Who Died With Jesus Christ

The Two Men Crucified Next To Jesus Were

According to the Gospel of Luke, two additional men were crucified with Our Blessed Lord, one on either side of Him, and both died at the hands of the Romans. Traditionally, the thief to Christ’s right has been referred to as the “Good Thief,” while the thief to Christ’s left has been dubbed the “Unrepentant Thief.” While the names of the Good Thief and the Unrepentant Thief are not mentioned in the Gospels, legend claims that the one was named Saint Dismas and the latter, Gestas. Despite the fact that both men were subjected to the same brutal death and were both in the presence of Christ, their attitudes to their circumstances were vastly different.

Dismas, on the other hand, does not request that he be removed from power.

Rather, he begs to be brought up into the presence of Christ, pleading, “Jesus, remember me when You come into Your kingdom.” (Matthew 23:42) St.

Which of these two is the most like you?

To help you accept the crosses that you will carry in this life, and to set your heart on Heaven in the next life, the Norbertine Fathers of Saint Michael’s Abbey would like to give you a FREE Saint Dismas prayer card, so that you may seek the intercession of the Good Thief. To download the free prayer card, just click the button below.

Download the Saint Dismas Prayer Card for free here.

Immersed in the 900-year tradition of our order, the Norbertine Fathers live a monastic common life of liturgical prayer and care for souls. Our abbey in Orange County consists of nearly fifty priests and thirty seminarians studying for the priesthood.

St. Michael’s Abbey is celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2017.

Impenitent thief – Wikipedia

‘The impenitent thief’ is a character who appears in the New Testament account of Jesus’ death on the cross. Two criminal bandits are executed on the cross with Jesus, according to the Gospel story. Mocking him is recorded in the first two Gospels (Matthew and Mark), in which they both join the rest of the mob. One taunts Jesus for not rescuing himself and them, while the other (known as the contrite thief) begs for compassion, according to the version of the Gospel of Luke. In apocryphal literature, the impenitent thief is given the nameGestas, which first comes in the Gospel of Nicodemus, and his accomplice is given the nameDismas, which first appears in the Gospel of Nicodemus.

The impenitent thief’s name isGesmas, according to Jacobus de Voragine’sGolden Legend, which is a work of fiction.

As Dumachus and Titus, Gestas and Dismas are referred to in the apocryphalArabic Infancy Gospel, which is apocryphal.

According to legend – as shown, for example, inHenry Wadsworth Longfellow’sThe Golden Legend– Dumachus was a member of a gang of thieves who ambushed Saint Joseph and the Holy Family on their journey into Egypt, according to the Bible.

New Testament narrative

The version of the tale that is regarded to be the earliest is found in the Gospel of Mark, which is commonly dated to approximately AD 70. He claims that Jesus was crucified with two bandits, one on either side of him, according to the author. Passersby and chief priests make fun of Jesus for claiming to be the Messiah while failing to rescue himself, and the two criminals who were crucified with him participate in the fun. There is a reference to the Book of Isaiah in several verses, which is seen as a fulfillment of prophesy (Isaiah 53:12: “And he.

The Gospel of Matthew, which was written about the year 85, has many of the same elements as the Gospel of Mark.

This bandit is known as the repentant thief, while the other is known as the impenitent thief, according to tradition.

See also

  1. William Lane Craig and Joe Gorra are two of the most well-known actors in the world (1 September 2013). Answers to Difficult Questions about God, Christianity, and the Bible from a Reasonable Perspective. Moody Publishers, p. 153, ISBN 978-0-8024-8384-3
  2. “William Lane Craig and Bart Ehrman Debate “Is There Historical Evidence for the Resurrection of Jesus?””.physics.smu.edu
  3. “William Lane Craig and Bart Ehrman Debate “Is There Historical Evidence for the Resurrection of Jesus?””.physics.smu.edu. Obtainable on June 24, 2020
  4. Abcd Bart D. Ehrman, Ph.D. (2008). Whose Word Is It, Anyway? : The Inside Story of Who Changed the New Testament and Why, and How. Book by A C Black (p. 143, ISBN 978-1-84706-314-4)
  5. The Golden Legend (p. 143, ISBN 978-1-84706-314-4)
  6. A C Black’s The Golden Legend
  7. Abcdef In Professor Bart D. Ehrman’s The Historical Jesus, Part I, p. 6, published by The Teaching Company in 2000, he describes Jesus as “a historical figure who lived in the first century AD.” Scholars are generally in agreement that they were written many decades after Jesus’ death: Mark (AD 65–70), Matthew and Luke (AD 80–85), and John (AD 90–95)
  8. Ehrman (2000: 5). For example, “Perhaps we might start with the oldest Gospel to have been written, which most academics think was the Gospel of Mark.”
  9. Mark 15:27–32
  10. Isaiah 53:12
  11. Matthew 27:38–44
  12. Luke 23:33–45
  13. John 19:18–25
  • It is included into this article through reference to a work that is now in the public domain:Wood, James, ed (1907). ” Dumachus ” is a Greek mythological figure. The Nuttall Encyclopaedia is a reference work. Frederick Warne is a publisher based in London and New York.

