Who Killed Jesus Bible Mysteries

“Bible Mysteries” Who Killed Jesus? (TV Episode 2004)

Edit Michael Baden is a well-known author and musician. Helen Bond is a British actress who was born in the United Kingdom. Mohamed Choubi is a Tunisian businessman and philanthropist. Cary Cooper is a well-known actor. Christopher Eccleston is a British actor. Richard Horsley is a British author and poet who lives in the United Kingdom. Mohamed Quatib was born in the city of Quatib. Ronny Reich is an American businessman and philanthropist. E.P. Sanders is a fictional character created by author E.P.

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Who Killed Jesus: Unsolved Mysteries of the Bible Book 1

English1505690579 Who Killed Jesus is a documentary that looks at the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of the historical figure Jesus Christ. It is presented as a modern suspense novel, with a dramatic twist at the ending, describing love as more eternally unchanging than endlessly immutable, rather than infinitely immutable. In Who Killed Jesus, the investigators aim to understand the ramifications of the evidence left at the site, which will disclose whether or not Jesus died and, if he did, who or what was responsible for his death.

When a result, as we follow the blood trail, we shall be led either down the path of faith or down the path of skepticism.

You will either learn that there is an Almighty loving God who cares about you, or you will realize that there is no such thing as a God at all when all the evidence has been gathered and analyzed.

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ISBN-13: 9781505690576
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Publication date: 12/23/2014
Pages: 46
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.10(d)

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Some of our deeply held beliefs about the Christian life need to be re-examined in light of the Bible rather than traditional teachings. The term ‘chutzpah’ has made its way into the English language from the Hebrew and Yiddish languages. It is an abbreviation for ‘impudence.’ “You’ve got a cheek,” we may remark more regularly, but we might also say, “That’s chutzpah,” which means “bravery.” The story of a little child who murdered his parents and then begged to be pardoned because he was an orphan exemplifies the significance of the term for Jews.

The death of Jesus Christ on the crucifixion of Calvary was the result of the actions of a number of individuals or groups of individuals:

  1. Pontius Pilate was a Roman governor. The first was, without a doubt, Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Israel who sentenced Jesus to death despite the fact that he was aware that the evidence against Him was false
  2. The second was, without a doubt, Herod Antipas, the Roman governor of Syria who sentenced Jesus to death despite the fact that he was aware that the evidence against Him was false
  3. And the third was, without a doubt, the Roman governor of Syria who sentenced Jesus to death despite the fact that he
Luke 23:4,13-15,22-23
  • In front of the chief priests and the assembled audience, Pilate declared, “I am unable to discover any grounds for a charge against this man.” After gathering the leading priests, governors, and members of the people, Pilate told them, “You have brought me this guy as one who is stirring the people to insurrection.” I have studied Him in your presence and have determined that your allegations against Him are without merit. Herod hasn’t either, as evidenced by the fact that he returned Him to us
  • As you can see, He has done nothing to merit death.” “Why?” he inquired, for the third time, of the group. What crime has been committed by this individual? “I have found in Him no justification for the imposition of the death sentence.” The Roman troops wore a uniform. Afterwards, the Roman troops who carried out the execution bear some of the culpability.
John 19:16-18

  • At long last, Pilate handed Him over to the soldiers to be crucified with them. As a result, the soldiers were in command of Jesus. He walked out to the site of the Skull, carrying His own cross with him (which in Hebrew is called Golgotha). They crucified Him here, along with two others — one on either side of Him, with Jesus in the center. It is believed that Jesus’ death on the cross was a sacrifice for the sins of the entire world
  • The leaders and people of Israel, as a collective, believe this to be true. The leaders and people of Israel came in second place as a collective. This allegation is made in the gospel stories, which were authored by Jews. Another example is when the Jewish apostle Peter accused his own people, as a country, of condemning Jesus to death.
Matthew 27:25

Every everyone responded in unison, “Let His blood be shed on us and our children!” ×

Acts 2:22-23

“Men of Israel, pay attention to this: Jesus of Nazareth was a man who was accredited by God to you via miracles, wonders, and signs, which God performed among you through Him, as you are well aware.” “This man was sent to you by God’s predetermined plan and foreknowledge, and you, with the assistance of evil men, put Him to death by nailing Him on the cross.”

Acts 4:10
  • “. then understand this, you and all the people of Israel: This man stands before you in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified but whom God resurrected from the grave.” God the Father is referred to as However, the Bible states that it was also the desire of God the Father that Jesus pay the penalty for the sins of the entire world
  • This is supported by historical evidence.
Acts 2:23

.” “This individual was given over to you by God’s predetermined plan and foreknowledge; and.”

