Who Took Jesus Off The Cross

Jesus is taken down from the Cross and given to his Mother

Via Crucis, Scuola Veneta – Sec. XVIIICattedrale – PadovaTHIRTEENTH STATIONJesus istaken down from the Cross and given to his Mother V/. Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi.R/. Quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.From the Gospel according toMatthew27:54-55 When the centurion and those who were with him, keepingwatch over Jesus, saw the earthquake and what took place, they were filledwith awe, and said, �Truly this was the Son of God!� There were also manywomen there, looking on from afar, who had followed Jesus from Galilee,ministering to him.MEDITATION Jesus is dead. From his heart, pierced by the lance of theRoman soldier, flow blood and water: a mysterious image of the stream of thesacraments, Baptism and the Eucharist, by which the Church is constantlyreborn from the opened heart of the Lord. Jesus� legs are not broken, likethose of the two men crucified with him. He is thus revealed as the truePaschal lamb, not one of whose bones must be broken (cf.Es12:46). Andnow, at the end of his sufferings, it is clear that, for all the dismay whichfilled men�s hearts, for all the power of hatred and cowardice, he was neveralone. There are faithful ones who remain with him. Under the Cross standMary, his Mother, the sister of his Mother, Mary, Mary Magdalen and thedisciple whom he loved. A wealthy man, Joseph of Arimathea, appears on thescene: a rich man is able to pass through the eye of a needle, for God hasgiven him the grace. He buries Jesus in his own empty tomb, in a garden. AtJesus�s burial, the cemetery becomes a garden, the garden from which Adam wascast out when he abandoned the fullness of life, his Creator. The garden tombsymbolizes that the dominion of death is about to end. A member of theSanhedrin also comes along, Nicodemus, to whom Jesus had proclaimed themystery of rebirth by water and the Spirit. Even in the Sanhedrin, whichdecreed his death, there is a believer, someone who knows and recognizes Jesusafter his death. In this hour of immense grief, of darkness and despair, thelight of hope is mysteriously present. The hidden God continues to be the Godof life, ever near. Even in the night of death, the Lord continues to be ourLord and Saviour. The Church of Jesus Christ, his new family, begins to takeshape.PRAYER Lord, you descended into the darkness of death. But your bodyis placed in good hands and wrapped in a white shroud (Mt27:59). Faithhas not completely died; the sun has not completely set. How often does itappear that you are asleep? How easy it is for us to step back and say toourselves: �God is dead�. In the hour of darkness, help us to know that youare still there. Do not abandon us when we are tempted to lose heart. Help usnot to leave you alone. Give us the fidelity to withstand moments of confusionand a love ready to embrace you in your utter helplessness, like your Mother,who once more holds you to her breast. Help us, the poor and rich, simple andlearned, to look beyond all our fears and prejudices, and to offer you ourabilities, our hearts and our time, and thus to prepare a garden for theResurrection.All:Pater noster, qui es in c�lis:sanctificetur nomen tuum;adveniat regnum tuum;fiat voluntas tua, sicut in c�lo, et in terra.Panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis hodie;et dimitte nobis debita nostra,sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris;et ne nos inducas in tentationem;sed libera nos a malo.Vidit suum dulcem Natummorientem, desolatum,cum emisit spiritum.� Copyright 2005 – LibreriaEditrice Vaticana

Descent from the Cross – Wikipedia

Rosso Fiorentino is a kind of Italian red wine. The Descendants of the Cross, 1521. Painting in oil on wood. The dimensions are 375 x 196 cm. Volterra’s Municipal Art Gallery, or Pinacoteca Comunale, is a must-see. When Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus take Christ down from the cross after his crucifixion (John 19:38–42), this is known as theDescent from the Cross (Greek: o, Apokathelosis), or Deposition of Christ, and it is shown in art as theDescent from the Cross. In Byzantine art, the subject became popular in the 9th century, and in Western art, it became popular in the 10th century.

In addition to Mary, other people who are not named in the Gospels but who are frequently shown in this subject matter include John the Evangelist, who is sometimes depicted comforting a bereaved Mary (as in the picture below by Rogier van der Weyden), and Mary Magdalene.

These and other ladies, as well as unidentified male assistants, are frequently shown.

Development of the image

It is possible to see variations in the intricacies and positioning of the composition, and notably in the position of Christ’s body, even in early portrayals. During the Middle Ages, the scene was frequently featured in cycles depicting the Life or the Passion of Christ, and it took place sometime between the Crucifixion and the Entombment of Christ. In between these two images, theLamentation of Christ, orPietà, depicting the body of Christ held by Mary, may interrupt, and it is frequent as a single picture, particularly in sculpture.

As a result of the compositional difficulties and the appropriateness of the subject’s vertical form, the subject became more popular for altarpieces throughout the Renaissance period.

Both Rubens and Rembrandt painted the subject multiple times, and Rembrandt reproduced one of his paintings (now in the Munich Museum) in a huge print, which was his only print to be mostly engraved, as well as creating two more etchings of the subject.

Selected examples

  • Rogier van der Weyden’s Descent from the Cross (c. 1435) is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid
  • And Fra Angelico’s Deposition of Christ (c. 1433) is housed in the National Museum of San Marco in Florence. It is housed at theGalleria dell’Accademia di Firenze (Florence’s Academy of Fine Arts), and it was painted by Filippino Lippi and finished by Pietro Perugino in 1506. In the Pinacoteca di Volterra, there is a painting by Rosso Fiorentino titled Deposition from the Cross (1521). Pontormo’s Deposition from the Cross (1528) in the Capponi Chapel of the church of Santa Felicita, Florence
  • Bronzino’s Deposition of Christ (1545) in the Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  • Deposition of Christ (1545) at thePalazzo Vecchio, Florence
  • Among the works on display are Rubens’ The Descent from the Cross (1612–14), which can be seen in the Cathedral of Our Lady in Antwerp
  • David Folley’s Descent from the Cross (1995–1996), which can be found at the Jesus Chapel of St. Andrew’s Church in Wickford, Essex
  • And a number of other works.

Gallery

  • Descent from the Cross, oil on wood, Italy, 14th century
  • Descent from the Cross. Descent from the Cross. Manuscript written in Armenian. The Gospel of Daniel of Uranc, written in 1463
  • The icon Descent from the Cross, from the 15th century.

See also

  • Antimension
  • Epitaphios (liturgical epitaphios)
  • The life of Jesus as depicted in the New Testament
  • The Seven Sorrows of Mary
  • Pietà
  • Zdrafei
  • And others.

References

  1. G. Schiller, Iconography of Christian Art, Vol. II, 1972 (English translation from German), Lund Humphries, London, p.164, ISBN0-85331-324-5
  2. G. Schiller, Iconography of Christian Art, Vol. II, 1972 (English translation from German), Lund Humphries, London, p.164, ISBN0-85331-324-5

External links

  • On Wikimedia Commons, you can find images and videos connected toDescent from the Cross.

