Which Of The Following Is Not One Of Jesus Claims To Be Deity

Theo 104 quiz 3

Question No. 1:

  1. When it comes to Jesus’ claims to deity, which apostle provides the clearest picture?

Question 2 has 2 points from MatthewMarkJohnPeter. Question 3: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse

  1. According to Islamic tradition, Jesus is regarded to be a false prophet.

Question 4: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse

  1. Jesus asserts that he is the “I AM” of the Hebrew Scriptures.

Question 5: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse2 points

  1. Not all of Jesus’ disciples were convinced that he was the Son of God.

Question 6: TrueFalse2 points: True His conception and conception of his conception and conception of his conception and conception of his conception His adolescence His adolescence and young adulthood None of the options are available. all of the foregoing a total of two points Question number seven.

  1. While Christ’s humanity is significant, the divinity of Christ is far more important.

Question 8: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse2 points

  1. Despite the fact that Jesus was human, he never became hungry, thirsty, or exhausted since he was God

Question 9: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse2 points

  1. Question 9: TrueFalse2 points

Question 10: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse

  1. How do you characterize God’s Son taking on flesh and becoming a man in the theology of the Incarnation?

Incarnationa. Transcendence Transubstantiation Question 11: What is the aim of transfixion2?

  1. Essentially, the concept indicated by the phrase redemption is “buying back” or “purchasing.”

Question 12: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse

  1. Even though Jesus did not have to die in order to give redemption, God determined that his death would be the finest alternative.

Question 13: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse2 points Sacrifice Propitiation SubstitutionReconciliation a total of two points Question number 14:

  1. What well-known chapter in the book of Isaiah paints a clear image of a sacrifice

Question 15 is worth 24751532 points.

  1. Essentially, the law of God is a set of preferences that God has formed that are most appropriate for humans

Question 16: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse

  1. The Resurrection of Christ is one of the few miracles recorded in only the gospels of John and Luke
  2. It is also one of the few miracles recorded in only the gospel of Mark.

Question 17: TrueFalse2 points Question 18:

  1. The Lost or Stolen Body Belief is a theory that asserts that Jesus did not actually die on the cross as believed. According to proponents of the viewpoint, Jesus just seemed to be dead on the cross.

Question 18: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse

  1. Question 18: TrueFalse2 points

Persecutor of the Church Paul’s personality was completely transformed. James, the skeptic and Jesus’ brother, had his mind instantly transformed. Thomas, the doubting Thomas, never doubted again. None of the two things mentioned above Question number 19:

  1. What event is considered to be the turning point in the development of the Christian religion

What event is considered to be the turning point in the history of Christianity?

  1. No phrase has been found by theologians that relates with the notion of Jesus emptying himself
  2. Yet,

Question 21: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse2 points

  1. Question 21: TrueFalse2 points

Question 22: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse2 points The coming of Christ to earth in the form of incarnation and death was a major act of humiliation. The death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus were the climax of his incarnation. Christians have reason to be optimistic about their own eventual resurrection as a result of Christ’s humility. None of the options are available. a total of two points Question number 23:

  1. The theology of Christ’s incarnation is best shown in the following passages:

This passage perfectly illustrates the notion of Christ’s incarnation;

  1. Christians have reason to be hopeful about their own coming resurrection and eternal abode with the Trinity as a result of Christ’s exaltation.

Question 25: TrueFalse2 points TrueFalse

  1. In terms of Jesus Christ’s humiliation, the crucifixion represents the lowest point in that process.

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THEO 201 Quiz 6 Liberty [Answers]

  1. God the Son has existed since the beginning of time. One of the primary reasons that Jesus was killed was because he was accused of violating the Sabbath. How do you define the idea that God the Son took on human flesh and became a man? Those who adhered to this Christological error believed Jesus simply appeared to have a true bodily body. In spite of the fact that Jesus was entirely God at the time of his earthly mission, he need food, drink, and sustenance to develop and care for his body. Jesus, according to this apostle, is God among us and dwells among us, and he begins his gospel by characterizing him as such. rejected the concept of two natures and claimed that following the virgin birth, Jesus transitioned from having two natures to having only one nature
  2. This Christological heresy argued that Jesus was both divinity and human in both his soul and body. In 325, the Council of Nicaea pronounced Arius’s death sentence. Identify one of Jesus’ claims to be the Son of God that is not included above. The Greek phrase that the writers of the New Testament frequently used to characterize Jesus, particularly after His ascension into heaven
  3. It is said in this creed that Jesus possesses the same nature or essence as God the Father and that he possesses the same nature as mankind. In Islam, it is believed that Jesus was God, but that he did not die on the cross, but that another person died in his place. This Christological heresy asserted that Jesus was transformed into God during his baptism. This trait was acknowledged as an indication of deity by Jewish religious authorities in the first century CE. The humanity of Jesus is not as significant as the deity of Christ
  4. The humanity of Jesus is secondary. Despite the fact that Jesus claimed to be God, he made no predictions about his death or resurrection. The Bible appears to support the idea that sin is handed down from the father. According to Erickson, it is this aspect of Jesus’ humanity that enables him to be the most effective intercessor for believers. When did the process of incarnation begin to take place?