Mark 14:35-36
  • After a short distance, he dropped on the ground and prayed that the hour would pass him by as quickly as possible. ‘Abba, Father,’ he explained, “everything is possible for you.’ Please accept this cup from Me. “However, not what I want, but what You want.”
  • Jesus Christ Himself Having said that, the Bible makes it quite clear that Jesus was not a helpless “victim” of circumstances. He freely gave His life for the sake of others.
John 10:14-18

  • After a short distance, he dropped on the ground and prayed that the hour would pass him by as soon as possible. ‘Abba, Father,’ he said, “everything is possible for you.’ This cup is yours
  • Please accept it. Nevertheless, not what I want, but what You want.”
  • The Lord Jesus Christ However, despite all of this, the Bible makes it quite plain that Jesus was not a helpless “victim.” He freely gave His life for the good of others.
Romans 3:23
  • . because all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God
  • Your sin If this is true, I dare suggest that you were also responsible for the death of Jesus. Of course, if you do not consider yourself to be a sinner, you will not want the services of a Saviour.
1 John 1:8-10
  1. If we assert that we are sinless, we are deceiving ourselves, and the truth is not in us at all. His faithfulness and justice will be shown toward us if we confess our sins to Him, and He will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. Whenever we assert that we have not sinned, we are portraying God as a liar, and His truth has no place in our life. ×

One of the most tragic aspects of church history is that Jews have been accused of being “Christ murderers” at various points throughout history. They are culpable – but no more so than the rest of the world is. Persecutions against Israel have reached staggering proportions because ultra-religious Christians have claimed that Jews are guilty of deicide — the assassination of God – on their hands. Anyone who casts a finger at someone else without qualification is failing to acknowledge their own responsibility.

Jesus died on the cross for our sins.

The most amazing element of the narrative is that death was unable to keep Him down.

In addition, praise God, forgiveness of sins is available to everyone, Jew and Gentile alike, for everyone who turns to Him, believes in Him, and calls on His name.

Who Killed Jesus?

In 1965, as part of the Second Vatican Council, the Catholic Church issued the much-anticipated proclamation Nostra Aetate, which took a fresh look at the subject of Jewish blame for the execution of Jesus Christ. That modern-day Jews could not be held responsible for Jesus’ crucifixion, and that not all Jews who were alive at the time of Jesus’ execution were guilty of the crime, according to the arguments in the paper. In the history of Christian views toward Jews, this was a significant step forward, as Christian anti-Semitism has long been predicated on the assumption that Jews were responsible for Jesus’ crucifixion.

When Jesus was crucified, they thought that the Church would come out and claim that the Jews had had no role in his execution.

Jews Lacked A Motive for Killing Jesus

Indeed, most historians believe that it would have been more rational to place the responsibility for Jesus’ execution on the Romans. Crucifixion was a common form of punishment among the Romans, not among the Jews. At the time of Jesus’ execution, the Romans were enforcing a harsh and ruthless occupation on the Land of Israel, and the Jews had been rebellious at times throughout the occupation. The Romans would have had good cause to desire to silence Jesus, who had been dubbed “King of the Jews” by some of his disciples and was well-known as a Jewish upstart miracle worker at the time of his death.

The many factions of the Jewish society at the period — including the Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, and others — had numerous differences with one another, but none of the organizations orchestrated the death of the leaders of the other purportedly heretical sects.

READ: The History of the Land of Israel Under Roman Control Nonetheless, the notion that Jews murdered Jesus can be found in Christian foundational literature dating back to the early days of the Jesus movement, and it is unlikely that it will be readily abandoned simply because of historians’ arguments.

The New Testament Account

The notion that Jews assassinated Jesus is parodied in this 1896 cartoon, which substitutes Uncle Sam for the historical figure. (Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons) “The Jews who killed the Lord, Jesus,” Paul writes in his writings, which are considered by historians to be the earliest works of the New Testament (written 10 to 20 years after Jesus’ death), and he addresses them very briefly: “the Jews who slaughtered the Lord, Jesus” (I Thessalonians 2:14-15). While the idea that the Jews bear primary responsibility for Jesus’ death is not central to Paul’s understanding of Jesus’ life and death, the idea that the Jews bear primary responsibility for Jesus’ death is more prominent in the four gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, each of which presents a slightly different account of Jesus’ life.

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Eventually, the high priest comes to the conclusion that Jesus is guilty of blasphemy and petitions the Jewish council for guidance on how to punish him.

Matthew’s account of Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross (referred to by Christians as “Jesus’ “passion”) has served as the inspiration for numerous books, plays, and musical compositions over the years, and it is a prominent part of Christian liturgy, particularly during the celebration of Easter.