John 19:38 Afterward, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus (but secretly for fear of the Jews), asked Pilate to let him remove the body of Jesus. Pilate gave him permission, so he came and removed His body.

New International Version (New International Version) Later on, Joseph of Arimathea approached Pilate and requested the corpse of Jesus be returned to him. Now, Joseph was a follower of Jesus, but he did so in secret because he was afraid of the Jewish leaders. He arrived and removed the body from the scene with Pilate’s consent. New Living Translation (New Living Translation) Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a hidden disciple of Jesus (because he was afraid of the Jewish authorities), next approached Pilate and requested for permission to remove Jesus’ body from the cross.

  • Version standardized in English Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a follower of Jesus but had kept his discipleship a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the corpse of Jesus, which Pilate granted.
  • Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) Following that, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a follower of Jesus (but who did so in secret for fear of the Jews), petitioned Pilate to allow him to take the corpse of Jesus from the tomb.
  • The Literal Bible of the Bereans And when these things happened, Joseph from Arimathea, who was a follower of Jesus but remained hidden because of the Jews’ fear of him, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus from the tomb; and Pilate granted his request.
  • The King James Version of the Bible And after this, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was a follower of Jesus but who kept his membership a secret out of dread of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the corpse of Jesus, and Pilate granted his request.
  • The New King James Version (sometimes known as the New King James Version) was published in 1611.
  • As a result, he arrived and seized the corpse of Jesus.
  • Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a follower of Jesus but kept his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the corpse of Jesus from the tomb; and Pilate granted his request.

NASB (National Association of School Boards) 1995 Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but kept his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to carry away the corpse of Jesus, and Pilate granted him permission.

NASB 1977 (National Association of School Boards) And when these things happened, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a follower of Jesus but kept his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the corpse of Jesus, which Pilate allowed.

The Bible with an amplification system And after that, Joseph of Arimathea, a follower of Jesus who had been keeping his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the corpse of Jesus, which Pilate granted.

The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.

Pilate granted him permission, and so he came and removed his body from the scene.

Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a follower of Jesus—but who did so in secret due to his dread of the Jews—appealed to Pilate and requested that the corpse of Jesus be removed from the tomb.

The American Standard Version is the version used in the United States.

As a result, he arrived and removed his body from the scene.

Version in the Present Tense of the English Language Joseph of Arimathea was a follower of Jesus who befriended him.

But now he’s pleading with Pilate to allow him to take possession of Jesus’ body.

The Bible of Douay-Rheims And when these events occurred, Joseph of Arimathea (since he was a follower of Jesus, but secretly out of dread of the Jews) petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the corpse of Jesus from the tomb of Lazarus.

As a result, Satan arrived and took the corpse of Jesus with him.

(Joseph was a disciple of Jesus, but he did it in secret due to his fear of the Jewish authorities.) As soon as Pilate informed him that he may have the body, Joseph went and carried it away.

Pilate granted his request.

Standard Version in its literal sense In the aftermath of these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but kept his identity secret because of the Jews’ dread of him, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the corpse of Jesus; Pilate granted his request; Joseph of Arimathea arrived and removed the body of Jesus.

  1. Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, who was secretly a disciple of Jesus because of fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to take the corpse of Jesus from the tomb.
  2. As a result, he arrived and seized his body.
  3. Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, a disciple of Jesus (though he did so in secret because he feared the Jewish leaders), petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the body of Jesus from the tomb.
  4. Revised Standard Version (New Revised Standard Version) Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a follower of Jesus, albeit a hidden disciple because to his dread of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the corpse of Jesus from the scene.
  5. The New Heart English Bible is a translation of the New Heart Bible.
  6. Pilate granted him permission to do so.

Weymouth The New Testament is a collection of writings that were written during the years of ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad ad Following this, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was a disciple of Jesus but remained a hidden follower out of fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the corpse of Jesus from the scene.

As a result, he arrived and removed the body.

Pilate granted him permission to do so.

Young’s Literal Translation of the Text And after these things happened, Joseph of Arimathea – who was a disciple of Jesus but remained hidden because of the Jews’ fear of him – petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, and Pilate granted it; he then came and removed the body of Jesus, and the body of Jesus was buried.

  • Context Jesus’ Burial was a major event in the history of the world.
  • Pilate granted him permission, and she arrived and took his body.
  • … References to Other Sources Joseph, a wealthy businessman from Arimathea who had become a follower of Jesus, arrived as the sun was setting in Matthew 27:57.
  • In light of the fact that it was Preparation Day (i.e., the day before the Sabbath), Joseph of Arimathea, a prominent Council member who likewise was looking forward to the coming of the kingdom of God, went to Pilate and confidently requested that the corpse of Jesus be returned to him.
  • Despite this, no one dared to speak openly about Him for fear of offending the Jews.
  • The Scriptures are a treasure trove.
  • As a result, Satan arrived and took the corpse of Jesus with him.

Matthew 27:57-60 (NASB) When the time came, a wealthy businessman from Arimathaea by the name of Joseph arrived, who was also a disciple of Jesus: … Mark 15:42-46 (KJV) And now, because it was the day before the sabbath, the time had arrived for the event to take place, and.

9:22 (John 9:22) These comments were said by his parents out of dread for the Jews: for the Jews had already resolved that if any man professed to be Christ, he would be expelled from the synagogue, according to Jewish tradition.

(38) In the case of the burial (John 19:38-42), comp.

But only in secret, out of fear of the Jews.

John provides about Joseph’s character.

Verse 38 to 42.

Verse 38 is a proverb.

With the article () and a second preceding, the reader is led to believe that this “Joseph” is now, as a result of the synoptic tale, a well-known individual.

49).

The maps of the Palestina region.

It is approximately a league to the east of Bethlehem, according to the fund.

We may infer that Joseph had a domicile in Jerusalem, despite the fact that he was still referred to as “from” and “belonging to” Arimathaea, because he had a grave prepared, close to the city, which had not yet been utilized.

John sums up his entire point of view in the following way: Being a disciple of Jesus, but a secret disciple(), who had remained hidden as such up to this climactic moment in his Lord’s humiliation, and not daring to profess Christ because of his dread of the Jews, was a source of pride for him.