Set 2

  1. For example, the apostles Matthew and John begin their gospels with a genealogy of Jesus in order to demonstrate the fulfillment of prophecy from the Old Testament. As defined by Erickson, Jesus possessed both the nature of God and the nature of man in a single person, rather than two natures fused together to form a third nature in a single person, which is known as Eutychianism
  2. And What is meant by kenosis is described as follows: When did the process of incarnation begin to take place? How do you define the idea that God the Son took on human flesh and became a man? The followers of whatever religion believe that Jesus is divine, but they do not believe in the Trinity and think that Jesus was formed at a certain point in time
  3. Jesus, according to this apostle, is God among us and dwells among us, and he begins his gospel by characterizing him as such. A historical perspective, according to this theologian, is necessary in order to understand what happened in the resurrection. This Christological heresy asserted that Jesus swapped his divine traits for human characteristics. This Christological heresy argued that Jesus was both divinity and human in both his soul and body. It is said in this creed that Jesus possesses the same nature or essence as God the Father and that he possesses the same nature as mankind. One reason in favor of Christ’s divinity was the fact that the apostles were prepared to die for their conviction that Jesus was, in fact, God
  4. This was one of the strongest arguments in favor of Christ’s deity. The Greek phrase that the writers of the New Testament frequently used to characterize Jesus, particularly after His ascension into heaven
  5. In reality, the incarnation was more about the addition of human characteristics than it was about the loss of divine characteristics
  6. God the Son has always existed. There are three alternatives for the identity of Jesus Christ, according to C.S. Lewis, namely: excellent teacher, prophet, or God. The Colossians 1 passage is referred to be an early declaration of Christ’s deity in the Etzel and Small version. Exactly which Gospel, according to Erickson, is the most explicit and direct proclamation of Christ’s deity? We know that Jesus is God because.
  7. In 325, the Council of Nicaea pronounced Arius’s death sentence.

Set 3

  1. Identify which New Testament Letter affirms Jesus as the God of revelation, who is superior to all other created creatures
  2. This council was primarily concerned with the divinity of Christ
  3. Arius was condemned at the Council of Nicea in 325
  4. He died shortly after. When God the Son has always existed, the term kenosis is used to characterize it. Which Gospel, according to Erickson, provides the clearest and most plain affirmation of Christ’s divinity
  5. And Despite the fact that Jesus claimed to be God, he made no predictions about his death or resurrection. The Greek phrase that the writers of the New Testament frequently used to characterize Jesus, particularly after His ascension into heaven
  6. Those who adhered to this Christological error believed Jesus simply appeared to have a true bodily body. In his conversations with God the Father, Jesus always spoke in a solitary voice. In spite of the fact that Jesus was entirely God at the time of his earthly mission, he need food, drink, and sustenance to develop and care for his body. In Islam, it is believed that Jesus was God, but that he did not die on the cross, but that another person died in his place. The followers of whatever religion believe that Jesus is divine, but they do not believe in the Trinity and think that Jesus was formed at a certain point in time
  7. It is said in this creed that Jesus possesses the same nature or essence as God the Father and that he possesses the same nature as mankind. This Christological heresy asserted that Jesus was transformed into God during his baptism. One of the primary reasons that Jesus was killed was because he was accused of violating the Sabbath. The Apostle Paul wrote some of the first declarations of Christ’s divinity
  8. They are known as the “Apostles’ Creed.” Theology professor Erickson believes that Jesus is entirely God and fully human in one nature. This trait was acknowledged as an indication of deity by Jewish religious authorities in the first century CE. How do you define the idea that God the Son took on human flesh and became a man?

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The humbling and exaltation of Christ aid in providing a comprehensive picture of what the Savior of the world has done on our behalf. Is Christ’s exaltation reaching its climactic stage? The crucifixion of Jesus Christ represents the pinnacle of Jesus Christ’s humility. Christ’s humility begins at the lowest point of his crucifixion and ends at the highest point of his eternal glory as the sovereign Lord over all of his created things. The theology of Christ’s incarnation is best shown in the work .

  1. Which of the following facts does not fall under the purview of the Minimal Facts Approach?
  2. Body that has been misplaced or stolen An argument for the existence of a hypothesis is that Jesus never truly died on the cross.
  3. Who was the first to use the Minimal Facts Approach?
  4. He never questioned whether or not he should die on the cross.
  5. God did not require Jesus to die in order to give redemption, but he believed that his death was the greatest alternative.
  6. Theophanies and Christophanies are other names for the phenomenon of incarnation.
  7. Although Jesus was human, he never experienced hunger, thirst, or fatigue because he was God.
  8. Religion recognizes Jesus as divine, but does not acknowledge the existence of a triune God and believes that Jesus was created at a certain point in time.

Jesus Christ proclaims himself to be the “I AM” of the Old Testament. Know that Jesus is God because. When Jesus claims to be the “food of life,” He is also asserting that He is God.

THEO 104 quiz 3 Answers Liberty University Update!

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Textbook notes

Answers to THEO 104 quiz number three Liberty University Has a New Website! By claiming to be the “food of life,” Jesus is claiming to be the creator of the universe. Which religion recognizes Jesus as divine, but does not acknowledge the existence of a triune God and believes that Jesus was formed at a certain point in time. The incarnation is also referred to as theophanies or Christophanies in some circles. Jesus asserts that he is the “I AM” of the Hebrew Scriptures. Jesus never claimed to be God in the traditional sense.

  1. The humanity of Christ is not nearly as essential as the deity of Christ in the eyes of the world.
  2. Which thesis was developed by the eleventh-century church theologian Peter Abelard is the subject of this question.
  3. 14The meaning represented by the phrase redemption is to “buy back” or “to purchase” something previously purchased.
  4. Which of the following points to the humanity of Jesus?
  5. 21The notion of Christ’s incarnation is best shown in the book of .
  6. When it comes to the idea that God the Son took on flesh and became a man, what language is employed to express it?
  7. “To appease wrath” is the meaning of the word .
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17Can you tell me who was the first to use the Minimal Facts Approach?

22In what stage does Christ’s exaltation reach its culmination?

23Which of the following is true about Christ’s exaltation?

25Christ’s elevation gives Christians reason to be hopeful about their own eventual resurrection and eternal dwelling in the presence of the Trinity.

