Who Were Jesus Siblings

Did Jesus have any brothers, sisters or siblings?

Former Probe Ministries intern, Dr. Daniel Morais, is now a full-time employee. The University of Massachusetts in Amherst served as his undergraduate institution before he went on to receive his Doctor of Optometry from The New England College of Optometry in Boston. He is presently working as an optometrist in the Fort Worth area while continuing his studies in Christian apologetics and theology at the University of Texas in Arlington. He has a website, isrevelationrevolution.org, which contains the findings of these research.

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Three views about Jesus’ siblings

Some adhere to the first viewpoint, arguing that it is the most natural way to interpret the multiple allusions to these brothers, as well as the most evident intention of Matthew 1:25 and Luke 2:7. Second, those who believe in family ethics claim that younger siblings should not be permitted to mock or otherwise interfere with an older brother in the same way that Jesus’ brothers ridiculed Him (see Mark 3:31; John 7:3-4). Moreover, they argue, Jesus’ decision to entrust His mother’s care to the apostle John (John 19:26-27), rather than to one of His brothers, clearly shows that Mary did not have any other children.

The fact that they were

Jesus’ brothers, sistersmother

Several of Jesus’ siblings are reported as joining him and his mother to Capernaum following their marriage at Cana (Matthew 19:9). (John 2:12). The next year, Mary and these brothers are mentioned as attempting to have an audience with Jesus (Matthew 12:46-50; Mark 3:31-35; Luke 8:19-21). A few chapters before the conclusion of Jesus’ public career, His brethren are recorded as asking Jesus to demonstrate His Messiahship, which they themselves had questioned (John 7:3-5). Their conversion is obvious from the fact that they are portrayed in Acts as joining with the disciples and others in “prayer and supplication” before to the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:1–3).

Paul makes the implication that they were all married (1 Corinthians 9:5).

Who Were Jesus’ Brothers?

Those of us who have siblings are well aware of the toll they may have on our ability to remain calm under pressure. I recall thinking as a youngster that I would have sinned significantly less if I had not been given siblings. I was probably right. Of course, knowing me, I would’ve sinned regardless, but I had a strong belief in this idea for many years before I realized it. Our first thoughts aren’t often about Jesus’ brothers and sisters; they’re more typically on Jesus himself. As a result, we tend to think of Jesus as an only child throughout his early years, in a stable and a manger, which makes it easy to overlook that Mary and Joseph had numerous children after Jesus arrives.

After all, ancient Israel lacked effective contraceptive measures, and Mary gave birth to Jesus when she was a very young girl. This would imply that they may have done anything before Joseph died.

Did Jesus Have a Twin?

In a nutshell, no. After the birth of Jesus, the Bible makes it plain that Joseph and Mary did not have sexual relations until after the birth of Jesus (Matthew 1:25). Despite this, the belief that Jesus has a twin brother continues to pervade churches today. The notion that Jesus had a twin called “Didymus Judas Thomas” is completely absurd, especially in light of the fact that Joseph and Mary did not engage in sexual intercourse until after the birth of Jesus. Jesus, on the other hand, did not grow up in a family without siblings and sisters.

Let’s have a look at some of the names of Jesus’ brothers and sisters that appear in the Bible.

Jesus’ Brother and Sister Names

In the Bible, we don’t have any names that are similar to ours. Women’s names are rarely mentioned in the Bible, unless they had major parts in the story, such as the judge Deborah or Mary the mother of Jesus, who were both mentioned. Consider some of the scriptures that refer to Jesus’ brothers and sisters. While Jesus was still speaking to the multitude, his mother and brothers remained outside the door, waiting for an opportunity to speak with him. Matthew 12:46 As a result of the verses below, we know that Jesus had sisters.

“How did he obtain all of these things?” you might wonder.

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What is now happening to some of these brothers will be discussed in detail later.

What Happened to Jesus’ Brothers and Sisters?

According to the Bible, we don’t have any other names. Most of the time, the Bible does not record the names of female characters unless they performed major roles, such as Deborah, the judge, or Mary, Jesus’ mother. Consider some of the texts that refer to Jesus’ brothers and sisters. While Jesus was still speaking to the throng, his mother and brothers waited outside the door, clamoring to speak with him. Matthew 12:46 Because of the text below, we know that Jesus had several sisters. “Aren’t all his sisters here with us?” says Matthew 13:56.

As time permits, we will talk about what is now happening to some of these guys.

3 Lessons from Jesus’ Brothers

In spite of the fact that we don’t get to learn much about Jesus’ siblings and sisters in Scripture, we may take away a number of important truths from them. First and foremost, Jesus’ relationship with his siblings demonstrates that he fully comprehends every element of our existence. He understands what it’s like to grow up in a family with folks who don’t always agree with you. Even though ancient Israel did not have the same individualistic worldview as we have now, there was nonetheless sibling rivalry and competitiveness between brothers and sisters.

