whereas they are mentioned in Luke after theLord’s prayer is given and thedisciples are first sent out across the land. Immediately before introducing the woes themselves, Matthew states that Jesus rebuked them for taking the place of honor at banquets, for dressing in ostentatious clothing, and for encouraging people to address them as rabbi.

The Pharisees, according to Jesus, were impatient with outward, ritual observance of minutiae that made them appear acceptable and virtuous outwardly but left their inner selves unreformed and corrupt.

The seven woes

The seven ills are as follows:

  1. Among the seven calamities are as follows:

See also

  • If the rest of the world despises you
  • Christ’s Law
  • The Law of the Father
  • Take care of yourself, physician.

References

At this point, Jesus was surrounded by travelers from all across Israel, who had gathered to commemorate the Passover festival with him. As He addressed them and His own followers, Jesus issued a severe warning about the scribes and Pharisees who were in the audience with Him (cf. Mark 12:38-40; Lk 20:45-47). This entire dialogue can be found solely in Matthew’s version of the story. Jesus began by admitting that they had taken Moses’ place in the temple. In other words, He hinted that they were usurpers who were not legitimate heirs to Moses, albeit he did not state so explicitly.

  • As a result, He instructed them to “observe and do all that they command you to observe and do” (23:3).
  • In general, the Pharisees were zealous defenders of the law, and they should be commended for their efforts.
  • “But do not follow in their footsteps: for they talk, but do not,” Jesus said (v.
  • The hypocrisy of the Pharisees was then brought up by him.
  • Their own deeds were carried out for the sake of being noticed by others rather than by God.
  • These were the actions they took not only when they prayed in the morning, but also during the day, in order to be seen by men.
  • The Pharisees, according to Jesus, were devoted to the finest seats at the feasts and the most prominent seats in the synagogue.
  • It was Jesus who reminded them that their Messiah, “Christ,” was their Master, and that God was their Father in heaven.
  • In other words, He was asserting that the Pharisees and scribes had forgotten about God’s supremacy and the coming of their Messiah.
  • Rather, He emphasized the importance of being a servant, or a minister, and He continued with the words, “And whoever exalts himself shall be humbled, and whoever humbles himself shall be exalted” (v.
  • His pupils were not to pursue the title of rabbi and were not to use the wordfather without permission, despite the fact that Paul used the wordfather appropriately in 1 Corinthians 4:15 and that John addressed fathers in 1 John 2: 13-14, respectively.

In order to acquire the acceptance of men, they were not to pursue titles that were demeaning to males, such as rabbi, father, or minister. People who claim to be followers of Christ should not glorify themselves, but instead endeavor to serve others and leave the exaltation to God Himself.

Jesus Pronounces Seven Woes Upon the Scribes and Pharisees, 23:13-36

Seven grave calamities are delivered upon the scribes and Pharisees in this passage, which serves as the culmination of Christ’s debate with them and concludes the book of Matthew. Only Matthew captures this caustic criticism of these Jewish religious leaders in his writings. Instead of praising God for his blessings, these troubles decry false religion as being absolutely hateful to God and deserving of the most severe censure. None of Christ’s pronouncements against the Pharisees in the New Testament is more cutting, more direct, or more harsh than this one in the Bible.

  • Even though they were seeking to revere the Word of God and demonstrating a severe kind of religious adherence, the Pharisees were the ones who were the furthest away from God.
  • In every age, false religion and pretense are the most dangerous opponents of the truth, and they are far more harmful than immorality or apathy.
  • In verse 14, another calamity is foreshadowed, in which the scribes and Pharisees were accused of destroying widows’ homes and praying for lengthy periods of time in order to impress others.
  • It’s possible that it was taken from Mark 12:40 and Luke 20:47 and appended.
  • It is written in Matthew 23:15 that the second woe will come upon you.

However, after they were successful, Jesus rebuked them, saying, “Ye make him twofold more a child of hell than yourselves.” Rather of using the name Hades, which refers to the transitory dwelling of the wicked in the intermediate state, Christ used the word Geenna or Gehenna, which refers to eternal damnation and is a reference to eternal damnation.