19The Minimal Facts Approach proposed by Gary Habermas and Michael Licona is a valid explanation of the facts surrounding Jesus’ resurrection, according to the authors.

1Jesus never claimed to be God in a direct manner.

3Not all of Jesus’ disciples were convinced that he was the Son of God.

8Even though Jesus was human, he never experienced hunger, thirst, or fatigue because he was God.

10The incarnation is often referred to as theophanies or Christophanies in some circles.

6What is the term used to describe kinesis?

12Which belief asserts that the death of Jesus serves as a model for humanity of God’s unfailing love for them?

18Can you tell me who was the first to use the Minimal Facts Approach?

God did not require Jesus to die in order to give salvation, but he determined that his death was the greatest alternative.

Despite the fact that God is holy, everyone can come into his presence because he is compassionate.

16 When it comes to the facts of Jesus’ resurrection, the Minimal Facts Approach advocated by Gary Habermas and Michael Licona provides an appropriate assessment of the evidence.

The ultimate step of Christ’s ascension is as follows: 22Christ’s crucifixion represents the lowest moment of His humiliation.

2Jesus is regarded as a false prophet by many Muslims across the world.

24The crucifixion of Christ is the pinnacle of Jesus Christ’s humiliation on the cross.

Which apostle provides the most convincing illustration of Jesus’ claims to be God?

(5)At its most fundamental level, the phrase “atonement” literally means “to unveil.” 6Even though Jesus was human, he never experienced hunger, thirst, or fatigue because he was God.

Which thesis was developed by the eleventh-century church theologian Peter Abelard is the subject of this question.

14The meaning represented by the phrase redemption is to “buy back” or “to purchase” something previously purchased.

9Which doctrine stated that Jesus was a man who possessed the power of God in his life, but was not divine in any sense.

“To appease wrath” is the meaning of the word .

17Theologians have not yet come up with a name to describe the notion of Jesus emptying himself of his possessions.

1924 The crucifixion represents the lowest moment of Christ’s humiliation.

1 When Jesus claims to be the “food of life,” He is essentially claiming to be the creator of the universe.

3 Jesus asserts that he is the “I AM” of the Hebrew Scriptures.

20Because of the sin of humanity, the preaching of the gospel of Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection is required.

22Christ’s elevation gives Christians reason to be hopeful about their own future resurrection and eternal dwelling in the presence of the Trinity.

5 Which apostle provides the most convincing illustration of Jesus’ claims to be God?

11 Although it was not necessary for Jesus to die in order to give redemption, God determined that it was the greatest alternative.

13 is an expression that implies to “satisfy anger.” 14 Jesus never questioned whether he would have to die on the cross.

16 Who was the first to use the Minimal Facts Approach?

7 Kenosis is a term used to describe which of the following?

Ninety-nine percent of Christians believe that Christ’s humanity is less essential than his Godhead.

According to proponents of this viewpoint, Jesus just seemed to be dead on the cross.

Identify which of the following facts is NOT addressed by the Minimal Facts Approach in question number 19: 20 23 The crucifixion of Christ is the pinnacle of Jesus Christ’s humiliation and humiliation.

24 Who knows what the last stage of Christ’s ascension will be. 25 The humbling and exaltation of Christ aid in providing a comprehensive picture of what the Savior of the world has done on our behalf. Preview 3 pages out of 17 total pages

The Deity of Christ

Answers to THEO 104 Quiz #3 Latest News from Liberty University The claim that Jesus makes about being the “bread of life” is a claim that He makes about being God. In which religion, while acknowledging that Jesus is divine, does not believe in the Trinity and holds that Jesus was created at a specific point in time? Theophanies and Christophanies are other terms for the incarnation. “I AM” refers to Jesus’ claim that he is the Old Testament’s “I AM.” Jesus never claimed to be God in a direct manner or at any point during his life.

  1. The humanity of Christ is not nearly as important as the deity of Christ in the eyes of the universe.
  2. 12What theory was developed by the church theologian Peter Abelard in the eleventh century?
  3. “To purchase” or “to buy back” is the concept expressed by the term redemption.
  4. Tenth, Christ’s resurrection is one of the few miracles recorded in the New Testament, appearing only in the Gospels of John and Luke.
  5. 22Christ’s humiliation begins with his crucifixion and culminates in his eternal glory as the sovereign Lord over his creation.
  6. Although God is holy, anyone can come into his presence because he is compassionate.
  7. The event that established the Christian faith is described in detail in verse 16.16.

With the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem in 1821, the big-picture perspective on the stages of Christ’s work begins.

25Christ’s exaltation gives Christians reason to be hopeful about their own future resurrection and eternal home in the presence of the Triune Godhead.

Specifically, the Minimal Facts Approach proposed by Gary Habermas and Michael Licona is a reliable interpretation of the facts surrounding the resurrection of Jesus.

Nowhere in the Gospels does Jesus claim to be the Son of God.

45Of the following, which one indicates that Jesus was a human being?

9Which doctrine claimed that Jesus was a man who possessed the power of God in his life, but was not divine in any kind.

On the simplest level, the phrase atonement literally means “to unveil.” .because we have come to believe that Jesus is God.

It was possible for God to just wave a magic wand and make everything great and offer redemption for the entire world, but he chose to send his Son to die in the place of everyone else.

13 There is no name that theologians have used to describe the notion of Jesus emptying himself.

Identify which of the following is NOT one of the facts addressed by the Minimal Facts Approach in the following question.

14.

Which thesis was developed by Peter Abelard, a church theologian who lived in the eleventh century?

One of the rare miracles recorded in the New Testament, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ is mentioned in only two gospels: John’s and Luke’s.

231By claiming to be the “food of life,” Jesus is implying that He is the creator of the universe.

