Where Did Jesus Go After Resurrection

Where was Jesus for the three days between His death and resurrection?

QuestionAnswer On the cross, after saying, “It is done,” Jesus bent his head and surrendered his spirit, according to the Bible (John 19:30). When Jesus died on the crucifixion, his corpse stayed there until it was brought down and laid in a neighboring tomb (John 19:40–42). His spirit, on the other hand, was somewhere else. Thirty-two hours later, He was raised from the dead by the reunification of his body and spirit (John 20). There has been some debate concerning where Jesus was during the three days between His death and resurrection—that is, where His spirit was during that time period.

During Jesus’ entry into His kingdom, the believing thief requests to be remembered, and Jesus responds, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise” (Luke 23:42).

As a result, upon His death, Jesus was taken to the region of blessing where God resides—heaven.

Another text is frequently cited in the debate of where Jesus was during the three days that elapsed between His death and His resurrection.

  • (ESV).
  • According to this understanding, the spirits Jesus addressed may have been either demonic or human in nature, but not both.
  • Peter does not tell us what Jesus said to the spirits that were imprisoned, but it could not have been a message of redemption since angels cannot be rescued, as we know from the Bible (Hebrews 2:16).
  • However, there is another reading of the text from 1 Peter.
  • The fact that Jesus had “in spirit” taught to the people of Noah’s day while they were still alive on earth is provided by Peter as a footnote to the passage.
  • The wordnow in 1 Peter 3:19 is included for clarity in the Amplified Bible and the New American Standard Bibles of 1977 and 1995, and it contrasts with the words “long ago” (NIV) and “formerly” (ESV) in 1 Peter 3:20.

The Amplified Bible and the New American Standard Bibles of 1977 and 1995 include the wordnow in 1 To further understand, consider the following paraphrase of 1 Peter 3:18–20: When Jesus died in the flesh, He was raised to life in the Spirit (it was by means of this same Spirit that Jesus preached to those who are currently imprisoned—those souls who rebelled during the period of God’s great patience when Noah was constructing the ark).

The prophet Noah was used by Jesus to teach spiritually to the people of Noah’s day, according to this viewpoint.

Another verse, Ephesians 4:8–10, is cited in the explanation of Jesus’ actions during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection.

According to the English Standard Version, Christ “led a multitude of prisoners.” Some believe that phrase alludes to an occurrence that is not mentioned anywhere else in the Bible, namely, that Jesus gathered all of the saved who were in paradise and transported them to their eternal home in heaven.

Another interpretation of Ephesians 4 is that the phrase “ascended up high” is a direct allusion to Jesus’ ascension.

In His triumph, Jesus had beaten and captured our spiritual adversaries, including the devil, death, and the curse of sin, and He had taken them captive.

The only thing we can be certain of is that, according to Jesus’ own words on the cross, He was taken up to be with the Father in paradise.

As well as this, we may confidently state that because His work of salvation was completed, Jesus did not have to suffer in hell. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What happened to Jesus during the three days that elapsed between His death and resurrection?

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Did Jesus go to hell between His death and resurrection?

QuestionAnswer Currently, there is a considerable degree of uncertainty around this subject. According to the Apostles’ Creed, which states, “He descended into hell,” the concept that Jesus went to hell after His death on the cross is primarily derived from this verse. The Bible contains several passages in which Jesus is described as going to “hell,” depending on how the passages are translated. Prior to delving into this topic, it is critical to grasp what the Bible has to say regarding the realm of the dead.

  1. Sheol/hades, according to other passages in the New Testament, is a temporary place where souls are kept while they await the final resurrection and judgment.
  2. The lake of fire serves as a permanent and ultimate repository for the souls of the dead.
  3. Many people refer to both hades and the lake of fire as “hell,” which can lead to a lot of misunderstanding.
  4. As described in Matthew 11:23–18, Luke 10:15–16:23, and Acts 2:27–31, sheol/hades was a realm divided into two divisions—a place of blessing and a place of judgment.
  5. The abodes of the saved and the abodes of the lost are separated by a “great chasm” (or chasm in Hebrew) (Luke 16:26).
  6. The side of sheol/hades that deals with judgment has remained unchanged.
  7. Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell?
  8. Some of the misunderstanding has arisen from passages such as Psalm 16:10–11, which is translated as follows in the King James Version: “For thou wilt not abandon my soul to the depths of hell; nor wilt thou allow thine Holy One to be corrupted.
  9. The term “the grave” or “sheol” would be a more accurate translation.

Unfortunately, in many versions of the Bible, translators are not consistent, or correct, in how they translate the Hebrew and Greek words for “sheol,” “hades,” and “hell.” Some have the viewpoint that Jesus went to “hell” or the suffering side of sheol/hades in order to further be punished for our sins.

  1. It was the death of Jesus on the cross that sufficiently provided for our redemption.
  2. As He hung there on the cross, He took the sin burden of the whole human race upon Himself.
  3. (2 Corinthians 5:21).
  4. As Jesus neared death, He said, “ It is finished ” (John 19:30).
  5. His suffering in our place was completed.
  6. Jesus did not go to “hell” or the suffering side of hades; He went to “Abraham’s side” or the blessed side of hades.
  7. The payment for sin was paid.