  1. In verse 16, a third sorrow is described, which is based on the deception of the Pharisees, who believed that swearing by the riches of the temple was sufficient to bind the oath.
  2. Verse 19 continues His indictment, “Ye idiots and the blind: for which is greater, the gift itself, or the altar that sanctifies the gift?” He asks.
  3. When it comes to tithing, the fourth woe, which is referenced in verse 23, is hypocrisy.
  4. He reiterated His accusation that they were deaf, straining out a gnat or a little bug yet swallowing a camel in their greed for power.
  5. The sixth woe is spoken in verse 25, when He reiterated the allegation that they were hypocrites, only players who were playing a part for the audience.
  6. He was implying that they were more concerned with ceremonial cleanliness, such as that which men observed, than they were with holiness in the traditional sense.
  7. The sixth calamity was described by Jesus in verse 27.
  8. This demonstrated that the Pharisees appeared to be upright on the outside, but were filled with hypocrisy and wickedness on the inside.
  9. In verse 32, Jesus called their very testimony to account, stating that they were the progeny of those who killed the prophets.
  10. Jesus was, of course, alluding to their intention to murder Him as well as their subsequent persecution of the Christian community.
  11. In verse 34, Jesus said that He would send to them prophets, wise men, and scribes who would also be believers in order to strengthen their faith.
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Because of their deeds, they would be justified in receiving the fair punishment resulting from all of the righteous blood spilt on this planet, beginning with the death of righteous Abel at the hands of Cain (Genesis 4:8) and ending with the crucifixion of Zacharias, the son of Barachias (2 Ch 24:20-22).

In his outline of Matthew 23, Richard Glover summarizes the characteristics of hypocrisy as follows: “Hypocrisy is a difficult taskmaster.lives only for the praise of men.concerns itself with the minor matters of religion.deals primarily with externals.reveres only what is dead.finds a terrifying judgment.” 118 The current tragic episode in the history of Israel’s apostasy marked the culmination of the religious authorities’ long-standing rejection of the things of the Holy Spirit.

As Jesus spoke, He firmly declared that all of this generation’s deeds of rejection of God and His prophets would result in judgment being brought upon them, which they would bring to a head by rejecting God’s only Son.

Jerusalem, the city of God, and the majestic temple, which served as the focal point of Jewish devotion, were to be reduced to ashes as an expressive warning that divine judgment on hypocrisy and sin is unavoidably a part of human history.

Lament over Jerusalem, 23:37-39

There are perhaps no more eloquent words spoken by Jesus throughout His public ministry than the ones reported in Matthew of Christ’s lamentation for Jerusalem (cf. His earlier lament over Jerusalem, Lk 19:41-44). God’s heartbreak over a people whom God loved, but who turned their backs on that love by murdering those whom God sent to them is shown in this passage. According to Criswell, the chapter that contains the most harsh denunciation of any of Christ’s speeches “ends in cries and tears,” as the author portrays it.

(Matthew 23:37) The repeated address to Jerusalem expresses the intensity with which Jesus spoke, and it can be compared to similar repetitions in other biblical passages, such as Samuel 18:33, in which Absalom is addressed in the same way; Jesus’ repeated address to Martha in Luke 10:41; and the call to Saul in Acts 9:4.

  • Both of the verbs for “killest” and “stonest” are in the present tense, indicating that they refer to regular or typical behavior.
  • The figure of a hen, or any mother bird, connotes a brood of young huddled together under protecting wings, a symbol that appears frequently throughout Scripture (Deu 32:11; Ps 17:8; 61:4).
  • However, it was their own free will that caused them to reject God’s offer of salvation.
  • The phrase “left desolate” is derived from a simple word that means “to be left alone.” How alone is a city, a nation, or a person who has been separated from God?
  • However, while the age to which He was speaking would be left desolate and terribly alone, there was still hope for a future generation, a generation that would turn once more to the Lord.
  • Mt 24:1).

As he declared in Deuteronomy 30:6: “And the Lord thy God will circumcise thine heart, as well as the hearts of thy seed, to love the Lord thy God with all thine heart, as well as with all thine soul, in order that thou mayest live” There are several other allusions to the same revival in the Old Testament that may be uncovered.

  • Jeremiah, in a similar vein, forecasts Israel’s eventual restoration in Jeremiah 30:1-11; 31:1-14; and Jeremiah 27-37.
  • The New Testament takes up on a similar fact in Romans 11:25-36 and depicts Israel triumphant on Mount Zion in Revelation 14:1-5, among other passages.
  • The sorrowful note that concludes Matthew 23 heralds the beginning of the big prophesy of the end of the age, which is documented in Matthew 24-25 and communicated privately to Jesus’ apostles.
  • Part Eight of the series Cf.