3Beginning with the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem, the big-picture view on the stages of Christ’s activity starts.

25What is not a component of Christ’s exaltation?

According to which apostle does Jesus’ claim to divinity come across the clearest?

(5)At its most fundamental level, the phrase “atonement” literally means “to expose.” 6Even though Jesus was a human being, he never experienced hunger, thirst, or fatigue because he was the eternal Son of the Most High.

12What thesis was developed by the church theologian Peter Abelard in the eleventh century?

“To purchase” or “to buy back” is the concept indicated by the phrase redemption.

9Which doctrine claimed that Jesus was a man who possessed the power of God in his life, but was not divine in any kind.

“To appease wrath” is the definition of .

There is no name that theologians have used to describe the notion of Jesus emptying himself.

1924 It is Christ’s crucifixion that represents the pinnacle of His humility.

Which of the following is true?

Secondly, we know that Jesus is the Son of God because.

Because of the Minimal Facts Approach, not all scholars think that Jesus resurrected from the death.

The exaltation of Christ gives Christians reason to be hopeful about their own ultimate resurrection and eternal dwelling in the presence of the Triune God.

In what way does Jesus’ claim to be God come across the most clearly in the gospels?

11 Although it was not necessary for Jesus to die in order to give redemption, God determined that it was the greatest choice in the long term.

Thirteen is a slang term that meaning “to appease rage.” The fact that Jesus would have to die on the cross did not phase him in the least.

15 16 In what year did the Minimal Facts Approach first appear in print?

Seventh, what is the term kenosis meant to describe?

Ninety-nine percent of Christians believe that Christ’s humanity is less essential than his divinity.

The view’s proponents contend that Jesus just looked to be dead on the cross.

Identify which of the following facts is NOT addressed by the Minimal Facts Approach in question 19.

25 A big-picture perspective of what the Savior of the world has done for us is provided by the humility and exaltation of Christ. Preview Pages 3 and 4 out of 17

Jesus and the Father

The frequent naming of God as his Father, with the implication that Jesus is his Son, was unique and surprising in light of this context. The term “Son of God” was used in the Old Testament for the Messiah, as well as for Israel on a few occasions, but never for a specific person. 1Rather than using the term “Father” as a metaphor or a depiction of what God is like, Jesus addressed him as “Father.” Rather than referring to a broad paternity of all God’s creations, God’s revelation as the Father refers to mutual relationships within God’s being as a whole.

  • As a result of Jesus’ baptism, the Father declares him to be his Son (Matt.
  • Jesus says that he was sent by the Father (John 5:30, 36, 6:38–40, 8:16–18, 26, 29), that he participates with the Father in reviving the dead (John 5:24–29), and that he will judge the world (John 5:30, 36, 6:38–40, 8, 16, 18, 26, 29).
  • All will respect him in the same way that they respect the Father (John 5:23).
  • While he is carrying out the Father’s instructions, he is known and loved by the Father (John 10:15–18).
  • 6:9; John 17:1–26; Acts 2:42).
  • 26:39–42 et al., Luke 23:34).
  • (v.4).

20ff).

Mary Magdalene is informed by Jesus that he would ascend to his Father (John 20:17; see also 16:10, 17, 28, and 14:1–3).

As a result, he does nothing else than what he observes his Father doing (John 5:19).

John 5:26–29 explains that just as the Father has life in himself, he has given the Son the ability to have life in himself and to exercise judgment.

There is no other way to the Father but through Jesus Christ.

He makes mention of the three of them sharing a house together.

The disciples’ prayer to the Father is to be offered up in the name of Jesus, according to the tradition (John 15:16).

11:25–27).

Mackintosh, is “the most crucial for Christology in the New Testament,” because it speaks of “the unqualified correlation of the Father and the Son,” as well as of “the unqualified correlation of the Father and the Son.” 4 Jesus the Son expresses gratitude to the Father for keeping “these things” hidden from the wise and exposing them instead to infants.

  1. Jesus, on the other hand, instantly asserts that he, the Son, possesses this same authority.
  2. In the same way that the Father discloses “these things” concerning the Son to anyone he pleases, the Son shows the Father – and “all things” that the Father has entrusted to him – to whomever he pleases as well.
  3. One knows the Son, and one knows the Father only because they are both the Son and the Father.
  4. While on the other hand, in passages such as Matthew 24:36, when Jesus claims he is unaware of the hour of hisparousia, which only the Father knows, he is alluding to the voluntary limits that come with his incarnation status.
  5. In the words of Bauckham, “Jesus is not suggesting that he and the Father are a single person, but that they are one God when they are together.” 5It differentiates him from the prophets and, according to Paul’s teachings, includes his participation in the qualities of the divine.
  6. ‘Jesus Christ’ is referred to in both sections as “God’s Son” (v.3a).
  7. Prior to the crucifixion, Jesus was in a state of frailty, taking on “the shape of a slave” (Phil.
  8. Now that he has risen from the dead, he has been exalted to the right hand of God the Father (Acts 2:33–36, Phil.

2:9–11, Eph. 1:19–23, Col. 1:18, Heb. 1:3–4) and reigns over the entire cosmos (Matt. 28:18), directing all things until all of his enemies submit (1Cor. 15:24–26), at which point death will be finally eliminated and he will hand There is a contrast between them, as well as an identity.

Jesus’ Equality and Identity with God

In the face of accusations of blasphemy by the Jewish authorities, Jesus declares his equality and identification with God. The indictment against him is that he attempted to make himself equal to God (John 5:16–47), and subsequently that he identified himself with God (John 10:25–39). His accusers have threatened him with the death sentence for blasphemy. In all instances, Jesus disputes the charge on the grounds that he is telling the truth, citing as evidence the plurality of witnesses necessary by Jewish law in support of his position.