  1. Joseph inquired with Pilate(); a term that conveys a sense of assertiveness and self-assurance on Joseph’s behalf.
  2. In order for him to be able to remove the body of Jesus, Pilate granted him permission.
  3. The assertion made by Mark is fully compatible with this as well as with the statement made in verse 31.
  4. “The Christian martyrs of Rome were frequently buried in the catacombs,” according to Luthardt, because Roman law granted them this privilege to their friends.
  5. The death had occurred, and the Jews were prepared to transport the corpse to the Valley of the Son of Hinnom with Pilate’s permission, as he had instructed them.
  6. As a result, he arrived and grabbed the corpse since he had been granted permission (of Jesus).
  7. Greek Afterward,δὲ(de)Conjunction Strong’s 1161 (Strong’s 1161): A main particle; although, and, and so on.
See also:  How Many People Are Named Jesus

ofἀπὸ(apo) Preposition Strength 575: away from, in the opposite direction of It is a primary particle that means “away,” or “away” in various senses.

Arimathaea is a place in Palestine that has Hebrew origins.

a follower of Christ μαθητὴς(mathētēs) Noun – Nominative Masculine Form of Noun An apprentice, a disciple, or a pupil, according to SingularStrong’s 3101 A learner, i.e.

Noun – Masculine Genitive Form Singular Strong’s number 2424: Jesus, the name of our Lord, and two other Israelites are descended from the Hebrew language.

ConjunctionStrong’s 1161:A primary particle; however, and, and so on.

To hide is a fundamental verb.

fear φόβον(phobon) Noun – Accusative Masculine Form of the word In SingularStrong’s 5401: (a) dread, fright, or alarm; (b) the object or source of fear; and (c) reverence, respect.

This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the.

From the Hebrew word Iouda, which means “belonging to Jehudah.” askedἠρώτησεν(ērōtēsen) According to Strong’s 2065, the verb “interrogate” is derived from the Latin “ereo,” which means “to request” or “to interrogate.” “Pilate” is an accusative masculine singular noun that comes from Strong’s 4091: “Pilateon.” Pilatus was a Roman who was of Latin origin; he was close-pressed, i.e.

  1. toἵνα(hina) ConjunctionStrong’s 2443 is as follows: In order to ensure that, in order to ensure that.
  2. allow him to be removed ἄρῃ(arē) Strong’s 142: to elevate, hoist up, take away, or remove anything from its original position.
  3. This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; and the.
  4. in the person of Jesus Strong’s 2424:Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord, and two other Israelites are mentioned.
  5. SingularStrong’s 4091:Pilate is a pilates variation.
  6. firm; the Roman, Pilatus, granted him permission; (epetrepsen) To turn to, commit, entrust; I let, yield, permitStrong’s 2010:I turn to you; I commit to you; I entrust you.
  7. Strong’s 2064 is a verb in the aorist indicative active tense in the third person singular.
  8. removedἦρεν(ēren) Strong’s 142: to raise, lift up, take away, or remove something from a position or situation.
  9. The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.
  10. Noun – Accusative Neuter SingularStrong’s 4983:Body, flesh; the Church’s physical manifestation.

Prior Arimathea ArimatheaArimatheaArimathea Pilate’s SecretSecretlyJump to NextArimathaea soughtBodyCarryDiscipleFearGrantedJesusJewsJosephLeavePermissionPilatePilate’s SecretSecretlyJump to Next ArimatheaBesoughtBodyCarryDiscipleFearGrantedJesusJewsJosephLeavePermission PilatePilate’sSecretSecretlyLinks John 19:38 New International Version John 19:38 New Living Translation ESV (English Standard Version): John 19:38 John 19:38 New American Standard Bible KJV (King James Version): John 19:38 BibleApps.com has a translation of John 19:38.

Biblia del Evangelio 19:38 Paralela Chinese translation of John 19:38 French translation of John 19:38 Revelation 19:38 in the Catholic Bible Gospels of the New Testament: 19:38 (John 19:38) Following these events, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was (Jhn Jo Jn)

REMOVAL OF THE BODY OF JESUS FROM THE CROSS

a new International Version has been published Later on, Joseph of Arimathea approached Pilate and requested the body of Jesus be returned to his possession. The Jewish leaders were afraid of Joseph, so he kept his discipleship with Jesus a closely guarded secret. He arrived and removed the body from the scene with Pilate’s approval. Translation into Living Language Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a secret disciple of Jesus (because he was afraid of the Jewish leaders), then approached Pilate and asked for permission to remove Jesus’ body from the tomb.

  1. the standard version of the english language The body of Jesus was taken away from the tomb after these events, and Pilate granted the request made by Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a disciple of Jesus but had kept his membership a secret out of fear for the Jews.
  2. ‘Berean Study Bible’ is a biblical text that was written by the Bereans.
  3. Following the approval of Pilate, He came and took His body away from the tomb.
  4. As a result, he arrived and removed His body.
  5. Then Joseph of Arimathaea, who was a disciple of Jesus but who remained hidden for fear of the Jews, begged Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, and Pilate granted him permission.
  6. English translation of the New King James Version (also known as the New King James Version or New King James Version).
  7. As a result, he came and took Jesus’ body.

Bible) Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but kept his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus from the tomb.

As a result, he arrived and removed His body.

When all of this is completed, Pilate agreed to Joseph of Arimathea’s request that he be permitted to remove the body of Jesus because he was a disciple of Jesus, but he did so in secret for fear of the Jews.

In 1977, the National Academy of Sciences published NASB.

His body was taken away by Him as a result of his arrival.

As a result, he arrived and removed His body.

Pilate granted his request.

Holman New International Version of the Bible (also known as the Christian Standard Version) Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus—but who did so in secret due to his fear of the Jews—appealed to Pilate and requested that the body of Jesus be removed from the tomb.

Pilate granted him permission, and he arrived and removed His body from the scene of the accident.

His body was taken away by him as a result of his appearance.

Version in the Present Day (Current English) A member of Jesus’ inner circle was Joseph from Arimathea.

His request to have Jesus’ body returned to him has now been granted by Pilate.

The Bible from Douay-Rheims So, after these events transpired, Joseph of Arimathea petitioned Pilate for permission to remove Jesus’ body (not because he was a disciple of Jesus, but rather out of fear for his life due to Jewish opposition).

As a result, he came and took the body of Jesus with himself.

Pilate agreed.

ANSI/ISBE/ISO/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/IEC/I The body of Jesus was later removed from the tomb by Joseph of Arimathea, who had become a disciple of Jesus (though a secret disciple because he was afraid of the Jewish leaders).

English Standard Version in its most literal sense Because of the Jews’ fear for his life, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but was kept hidden, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted; he then came and took the body away from the cross, and he was crucified alongside him.

  • This was followed by Pilate granting Joseph of Arimathea permission to remove Jesus’ body from the tomb because he was afraid of the Jews.
  • As a result, he came and claimed his body.
  • As a result of Pilate’s approval, he went and removed the body.
  • Because of his fear of the Jews, Joseph of Arimathea, a disciple of Jesus who had been keeping his identity a secret out of fear of the Jews, approached Pilate and asked that he be permitted to take his body away.
  • English Bible with a New Heart Joseph of Arimathaea, who had been a disciple of Jesus but had remained anonymous for fear of the Jewish leaders, approached Pilate after these events and requested that the body of Jesus be removed from the scene.
  • His body was taken away by him as a result.
  • The body was taken away by him as a result.
  • In response, Pilate granted him permission to proceed.