External links

On the day when Jesus Christ was crucified, there were three crosses on the hill of Calvary. “And when they arrived at the location known as Calvary, they crucified him together with the criminals, one on his right hand and the other on his left,” the Bible says. Luke 23:33 is a biblical passage. It was not by chance that Jesus was crucified alongside two robbers on the cross. “Therefore, I will give Him a part with the great, and He shall share the spoil with the strong, because He poured out His soul unto death, and He was numbered with the transgressors, and He carried the sin of many, and He interceded for the transgressors,” declared the prophet Isaiah.

The first man

“One of the convicts who were hanged blasphemed Him, saying, ‘If You are the Christ, save Yourself and us,'” the Bible says. Luke 23:39 is an example of a parable. We can all identify with this thief because he represents the world that wants to be rescued without admitting the judgment: If You are the Messiah, then take away the judgment; let us flee and take You along with us. Demonstrate your abilities to us. In order to prove that you are a Christian, you must please me and meet my requirements.

  • Demonstrate Your magnificence and Your abilities so that people can actually see and comprehend that the Messiah is present among us.
  • Christ’s mission, on the other hand, was not to save the world from judgment, nor was it to produce wonders and miracles in the midst of the beast in order to win the beast’s favor.
  • The thief was nailed to the cross by his own hands.
  • A similar manner, the world has been crucified, for we believe that if one is crucified for all, then we are all crucified; and if one died for all, then we are all dead; and if one died for all, we are all dead.

These beliefs are the nails in the coffin of an ungodly person’s heart, and they will never be removed. Even if the world tries to rescue its own life – as the thief did – it will not succeed; rather, it will lose its own life.

The second man

The other, in response, confronted him and scolded him, asking, ‘Do you not even fear God, seeing as how you are subject to the same condemnation? And we are rightfully so, for we have received proper compensation for our acts; but, this Man has done nothing wrong.'” In Luke 23:40-41, the Bible says The first thief desired to be saved without fear of being judged. The second thief, on the other hand, was prepared to suffer as a result of the wicked actions he had committed in the flesh in order to be liberated from them in the hereafter.

In both the first and second thieves, there was sin with them and it hung over them, just as it did in the first thief.

He was no longer under any sort of censure.

Despite this, he was unable to free himself of his indwelling vice.

The third man

This was none other than the Lord Jesus Christ. Although the first thief targeted Him with his sneer, He did not respond; instead, the other thief spoke on His behalf. God has also preserved thieves today who are capable of answering all of the world’s inquiries concerning Jesus, as well as refuting their arguments and turning aside their ridicule. Jesus, on the other hand, did not say a single word in response to their questions. He does, however, respond to the second thief with an oath: “I assure you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,” He says.

  • Jesus not only suffered our sins on His body while nailed to the cross, but He also bore sin inside Himself.
  • God condemned sin in the person of Jesus Christ.
  • It was impossible for the law to judge sin in the flesh since all of a man’s sin is done outside of his physical body, making it impossible for the law to judge sin in the flesh.
  • Everyone who wishes to be saved from the power of indwelling sin must now daily take up his or her own cross.
  • Jesus did not have the nature of angels; instead, He was descended from Abraham’s lineage.
  • No one can be held responsible or condemned for the judgment that takes place in the body over sin inherent in our nature since it takes place within the body.
  • There is a growth of the body, a salvation of the body, and a judgment of the body.
  • He offers an external redemption via the person of Jesus Christ.
  • The adversaries of the cross of Christ, on the other hand, are opposed to this inner redemption, and, like the thief, they are content with the remission of sins as a result of the crucifixion of Christ.
  • She longs to be a participant in His holiness and has calculated the cost of such a pursuit.

She is made of the same flesh that He is and the same bone as He is. The bridegroom is willing not only to partake in the delight, but also to suffer and die with him – not just to the curse of the law, but also to the character of Adam in his physical body – because she shares in his joy.

Who was responsible for Christ’s death? Who killed Jesus?

QuestionAnswer The solution to this question has a number of different sides. In the first place, there is little question that the religious leaders of Israel were directly or indirectly responsible for Jesus’ killing. “The chief priests and the elders of the people convened in the palace of the high priest, whose name was Caiaphas, and they devised a plan to secretly capture Jesus and murder him,” according to Matthew 26:3–4. The Jewish authorities asked that Jesus be put to death from the Romans (Matthew 27:22–25).

  • (John 11:53).
  • It was a Roman form of execution approved and carried out by the Romans under the authority of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who sentenced Jesus to death on the cross.
  • The people of Israel were also participants in Jesus’ execution, as was the Roman Empire.
  • Crucify him!” “Crucify him!” the crowd chanted as He faced trial before Pilate (Luke 23:21).

When Peter told the men of Israel in Acts 2:22–23, he was confirming their suspicions: “You, with the assistance of evil men, put him to death by nailing him on the cross.” As it turned out, the murder of Jesus was part of an elaborate conspiratorial scheme that involved the Roman Empire, Herod’s Jewish leaders, and the Jewish people themselves, a diverse group of people who had never worked together before or since, but who came together this one time to plot and carry out an unthinkable act: the assassination of the only begotten Son of God.