  1. “Lord” (kurios) is the distinctive term that Paul gives to Jesus Christ, which is the same Greek word that is often used for YHWH (), the covenant name of God in the Old Testament.
  2. He makes no attempt to explain or justify it, instead mentioning it so unselfconsciously that, as Hurtado points out, it implies that it was common currency among the early Christians at the time of his writing.
  3. Hurtado reminds out that the Aramaic acclamation marana tha (Lord, come!) in 1 Corinthians 16:22, which means “Lord, come!” confirms this.
  4. Furthermore, the prayer’s origins are Palestinian, it is well known outside of its original context, and it is most likely pre-Pauline in nature.
  5. “Without explanation or justification, Paul refers to Christviakurios by the divine name (YHWH), implying that his audience were already aware with the phrase and its implications.” It is possible that in Romans 9:5, Paul refers to Jesus Christ as theos in an explicit manner (God).
  6. 1:8–9), which is consistent with the rest of the Bible.
  7. He is to be worshipped by all angels (Heb.
  8. “Because he is superior to the angels,” writes Bauckham, “he is included in the one God’s distinctive identity as a result of his superiority.” In this instance, Psalm 102, which is a reference to God as the creator of the cosmos, is attributed directly to Christ.
  9. Torrance, Christ is “not only some kind of locum tenens for God in his absence, or a type of ‘double’ for God in his absence, but the incarnate presence ofYahweh.” Additionally, Jesus’ resurrection reveals his divinity, with Christ’s deity becoming “the highest truth of the Gospel.

the core point of reference that is compatible with the entire sequence of events leading up to and beyond the crucifixion.” 12 The unbroken relationship between the Son and the Father is at the heart of the New Testament message.13

Jesus as Creator, Judge, and Savior

The deeds of Jesus Christ are credited to him because they are works that only God can perform. It is declared by John in John 1:1–18 that Jesus Christ is the everlasting Word, the creator of all things, the one who is with God and the one who is God. There isn’t a single thing that exists aside from that Word. This “in the beginning” Word is “with God,” is headed toward God, and is God. This is the Word who is “in the beginning.” This implies the concept of pre-existence. He is the only begotten Son of the Father (v.18).

  • The same may be said in Hebrews 1:1–4, for the Son created the universe and steers it toward his planned destiny.
  • Several events in the Gospels (Matt.
  • Psa.
  • 89:9, Psa.
  • Despite the fact that they are presented as indications of God’s kingdom, they really point to his sovereignty over the whole world as its monarch.
  • Matthew 25:31–46 describes Jesus as the Son of Man who would judge the nations with justice (cf.
  • 7:14).
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5:10).

146:3–6), and that only Yahweh can bring about relief.

1:21).

Beyond that, Jesus frees us from the bonds of sin and death.

3:20, 2Tim.

1:11) While it was historically popular to believe that New Testament teaching about Christ was solely functional, Bauckham argues that “Jesus’ participation in the unique divine sovereignty is not only an issue of what Jesus accomplishes, but also of who Jesus is in connection to God.” As a result, “it becomes unambiguously a question of viewing Jesus as inherent to the unique nature of God,” as the author puts it.

15

Worship of Jesus

There are a number of verses in the New Testament that express praise for Jesus Christ, suggesting that Christ is a worthy object of worship (John 1:1–18, Heb. 1:3f, Col. 1:15–20, Phil. 2:5–11, 2Tim. 2:11–13, 2Tim. 2:11–13). Because of the way Jesus is presented, it is necessary that hymns be written specifically for him. It is probable that the hymns in Revelation were based on an established tradition, given that they do not appear to require any additional explanation and are widely known in the Christian community.

  1. 16 Furthermore, there is no indication of opposition from the Jewish religious establishment.
  2. 2:9-11).
  3. 3:18, Rev.
  4. 9:5, 2Tim.
  5. Stephen, as he is being stoned to death (Acts 7:59–60), cries out to the Lord Jesus, his plea being in sync with Jesus’ own words (Luke 23:46).
  6. He alludes to a popular cry known as “Maranatha” (1Cor.
  7. 22:20; see also 1Thess.
  8. 3:11–12, 1Thess.
  9. The act of acknowledging Jesus Christ as askurios (Rom.
  10. 12:1–3; Phil.
  11. Rather than relying on individual episodes reported in the Gospels or specific declarations, we place our faith in Christ’s divinity on the entire coherent evangelical framework of historical divine revelation revealed in the New Testament Scriptures, as T.F.

Because it is only after we have indwelt it, meditated on it, tuned into it, penetrated inside of it, and absorbed it into ourselves that we will find the very foundations of our life and thought changing under the creative and saving impact of Christ, have been saved by Christ, and have been personally reconciled with God through Christ, that we will come to believe in him as Lord and God.

20 To this end, Torrance adds, we pray to Jesus as Lord, adore him, and sing praises to him as God in response to his sacrifice. It’s no surprise that Thomas, when presented with the extremely concrete evidence of Jesus’ resurrection, could respond with “My Lord and my God” in response (John 20:28).

The 7 “I AM” Statements of Jesus: OT Background & NT Meaning

The gospel of John was written with the following goal in mind: “they are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ” (John 20:31). The historical context for John’s book is as follows: “The framework for Jesus’ conception of his own mission is influenced by the Scriptures, as mediated by the Jews” (D. A. Carson). The following are John’s two questions for the reader to consider: 1) Who is Jesus? Secondly, what am I supposed to do with his words/teachings? I WORK AS OT Background: Exodus 3:1-20, with a specific emphasis on verses 13-18.