Jesus was completely innocent in his relationships with his siblings, and it speaks a lot about him. Second, even Jesus’ siblings expressed skepticism. However, following Joseph’s death, Jesus’ mother and father wanted him to return to carpentry and family life, despite their initial encouragement.

How Many Brothers and Sisters Did Jesus Have?

When it came to Joseph and Mary’s household in Nazareth, who was there? Are we to believe that Jesus was an only child in the family, or if there were brothers and sisters, what was their status in regard to Him? His siblings and sisters are frequently mentioned by the gospel authors. What were the names of Jesus’ siblings? This is a matter that has been debated since the beginning of time, and many lengthy writings have been published on the subject. Due to theological reasons related to the perpetual virginity of the Lord’s mother, denominational difficulties, and the canonicity of non-apostolic epistles, it has been difficult to have an objective discussion on the subject.

Bible Verses about Jesus’ Brother and Sisters

Let us begin by summarizing what we know about the brothers and sisters of the Lord from the Scriptures of the New Testament. Their names are found in Matthew 12:46-50, 13:55-56, Mark 3:31, 6:3, and Luke 8:19, as well as John 2:12, 7:3, Acts 1:14, and 1 Corinthians 9:5, and Paul refers to a James the Lord’s brother (Galatians 1:19). There appear to have been four brothers who are listed in Matthew 13:55: James, Joseph, Simon, and Judas, according to the evidence (seeMark 6:3). The sisters are mentioned in Matthew and Mark, although neither the number nor the names of the sisters are recorded.

They were reportedly married and living in Nazareth at the time of Christ’s death.

What Happened to Jesus’ ‘Brothers’?

Sign up for Christianity Today and you’ll gain instant access to back issues of Christian History! A number of “brothers and sisters” are referenced in the Gospels, but only James and Jude are mentioned elsewhere in the New Testament—James as the leader of the early church in Jerusalem, and Jude in the brief epistle that bears his name. See “Mary” for a potential meaning of “brothers and sisters.” According to the Gospel of John, Jesus’ family was first doubtful of his mission: “Even his brothers did not believe in him,” the Gospel reads.

At the Jerusalem Council, James, the eldest of Jesus’ brothers, made the decision that Gentile Christians did not have to follow traditional Jewish rules.

He may be able to

The other disciples

Following the Gospels, the disciples are only briefly mentioned in the New Testament. We have only legends to go on for more specifics, some of which are questionable. Andrew, Peter’s brother, is said to have preached in Asia Minor, Thrace, and Greece before being crucified on an X-shaped cross, according to a tenth-century story. He was recognized as the founder of the church in Constantinople, and he may have had a connection to the development of written language.

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Did Jesus have brothers and sisters (siblings)?

QuestionAnswer More than a few verses in the Bible make reference to Jesus’ brothers. A visit by Jesus’ mother and brothers is recorded in three different Bible passages: Matthew 12:46, Luke 8:19, and Mark 3:31. The Bible teaches us that Jesus had four brothers: James, Joseph, Simon, and Judas, according to the book of Matthew (Matthew 13:55). Although the Bible says that Jesus had sisters, they are neither named or counted in the book of Matthew (Matthew 13:56). In John 7:1-10, Jesus’ brothers accompany him to the feast, while he remains at home.

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James, according to Galatians 1:19, was Jesus’ younger brother.

Some Roman Catholics believe that these “brothers” were actually Jesus’ cousins, rather than his siblings.

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Did Jesus Really Have Half-Siblings?

Jesus had at least four brothers, according to Matthew 13:55: James, Joseph (sometimes referred to as Joses), Simon, and Judas. James was the oldest of the brothers (also referred to as Jude). Matthew 13:56 indicates that he had at least two sisters, which is consistent with the plural form of the word “sister.” Despite the fact that the Greek term for “brothers” and “sisters” does not necessitate that someone be a blood related, it is most likely that these six persons are the offspring of Joseph and Mary and half-siblings of Jesus, according to tradition.

Why Is This Question So Controversial Among Christians?

Mary’s eternal virginity is at the heart of this debate, which has raged for more than two centuries. It is possible that Mary is eternally a virgin, in which case Jesus would have no biological relations. This offers the potential of Jesus having half-brothers and sisters if Mary remained a virgin until the birth of Jesus, but then began having sexual intercourse with her husband Joseph afterward. Because of Jesus’ virgin birth, Joseph was not his biological father, therefore they would act on his behalf as step-siblings.

In the first place, it is important to note that Jesus’ siblings were offspring of Mary and Joseph after Jesus was born (referred to as the Helvidian view).

Third, they were first cousins of Jesus (according to the conventional Roman view).

Why Are There Objections to Jesus Having Half-Brothers?