He then awaited the resurrection of His body and His return to glory in His ascension. Did Jesus go to hell? No. Is it true that Jesus died and went to sheol/hell? Yes. Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) Did Jesus go to hell between His death and resurrection?

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What Happened After the Resurrection?

In his previous position, Andy served as the senior manager of content at Bible Gateway. Currently, he is employed at Calvin College. Christians all across the world have been devoting a significant amount of time to contemplating the Gospel stories of Jesus’ death and resurrection during the last several weeks (and here at the Bible Gateway blog, wespent plenty of time discussing themtoo). During the week leading up to Easter, we read the well-known tales of the Triumphal Entry, the Last Supper, and the Crucifixion.

Right?

While the Gospels of Matthew and Mark finish immediately after the Resurrection, the Gospels of Luke and John contain further information regarding what Jesus accomplished between his resurrection and his ascension into heaven during that period.

Jesus’ Appearances After the Resurrection

Both Luke and John provide extensive descriptions of Jesus’ post-Resurrection appearances to his disciples. (I’ll also address these in a quick manner.) There are several minor nuances in Jesus’ appearances before “doubting Thomas” and the other disciples (in both John and Luke), all of which are widely known. For example, Jesus appeared “when the disciples were gathered, with the doors shut for fear of the Jewish leaders”—a simple line, but one that conveys the panic and disorientation that must have engulfed the disciples in the hours and days following Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection.

  • What would you do if you were in this situation?
  • In the midst of intriguing but confusing stories of the empty tomb still circulating, Jesus comes in disguise to a pair of his disciples.
  • During their conversation on the trip, they questioned each other, “Didn’t our hearts burn inside us as he talked with us and opened the Scriptures to us?” The Gospel of John contains a few of more remarkable tales.
  • Peter’s re-instatement is the subject of a touching narrative that follows shortly after.

During his master’s trial, Peter, who had previously denied knowing Jesus three times, is interrogated by Jesus. three more times. The famous command to “Feed my sheep” is given to Peter during this interrogation by Jesus.

Jesus Gives the Great Commission

Jesus’ instructions to his disciples to go into the world and share the good news of salvation are found at the end of both Matthew and Mark’s accounts:Then Jesus appeared to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” As a result, go and make disciples of all countries, baptizing them in the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, and instructing them to follow everything I have instructed you to do in the first place.

  1. And without a doubt, I will be with you constantly, till the end of the era.” (Matthew 28:18-20, New International Version) It has been a long time since this text served as the foundation for Christian emphasis on spreading the Gospel across the world via evangelism and missionary activity.
  2. He is “taken up into heaven,” as Mark puts it.
  3. Nevertheless, the snippets we do learn about the days after Jesus’ resurrection not only satisfy some of our curiosity about how his supporters reacted to his resurrection, but they also provide us with the evangelistic orientation that continues to guide Christ-believers to this day.
  4. For the first 30 days, it’s completely free!

What Happened after the Cross and before the Resurrection?

This is a thought-provoking and significant question. Those associated with the so-called “Faith Movement” have a version of this that is wholly incompatible with biblical teaching. “Do you believe that the punishment for our sin was to die on the cross?” Frederick K.C. Price, a key instructor in the “Faith Movement,” has asked. If it were the case, the two robbers would have been forced to pay your debt. No, the penalty was to be sent into Hell itself, where they would spend the rest of their lives alienated from God.

  1. 2).
  2. This is not in accordance with what the Bible says.
  3. The work Jesus had to accomplish after the crucifixion and before the Resurrection was critical and must not be overlooked.
  4. In the same way, He who descended is also the One who climbed far above all the heavens, in order that He may fill all things.” (See also Ephesians 4:8–10).
  5. The fact that Jesus used a real person name indicates that this was not a parable.
  6. The narrative tells about a place named Hades, which served as both a haven and a source of misery for the characters.
  7. If the individual was a believer, he was taken to Abraham’s bosom, where he found consolation and rest (Hebrews 11:13).
  8. Immediately after His death, Jesus descended into Hades, into Abraham’s bosom, the realm of consolation, where He announced liberation to all who had died in faith.
  9. No matter how long it takes, the unbeliever will be thrown into Hell, where he or she will be punished until the Great White Throne Judgment depicted in Revelation 20:13–15 takes place.

Afterwards, Death and Hades were thrown into the Lake of Fire for all eternity. This is the second death in the series. In addition, anybody who was not found to be recorded in the Book of Life was thrown into the Lake of Fire.”

Does the Bible Tell Us Where Jesus Was the Three Days Between His Death and Resurrection?

When Jesus died, did He immediately ascend to the throne of glory? Is it possible that He descended into hell in order to rescue people who have been imprisoned by sin? Was He in a condition of limbo, purgatory, or hell at the time of his death? We know that Jesus died, was buried, and was risen on the third day, but where was He during the time between His death, burial, and resurrection, and where did He go after His resurrection?