It is said that Pontius Pilate, the Roman ruler of Judea, was fundamentally sympathetic to Jesus, but that he was unable to overcome the pressure from the Jews, who demanded that Jesus be put to death.

When Pilate arrives, the gathering members of the Jewish community tell him, “His blood be on us and on our children,” which is the most contentious verse in all of the passion accounts (Matthew 27:25).

Church Fathers and Thereafter

An etching from 1845 portraying King Herod and Pontius Pilate exchanging handshakes. (Photo by F.A. Ludy courtesy of Wellcome Images/Wikimedia Commons) With even more clarity and power, this allegation emerges in the works of the Church Fathers, who are considered to be the most authoritative Christian theologians who lived after the New Testament period. After explaining to his Jewish interlocutor why the Jews had experienced exile and the destruction of their Temple, Justin Martyr (mid-second century) concludes that these “tribulations were justly placed on you since you have assassinated the Just One” (Jesus Christ) (Dialogue with Trypho, chapter 16).

  1. A historical King Solomon addresses the Jews in “The Mystery of Adam,” a religious drama from the 12th century that prophesies that they would eventually slay the son of God, as depicted in the play.
  2. This statement is subject to verification.
  3. The masters of the law will be the ones who do this.
  4. They’ll descend from a tremendous height, and may they be comforted in their bereaved state of affairs.

In recent times, passion plays — large-scale outdoor theater events that dramatize the end of Jesus’ life and frequently feature hundreds of actors — have continued to spread this notion, as have other forms of religious expression.

In the Talmud

It’s worth noting that the notion that the Jews assassinated Jesus may be found in Jewish religious literature as well. Against the evidence of theBabylonian Talmud, on folio 43a of tractateSanhedrin, aberaita (a doctrine dating back to before the year 200 C.E.) says that Jesus was executed by a Jewish tribunal for the crimes of sorcery and insurrection. For this reason, there is a blank area near the bottom of that folio in normal Talmuds from Eastern Europe — or in American Talmuds that simply copied from them — since the possibly offending text has been omitted.

  1. This section has been restored in a number of recent Talmudic versions.) When the Talmud claims that the incident occurred on the eve of Passover, it follows the timeline given in the gospel of John, which is supported by historical evidence.
  2. Responsibility for the killing of Jesus is also given to the Jews in Jewish folk literature, such as the popular scurrilous Jewish biography of Jesus,Toledot Yeshu (which may be as old as the fourth century), and in Christian folk fiction.
  3. From the first through the nineteenth century, the degree of hostility between Jews and Christians was such that both parties believed the accusation that the Jews were responsible for the death of Jesus.
  4. People who believe the tales of the New Testament (or of the Talmud) to be credible historical sources should not be shocked if this belief prevails.

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It’s worth noting that the notion that the Jews assassinated Jesus may be found in Jewish religious literature, which is interesting. Against the evidence of theBabylonian Talmud, on folio 43a of tractateSanhedrin, aberaita (a doctrine dating back to before the year 200 C.E.) says that Jesus was executed by a Jewish court for the crimes of sorcery and subversion. For this reason, there is a blank area near the bottom of that folio in normal Talmuds from Eastern Europe — or in American Talmuds that have simply copied from them — since the possibly offending text has been omitted.

  • This section has been restored in a number of modern Talmudic versions.
  • Accordant to the talmudic narrative, the Romans played no involvement in his demise.
  • In Christian Europe, it is probable that Jews held the belief that their forefathers had slain Jesus until at least the nineteenth century.
  • Fortunately, it is not heard as frequently in our environment anymore.

People who believe the tales of the New Testament (or of the Talmud) to be credible historical sources should not be shocked if this belief continues. You may read this article in Spanish (leer en espaol) if you want to know “Who Killed Jesus?”

Who Killed Jesus? A Most Curious Mystery

Recently, I came into a little mystery: no one knows who is to blame for the death of Jesus Christ, as I found during the previous few of days. Everybody likes to point the finger at someone else, even if it means seeming silly in the process of doing so. In one of my comment threads on the Patheos Catholic Facebook page, I came across an Italian woman who had read my most recent blog piece and expressed surprise at learning that Jesus had been crucified by Italian soldiers. My reiteration of Jesus’ suffering under Pontius Pilate, his death on the cross, and his burial provoked her response, in which she claimed that this was not done by Italians.

Now, I am not of Italian descent.

However, I married an Italian-American, which explains my vivacious surname.

When I told my husband about some of the activities of ancient Roman centurions, he remarked, “yeah, we did stuff like that,” without a hint of sarcasm in his literary geek voice.