  • At the end of the day, and maybe quite astonishingly, it was God Himself who executed Jesus.
  • Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross insured the redemption of untold millions of people and offered the sole means by which God could forgive sin without compromising His holiness and flawless righteousness, which was otherwise impossible.
  • As opposed to being a win for Satan, or a needless tragedy, as some have indicated, it was the most gracious act of God’s grace and mercy, the greatest manifestation of the Father’s love for sinners.
  • As the Bible says, “God caused him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that through him, we may become the righteousness of God” (2 Corinthians 5:21).
  • He died in order to pay the price for our sins (Romans 5:8; 6:23).

He did it this way to serve as a constant reminder to himself and everyone else that it was our faults that condemned Jesus to death on the cross. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) Who was to blame for the killing of Jesus Christ? Who was responsible for Jesus’ death?

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Who Killed Jesus?

In 1965, as part of the Second Vatican Council, the Catholic Church issued the much-anticipated proclamation Nostra Aetate, which took a fresh look at the subject of Jewish blame for the execution of Jesus Christ. That modern-day Jews could not be held responsible for Jesus’ crucifixion, and that not all Jews who were alive at the time of Jesus’ execution were guilty of the crime, according to the arguments in the paper. In the history of Christian views toward Jews, this was a significant step forward, as Christian anti-Semitism has long been predicated on the assumption that Jews were responsible for Jesus’ crucifixion.

When Jesus was crucified, they thought that the Church would come out and claim that the Jews had had no role in his execution.

Jews Lacked A Motive for Killing Jesus

Indeed, most historians believe that it would have been more rational to place the responsibility for Jesus’ execution on the Romans. Crucifixion was a common form of punishment among the Romans, not among the Jews. At the time of Jesus’ execution, the Romans were enforcing a harsh and ruthless occupation on the Land of Israel, and the Jews had been rebellious at times throughout the occupation. The Romans would have had good cause to desire to silence Jesus, who had been dubbed “King of the Jews” by some of his disciples and was well-known as a Jewish upstart miracle worker at the time of his death.

The many factions of the Jewish society at the period — including the Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, and others — had numerous differences with one another, but none of the organizations orchestrated the death of the leaders of the other purportedly heretical sects.

READ: The History of the Land of Israel Under Roman Control Nonetheless, the notion that Jews murdered Jesus can be found in Christian foundational literature dating back to the early days of the Jesus movement, and it is unlikely that it will be readily abandoned simply because of historians’ arguments.

The New Testament Account

The notion that Jews assassinated Jesus is parodied in this 1896 cartoon, which substitutes Uncle Sam for the historical figure. (Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons) “The Jews who killed the Lord, Jesus,” Paul writes in his writings, which are considered by historians to be the earliest works of the New Testament (written 10 to 20 years after Jesus’ death), and he addresses them very briefly: “the Jews who slaughtered the Lord, Jesus” (I Thessalonians 2:14-15). While the idea that the Jews bear primary responsibility for Jesus’ death is not central to Paul’s understanding of Jesus’ life and death, the idea that the Jews bear primary responsibility for Jesus’ death is more prominent in the four gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, each of which presents a slightly different account of Jesus’ life.

Eventually, the high priest comes to the conclusion that Jesus is guilty of blasphemy and petitions the Jewish council for guidance on how to punish him.

Matthew’s account of Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross (referred to by Christians as “Jesus’ “passion”) has served as the inspiration for numerous books, plays, and musical compositions over the years, and it is a prominent part of Christian liturgy, particularly during the celebration of Easter.

It is said that Pontius Pilate, the Roman ruler of Judea, was fundamentally sympathetic to Jesus, but that he was unable to overcome the pressure from the Jews, who demanded that Jesus be put to death.

When Pilate arrives, the gathering members of the Jewish community tell him, “His blood be on us and on our children,” which is the most contentious verse in all of the passion accounts (Matthew 27:25).

According to Christian doctrine, succeeding generations of Jews are also guilty of deicide, the crime of murdering God, which was committed by their forefathers.

Church Fathers and Thereafter

The belief that Jews assassinated Jesus is parodied in this 1896 cartoon, which substitutes Uncle Sam for the titular character. Wikimedia Commons has a collection of images. “The Jews who slaughtered the Lord, Jesus,” Paul writes in his writings, which are considered by historians to be the first works of the New Testament (written 10 to 20 years after Jesus’ death), and he does so almost casually (I Thessalonians 2:14-15). This idea that Jews bear primary responsibility for Jesus’ death does not appear to have been central to Paul’s understanding of the events surrounding Jesus’ life and death; however, it does appear prominently in the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, all of which give somewhat differing accounts of Jesus’ life.

  • Matthew is the most widely read gospel in the world.
  • “They responded by saying, ‘He deserves to die.’ ” Afterwards, they spat in his face and hit him” (Matthew 26:57-68).
  • Each of the four gospels makes the argument, either tacitly or expressly, that because Jews were not permitted to punish fellow Jews who committed blasphemy, they had to persuade the hesitant Romans to execute Jesus.
  • Throughout the gospel of John, we see this concept represented most clearly: “Pilate responded, ‘Take him yourself and judge him according to your own law.'” “We are not authorized to put anyone to death,” the Jews said.
  • The gathering members of the Jewish community tell Pilate, “His blood be on us and on our children,” which is the most contentious verse in all of the Passion tales (Matthew 27:25).