Translating Young’s Work Literally Afterwards, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but remained hidden because of the Jews’ fear of him, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted; he then went and removed the body of Jesus, which was buried in a nearby tomb.

  1. Context Jesus’ Burial was a major event in the history of Christianity.
  2. 38 The following day, Josephof Arimathea, a disciple of Jesus (who was also secretly afraid of the Jews), petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the body of Jesus from a tomb in the Temple.
  3. 39 Also brought by Nicodemus, who had previously arrived at Jesus’ home late in the night, was an approximately seventy-five-pound mixture of myrrh and aloes.
  4. In Mark 15:42, the apostle Paul says, It was getting late in the day.
  5. Mark 15:43 Luke 23:50 is a biblical passage.
  6. For fear of offending the Jews, no one would publicly discuss Him.
  7. They took Him down from the tree and buried Him in a tomb after they had completed all of the tasks that had been assigned to them concerning Him.

As a result, he came and took the body of Jesus with himself.

Jesus says in Matthew 27:57-60, When the time came, a wealthy businessman from Arimathaea by the name of Joseph arrived, who was also a disciple of Jesus.

And now, because it was the day before the Sabbath, and because it was the preparation day,.

After all, there was a man named Joseph who worked as a counselor; he was an honorable and just individual; but there was a problem.

After all, the Jews had already agreed that if any man professed to be Jesus Christ, he would be expelled from the synagogue.

Psalm 29:25 (NIV) The fear of man is a snare, but whoever puts his trust in the LORD will not be caught in one.

The Jews, on the other hand, were keeping their distance.

John.

37th to 42nd verses: A funeral service for two friends, Joseph and Nicodemus, was held on Saturday, July 7.

This “Joseph” is introduced with the article (and a second before), implying to the reader that he is now, as a result of the synoptic narrative, a well-known individual.

49) points out, this Arimathos is most likely the Ramathaim mentioned in 1 Samuel 1:1 as the birthplace of Samuel, which is now known as the Nebi Samwil and located about two leagues north-west of Jerusalem (Caspari, p.

His guess is that the location is Ramleh, which is eight hours from Jerusalem by car or plane.

Explor.

It is recorded in Matthew 27:57 that he was a “rich man” – a fact that the First Gospel recalls without quoting the remarkable oracle of Isaiah 53:9, which states that Messiah, Servant of Jehovah, was with the “rich in his death” (Matthew 27:58).

Furthermore, he was ao(Luke 23:50;Mark 15:43), a member of the Sanhedrin, of high character, “good and just, waiting for, expecting the kingdom of God,” (say Mark and Luke), “and by no means consentient to the counsel and deed of his colleagues.” (Luke 23:50; Mark 15:43) (adds Luke).

That he and Nicodemus were able to put their fears aside at such a crucial time is perplexing.

In fact, all three synoptists make use of the term “supplanter,” which refers to someone who has come to beg for favors.

Some people believe (in accordance with Mark 15:43) that Pilate had already granted permission for the crurifragium, but was surprised to discover that Jesus had already died.

The statement made by Mark is perfectly consistent with this, as well as with the statement made in verse 31 of this chapter.

“The Christian martyrs of Rome were often buried in the catacombs,” according to Luthardt, because Roman law granted them this privilege.

The death had occurred, and the Jews were prepared to transport the corpse to the Valley of the Son of Hinnom with Pilate’s permission, as he had instructed.

As a result, he came and took the body because he had been given permission (of Jesus).

However, and, and, and, and, and, and, and JosephἸωσὴφ(Iōsēph) In Strong’s 2501: Joseph, a proper name, the noun is in the nominative masculine singular form.

ofἀπὸ(apo) Preposition Strong’s 575: away from, away from the.

Arimathaea is a place in Palestine that is of Hebrew origin.

I exist in the first person singular present indicative; it is a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; it is in the first person singular present indicative a follower of a religion μαθητὴς(mathētēs) The noun is in the masculine nominative case.

Isou (Jesuspupil )’s is derived from the Greek word manthano, which means “learner.” Male Genitive Noun – Noun in the Genitive Form Singular In the case of Strong’s 2424, the answer is “yes.” Jesus, the name of our Lord, and two other Israelites are descended from the tribe of Benjamin, who lived in ancient Israel.

  1. ConjunctionStrong’s 1161: A primary particle; however, and, and so on.
  2. Passive The nominative masculine is a masculine pronoun that is used to refer to a male.
  3. To conceal is a primary verb.
  4. This word derives from an ancient Greek word meaning “alert” or “fright.” The Genitive Masculine is discussed in detail in this article.
  5. This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; The adjective Jews), (Ioudain)Adjective – Genitive Masculine PluralStrong’s 2453:Jewish Coming from Iouda; Judaean, which means belonging to Jehuda.
  6. “Pilate” is an accusative masculine singular noun that comes from Strong’s 4091: “Pilaton.” Pilatus was a Roman who was of Latin descent; he was close-pressed, i.e.
  7. toἵνα(hina) This is the 2443 from ConjunctionStrong: Consequently, in order that In order to achieve this, it is most likely derived from the same source as the previous part of heautou.

theτὸ(to) Singular Article – Accusative Neuter SingularStrong’s 3588:the, the definitive article This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he as well as the neuter to; the definite article; bodyσῶμα(sōma) In Strong’s 4983, “body” refers to “flesh,” which is also used to refer to “the church’s body.” With its roots in sozo, which means “body,” the word can be applied in a wide variety of contexts, both literally and metaphorically: as if they were Jesus Noun – Genitive Masculine SingularStrong’s 2424:Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord and two other Israelites are mentioned.

  • Pilate Noun – Nominative Masculine Form of (Pilatos) 4091:Pilate by SingularStrong.
  • firm; Pilatus, a Roman, granted him permission (epetrepsen) Strong’s 2010:I turn to, commit, entrust; I allow, yield, permit; I allow, yield, permit.
  • Verb – Aorist Indicative Active – Third Person SingularStrong’s 2064:To come and go.
  • A possessive pronoun that is used in the third person singular genitive masculineStrong’s 846:he, she, it, they, them, the same, the same as The reflexive pronoun self, which is used in the third person as well as the other persons, is derived from the particle au.

smaNoun – Accusative Neuter SingularStrong’s 4983:Body, flesh; the physical body of the Church With its roots in sozo, which means “body,” the word can be applied in a wide variety of contexts, both literally and metaphorically: Prior Arimathea ArimatheaArimatheaArimatha ArimathaeaBodyCarryDiscipleFearGrantedJesusJewsJosephLeavePermissionPilatePilate’sSecretSecretlyJump to NextBodyCarryDiscipleFearGrantedJewsJoseph ArimatheaBesoughtBodyCarryDiscipleFearGrantedJesusJewsJosephLeavePermission PilatePilate’sSecretSecretlyLinks NIV (New International Version): John 19:38 The New Living Translation of John 19:38 ESV (English Standard Version): John 19:38.