The dogma of Mary’s permanent virginity is the primary source of opposition to Jesus having half-siblings in the first place. From the early church through the Reformation, this idea was embraced by a large number of people. It is Matthew 1:25 that is important since it says, “but (Joseph) did not have sexual contact with her until she gave birth to a son.” “And he gave him the name Jesus” (CSB). In this case, the term “until” is at the core of the debate. This term signifies the conclusion of a span of time in a chronological sense.

They remained in Egypt “until Herod’s death,” according to Matthew 2:15, which is the same as the CSB.

What Do We Know about the Half-Siblings?

James was the most well-known of Jesus’ half-brothers and sisters. James the son of Zebedee, the brother of John, is not to be confused with the person named James here (seeMatthew 4:21). According to Acts 12:2, James the son of Zebedee was killed at a young age in the history of Christianity. A number of times in the New Testament, Jesus’ half-brother James is mentioned by name. Besides the passage from Matthew 13:55, we know that Mary and Jesus’ brothers (most likely included James) went to Jesus when he was ministering to the people (Matthew 12:46;Mark 3:31;Luke 8:19-20).

Because the terms “brothers” and “disciples” are distinct, it is most likely that these are the sons of Mary, half-brothers of Jesus, and most likely include James as well.

This is an unequivocal case.

How to Respond When People Say Jesus Had Brothers and Sisters

From the early days following the Resurrection, the Church has held that Mary was a perpetual virgin and that Jesus did not have any biological brothers or sisters, as was traditionally thought. The carpenter, son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon, is this not the carpenter, and are his sisters with us?” “Are his sisters among us?” —Matthew 6:3 Is it possible that Jesus had siblings and sisters? Some people believe that the Gospel of Mark appears to support their claim.

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The subject is brought up once more in Luke 8:19-21.

“Your mother and brothers are gathered outside, waiting to meet you,” the mob exclaims loudly.

Did Jesus have brothers and sisters?

The lone kid is frequently given a negative reputation. People who grow up without siblings are often stereotyped as entitled and self-important, and this is especially true among those of us who have at least one sibling or two of our own to compare them to. Even though Jesus appears to have behaved as if he were an only child at times in the gospels, all four of the gospel writers make some mention of his brothers and sisters. As recorded in Mark, a large group of people confronted Jesus and said, “Isn’t this the carpenter?

Isn’t he the brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon?

When Jesus is informed by a multitude assembled to hear him speak, “Your mother and your brothers are standing outside, wanting to see you,” he famously dismisses them, saying, “My mother and my brothers are standing outside, wanting to see you.”

The Brothers of Jesus: Loving the Unbelieving Relative

“The Brothers of Jesus: Loving the Unbelieving Relative,” a publication from the Society of Jesus. The Ensign, March 1987, page 50 For many of us, we have a father or mother, a husband or wife, a brother or sister, a son or daughter who does not believe in the faith that we hold so dear. However, despite the fact that many sympathetic and useful lectures have been delivered on how to best manage this issue, I have never heard one that sought to explore how the Savior dealt with it in his own family.

But even from the few instances that have been recorded, as well as from the end consequence of Jesus’ labors with his family, we may gain a great deal of insight. Mark 6:3 informs us

Did Jesus Have Brothers and Sisters?

The marriage of God and Mary that resulted in the birth of Jesus was the outcome of a supernatural union. At the time of Jesus’ conception, she was still a virgin. Some believe that Mary was a virgin during her whole life, and that this is correct. According to this interpretation, Jesus would have been an only child. The Scriptures, on the other hand, reveal that Jesus had siblings and sisters of his own. Matthew’s Statements Earliest and foremost, the first chapter of Matthew provides the first evidence that Mary was not a virgin after the birth of Jesus.

He had never had sexual intercourse with her and was well aware that the child was not his biological child.

  1. As a result of a prior marriage, there were children born to Mary and Joseph after Jesus was born, resulting in His younger brothers and sisters (natural half-brothers and sisters)
  2. These were the offspring of Joseph from that previous marriage (step-brothers and sisters). This was the point of view of Epiphanius, a fourth-century supporter of Mary’s everlasting virginity who held this belief. It was also the point of view of the classical scholar Jerome at the time. The famous scholar Joseph Barber Lightfoot, among others, has defended this point of view in modern times, stating that they were cousins of Jesus rather than genuine brothers and sisters. They were the sons of Cleopas, who was purportedly Joseph’s brother or brother-in-law
  3. They were the sons of Cleopas
  4. And they were the sons of Joseph.

The manner in which they are labeled is one of the reasons why some people feel they were not the offspring of Joseph and Mary. According to Mark 6:3, Jesus is referred to as the “Son of Mary,” and he is distinguished from the other named brothers as well as the other female siblings. In the Upper Room, There Was a Dispute Among those present in the upper chamber were “Mary, Jesus’ mother, and. his brothers” (Acts 1:14). They were referred to as Hisbrothers rather than her sons in this context.

SummaryJesus had four brothers and at least two sisters, according to the gospels.

Despite the fact that nothing can be guaranteed,

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