One of my readers informed me that the contemporary manhole covers in Rome still bear the letters “SPQR,” which stands for “Senatus PopulusQue Romanus.” However, when you point out that this makes Pontius Pilate a native-born Italian, they immediately start saying that Italy didn’t exist yet and that it wasn’t their responsibility.

  • In fact, they didn’t come into existence until the nineteenth century.
  • He stated that it was those deceitful Jews who were the genuine killers of Jesus.
  • In the first instance, it was the Romans who oppressed the Jews.
  • In the event if Rosie’s martial arts sensei attempted to maintain discipline in his studio by nailing pupils to boards, I would be outraged.
  • Jesus, who was Jewish, was used as a scapegoat.
  • Out of panic, the Jews fled and pretended they didn’t know who He was.
  • He was buried by Jews after being given a tomb by a Jew.

The Gospels do not provide a tale about how bad Jews are, nor do they condemn them.

Nonetheless, it was the Romans who were in command, and it was the Romans who provided the wood and nails.

With such gibberish, God the Parent is portrayed as the ultimate killer, as an abusive father who has committed the most serious form of sin, and I have no sympathy for that.

Who was responsible for the death of the Son of God?

Are you saying that Jewish people did it at the behest of other Jewish people, in spite of the pleadings and efforts of even more Jewish people.

Did the sparrow with his bow and arrow get away with it?

That is, of course, a straightforward puzzle to solve.

You did the same thing.

As he explained to us, this was the situation.

You, too, believe this.

Jesus had always intended to come to us as a Man and bring our humanity up into the life of the Holy Trinity, and he had made that decision long ago.

While He might have arrived in an other manner, he choose to come to us as a Man who was like us in all respects except sin, and as a defenseless Man of an oppressed race living in an occupied nation.

In our pain and death, you and I serve as an emblem of God to the world.

That is exactly what will happen to you and me if we so choose.

People from other countries, such as Italy and Israel, felt the same way.

Cain and Abel did the same thing.

And He forgives us, and He is willing to go through it all over again for our benefit.

He did this for me, and he did it for each and every one of you who is reading this, on our behalf and on our behalf individually.

He even went out of his way to help Italians who had conveniently forgotten where Rome was situated. And this is the most amazing puzzle of them. (Image courtesy of Pixabay) Almost all of Steel Magnificat’s energy comes from tips. To make a donation to the author, please visit ourdonate page.

Why Did Pontius Pilate Have Jesus Executed?

“What is truth?” Pontius Pilate asks Jesus of Nazareth in the Gospel of John, and Jesus responds with a question. It’s a question that may be raised regarding Pilate’s own personal background as well. According to the New Testament of the Christian Bible, the Roman ruler of Judea was a shaky judge who originally exonerated Jesus before bowing to the will of the multitude and condemned him to death as a result of his actions. Non-Biblical sources, on the other hand, present him as a barbaric commander who wilfully rejected the traditions of the Jewish people under his command.

WATCH: JESUS: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE VaultJesus before Pilate, just before he was crucified.

Pilate’s early life is a mystery.

Before his time as Roman governor of Judea, from 26 and 36 A.D., nothing is known about Pilate’s early life and career. While most believe he was born into an equestrian family in Italy, certain tales indicate that he was actually born in the Scottish Highlands. From the Jewish philosopher Philo of Alexandria emerges one of the earliest—and most damning—accounts of Pilate’s reign as governor. Around the year 50 A.D., he denounced the prefect for “briberies, insults, robberies, outrages and wanton injuries, executions without trial, constantly repeated, endless and extremely severe brutality,” among other things.

  1. Patterson describes Pilate’s rule as “corrupt and full of bribery.” Patterson is an early Christianity historian at Willamette University and the author of several books, including The Forgotten Creed: Christianity’s Original Struggle Against Bigotry, Slavery, and Sexism.
  2. “Philo is a really dramatic writer,” she observes, “and one who has very apparent biases: persons who maintain Jewish rules are documented in highly favorable ways, whereas people who do not uphold Jewish laws are represented in quite bad ways.
  3. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: The Bible asserts that Jesus was a real person.
  4. Prior to his crucifixion, Jesus had been tortured, and this was the culmination of that suffering.

Pilate clashed with the Jewish population in Jerusalem.

A pair of golden shields emblazoned with the name of the Roman Emperor Tiberius were allowed into King Herod’s ancient residence in Jerusalem, according to Philo, despite Jewish tradition. Writing more than a half-century later, the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus related a similar story, claiming that Pilate let troops bearing military standards with the likeness of the emperor into Jerusalem, despite Jewish law prohibiting the carrying of images in the holy city. A large number of people journeyed to the Judean city of Caesarea to express their displeasure, and they laid prostrate outside Pilate’s palace for five days until he finally yielded.