In the Talmud

It’s worth noting that the notion that the Jews assassinated Jesus may be found in Jewish religious literature as well. Against the evidence of theBabylonian Talmud, on folio 43a of tractateSanhedrin, aberaita (a doctrine dating back to before the year 200 C.E.) says that Jesus was executed by a Jewish tribunal for the crimes of sorcery and insurrection. For this reason, there is a blank area near the bottom of that folio in normal Talmuds from Eastern Europe — or in American Talmuds that simply copied from them — since the possibly offending text has been omitted.

This section has been restored in a number of recent Talmudic versions.) When the Talmud claims that the incident occurred on the eve of Passover, it follows the timeline given in the gospel of John, which is supported by historical evidence.

Responsibility for the killing of Jesus is also given to the Jews in Jewish folk literature, such as the popular scurrilous Jewish biography of Jesus,Toledot Yeshu (which may be as old as the fourth century), and in Christian folk fiction.

From the first through the nineteenth century, the degree of hostility between Jews and Christians was such that both parties believed the accusation that the Jews were responsible for the death of Jesus.

People who believe the tales of the New Testament (or of the Talmud) to be credible historical sources should not be shocked if this belief prevails. You may read this article in Spanish (leer en espaol) if you want to learn more about who killed Jesus.

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The Crucifixion of Jesus and the Jews

Jesus was executed because he was a Jewish victim of Roman persecution. On this point, all documented authorities are in agreement. His execution was ordered by the Gentile Roman ruler, Pontius Pilate, who had him tortured and killed by Gentile Roman troops before he was executed. In fact, Jesus was one of thousands of Jews who were executed by the Romans. The New Testament not only attests to this fundamental reality, but it also provides for Jewish participation in two ways. A small group of high-ranking Jewish officials who owed their positions and authority to the Romans colluded with the Gentile leaders to have Jesus executed; they are claimed to have been envious of Jesus and to have regarded him as an existential danger to the status quo.

The number of individuals in this mob is not specified, nor is there any explanation provided for their actions (other than the fact that they had been “stirred up,” as stated in Mark 15:11).

As recorded in Matthew, the Roman ruler wipes his hands of Jesus’ blood, as the Jews exclaim, “His blood be upon us and upon our children!” (Matthew 27:25.) Throughout Jesus’ mission, the Jews are shown as desiring to murder him in John’s Gospel (John 5:18,John 7:1,John 8:37).

This shift in emphasis is not entirely clear, but one obvious possibility is that as the church spread throughout the world, Romans rather than Jews became the primary targets of evangelism; as a result, there may have been some motivation to “off-the-hook” the Romans and blame the Jews for Jesus’ death rather than the other way around.

However, by the middle of the second century, the apocryphal Gospel of Peter presents the Romans as Jesus’ supporters, and the Jews as those who crucify him, according to tradition.

As a result, anti-Semitism has fed such beliefs for ages, culminating in the crude demonization of Jews as “Christ-killers.” Christians have traditionally held, in opposition to such predictions, that the human actors responsible for Jesus’ execution are irrelevant: he offered his life voluntarily as a sacrifice for sin (Mark 10:45;John 18:11).

“Let his blood be upon us and upon our children!” cries out the congregation in most liturgical churches when Matthew’s PassionNarrativeis read during a worship service.

In most liturgical churches, when Matthew’s PassionNarrativeis read during a worship service, all members of the congregation are invited to echoMatt 27:25aloud, crying out, “Let his blood be upon us and upon our children!”

Contributors

Mark Allan Powell is a professor of New Testament at Trinity Lutheran Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota (Columbus, Ohio). He is the editor of the HarperCollins Bible Dictionary and the author of Introducing the New Testament (Baker, 2009) andJesus as a Figure in History (Westminster, 2009). He received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University. John Knox Publishing Company, 2012). A gathering of individuals who are participating in religious services and are worshiping. The proclamation of “the good news” of Jesus Christ to the entire world.

  • spurious gospel purporting to have been authored by the apostle Peter, but which was rejected by the early Roman Catholic Church as part of the canonical New Testament canon because of its apocryphal nature.
  • A narrative that has been written, spoken, or recorded.
  • God’s character and actions are discussed through writing, conversation, or contemplation.
  • 15:1111 (Mark 15:1111) The leading priests, on the other hand, incited the mob to demand that Jesus release Barabbas for them instead.

27:2525 (KJV) Following that, the entire population exclaimed, “His blood be on us and on our children!” 5:1818 (John 5:1818) In order to assassinate him, the Jews increased their efforts even further, believing that he was not only violating the Sabbath but also referring to God as his own Father in the process.

  1. He did not want to travel about in Judea since the Jews were searching for an occasion to attack him and his family.
  2. 1 2:14-1514 (Thess 2:14-1514) Because you, brothers and sisters, were models for the churches of God in Christ Jesus that are located in Judea, because you experienced the same things from your own compa, you became imitators of those churches.
  3. Observe further information 10:45:45 (Mark 10:45:45) The Son of Man, after all, did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” 18:1111 (John 18:1111) “Put your sword back into its sheath,” Jesus instructed Peter to do.
  4. God, on the other hand, demonstrates his love for us by sending Christ to die for us while we were still sinners.
  5. More details may be found at1 Tim 1:515 p.m.