NASB translation of John 19:38 KJV (King James Version) John 19:38 BibleApps.com – John 19:38 Biblia del Evangelio de John 19:38 Paralela Chinese version of John 19:38.

French translation of John 19:38. Catholic Bible (John 19:38). Gospels of the New Testament Jn. 19:38 (KJV) As a result of these events, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was (Jhn Jo Jn)

3 Things We Can Learn from Joseph of Arimathea

The New International Version (NIV) Afterwards, Joseph of Arimathea petitioned Pilate to release the body of Jesus. Now, Joseph was a follower of Jesus, but he did so in secret because he was afraid of the Jewish authorities. With Pilate’s permission, he arrived and removed the body from the scene. a new version of the living translation Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a secret disciple of Jesus (because he feared the Jewish leaders), then approached Pilate and asked for permission to remove Jesus’ body from the cross.

  1. The English Standard Version (ESV) Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a disciple of Jesus but had kept his membership a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted.
  2. The Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) After that, Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a disciple of Jesus (but had done so in secret for fear of the Jews), petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the body of Jesus from the tomb.
  3. Literal Bible of the Bereans Following these events, Joseph from Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but remained hidden because of the Jews’ fear of him, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus from the tomb; and Pilate granted his request.
  4. The King James Bible (also known as the King James Version) And after this, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was a disciple of Jesus but who kept his membership a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove the body of Jesus, and Pilate granted his request.
  5. The New King James Version (also known as the New King James Version) Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but who remained anonymous for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, and Pilate granted his request.
  6. The New American Standard Bible (NASB) Following these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but kept his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted.
  7. NASB 1995 (National Association of School Boards) As a result of these events, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but kept his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted.
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NASB 1977 (National Association of State Boards of Education) And after these things happened, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus but who kept his identity a secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted.

The Bible on amplification And after that, Joseph of Arimathea, a disciple of Jesus who had remained anonymous for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to take away the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted.

The Christian Standard Version of the Bible Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a disciple of Jesus—but had done so in secret because of his fear of the Jews—appealed to Pilate and requested that the body of Jesus be removed from the tomb.

Holman The Christian Standard Version of the Bible Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a disciple of Jesus—but had done so in secret because of his fear of the Jews—appealed to Pilate and requested that the body of Jesus be removed from the tomb.

The American Standard Version (also known as the ASA) Joseph of Arimath a, who claimed to be a disciple of Jesus but did so in secret for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus, which Pilate granted.

The Bible in Aramaic in Plain English Following these events, Yoseph, a Ramtha resident who was a disciple of Yeshua (and who did so secretly out of fear of the Judeans), petitioned Pilate for permission to take the body of Yeshua; Pilate granted his request, and Yoseph arrived and carried the body away.

  • He had kept it a secret, however, out of fear of the Jewish leaders.
  • Joseph was given permission by Pilate to remove the cross from the cross.
  • And Pilate granted permission.
  • Translation of Positive Messages Following this, Joseph, a man from the town of Arimathea, approached Pilate and requested permission to take Jesus’ body.

The International Standard Version (ISO) is a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised formalised The body of Jesus was later removed from the tomb by Joseph of Arimathea, who had been a disciple of Jesus (though a secret disciple because he was afraid of the Jewish leaders).

  • Pilate granted him permission, and he arrived to take his body away.
  • New American Bible (also known as the New American Bible) Following this, Joseph of Arimathea, who was secretly a disciple of Jesus out of fear of the Jews, approached Pilate and asked if he could remove the body of Jesus from the tomb.
  • As a result, he came and took his body.
  • Pilate granted him permission, and he proceeded to remove the body.
  • Pilate granted him permission, and so he came and took his body away.
  • Pilate gave him permission to proceed.

Weymouth The New Testament is a collection of writings that were written between the years of ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad nauseum and ad na Following this, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was a disciple of Jesus but, out of fear of the Jews, acted as a secret disciple, petitioned Pilate for permission to remove the body of Jesus from the scene.

  1. Pilate granted his request.
  2. The English Bible of the World Following these events, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was a disciple of Jesus but who remained silent for fear of the Jews, petitioned Pilate to allow him to remove Jesus’ body from the cross.
  3. As a result, he arrived and removed his body.
  4. Translations that aren’t already there.
  5. 37 “They will look on the One they have pierced,” according to another passage of Scripture.
  6. Pilat granted him permission, and she arrived and removed his body.
  7. … References to Other Works When it was evening, a rich man from Arimathea named Joseph arrived, who was himself a disciple of Jesus.

It was getting late in the evening.

Luke 23:50 (NASB) Now there was a member of the Council named Joseph, who was a good and righteous man, according to John 7:13 However, no one dared to speak publicly about Him for fear of offending the Jews.

The Bible’s treasury And after this, Joseph of Arimathaea, who was a disciple of Jesus but who kept his discipleship a secret for fear of the Jews, went to Pilate and asked permission to remove the body of Jesus from the tomb: and Pilate granted him permission.

Joseph.

When the time came, a rich man from Arimathaea by the name of Joseph arrived, who was also a disciple of Jesus: … Mark 15:42-46 (NASB) And now, because it was the day before the Sabbath, the time had come for the event to take place.

John 9:22 (NIV) These words were uttered by his parents out of fear for the Jews: for the Jews had already agreed that if any man professed to be Christ, he would be expelled from the synagogue.

(38) In the case of the burial (John 19:38-42), comp.

However, they did so in secret out of fear of the Jews.

John provides about Joseph.

Verse 38 through 42.

Verse 38 is a paraphrase.

With the article () and a second before, the reader is led to believe that this “Joseph” is now, as a result of the synoptic narrative, a well-known figure.

49).

The maps of the Palestino region.

It is approximately a league east of Bethlehem, according to the fund.

We can conclude that Joseph had a residence in Jerusalem, despite the fact that he was still referred to as “from” and “belonging to” Arimathaea, because he had a sepulcher built close to the city, which had not yet been used.

John summarizes the entire position as follows: Being a disciple of Jesus, but a hidden disciple(), who had remained hidden as such up to this climactic moment of his Lord’s humiliation, and not daring to confess Christ because of his fear of the Jews, was a source of pride for him.

Joseph inquired of Pilate(); a word that conveys a sense of assertiveness and confidence on Joseph’s part.

In order for him to be able to remove the body of Jesus from the scene, Pilate granted him permission.