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This account has the ring of a rookie governor experimenting with his powers and entirely underestimating the depth of local opposition to graven images.

Josephus related another event, this one with a bloodier conclusion, in which Pilate used cash from the Temple treasury to construct an aqueduct to provide water to Jerusalem.

They were successful. When he gave the signal, they withdrew clubs disguised in their clothing and beat many of the demonstrators to death with the clubs they had removed. More information may be found at: Where Is the Head of Saint John the Baptist?

The Gospels portray an indecisive Pilate.

Josephus also referred to Pilate’s well-known role in agreeing to Jesus’ death, which he had played previously. After being gravely concerned by his teachings, the Sanhedrin (an elite council of priestly and lay elders) arrested Jesus while he was celebrating the Jewish festival of Passover, according to the Gospels. They hauled Jesus before Pilate to be prosecuted for blasphemy, accusing him of claiming to be the King of the Jews, which they said was false. And they exerted pressure on Pilate, the only person who had the authority to sentence someone to death, to order his crucifixion.

According to the Gospel of Mark, Pilate intervened on Jesus’ behalf before caving in to the demands of the mob.

MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: Discovering the Early Christian Church’s Conversion Tactics from Within “Mark’s goal isn’t truly historical in nature,” Patterson explains.

Mark blamed the Jewish rulers in Jerusalem for the city’s collapse since the high priests and officials had turned their backs on Jesus when he had arrived in the city.

courtesy of DeAgostini/Getty Images Following this, according to the Gospel of Matthew, Pilate washed his hands in front of the assembled throng before declaring, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; take care of yourself.” When the Jewish people heard this, they yelled out, “His blood be on us and our children.” For millennia, it would be used to punish the Jewish people, and it is still being utilized now.

As Bond explains, “Matthew claims that, while Romans were accountable for carrying out the action, the Jews were liable—a line of thought that, of course, has had fatal ramifications ever since.” When Jesus was making problems during a gathering like Passover, when the city was packed to capacity, I don’t believe Pilate would have spent much time worrying about what to do with him.

According to the Gospels, the people preferred the criminal Barabbas than Jesus.

The so-called custom of freeing a prisoner on Passover has been investigated by scholars, but so far, according to Patterson, “they have not discovered anything in regard to this so-called ritual.” More information may be found at: Early Christians Didn’t Always Take the Bible Literally (Discovery).

Pilate disappears from history after his rule.

Also noted in Josephus’s account is Pilate’s well-known involvement in agreeing to Jesus’ death. According to the Gospels, Jesus was imprisoned at the Jewish holiday of Passover by the Sanhedrin, an elite council of priestly and lay elders who were extremely concerned about his teachings. They hauled Jesus before Pilate to be prosecuted for blasphemy, accusing him of claiming to be the King of the Jews, which they said he had denied. As a result, they exerted pressure on Pilate, the only person who had the authority to sentence someone to death, to order Jesus’ execution.

  • According to the Gospel of Mark, Pilate intervened on Jesus’ behalf before caving in to the demands of the people.
  • FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE READ THESE STATEMENTS.
  • “Its purpose is to put a specific light on the Jewish War in general.” Due to Jesus’ rejection by the city’s leaders when he first arrived in Jerusalem, Mark blamed the city’s Jewish authorities for the city’s collapse.
  • With his hands washed, Pilate said that Jesus’ death would not be the result of his own actions.
  • Several times in front of the multitude, Pilate washed his hands and declared, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; see to it yourselves.” This is according to the Gospel of Matthew.
  • For millennia, this text would be utilized to punish the Jewish people, and it is being employed today.
  • Pilate’s offer to reduce the death sentence of a prisoner by popular vote, which according to the Gospel writers was an annual Passover practice, is yet another detail of the New Testament tale that has not been proven historically accurate to the present day.

As Patterson points out, “scholars have sought for proof,” but to yet, “they haven’t uncovered anything that refers to the so-called custom of freeing a prisoner on the Jewish holiday of Passover.” More information may be found at: Early Christians Didn’t Always Take the Bible Literally (Read More).

Who was responsible for Christ’s death? Who killed Jesus?

Josephus also made notice of Pilate’s well-known involvement in agreeing to Jesus’ death. According to the Gospels, Jesus was imprisoned at the Jewish holiday of Passover by the Sanhedrin, an elite council of priests and lay elders who felt threatened by his teachings. They brought him before Pilate to be prosecuted for blasphemy, accusing him of claiming to be the King of the Jews. And they applied pressure to Pilate, the only person who had the authority to sentence someone to death, to order his crucifixion.