Tasker, R. V. G. (2001), The Gospel According to St. Matthew, page 214, note 18. 259, 263-65.119 Richard Glover’s A Teacher’s Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew is a must-read. W. A. Criswell’s Expository Notes on the Gospel of Matthew (Expository Notes on the Gospel of Matthew), page 129.

What the Bible says about Hypocrisy of Pharisees

Topical StudiesWhat the Bible says about Hypocrisy of Pharisees (FromForerunner Commentary)Ecclesiastes 7:15-18We need to be as clear as we can be about what Solomon’s paradoxical situation has the potential to produce in a person’s life if it goes unrecognized and is allowed full freedom to take over and produce its fruits without resistance. The following is a worst-case scenario. Not everybody will end up this badly, but the potential exists, which is whyGodgives the warnings about its dangers.

They knew me from the first, if they were willing to testify, that according to the strictest sect of our religion I lived a Pharisee.The key phrase for our purposes here is “the strictest sect of our religion.” The history of the Pharisees shows that they had thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors that would fit well under the definition of super-righteousness.

Pride destroys relationships, whether with God or man, because the proud person demands attention and submission that can never be satisfied.

They are demanding, display various degrees of narcissism, and tend to be standoffish, considering themselves to be better than others.In the case of the Pharisees, their narcissism drove them to their absolute failure: not to recognize God in the flesh through His teachings.

Eight times He pronounces on themwoe —defined byWebster’s Dictionaryas “deep suffering, grief,affliction, ruinous trouble.” He dubs them “hypocrites” seven times, “blind guides” twice, “fools and blind” twice, “blind” once, “whitewashed tombs” once, and finishes His name-calling tirade by designating them”brood of vipers”!He then accuses them of being the children of those who had killed the prophets—a heavy-duty insult considering how proud they were of their ancestry.

  • He predicts they would do the same themselves and declares that He would have nothing to do with them until they accept and bless the ones He sends.Jesus was really worked up over this!
  • These people were extremely careful in keeping every minor article of the law.
  • Endless, for they continued to break branches of the law down to twigs down to leaves.
  • They became so involved in making sureeveryone elseobeyed their demands that they no longer remembered the fundamental purpose of the law or kept it properly themselves.
  • Hence Christ’s remonstrance: Hypocrites!Yet they LOOKED good, publicly counting their mint, cummin and anise.

But there are far more important issues of the law to consider than counting individual seeds—namely, JUDGMENT, MERCY ANDFAITH.Notice Christ’s scathing indictment of the Pharisees’ religion and it’s effects:♦ They set a horrid example by not following their own teaching (verse 3).♦ They abused their office by burdening others with strict requirements while not requiring the same of themselves (verse 4).♦ What they did do was only for vanity and show (verse 5).♦ They were social climbers (verse 6).♦ Their teaching had negative results, driving people farther from the Kingdom rather than closer to it (verse 13).♦ Their twisted reasoning led them to steal even from the weak (verse 14).♦ Their misguided zeal made their proselytes twice as bad as they were before they were even “converted” to Pharisaism (verse 16).♦ Gold, money, and greed became their main focus andgod(verses 16-18).♦ Their perspective was so perverted that they would pay more attention to keep from swallowing a gnat than they would a camel (verses 23-24).♦ How others saw them was far more important than moral values (verses 27-28).♦ While they extolled the virtues of past men of God, they were so deeply hateful and murderous that they would kill Christ and any of His followers that they could (verses 29-37).♦ Their religious house was utterly worthless and desolate, bereft of any contact with or influence of God, though they thought they were perfectly righteous.

In a word, they were self-righteous.We could easily break these attitudes down into many more categories ofsin, but the point is obvious: The total of all their religious efforts was zero.

The Pharisees considered the carrying of the pad the man was using to lie on to be work as was His making of the clay paste.The Jewish authorities even debated whether a man with a wooden leg could carry it on theSabbath!

It really doesn’t belong to his body, and therefore he shouldn’t be carrying it around.” They tried to get into every detail to help people judge whether an activity was right or not to do on the Sabbath.

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