The statement made by Mark is perfectly consistent with this, as well as with the statement made in verse 31.

Friends were granted this privilege under Roman law; as Luthardt points out, “the Christian martyrs of Rome were frequently buried in the catacombs.” Removal of a body from the cross was not permitted until it was obvious that the person had died.

Joseph has been granted permission to transport the body to a cemetery for an honorable burial.

Commentaries that run concurrently.

JosephἸωσὴφ(Iōsēph) Strong’s 2501:Joseph, a proper name.

ofἀπὸ(apo) Preposition Strong’s 575: away from, away from.

away, in various contexts.

Arimathaea is a place in Palestine that has Hebrew roots.

I exist in the first person singular present indicative, which is a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I am first person singular present indicative.

From the Greek word manthano, which means “student,” as in “Pupil of Jesus” (Isou).

(butδὲ(de) A primary particle, but, and, and so on.

secretlyκεκρυμμένος(kekrymmenos) Perfect Participle of a Verb a middle or adverbial Passive – Masculine Nominative Form SingularStrong’s 2928: to conceal, conceal oneself, or lay up.

forδιὰ(dia) PrepositionStrong’s 1223:A primary preposition that denotes the channel through which an act takes place; through.

This includes all of the inflections of the feminine he and the neuter to as well as the definite article (the).

From Iouda; Judaean, i.e.

askedἠρώτησεν(ērōtēsen) Strong’s 2065: Apparently derived from ereo; to interrogate; by implication, to request.

Pilatus was a Roman who was of Latin origin and was close-pressed, i.e.

toἵνα(hina) The 2443 from ConjunctionStrong is as follows: In order to ensure that, in order to ensure that In order to accomplish this, it is most likely derived from the same source as the former part of heautou.

theτὸ(to) Article – Accusative Neuter SingularStrong’s 3588:the, the definite article.

bodyσῶμα(sōma) Strong’s 4983:Body, flesh; the body of the Church.

of the Lord Jesus Christ Strong’s 2424:Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord, and two other Israelites are named.

Of Latin origin; close-pressed, i.e.

Epi and trope are derived from the verb to turn over, which means to allow.

Evidently, a primary word; unquestionably, or in accordance with.

and(kai)ConjunctionStrong’s 2532: And, even more importantly, specifically.

A possessive pronoun that is used in the third person singular genitive masculineStrong’s 846:he, she, it, they, them, the same.

body.

From sozo, which means “body,” and is used in a wide variety of contexts, both literally and figuratively.

  1. Don’t just go along with the crowd. Joseph had confidence in Jesus and was regarded as one of his disciples. This occurred despite the fact that he was a member of the Sanhedrin, a group of Jews who were passionately opposed to Jesus Christ. Joseph, on the other hand, maintained his trust in Jesus and continued to have confidence in Him despite his circumstances
  2. Follow Jesus. It is unclear how loud Joseph was in his opposition to the Sanhedrin’s conduct toward Jesus, but he was clearly opposed to their intention to kill him. However, we do know for sure that Joseph risked everything in requesting Pilate for the corpse of Jesus. For example, Jesus stated in Luke 9:24 (CSB), “For anyone wishes to save his life will lose it, but whomever wishes to lose his life because of me will save it.” Trust in God’s timing. In the days and weeks leading up to the crucifixion, it’s likely that Joseph had no clue that he would have the opportunity to be the one to respect Jesus’ body by burying it according to custom. However, when the moment came, he took a leap of confidence. The appropriate position, the right location, and the right time were all there for Joseph while Jesus’ twelve disciples were dispersed
  3. Joseph acted at the perfect moment.

It’s possible that you’re at the right position at the right moment to make a difference for Christ. It might happen today or perhaps next week, but the important thing is to be prepared. For Joseph of Arimathea, the window of opportunity had opened, and he took advantage of it. What opportunities are in store for you? Fran Trascritti is a writer who lives in Italy.

Reader Interactions

We take it for granted, then, that four women are listed as being present at the crucifixion of the Lord in the New Testament. In John, we find two pairs of women: the unidentified women, who are the mother of the Lord and her sister, and the two women who are named, Mary of Clopas and Mary Magdalene. In Luke, we see two pairs of women, who are the mother of the Lord and her sister.

  • “Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene,” according to the Bible. (See also John 19:25.)

According to Luke’s account, there were many other women present, but these are the ones that stand out as being the ones who were most intimately acquainted with Him.

  • “He was followed by a great number of people, including ladies who wept and cried for him.” But everyone who recognized him, including the ladies who had accompanied him from Galilee, stood at a distance, taking note of what was happening. (Luke 23:27) (Matthew 23:49)

Roman Soldiers, Two Criminals, and the Roman Centurion

The soldiers’ presence, as well as the presence of the two malefactors who were crucified on either side of Jesus, is mentioned by all four gospel writers. When it comes to the crucifixion, the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke pay particular attention to the centurion in charge of the execution, and they offer some description of how he was affected in the presence of the Crucified.

  • The soldiers’ presence, as well as the presence of the two malefactors who were crucified on either side of Jesus, is mentioned by all of the gospel writers, including John. When it comes to the crucifixion, the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke pay particular attention to the centurion in charge of the execution, and they offer some description of how he was moved by the presence of the Crucified.

Let me state right away that there is no conflict between Matthew, Mark, and Luke, on the one hand, and the rest of the Bible on the other. Almost without exception, both of these statements were made by the centurion. It is certainly conceivable that this man spoke more than one sentence as he observed Jesus on the Cross, and we believe that, while Matthew and Mark record the statement that impressed them, Luke records the statement that appealed to him and was in perfect harmony with his entire scheme of teaching, as recorded in the Gospel of Luke.

Chief Priests and Jewish Leaders

Luke does not mention the top priests, despite the fact that they were there. Matthew, Mark, and John all mention their attendance. The scribes, elders, and rulers who make up the Sanhedrin are mentioned in Matthew, Mark, and Luke, although John makes no mention of them at all.

  • On the same level, the top priests, professors of law, and other seniors made fun of him. “In the same way, the top priests and teachers of the law made fun of him among themselves,” says Matthew 27:41. They said that “he helped others but that he couldn’t save himself!” ‘The people gathered around him, and the ruling class even laughed at him,’ says Mark 15:31. “If he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One, let him save himself,” they urged. “The crowds gathered around him, and the rulers even scoffed at him,” according to Luke 23:35. “If he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One, let him save himself,” they urged. (See also John 19:21.)

Multitudes and Disciples

Luke, in order to demonstrate the universality of Jesus’ activity and relationship with the people, proclaims the presence of large crowds of people.

  • “He was followed by a great number of people, including ladies who wept and cried for him.” (Matthew 23:27
  • Luke 23:27)
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In addition, John is the only one who tells us that the disciples were also present, and he is the only one who relates to the fact of his own attendance, and he does so in order to record Christ’s entrusting of His mother to his care.