When it comes to Christ Jesus coming into the world to help sinners—of which I am the foremost—the phrase is certain and deserving of complete acceptance. Matt. 27:2525 (KJV) Following that, the entire population exclaimed, “His blood be on us and on our children!”

6 Facts Surrounding the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ

The crucifixion of Jesus Christ was the most horrible, agonizing, and shameful method of lethal punishment ever utilized in the ancient world, and it remains so to this day. Binding the victim’s hands and feet together with nails, and nailing the victim’s hands and feet together with nails, was this form of execution.

See also:  What Does Jesus Say About Love

Crucifixion Definition and Facts

  • The word “crucifixion” (pronounced krü-se-fik-shen) derives from the Latin crucifixio, orcrucifixus, which literally translates as “attached on a cross. ” Crucification was a cruel type of torture and death in the ancient world that entailed tying someone to a tree or a wooden post with ropes or nails, and then hanging them from the tree or post. Preceding the actual crucifixion, convicts were subjected to torture including floggings, beatings, burning, racking, mutilation, and verbal abuse directed at the victim’s family. Crucifixion in the Roman tradition involved driving stakes into a person’s hands and feet before tying him or her to a wooden cross. The crucifixion was the method of execution employed by Jesus Christ.

History of Crucifixion

Although the crucifixion was considered to be one of the most shameful and painful ways of death in ancient times, it was also considered to be one of the most dreaded means of execution in ancient times. Extant records of crucifixions date back to prehistoric times, with the Persians most likely being the first to record them, before spreading to the Assyrians, Scythian, Carthaginian, Germanic, Celtic, and British cultures. Crucifixion, as a form of capital punishment, was reserved largely for traitors, captive armies, slaves, and the most heinous of offenders, among others.

Forms of Crucifixion

It is possible that secular historians were unable to explain the tragic events of this heinous practice because they could not bear to do so because of their religious beliefs. A great deal has been learned about this early form of the death punishment, however, thanks to archaeological discoveries made in first-century Palestine. For the crucifixion, four fundamental constructions or types of crosses were employed:

  • There are several types of cruxes: the simplex (one upright stake)
  • The commissa (a capital T-shaped structure)
  • The decussata (an X-shaped cross)
  • And the immissa (the well-known lower case t-shaped structure of Jesus’ crucifixion).

Bible Story Summary of Christ’s Crucifixion

Several biblical passages, including Matthew 27:27-56, Mark 15:21-38, Luke 23:26-49, and John 19:16-37 (all from the New International Version), describe Jesus Christ’s death on the Roman crucifixion. Christians believe that Christ’s death served as the perfect atonement for the sins of all humanity, which has resulted in the crucifix, also known as the cross, becoming one of the most recognized symbols of Christianity. As recounted in the Bible’s account of Jesus’ execution, the Jewish high council, known as the Sanhedrin, convicted Jesus of blasphemy and determined that he should be put to death.

  • Jesus was brought before Pontius Pilate, the Roman ruler, who determined that he was innocent.
  • Jesus was ordered to be executed by the Sanhedrin; thus, Pilate, fearing the Jews, handed Jesus over to one of his centurions to carry out the death sentence.
  • On his head was a crown of thorns, which he refused to take off.
  • Jesus was given a concoction of vinegar, gall, and myrrh, but he turned down the offer.

A cross was erected on which Jesus was crucified between two criminals, and stakes were hammered through his wrists and ankles to secure him to the structure. “The King of the Jews,” according to the inscription on the wall over his head.

Timeline of Jesus’ Death by Crucifixion

From roughly 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., Jesus hung on the cross for approximately six hours. People were passing by yelling obscenities and scoffing as soldiers cast lots for Jesus’ garments during this time. When Jesus ascended to the cross, he addressed his mother Mary and the disciple John. “My God, my God, why have You left Me?” he screamed out to his father as well. At that point, the entire landscape was enveloped in darkness. Soon after, as Jesus took his final excruciating breath, an earthquake struck the Earth, tearing the temple curtain in two from top to bottom, shattering it.

The tombs were opened, and the bodies of many holy individuals who had died were brought back to life by the might of God.” In order to demonstrate mercy, it was customary for Roman troops to break the criminal’s legs, so speeding up the process of execution.

Rather than shattering his legs, they punctured his side with a knife.

Good Friday – Remembering the Crucifixion

Christians celebrate the passion, or suffering, and death of Jesus Christ on the cross on Good Friday, the Friday before Easter, which is observed on the Friday before Easter. Many Christians spend this day in fasting, prayer, repentance, and contemplation of Christ’s anguish on the cross, among other things.