  1. 41:4 and 43:10-13.) John 6:20, 8:24, 28, 58, and 18:5 are examples of NT fulfillment.
  2. God exposes Himself to His people, and He sends His Son to redeem them from exile and guide them into a new way of living.
  3. He is the I Am, the everlasting, unchanging, self-existent one, infinite and wonderful in every way, and he is above and beyond all created things.
  4. He is the Almighty.
  5. Not a great teacher or a wonderful assistance to God, but the divine, eternal, pre-existent, infinite, and flawless Being Himself.
  6. Because he is the God of Moses, he is considered to be greater than Moses.
  7. The Jews were well aware that assuming this position entailed making such a claim, which is why they immediately began picking up stones to murder him (8:59).
  8. He is the God of Israel, and he is the God of all the nations.

1) I Am the Bread of Life

OT Background readings: Exodus 16:3; Deuteronomy 8:3; Psalm 78:23–25 NT John 6:22-59, with a specific emphasis on verses 28-35, is a book of fulfillment. Synopsis: A discourse between Jesus and Jews who had followed him because of his miracles—including the most recent feeding of the 5,000—but had failed to recognize the reality that lay beyond the surface (he is the Divine Messiah). It is more vital than simply providing them with physical food to satisfy their bodily hunger that Jesus gives himself as the Bread of Life to satisfy deeper longings and an everlasting desire.

It is not a food of this world, but rather a bread of paradise.

We require more than just physical bread, and we require it from a source other than our own bodies.

– With this Old Testament backdrop in mind, Jesus sets out to provide food for God’s people, and he claims to be the “bread of life.” He emphasizes that the bread in the desert of Exodus was only a temporary sustenance, and that it served as a type of genuine and eternal food from heaven that God would provide later on in the story.

This loaf of bread is presently in front of the Jews. In the manna, we see Jesus, who has been sent by God, who has come down from heaven, who must be received by faith, who must be eaten/fully ingested, and who provides life to those who receive it.

2) I Am the Light of the World

Background from the Old Testament: Exodus 13:17-22 (see also Ex. 14:19-20); Isaiah 42:6 and 49:6; (both verses are in the four Servant Songs of Isaiah). John 8:12-30 is the NT fulfillment of the prophecy. In addition, see John 1:4-5, 3:19-21, 9:5, and 12:35-36. Synopsis: One of the most significant motifs in John’s Gospel is the concept of light. In the midst of darkness, the world seems lost and helpless (John 1:4-14). The darkness has no effect on its current state. Light must be allowed to penetrate and infiltrate.

John draws light from a rich OT history and demonstrates how Jesus is the light of the world.

The same way that the Israelites were guided and saved from the Egyptians during the Exodus by a pillar of fire (light) when they crossed the Red Sea, Jesus claims that people who follow him (light) will enjoy eternal life with him.

In other passages, such as John 12:35-36, 46, this light has to do with the salvation of the nations, and it is most likely the primary reference in those verses.

3) I Am the door or gate4) I Am the Good Shepherd

Ezekiel 34 and Jeremiah 23 are examples of Old Testament texts that refer to gates as doors (cf. Isaiah 40:11; Numbers 27:15-18; Micah 5:4) NT John 10:1-18 are examples of fulfillment. Synopsis: In John 10:1-18, Jesus combines two of the I Am statements into a single statement. He asserts that he is both the door through which the sheep enter and the Shepherd who knows the sheep and is willing to lay down his life in their defense. Unlike shepherding imagery, the metaphor of a door does not have a rich OT history to draw on.

  • In addition to being the one who gathers the sheep and cares for them (shepherd), he is also the conduit through which they enter and are kept safe (door).
  • A rebuke against them was (in part) delivered through the claims of being a good shepherd and Israel’s true shepherd.
  • They should have placed the needs of the people ahead of their own.
  • The Pharisees, on the other hand, are like the bad shepherds in Ezekiel 34 and Jeremiah 23, leading their flocks astray with false doctrine, prioritizing themselves above the flocks, and abusing the flocks.
  • 34:11-16, 22-24; Jer.
  • Jesus does not come to add to our burdens, but rather to relieve us of them and carry them himself.
  • Jesus does not come to devour the sheep, but rather to protect them.

Specifically, Jesus comes to seek out and rescue the sheep, as well as to heal and feed them. He will do so because he adores the sheep and believes they are his property. This is demonstrated and accomplished by his willingness to lay down his life for his sheep.

5) I Am the resurrection, and the life

Background from the Old Testament: Genesis 1-3; Isaiah 53:10 NT John 11:17-27 are examples of fulfillment. Synopsis: He does not merely talk about what he can accomplish or provide; rather, He talks about who He is, in the same way that past I Am declarations have done. He does not only offer bread (like Moses did), but he himself is the bread. He is not only a reflector of light; he is the light itself. In the same way, Jesus declares in John 11 that he is the resurrection and the life. Even though the OT context is less obvious here than in other remarks, the majority of commentators believe Genesis 1-3 is partially in mind.

  1. The first Adam, on the other hand, chose sin, which resulted in the death of humanity and the destruction of the entire world.
  2. 5:12-21; 1 Cor.
  3. The death and decay brought about by Adam are replaced by the life and restoration provided by Jesus.
  4. While many of the Jews desired goods from Jesus without first coming to trust in and embrace him, the offer of Jesus is just himself and his sacrifice.
  5. These are unmerited and merciful gifts that can only be received through and through the person of Jesus.
  6. He is the second Adam, giving resurrection and life when the previous Adam only provided us death.