  • John is the only one who tells us that the disciples were also present, and he is also the only one who alludes to the fact of his own attendance, and he does so in order to record Christ’s entrusting of His mother to his care, as we will see later.

While taking a step back and looking out over the throngs of people, we notice a number of things: women and children, soldiers and criminals, a centurion, chief priests and Sanhedrin members, a group of His own disciples, and, on top of all of this, vast swaths of people from all over the surrounding country. Everyone and everything is gathered to the Cross in representational throngs, with the entire image serving as a picture and prophesy of how, throughout the centuries, people of every kind and situation would be drawn to the raised Cross of the Son of Man, symbolizing the end of time.

G. Campbell Morgan’s The Crises of the Christ, Book V, Chapter XXIV, is the source for this adaptation. Credit: Thinkstock/kasiawronska for the image.

Joseph and Nicodemus Bury Jesus’ Body (19:38-42) – IVP New Testament Commentary Series

The tale of Jesus’ burial in John’s gospel may serve to further establish the notion of Jesus’ royal character. The huge amount of spice employed (v. 39) clearly demonstrates their devotion to Jesus, just as the extravagant nature of Mary’s gift earlier in the chapter did (12:3). At least some royal funerals were characterized by the use of large amounts of spices (2 Chron 16:14; JosephusAntiquities of the Jews17.199). It is possible that the fact that Joseph’s tomb is a garden tomb (v. 41) implies more links with monarchy, given that the kings of Judah were buried in garden tombs (2 Kings 21:18, 26), including King David, suggests further associations with royalty (Neh 3:16 LXX; cf.

  1. There were many of people besides kings who had lavish funerals and were buried in garden tombs, but given all of the emphasis placed on Jesus as king in the Passion story, such features may continue the theme at the burial of Jesus.
  2. 41).
  3. Brown (1970:959) cites John85.4 as an example.
  4. Additionally, it may be connected to the topic of the formation of the new community: Jesus has reordered the lives of his mother and the Beloved Disciple (Vv.
  5. Mt 12:46-50 par.
  6. Lk 8:19-21).
  7. Indeed, in this narrative, we observe the addition of two more members to this family.

He was a disciple, to be sure, but he did so in secrecy out of fear for his life from Jewish authorities (v.

In addition, Nicodemus, despite the fact that he was not officially designated as a “disciple,” had visited Jesus in the middle of the night(v.

As a result, they are two of the individuals mentioned previously who were hidden believers “because they preferred honor from others over praise from God” (12:42-43).

According to the Synoptics, Joseph was a rich member of the Sanhedrin who was looking forward to the arrival of the kingdom and who had refused to agree to the Sanhedrin’s judgment of Jesus when it was announced (Mt 27:57; Mk 15:43; Lk 23:50-51).

39).

T.

In any event, they are two guys who wield considerable power, privilege, and fortune.

37).

It is odd that these two men come out of hiding and publicly link themselves with Jesus at the time of his death, given that they would have assumed his movement had come to an end by then.

By taking this step, they are making the degree of their dissatisfaction known to their fellow Jewish leaders.

The Romans would frequently keep the body on the cross for days at a time, though they would occasionally allow the family to remove the body for burial.

Consequently, Joseph had no claim to the body and, depending on how Pilate saw the situation, would have put himself in grave jeopardy.

Furthermore, by permitting Jesus to be buried in a dignified manner, Pilate would be able to aggravate the Jewish leadership even more.

It was instead possible to place the seventy-five pounds of spices, which were most likely in granular or powder form, beneath, surrounding and inside the body, as well as in the strips of linen that they used to wrap the corpse.

42; Robinson 1985:282-83).

As Brown (1994:2:1265) points out, there is no indication that Jews draped their corpses in strips, as Egyptian mummies did, and the Synoptics state that a single sheet was used as the primary covering for their corpses (Mt 27:59 par.

Lk 23:53).

Brown (1994:2:1265) suggests that the term “grave garments” can apply to a single sheet (see Brown 1994:2:1265) or can be used more broadly to refer to “grave clothing” in general (Robinson 1985:291).

When Joseph and Nicodemus perform this step, it marks a shift in their personal discipleship, since they are plainly breaking apart from the rest of the Jewish leadership.

If they miss the Passover itself, according to some accounts of the dating (see comments on 18:28 and 19:14), this means that Christ has replaced the Passover for them, which is consistent with John’s emphasis on Jesus as the Lamb of God and the fulfillment of the Jewish feasts in general, and the fulfillment of the Passover in particular.

The generosity of InterVarsity Press allows us to make the IVP New Testament Commentaries available to you.

Bible Gateway passage: John 19 – New International Version

According to John’s account of the burial, the subject of Jesus’ royal status may be developed further. It is clear that the huge amount of spice employed (v. 39) reflects their devotion to Jesus, just as the extravagant nature of Mary’s gesture earlier in the chapter did (12:3). At least some royal funerals were characterized by the use of large quantities of spices (2 Chron 16:14; JosephusAntiquities of the Jews17.199). It is possible that the fact that Joseph’s tomb is a garden tomb (v. 41) implies further connections with monarchy, given that the kings of Judah were buried in garden tombs (2 Kings 21:18, 26), which included King David (Neh 3:16 LXX; cf.

  • In addition to kings, many other individuals had lavish funerals and were buried in garden tombs, but given the focus placed on Jesus as king in the Passion story, such features may be used to carry on the idea here at the burial.
  • 41).
  • However, it does not appear that John was aware of these ideas; rather, it appears the essential point is that a new tomb is a mark of proper homage that is bestowed upon the monarch.
  • 26-27), in accordance with the new order of connections among people who have been linked to him (cf.
  • Mk 3:31-35 par.
  • The tomb of Jesus has been emptyed, and a new family of people born from above who will never die has been established in its place (11:26).
  • Due to the fact that the two men who bury Jesus had never previously been affiliated with him in any way.

38).

39) and had stated at the time that Jesus was a divine teacher (3:2).

The death of Jesus has freed them from this condemnation; they have moved from hiding in the darkness to coming into the light as a result of his death.

Nicodemus, who is not mentioned in the Synoptics, was also a member of the Sanhedrin (Jn 3:1), and, based on the quantity of spice he supplies for Jesus’ burial, it is reasonable to assume that he was prosperous (v.

According to John A.

Robinson, Nicodemus comes from a well-established family in Jerusalem, but Joseph is “thenouveau richecountry cousin with his brand-new tomb, which may imply that there is a dearth of an established family mausoleum in the city,” according to John A.

Robinson (1985:287).

Despite the fact that Joseph and Nicodemus had dissented from the decision, as members of the Sanhedrin, they were certainly the ones who wounded Jesus’ side, and now they are looking upon him with sorrow (see comment on v.