Sources

  • Crucifixion. The Lexham Bible Dictionary (p. 368)
  • The Crucifixion (p. 368)
  • The Lexham Bible Dictionary (p. 368)

Crucifixion of Jesus – Bible Story

Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John are the four New Testament writings that contain the story of Jesus’ death on the cross; they are known as the Gospels. This Bible tale serves as a succinct summation of the salvation message of Jesus Christ. “From that time on, Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests, and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life,” according to Matthew, who wrote, “from that time on, Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests, and the teachers of the law, and As a result, Jesus saw that his death would be necessary as a sacrifice for the sins of mankind.

  • During the height of Jesus’ career and miracles, a large number of Jews came to believe that he was the Messiah and the Son of God.
  • Roman soldiers apprehended Jesus with the assistance of Judas Iscariot, and he was placed on trial for claiming to be the Jewish king, which he denied.
  • When it came to the penalty for Jesus, the Roman ruler Pontius Pilate was apprehensive about the idea.
  • Jesus was turned over to be beaten and whipped after Pilate washed his hands in front of a mob to demonstrate that he was not accepting responsibility for the slaughter that had taken place.

In addition to being forced to carry his cross along the walk to the hill where he would be killed, Jesus was also beaten with whips and whipping cords. The site of Jesus’ crucifixion is known as Calvary, which is derived from the Latin phrase meaning “a place of skull.”

Jesus on the Cross

Crowds had assembled to grieve and witness the death of Jesus. In addition to being nailed on the cross between two criminals, Jesus’ sides were wounded by a sword. After being mocked for a while, one of the convicts approached him and requested Jesus to remember him. Jesus answered by saying, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” “Forgive them, because they do not know what they are doing,” Jesus said as he raised his eyes to the heavens. When Jesus took his last breath, he said the following: “Father, I entrust my spirit into your capable hands.

The Last Words of Jesus Christ on the Cross

1. According to Matthew 27:46, at around the ninth hour, Jesus cried out, “My God, my God, why have you deserted me?” 2. 2. “Father, please forgive them since they are completely unaware of what they are doing” (Luke 23:34). 3. I swear to you that from this day forward, you’ll be with me in paradise (Luke 23:43). 4. “Dear Lady, please accept this as your son!” “Here is your mother!” says the other. When Jesus saw His mother standing near the cross with the Apostle John, He committed the care of His mother to John’s care, saying, “I trust you to look after her.” (See also John 19:26–27.) 5.

  • In this instance, Jesus was responding to the Messianic prophesy from Psalm 69:21, which stated, “They put gall in my food and vinegar in my thirst.” 6.
  • ” (See John 19:30.) The mission that His Father had given Him to carry out, which included teaching the Gospel, performing miracles, and bringing His people back together, was successfully completed.
  • 7.
  • (Matthew 23:46) Jesus freely laid down his life for us.
  • This was a terrible and difficult assignment, yet Jesus volunteered to take on the challenge.
  • In the hands of those who crucified him, Jesus was not helpless; he was the only one who had the authority to put an end to his life.
  • (Revelation 13:8).

It is still a heinous crime against humanity.

Death was visited upon the creator of life by nefarious men (Acts 2:23).

The death of Jesus was distinguished by extraordinary occurrences.

When Jesus took his last breath, the ground shook, the temple curtain broke in half from top to bottom, and the graves of saints were opened, their bodies being lifted from the grave.

The sin of mankind would necessitate the offering of a sacrifice.

The complete Bible account of the crucifixion can be found in the Scriptures listed below.

Read the entire narrative of Jesus’ crucifixion in the scriptural text below, as well as articles, videos, and audio sermons that are related to this moving story. Image courtesy of Getty Images/mbolina

Who Were the Two Criminals Hanging Next to Jesus?

1.According to Matthew 27:46, Jesus cried out, “My God, my God, why have you left me?” at the ninth hour of the night. Secondly, “Father, please forgive them since they are completely unaware of what they are doing” (Luke 23:34). 3. “I will tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise,” says the narrator (Luke 23:43). 4. “Dear Lady, please accept this gift from your son!” 5. “Here is your mother!” says the other person. Following His mother’s identification as standing near the cross with the Apostle John, Jesus entrusted John with the task of ensuring her well-being.

  1. “I’m thirsty,” says the speaker.
  2. (John 19:28).
  3. ” We have completed it!” Jesus says this in John 19:30.
  4. He completed the task.
  5. « Father, I place my spirit in your capable hands!
  6. In laying down his life as a ransom for the world, Jesus faced a tremendous challenge.
  7. After three hours of dangling from the cross, Jesus eventually decided to give his life for the sake of the people.

The Bible states in Matthew 20:28 that the Son of Man has come “to sacrifice his life as a ransom for many.

(Revelation 13:8).

It is still a heinous violation of human rights and dignity.

Malicious men assassinated the creator of life (Acts 2:23).

At the day of Jesus’ death, extraordinary occurrences occurred.

After his final breath, the ground shook, the temple curtain parted from top to bottom, and the tombs of saints opened, their bodies rising from the graves to greet him.

A sacrifice would be required to atone for the sin of mankind.

It is the whole tale of Jesus’ crucifixion that is included in the Scriptures that follow.