  • According to the Gospel of Mark, Pilate intervened on Jesus’ behalf before caving in to the demands of the mob.
  • READ MORE ABOUT IT: Inside the Early Christian Church’s Conversion Tactics “Mark’s goal isn’t truly historical in nature,” Patterson explains.
  • As a result of their rejection of Jesus when he came to the city, Mark blamed the Jewish authorities in Jerusalem for the city’s downfall.
  • Photograph by DeAgostini/Getty Images Several times in front of the audience, Pilate washed his hands and declared, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; see to it yourselves.” “His blood be on us and our children,” the Jewish people chanted in response.

As Bond explains, “Matthew claims that, while Roman soldiers carried out the killing, it was the Jews who were responsible—a line of thought that, of course, has had terrible ramifications ever since.” “If Jesus was making problems during a gathering like Passover, when the city was crammed to capacity, I don’t think Pilate would have spent much time worrying about what to do with him.

According to the Gospels, the people preferred the criminal Barabbas over Jesus.

As Patterson points out, “scholars have sought for proof,” but to yet, “they haven’t uncovered anything that refers to the so-called custom of freeing a prisoner on Passover.” More information may be found at: Early Christians Didn’t Always Take the Bible Literally

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Who Killed Jesus?

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Justification for genocide

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The plot to murder Jesus

Simply blaming others can be – and frequently is – nothing more than a desperate attempt to rid oneself of personal responsibility. Who, exactly, was responsible for the killing of Jesus Christ? This is a topic that should have been raised long ago and should continue to be questioned now. Jesus had a large number of adversaries. He was a threat to the existing quo, the powerful, and the well-positioned individuals of the day. Many people had good cause to want Him to stay out of their path. It was not the broad population that desired Jesus’ murder, but rather the civic authorities, chief priests, scribes, and Pharisees, all of whom were repeatedly named as those who desired Jesus’ death.

In the midst of those to whom Jesus spoke, among those who He taught and performed miracles—the same ones who had only a few days before been lining the streets of Jerusalem, hailing Him as the prophesied Messiah, the Son of David (Matthew 21:9)—they had become disillusioned and had even called for His death.

Pilate condemned Him despite the fact that he was aware that He was innocent of the allegations made against Him.

It was a Roman who nailed the nails into His wrists and feet, according to tradition.

Who bears the blame?

Many weeks later, when asked about Jesus’ execution, Peter responded immediately: “For really against Your holy Servant Jesus, whom You anointed,” Peter said, “both Herod and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles and the people of Israel,were gathered together” (Acts 4:27). It doesn’t appear as though many individuals were left out in the cold. It is simple to place the blame for Jesus’ killing on a limited group of people—religious hypocrites and civil officials who wished to keep their posts appear to be the most directly responsible.

  • Furthermore, it is true that we may point the finger at the dominant Roman state.
  • It’s reasonable to conclude that if Jesus had arrived to any civilization or culture and exposed it for its flaws and hypocrisy, He would not have been welcomed or embraced.
  • This is the dreadful reality that we all wish to avoid hearing.
  • We were all participants in Christ’s killing, and we should repent.

According to Paul, personal culpability has been established: “Here is a trustworthy saying that merits complete acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to rescue sinners—of whom I am the worst” (Romans 3:23). (1 Timothy 1:15, NIV).

A world unknowing, unaware

“Even though I was once a blasphemer and a persecutor and a violent man, I was offered mercy because I operated in ignorance and disbelief,” Paul, the former Pharisee, says of himself (1 Timothy 1:13, NIV). That’s the crux of the problem. We were completely unaware of everything. Christ died for the ungodly, according to the apostle Paul, “at the allotted time” (Romans 5:6, REB). The world just does not understand what it is doing! God, on the other hand, knows, and one day we shall all understand.

Jesus entered this planet with the knowledge that He would be slain (John 12:27).

The sacrificial system that was provided to Israel foreshadowed the ideal offering that would be made later on.

To think that He would create His Kingdom right then and there, and that all their anxieties would be put to rest, was considerably more pleasant.

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Nevertheless, Peter states in Acts 3:17, “Yet now, comrades, I know that you did it out of ignorance, just as your authorities did.” “However, those things which God predicted through the mouths of all His prophets, namely, that the Christ would suffer, He has brought to fruition in this way” (Acts 3:18).

Don’t remain in ignorance

‘Even though I was once a blasphemer, a persecutor, and a violent man, I was offered mercy since my actions were based on ignorance and disbelief,’ Paul, the former Pharisee, claims about himself (1 Timothy 1:13, NIV). And therein lies the issue. All of this was completely unknown to us. According to Paul, “Christ died for the ungodly at the allotted time” (Romans 5:6, REB). Everything in the world appears to be completely adrift. God, on the other hand, knows, and we shall all know it one day.