In John 12:32, Jesus has been exalted and is now beginning to attract everyone to himself, beginning with these concealed disciples, who were part of the exact group who insisted on Jesus’ execution (12:31).

Their chances of winning were slim, and they stood to lose everything.

In addition, their asking for the corpse was a really brave effort on their behalf.

The same would not be true in the event of treason, but (Beasley-Murray 1987:358).

It is possible that Pilate allowed Joseph to take the body since he had plainly stated three times that Jesus was innocent.

The men did not have enough time to offer Jesus a proper burial, which would have included washing his corpse, anointing it with oil, and then dressing and wrapping it in linens and cloths (Brown 1994:2:1261).

Using this method would assist to mask the odor of decay and keep the body alive until it could be properly treated to after the sabbatical period (v.

In this case, it is unclear what the term forstrips of linen (othoniois) means.

Mk 15:46 par.

After being resurrected from the dead, Lazarus was found with “his hands and feet covered with strips of linen, and a garment around his face” (11:44), however the phrase “strips of linen” (keiria) used in that verse is not the same word used in this verse (keiria in this verse) (othonion).

The manner in which they wrapped the body is therefore unclear.

Having touched the body, they have rendered themselves unclean and are thus barred from taking part in the feast that is being held that evening.

However, some scholars believe that this is incorrect (see comments on 18:28 and 19:14). Because of the generosity of InterVarsity Press, the IVP New Testament Commentaries are provided accessible.

The Crucifixion of Jesus W)”>(W)

The narrative of Jesus’ burial in John’s gospel may serve to further establish the notion of Jesus’ royal character. The huge amount of spice employed (v. 39) clearly demonstrates their devotion to Jesus, just as the extravagant nature of Mary’s gift earlier in the chapter did (12:3). At least some royal funerals were characterized by the use of excessive quantities of spice (2 Chron 16:14; JosephusAntiquities of the Jews17.199). It is possible that the fact that Joseph’s tomb is a garden tomb (v.

  • Brown 1994:2:1270).
  • John emphasizes the fact that it is a new tomb (v.
  • When the tomb was found to be empty, some believe that John’s meaning is that Jesus would not be brought into touch with corruption (Westcott 1908:2:324), or that there would be no issue of mistaken identity (Chrysostom).
  • Although it is possible that John was aware of these ideas, it appears that the essential argument is simply that a new tomb is a mark of due homage offered to a monarch.
  • 26-27), in accordance with the new order of connections among people who have been linked to him (cf.
  • Mk 3:31-35 par.
  • The tomb of Jesus has been replaced by a new family of individuals born from above who will never die (11:26).

For the two men who bury Jesus had never previously been affiliated with him in any way.

38).

39) and had stated at the time that Jesus was a teacher sent by God (3:2).

The death of Jesus has freed them from this condemnation; they have moved from hiding in the darkness to coming into the light.

Nicodemus, who is not named in the Synoptics, was also a member of the Sanhedrin (Jn 3:1) and, based on the quantity of spice he supplies for Jesus’ burial, he was probably well-to-do (v.

According to John A.

Robinson, Nicodemus comes from a well-established family in Jerusalem, but Joseph is “thenouveau richecountry cousin with his brand-new tomb, which may imply that there is a dearth of an established family mausoleum in the city” (1985:287).

In spite of the fact that Joseph and Nicodemus had dissented from the vote, they were among those who wounded Jesus’ side, and now they are looking upon him with sorrow (see comment on v.

Jesus has been exalted and is now beginning to bring all people to himself (12:32), beginning with these concealed disciples, who were part of the identical group that insisted on Jesus’ execution.

They stood to win nothing and lose everything.

Their asking for the corpse was obviously a very brave thing for them to do.

In the instance of treason, however, they would not do so (Beasley-Murray 1987:358).

However, Pilate had stated three times that Jesus was innocent, which may explain why he allowed Joseph to take the body away.

The men did not have enough time to offer Jesus a proper burial, which would have included washing the corpse, anointing it with oil, and then dressing and wrapping it (Brown 1994:2:1261).

This would assist to mask the odor of decomposition and keep the body alive until it could be properly treated to when the sabbath was over (v.

The meaning of the word forstrips of linen (othoniois) is a bit obscure at the moment.

Mk 15:46 par.

When Lazarus was risen from the dead, he came out with “his hands and feet covered with strips of linen, and a garment around his face” (11:44), however the Greek term for “strips of linen” (keiria) in that verse is not the same word used here (othonion).

Brown 1994:2:1265) or be used generally for “grave clothing” (see Brown 1994:2:1265).

As a result, it is unclear exactly how they wrapped the body.

They have become ritually unclean as a result of their treatment of the body and are thus barred from participating in the feast.

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The Death of Jesus AM)”>(AM)

28Later, seeing that all had been completed, AN) expressed gratitude “So that Scripture would be fulfilled, and in order to ensure that AO) The abbreviation for “Another One” is “AO.” “When Jesus remarked, “I am thirsty,” the crowds applauded. 29A jar of wine vinegar (optional) “>(AP)was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, placed the sponge on a stem of the hyssop plant, and elevated the sponge to Jesus’ lips to kiss him. 30After receiving the cup, Jesus declared, “It is done.” AQ) AQ) “(AQ)He bent his head and surrendered his spirit as a result of this.

  1. AS) Because the Jewish officials did not want the bodies to be left on the crosses “Over the course of the Sabbath, they petitioned Pilate to have the legs broken and the bodies brought down.
  2. At the time of writing, AT is abbreviated as AT “>(AT)33However, when they arrived at Jesus’ location and saw that he had already died, they did not break his legs.
  3. AV)”>(AV)35The guy who witnessed it AW)”>(AW)has testified, and his evidence is reliable.
  4. 36These events occurred in order for the scripture to be fulfilled: AY)”>(AY)”Not one of his bones will be broken,”AZ)”>(AZ)37 “Not one of his bones will be broken,”AZ)”>(AZ)38 In addition, according to another text, “They will cast their gaze towards the one who has been wounded.

The Burial of Jesus BB)”>(BB)

38After thereafter, Joseph of Arimathea approached Pilate and requested the corpse of Jesus. Now, Joseph was a follower of Jesus, but he did so in secret because he was afraid of the Jewish leaders. (British Columbia) “>(BC)With Pilate’s permission, he arrived and removed the body from the scene. He was joined by Nicodemus, according to BD) “>(BD)the man who had previously visited Jesus in the middle of the night. Nicodemus arrived with a combination of myrrh and aloes weighing around seventy-five pounds.

(Belgium) “According to Jewish burial practices, this was done in conformity with the law.

Because it was the Jewish Day of Preparation BG)”>(BG) and because the tomb was close by, BH)”>(BH) they buried Jesus in the tomb on that day.

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