Find articles, videos, and audio sermons that relate to the account of Jesus’ crucifixion in the scriptural passage below, as well as resources for further study. Image courtesy of Getty Images/mbolina.com

A Tale of Two Brothers

A short video on the two criminals who were crucified beside Jesus was made some years ago by a well-known Christian media organization. Of course, it was all made up, but it was so fascinating that I can’t get it out of my head to this day. The two criminals in the narrative were revealed to be brothers. One was the nice brother, while the other was (as you would have guessed) the bad brother in this story. They were diametrically opposed to one another. The evil brother had troubles with drinking and gambling, whereas the good brother was studying to become a synagogue instructor under the supervision of a rabbi.

  • He would always be rescued, though, by his decent brother, who would always remind his dumb sibling to clean up his act.
  • He would drink in order to alleviate his anxiety.
  • His brother came to his aid once more, promising him that it would be the last time.
  • He devised a mad scheme to rob a nearby villager in order to pay off his obligations, which he executed successfully.
  • Nonetheless, he managed to become enmeshed in his brother’s scheme, and the Romans apprehended both of them and imprisoned them.
  • Returning to the Bible, it is at this time that the account of the two criminals who were executed with Jesus is picked up.
See also:  What Is Jesus In Aramaic

The Criminals Encounter Jesus

It is recorded in Luke 23:39-43 that the convicts’ contact with Jesus occurs after the multitude insults the Lord as He and the two men are nailed to the cross. This is how it is recorded in Mark 15:29-32. People who went by mocked Him, waving their heads and exclaiming, ‘Aha! You who destroy the temple and rebuild it in three days, rescue Yourself and come down from the cross!’ he wrote. Likewise, the top priests, who were laughing among themselves with the scribes, said, “He saved others, but He cannot save Himself.” Allow the Christ, the King of Israel, to descend from the cross at this time, so that we may see and believe.” A comparable account of the scenario may be found in chapter 27, verse 43 of the gospel of Matthew, except Matthew includes a bit more of the mocking of the Pharisees and scribes.

God will deliver him now if He wills it.” “He placed his confidence in God; let Him deliver him now if He wills it.” Because He said, “I am the Son of God.” The two criminals who mocked Jesus are likewise mentioned in both the gospels of Mark and Matthew.

“Even the thieves who were hanged with Him slandered Him with the same accusation.” Matthew 27:44 (KJV) Perhaps the two crooks were just carried away by the emotions of the audience.

And the nasty brother, well, he may have simply been being himself, it’s possible. Who knows what motivated them to act in the manner that they did? Whatever the motive, whether they are criminals or brothers, one of them has a change of heart a short time later.

Asking for Forgiveness

As the multitude booed and jeered Jesus, it appears that one of the convicts came to the conclusion that possibly Jesus was who He claimed to be. A felon who was about to be hung blasphemed Him, telling Him, ‘If You are the Christ, rescue Yourself and us.’ “Do you not even fear God, considering as how you are both under the same condemnation?” said the other when he spoke. And we have truly been justly rewarded for our efforts, as we have received the proper compensation for our efforts. ‘However, this individual has done nothing wrong.’ ‘Lord, please keep me in mind when You come into Your kingdom,’ he requested to Jesus after that.

  • And, of course, we can see that the other man is not convinced.
  • It’s possible that they had never met until that fateful day.
  • Alternatively, you may say “no.” Who knows what will happen?
  • However, there is one aspect about these gentlemen that is important.

The Criminals and the World

We have no idea who the two culprits are or where they came from. All we know about them is that they were thieves. Using the original Hebrew word for “robber” in this Scripture (“lestes”), we might infer that they were either rebels of some type or members of a gang who were well-known for ambushing unsuspecting victims with deadly force. Such aggressive individuals were frequently crucified by the Romans. Regular thieves, on the other hand, were not. Whatever the case, what we are expected to observe is how diametrically opposed the two are.

However, one guy changes his heart and becomes defensive of Jesus, whilst the other man continues to insult Jesus and remains hard-hearted throughout.

What does this have to do with Jesus, you might wonder.

The two criminals are a representation of all of us.

We Must Make a Choice

Whatever the circumstances were that brought them to the cross on that particular day, it is significant that they were crucified on the same day as Jesus. It wasn’t a strange coincidence at all. That is exactly how our all-powerful God designed it. They were meant to be there to meet with the Messiah, but they were late. Isn’t that similar to God’s character? He is continually working our circumstances until we come face to face with Him, even when we are not conscious of it occurring. He’ll go to any length to achieve his goals.

  • Do we join the hordes of people who despise the Lord, making fun of Him and laughing at Him?
  • Or it’s possible that we just don’t see the point in having Him in our lives.
  • How many of us are willing to humble ourselves, confess our bad actions, and beg forgiveness?
  • Another prayed for forgiveness, while the first insulted him because others had done so.
  • The other, on the other hand, saw the possibility of endless life.

Despite the fact that both men encountered Jesus, only one chose to follow Him. Their story is a perfect reflection of the rest of the world. We all come into contact with Jesus in some way at some point in our lives, but we all have to make a decision at some point.