Jesus came into this earth with the knowledge that He would be murdered by the authorities (John 12:27).

Prefiguring the perfect offering was the sacrificial system that had been provided to Israel.

Having faith that He will set up His Kingdom right away and put an end to all of their problems was considerably more pleasant for them.

“Yet now, comrades, I know that you did it in ignorance, just as your authorities did,” Peter states in Acts 3:17. “However, those things which God predicted through the mouths of all His prophets, namely, that the Christ would suffer, He has brought to fruition in this manner” (Acts 3:18).

God’s will and our guilt

“Even though I was once a blasphemer, a persecutor, and a violent man, I was offered mercy because I acted in ignorance and disbelief,” Paul, the former Pharisee, says of himself (1 Timothy 1:13, NIV). That is the issue. We were completely unaware of what was going on. Paul informs us that “Christ died for the ungodly at the allotted time” (Romans 5:6, REB). The world just has no idea what it is doing! God, on the other hand, knows, and one day we shall all know as well. It had been His intention from the beginning.

  • The prophets of the Old Testament were inspired by Jesus to not only prophesy His death, but also to depict it in gory detail.
  • In various instances, Jesus foreshadowed His death and suffering to His followers, but for the most part, they rejected what He said.
  • Paul talks of “the secret knowledge which God designed before the ages.which none of the rulers of this age understood; for if they had known, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory” (1 Corinthians 2:7-8).
  • “However, those things which God predicted through the mouths of all His prophets, that the Christ would suffer, He has brought to pass in this manner” (Acts 3:18).

Bible Mysteries – DocuWiki

  • Paul, the former Pharisee, says of himself, “Even though I was once a blasphemer and a persecutor and a violent man, I was granted mercy since I operated in ignorance and disbelief” (1 Timothy 1:13, NIV). That’s the crux of the issue. We were completely unaware of anything. Paul informs us that “at the allotted time, Christ died for the ungodly” (Romans 5:6, REB). The world just does not realize what it is doing! God, on the other hand, knows, and one day we shall all know it too. It was His intention from the beginning. Jesus came into this earth with the knowledge that He would be slain (John 12:27). The Old Testament prophets were moved by Jesus to not only prophesy His death, but also to depict it in gory detail. The sacrificial system that was provided to Israel foreshadowed the perfect offering that was to come. Jesus foreshadowed His death and suffering to His followers on a number of times, but for the most part, they refused to believe what He had said. It was considerably more pleasant to assume that He would create His Kingdom immediately and that all of their concerns would be alleviated. “The secret knowledge which God ordained before the ages.which none of the rulers of this era understood
  • For if they had known, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory,” Paul writes (1 Corinthians 2:7-8). In Acts 3:17, Peter adds, “Yet now, comrades, I know that you did it in ignorance, as did likewise your authorities.” “However, those things which God predicted through the mouths of all His prophets, that the Christ would suffer, He has brought to pass in this way” (Acts 3:18).
  • In this section, you will find links to the following: 6.1Release Post
  • 6.2Associated Documentaries
  • 6.3ed2k Links.

General Information

a history documentary presented by Christopher Eccleston and broadcast by the BBC in 2003 with English narration

Cover

A series of programs focusing on historical individuals and events from the Bible’s time period. Historical, archaeological, and anthropological findings provide new insights into the historical facts of the time period under consideration. Elegant theatrical re-enactments, computer-generated imagery (CGI), and expert perspectives combine to provide an in-depth analysis of some of the Bible’s most captivating personalities and tales. Was Mary Magdalene a real prostitute, or was she just acting like one?

Did Joseph really have a “coat of many colors” as he claimed?

This series provides solutions to these and other topics.

Who Killed Jesus?

It is believed that no trial or death in history has had such a significant effect as Jesus’ trial and execution in Roman-occupied Jerusalem 2000 years ago. But, more importantly, was it an execution or a judicial murder, and who was to blame? On the Bible Mysteries episode, the spotlight was on three suspects: Caiaphas, the Jewish High Priest, Pontius Pilate, the Roman ruler, and most unexpectedly, Jesus himself.

Joshua and the Battle of Jericho

One of the most violent stories in the Bible is the story of Joshua and the walls of Jericho. After emerging from the desert, a group of nomadic warriors devastates a heavily fortified city.

not through coercion, but through faith A memorable and dramatic story from the Bible is the one about Joshua destroying Jericho with only trumpets. It is one of the most memorable and dramatic stories in all of Scripture.