6) I Am the way, the truth, and the life

Background from the Old Testament: Exodus 26:33; Leviticus 16NT John 14:6 has been fulfilled. Synopsis: It’s possible that Jesus is using this passage to contrast himself with the numerous different methods that God established for the Jews to approach and relate to him in the Old Testament. God could only be reached through transitory “routes” such as the sacrifices, the temple, the curtain, the tabernacle, and other forms of devotion. As the New Testament makes clear, these things did not, in and of themselves, purify or make individuals acceptable to God, but they did provide a means by which God’s people may walk in faith and follow in His footsteps (see Hebrews 8-9).

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He is the only one who can lead us to the Father, but he is also the only one who can lead us to the entire revelation of the Father at the same time (truth).

Jesus is the only route and the only road to follow.

All of them pointed to him and accomplished limited things (such as making people ceremonially pure but not actually clean), and he is now here and able to complete salvation and redemption in their entirety.

7) I Am the true vine

OT Background: Two vineyard hymns are found in Isaiah 5:1-7 (the desolate vineyard) and Isaiah 27:2-6 (the bountiful vineyard) (the fruitful vineyard). NT Fulfillment: John 15:1-6 is a passage from the Gospel of John. Synopsis: In this last I Am declaration, Jesus refers to a vine, which is a typical Old Testament emblem for Israel (God’s people). However, Jesus states that the people of God now have life and fruit because they are in him, as described in Isaiah 27:2-6, but the terminology of the unfruitful branches is related to Israel as the barren vineyard in Isaiah 5.

The only one who can fulfill Israel’s purpose (since Israel has never been able to do so) and who can provide authentic, flourishing, and productive existence for God’s people is Jesus Christ.

The Deity of Jesus

In a number of occasions, the Bible explicitly asserts that Jesus is the Son of God. 1As a standalone piece of proof, these words give sufficient justification for the church to believe in and preach the divinity of Jesus Christ. The indirect evidence provided by Scripture, on the other hand, is as convincing. The names of God are frequently used to refer to Jesus. He is referred to as “the Mighty God, the Everlasting Father,” and “Immanuel” (God with us) (meaning “God with us”). 2Jesus is referred to as “The Lord (Jehovah) our Righteousness,” “God,” and “Son of God” in other passages.

  1. He is portrayed as being everlasting, omnipresent, omniscient, omnipotent, and unchangeable, among other characteristics.
  2. He is revered as if he were God.
  3. 6Christ accomplished things that only God is capable of accomplishing.
  4. 7He is the upholder of all things in the universe.
  5. 9He will bring the dead back to life and carry out justice.
  6. He instructed His disciples on how to pray in His honor.

Twelve years ago, he claimed that knowing Him was the same as knowing God, seeing Him was the same as seeing God, receiving Him was the same as receiving God, believing Him was the same as believing in God, and honoring Him was the same as honoring the Almighty; however, hating Him was the same as hating the Almighty.

  1. 2:6; Romans 9:5; Phil.
  2. 2:6; Titus 2:13, Hebrews 1:8; 1 John 5:20 John 13:3, 17:5, Colossians 1:15–19, 1 Timothy 3:16, and Hebrews 1:32 are some of the other texts to consider.
  3. Jeremiah 23:6, Isaiah 40:3, Hebrews 1:8, 1 Timothy 3:16, and John 10:364 are all references to the Bible.
  4. also Exodus 34:14 and Hebrews 1:6.
  5. Acts 2:38, 2 Corinthians 13:14, and 1 Corinthians 1:3, as well as Ephesians 1:17, cf.
  6. See also Colossians 1:17 and Hebrews 1:3; also Luke 10:22, John 3:35, 17:2, and Ephesians 1:229.

John 5:25, 28–29; 6:39–40, 54; John 5:2211John 16:23, 2412John 10:30, 36, and 14:9; John 17:1113 John 8:18, John 14:7, John 12:45, John 14:9, Mark 9:37, John 12:44, John 14:1, John 5:23, John 15:23; John 15:23

“The Humanity and Divinity of Jesus”

Originally prepared at the beginning of Davis’s course Christian Theology for Today’s second term, this article demonstrates King’s growing disillusionment with conservative Baptist theology that he absorbed as a boy. In the same way that he had done in his earlier outline of William Newton Clarke’sAn Outline of Christian Theology, King dismisses the notion that Jesus possesses inherent divinity and concludes, “The true significance of the divinity of Christ lies in the fact that his achievement is prophetic and promissory for every other true son of man who is willing to submit his will to the will and spirit of God.” By presenting Jesus as a human being, King opens the door to the prospect of gradual development in earthly civilization as a result of individual effort.

Davis made the following observation on the essay: “You should proofread your papers before sending them in.” Take note of the revisions on page 4.” The essay was still given a B +, with the professor hailing the paper as presenting “a solution that would appeal to the liberal mind.” A question was posed by a young Jewish leader to his followers many years ago that seemed almost unbelievable at the time.

  1. He’d been putting in a lot of time and effort with them.
  2. However, one day he brought the subject up closer to home.
  3. Who do you think I am, exactly?
  4. 1 Numerous people have sought to provide an answer to this issue by giving to Jesus complete divinity while showing little regard for his humanity.
  5. Others have sought to answer the question by viewing Jesus as both completely human and fully divine at the same time.
  6. Modern Christian thought is unequivocal in its presentation of Jesus’ entire humanity when confronted with the topic of his person, but Christians have not been content to stop there in their deliberations.
  7. Having reached this stage, we may proceed to a more in-depth consideration of Jesus’ humanity and divinity.

3 All docetist, Eutychean, and Monophysite fallacies that attempted to explain away our Lord’s humanity have now been discarded by all serious theological thinking.

All we have to do is read the Gospels to see that Jesus was truly human in every way.

He became hungry, just like the rest of us.

When he became exhausted, he need rest and sleep.

When his followers became disloyal to him, it was a very painful experience for him.

In the garden, he went through the same suffering that any other person would go through in the same position.