Abundant Grace

Upon realizing that he had no other option except divine grace, the criminal who approached Jesus for mercy felt that Jesus was the only one who could provide it. His belief that by recognizing Jesus as the Son of God, he would be admitted to heaven was likewise based on this belief. He definitely exhibits real faith when he expresses his belief. Despite the fact that he is about to die, he feels he still has a shot at redemption. Every one of us, my dear friends, has the same opportunity. Everything that happens in the future is determined by the most significant decision that we can make today, regardless of our prior actions or decisions, or what we’ve done in the past.

  1. We have the option of acknowledging our sin and asking Jesus for divine pardon.
  2. What is the extent of God’s grace?
  3. A LOT, in fact.
  4. 1 Timothy 1:14; Psalm 145:8 tell us that he is totally abounding in it!
  5. He is ecstatic to be able to present it to you.
  6. It’s possible that you’re standing on the threshold of death after a lifetime of rejecting God, just like the criminals who hanged alongside Jesus.
  7. He forgives the criminal of all he has ever done with the last breath He takes on this earth.
  8. What is the maximum amount of forgiveness Jesus will extend to you?
  9. What are your plans?
  10. Allow this to be the happiest moment of your life—the moment you realized you had been guaranteed of your entrance into Paradise.

Chapter 53: Jesus Is Crucified

Jesus was beaten with whips by the soldiers. He was dressed in a purple robe by the guards. They fashioned a crown of thorns and placed it atop Jesus’s scepter. It seemed as though they were spitting on Him as they laughed at Him. He was referred to as “King of the Jews.” As the soldiers led Jesus to a hill near Jerusalem, a large crowd gathered to see the event. They compelled Him to bear His own cross. It was raised off the ground by His own hands and feet, which were nailed to the cross. They also nailed on the cross two more men, both of whom were robbers.

  1. He pleaded with Heavenly Father to pardon the soldiers who crucified Him and prayed for forgiveness.
  2. Mary, the mother of Jesus, was standing by the crucifixion, looking at the cross.
  3. John was instructed by Jesus to look after His mother.
  4. The country was blanketed in darkness.
  5. Finally, His spirit was expelled from his body, and He passed away.
  6. The veil, which is a curtain that hangs in the temple, was split in half.

One of Jesus’ followers was responsible for removing the Savior’s body from the crucifixion. He covered it in a cloth and buried it in a tomb, which is a location where individuals are laid to rest after death. In front of the tomb, a large boulder was moved into position.

Who Died on the Cross? — Crescent Project

M. Bonner contributed to this article.

For Christians, springtime means Lent and Easter, a season when the faithful remember the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Churches adorn wooden crosses with purple cloth and crowns of spring lilies. It is a time of celebrating life out of death, Christ’s ultimate victory on the cross.

However, for Muslims, the truth that is basic to Christianity may well be the most difficult obstacle to overcome in order to believe. Christians believe that Jesus died on the cross in order to atone for the sins of the entire human race. However, in the perspective of a Muslim, it is difficult to comprehend how Jesus, the messenger of God, could be vanquished in such a humiliating manner. Muslims believe that Jesus was, in fact, a prophet sent by the Almighty. This is the crux of the problem.

  1. Was God unable to provide protection for His prophet?
  2. According to Islamic theology on the matter, He did just that.
  3. Masri (2016) defined formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized (Masri, 2016).
  4. This question is frequently addressed in a number of various ways by different people.
  5. is a book on who died on the cross.
  6. The Holy Qur’an The Qur’an asserts unequivocally, “.because there is no doubt that they did not murder him (Jesus),” (see Qur’an 4:157-159).
  7. As a result, many Muslim scholars have concluded that someone other than Jesus, the Messiah, died on the cross in place of Jesus Christ.

Judas, a well-known traitor and thief, appeared to be deserving of the death penalty.

The Injeel, on the other hand, portrays Judas’ actual death in two distinct chapters, both of which are quite detailed (See Matthew 27:5 and Acts 1:16-18).

A Bystander who happens to be Jewish.

Some Muslims believe that God misled the soldiers’ thoughts, causing them to crucify Simon of Cyrene instead of Jesus, as a result of which they were crucified.

Peter is another another option that has been proposed for replacement on the cross.

Nevertheless, history tells that Peter not only survived, but also played an important role in the spread of the Gospel following Jesus’ death and resurrection.

Last but not least, a Roman soldier who led Jesus to his death has been proposed as a possible candidate to take Jesus’ place on the cross.

Traditions of the Islamic faith: Jesus had completely swooned.

The most likely time for this to have occurred would have been at the time when everyone was reporting that He had died.

The Injeel is a kind of lizard.

It is universally acknowledged that Jesus died on the cross, was buried, and then resurrected from the dead.

Wouldn’t that be a source of embarrassment for God?

The Messiah’s death, on the other hand, was not the conclusion of the tale.

Our Christian friends have the opportunity to hear the final possibility: that Jesus did, in fact, die on the cross and that by conquering death through the resurrection we celebrate on Easter, Jesus brought greater glory to God than any possible escape from the cross could ever bring to himself or her.

The Last Days of the Victorious Messenge may be found at the link below.

Terms The Qur’an is considered by Muslims to be the sacred scripture of Islam, and it is believed to contain the revelations of God to Muhammad. Injeel is the Arabic word for the Book of Jesus, which is also known as the New Testament in Christianity.

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