Joseph and his Multi-coloured Coat

In the Bible, one of the most well-known stories is that of Joseph’s life. It is also recorded in the Torah and the Qur’an that Joseph’s life events occurred. Currently, it’s most closely linked with the West End and Sunday school. When you consider that the narrative was written down by scribes roughly 1000 years after the events reportedly took place, it is typically assumed to have some historical basis, albeit one that includes a generous dose of theatrical license. Egyptologists, on the other hand, have unearthed some fascinating evidence.

The Real Mary Magdalene

Mary Magdalene’s life is inextricably intertwined with the life of Jesus. The Gospels include one of the most dramatic and significant moments in history, and she has a prominent role in it. Jesus is crucified by the Romans and Mary Magdalene is present to encourage him through those final horrific moments and to grieve His death. She also discovers the empty tomb, and she is present when Jesus is raised from the dead. At the outset of a movement that would change the face of the Western world, she was there to see its birth.

In art, she is frequently shown as semi-naked, or as a hermit in the forest, repenting for her sins: she is an outcast.

David and Goliath

In the Old Testament, the fabled conflict between the over-grown Philistine warrior Goliath and the lowly shepherd kid David is an archetype whose reverberations extend well beyond the pages of the Bible. In football, it’s sometimes referred to as a ‘David and Goliath’ moment when a lower league club defeats an elite team in a giant-slaying match. It appeals to our deep-seated emotional urge to observe the helpless turn the tables on the mighty for a little moment when the underdog shows stubborn courage.

Herod and the Bethlehem Massacre

In 37 BC, the Romans anointed King Herod as King of Judea, and he reigned until his death. Historians generally believe that Herod’s reign was extraordinarily successful in a variety of ways. King Herod, an ethnically Arab but religiously committed Jew, expanded the territory under his control from Palestine to sections of modern Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria, erecting fortresses, aqueducts, and amphitheatres, earning him the epithet ‘Herodes Magnus,’ or Herod the Great, in the process.

The Disciples

Nobody knows for certain how long Jesus’ ministry, which included teaching and traveling across Israel, was active. Some believe it will take three years, while others believe it will take as little as one. Because of the force of the message Jesus preached, Christianity has grown from its small beginnings to become the universal religion it is today, despite its relatively short history. However, it is also owing to a far more straightforward and sometimes overlooked reality. He received a great deal of assistance from his buddies.

The Revelation: The End of the World?

Christians have been captivated and perplexed by the Book of Revelation, the last book of the Bible, for hundreds of years. Many have interpreted it as a guide to the end of the world because of its powerful imagery of catastrophe and pain – the Battle of Armageddon, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, the monstrous Beast whose number is 666 – and its vivid picture of disaster and misery.

Some believe it foretells global warming, AIDS, and even the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophe. A distinct reading has been reached by biblical scholars after careful study of both the text and the social and political background of the time.

Peter the Rock

Christians revere Peter as a saint; the fisherman who rose from the depths of the sea to become the right-hand man of Jesus himself, the head of the early church, and a Father of the faith. But how much of his enthralling narrative is based on fact? How much do we really know about Peter the genuine person?

Screenshots

  • DivX 5.2.1 (WaffleDay)
  • Video Bitrate: 1797 kbps
  • Video Resolution: 640×352
  • Video Aspect Ratio: 1.818:1
  • Frames Per Second: 29.970
  • Audio Codec: 0x2000 (Dolby AC3) AC3
  • Audio Bitrate: 192kb/s CBR 48000 Hz
  • Audio Streams: 2
  • Audio Languages: English
  • Video Codec: DivX 5.2.1 (Waffle Runtime each part is 48:58.765 minutes
  • There are nine parts
  • The total size of the parts is 735,287,296 bytes
  • There are no subtitles. m06166 was responsible for the rip.

Links

  • The Bible has been removed from circulation. Scripture Mysteries
  • Biblical Conspiracies
  • Bible Hunters
  • Secrets of the Apostles
  • Testament. From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians
  • Moses
  • The Apostles
  • There’s something about Mary Magdelene that makes me feel good. The Bible: The Epic Miniseries
  • Secret Lives of the Apostles
  • The Devil’s Bible
  • The Bible: The Epic Miniseries
  • Riddles of the Bible – Season 2
  • Riddles of the Bible – Season 1
  • Riddles of the Bible – Season 2
  • Armageddon in the electronic era
  • The Bible Code
  • The Secrets of Mary Magdalene
  • The Star of Bethlehem
  • Herod’s Lost Tomb
  • The Lost Tomb of Jesus
  • The Miracles of Jesus
  • Jesus – The Real Story
  • Jesus: The Preacher
  • The Secrets of Mary Magdalene

ed2k Links

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