5 Take note of how the anonymous author of the Epistle to the Hebrews refers to Jesus’ humanity throughout his writing.

His agony is shown in prayer (5:7), and we see him embracing the Cross with gladness and trust (12:2).

He was enticed in the same way that every other man was.

There is no other place in the New Testament where we may find such a direct focus on Jesus’ humanity as we do here.

R.

6Once again, it should be noted that Jesus was by no means omnipotent.

As early as 1912, the distinguished theologian H.

Mackintosh asserted that this was indeed the case.

Not only is it mentioned that Jesus asked questions in order to obtain information—for example, about the location of Lazarus’ tomb, the quantity of loaves, or the name of the crazy Gadarene—but there is also a clear admission of ignorance at one point.

‘Not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, nor the Father, but only the Father knows.’ If Jesus could be so ignorant of a matter that was in some way relevant to his redeeming mission, it is inevitable to conclude that His understanding of secular concerns was limited to the knowledge of His time.” On page 397 of the same book, it says: Again, we can see the human nature of our Lord’s moral and religious life in his teachings and actions.

  1. His religious experience took place in the domain of the human.
  2. “Our Lord’s life on earth was a life of faith, and His victory was a victory won through faith,” as Dr.
  3. His temptations were genuine temptations, and He found it difficult and agonizing to overcome them.” God was in Christ, p.
  4. M.
  5. Jesus conquered his temptations not by relying on an inherent supernatural component, but rather by being true to his own will throughout the process.
  6. Jesus’ Divinity is a subject of debate.
  7. To consider Jesus to be a “mere” decent guy in the same way that all previous prophets were is insufficient to understand him.

However, they alone do not provide a solution to one important question: what makes him different from everyone else in the same situation?

It is possible that these will explain why Jesus was a certain sort of Jew, but they will not explain why some other Jews were not Jesus.

The distinctiveness of Jesus’ spiritual existence has led Christians to consider him not just as a human person, but also as a human being who has been enveloped by the presence of divine.

“The fact that God was in Christ is at the very heart of the Christian faith,” Dr.

The ever-repeating antinomy of the world is given in a living representation in this holy human person—the antinomy of the eternal in the temporal, of the infinite in the finite, and of the divine in the human.” Page 9 of W.

Brown’s book How to Think of Christ.

His divinity, according to the more orthodox Christians, was an inherent attribute that had been metaphysically conferred.

He is the manifestation of the word made flesh.

He is the very God of the very Gods, of one substance with the Father, who, for our salvation, came down from Heaven and took on the form of the Holy Ghost in the person of the Virgin Mary, who is the Son of God.

The merging of the human and divine in a metaphysical incarnation is not something that most of us are willing to accept.

We must have a Christology if we are to remain within the bounds of the Christian faith itself.

Baille that we cannot have a sound theology without first having a proper Christology.

In Christ’s filial consciousness and his one-on-one dependence on God, rather than in his substantive union with God, we might discover the divinity of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Yes, it was the warmth of his love to God and the intimacy of his confidence in God that accounted for his status as the highest revelation of the will of the Father.

It is the accomplishment of a man who, to the best of our knowledge, has entirely surrendered his life to the power of the heavenly spirit.

In fact, asserting that the Christ, whose example of living we are expected to emulate, is divine in an ontological sense is harmful and detrimental.

Consequently, the orthodox position of Christ’s divinity is, in my opinion, simply disproved by the evidence.

Christ was to be simply the prototype of one of many brothers who would follow in his footsteps.

This divine character or this union with God was not something that was imposed upon Jesus from on high; rather, it was something that was achieved via a process of moral struggle and self-abnegation on Jesus’ part.

D.

Baille, God was in Christ, published by Scribner’s in 1948.

Brown, William A., “How to Think of Christ,” Scribner’s New York, 1945.

George Hedley’s The Symbol of the Faith, published by Macmillan in 1948.

R.

The following is taken from William Adams Brown’s How to Think of Christ (New York: Scribner, 1948), p.

The questions he was asking them were about what his contemporaries were saying about him, and they had given him a variety of responses.

It’s all very well to tell me what other people think of me, but it’s not really helpful.

It has been that way ever since.

King’s bibliography includes a reference to Baillie’s God Was in Christ (New York: Scribner, 1948).

6–7: “If there is one thing about which Christians have always been confident, it is that Jesus is real man, bone of our bone, flesh of our flesh, tempted in every way that we are.” According to Bailie, God Was in Christ, p.

He was starving, just like the rest of us.

When he became exhausted, he need rest and sleep.

He was a lifelong learner who didn’t just learn from books.

By the disciples’ lack of trust, he was deeply wounded in the heart.

He was moved to tears by the blindness of the city he wished to see restored.

On the Cross, Jesus added to the misery of all the bodily tortures the agony of feeling abandoned by God.” 6.H.

Mackintosh, The Doctrine of the Person of Jesus Christ (Edinburgh: T.T.

79: “The Doctrine of the Person of Jesus Christ” (Edinburgh: T.T.

“Nowhere else in the New Testament is the humanity of Christ demonstrated in such a striking manner.

He was born into the tribe of Judah and went through the usual growth of human life, learning obedience, despite the fact that He was a Son, via the things that He endured (5:8).

“His human virtues are emphasized in a straightforward manner that is unprecedented in the New Testament.” 7.Baillie, God Was in Christ, p.

147: “God was in Christ, and Christ was God.” His constancy of will enabled him to defeat them in the same way that every other man who does so has overcome temptation.” 8.Davis underlined the phrase “surrounded by divinity,” and he wondered aloud, “Was not divinity ‘inside’ him?” 9.Baillie, God Was in Christ, pp.

42–43.

247 in this book).

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