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Where Did Jesus Go After His Death on the Cross?

In 1 Peter 3:18-20, the Apostle Peter refers to Jesus going to preach to people who are “imprisoned spirits,” and says, “Jesus will preach to them who are imprisoned spirits.” ” For Christ also died for sins once and for all, the just for the unjust, in order that He might reconcile us to God, having been put to death in the flesh but raised to life in the spirit; in which He also went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who once were disobedient, when the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight persons, were brought safely through the water, when ” The fact that Jesus was put to death “in the flesh yet raised to life in the spirit” indicates that death was unable to grasp Him.

  • He was sinless, since death is the penalty of sin (Rom 6:23), but because Jesus had never sinned, his soul was able to remain alive even while He suffered death “in the flesh” (1 Peter 3:18).
  • The death has no power over spotless flesh, and it is for this reason that those who are Christ’s will be resurrected to eternal life, for His righteousness is credited to those who place their faith in Him.
  • Was this the proclamation of the gospel, or something else?
  • Is it possible that Jesus performed this while His body was in the grave?

Some believe that Jesus preached (proclaimed) the gospel to those who died in the flood who had never heard the gospel before, and that those who died in the flood could now hear it because Jesus had not yet died to save them, and that those who died in the flood could now hear it because Jesus had not yet died to save them.

  • It does not state whether or not they will be given another chance after death.
  • Those who believe that Jesus went to those elderly saints of the Old Testament who were in Paradise but were not yet in heaven because Jesus had not yet completed atonement for their sins are known as apocalyptic theologians.
  • Jesus did not declare, “Today you will be with me in heaven,” as others have claimed.
  • What exactly is Peter referring to in these verses?

In Hebrews 11, the so-calledHall of Faith, it does not appear that the Old Testament believers need a proclamation from Jesus because they are all stated as being assured in God’s redeeming purpose, suggesting that they did not require such a message.

Jesus’ Proclamation to the Demons

When Jesus was imprisoned, it is stated that he issued a message to “the spirits currently in prison.” Because people are never referred to as “spirits” in the Bible, it appears that this is a reference to demon spirits who are imprisoned in the abyss, and that these demons are fallen angels who were imprisoned in the abyss because of their horrible evil. It’s something like this that is included in the study notes of John MacArthur’s Study Bible (ESV) (p 1894). In Jude 6-7, it reads, “And the angels who did not maintain their places of power, but instead abandoned their appropriate dwelling—these he has confined in darkness, shackled with eternal chains, ready to be judged on the great Day.” In a similar vein, the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, as well as their neighboring villages, surrendered to sexual immorality and depravity.

“For if God did not spare angels who sinned, but sent them to hell and bound them in chains of darkness to be held for judgment; if God did not spare the ancient world when he brought the flood on its ungodly people, but protected Noah, a preacher of righteousness, and seven others,” the apostle Peter writes.

It is written that they are bound with “everlasting chains for judgment on the great Day” (Jude 6) and that this proclamation “to the spirits now in prison” was where Jesus was believed to have been for at least a portion of the time between the day of His crucifixion and death and the day of His resurrection.

Therefore, it is not surprising that the Apostles’ Creed includes a statement that Jesus fell into hell as part of their Creed.

The possibility exists that Jesus went into heaven following this and remained there until His resurrection on the third day.

Jesus Descends into Hell

After all, according to Second Peter 2:4, God did not spare angels when they sinned but consigned them to pit, where they were bound in chains of darkness until they were brought to justice. In verse 4, Peter purposefully employs the Greek word for hell, Tartarus, which is a region deeper than Hades and destined for the most vile and terrible of all human beings, gods, and demons according to Greek mythology. According to MacArthur’s Study Bible, page 1905, Peter was underlining that this was the worst location in all of God’s creation in terms of eternal misery and pain.

The demons that were present then, and who must unavoidably be present today, had to have been the most vile of all fallen angels, if not all of them.

Instead, Jesus let them to be tossed into the swine herd.

He went to hell in spirit to declare His victory over evil and the fact that He had conquered the tomb as well.

Numerous Bible academics and theologians think that these bound demons will be freed during the Great Tribulation, which is described in Revelation 9, despite the fact that we know that there are many demons now wandering the planet under the control of Satan (Rev 12:7-9).

The Abyss Opens Up in Great Tribulation

A portal has been opened in the abyss indicated in Luke 8:31 and Matthew 8:29 to allow the most vile and destructive of these fallen angels (the worst of the demons) to punish those who had failed to repent before the Great Tribulations began. By this time, the church had closed its doors. The following passages from Revelation 9:1-3, 10-11 speak about these evil spirits: “The fifth angel blew his trumpet, and I saw a star that had fallen from the sky to the earth.” The star was given the key to the Abyss’s shaft, which he used to enter.

The smoke from the Abyss had cast a shadow across the sun and the sky.

They had stingers on their tails, just like scorpions, and they had the capacity to torture individuals for five months because of the power in their tails.

These now imprisoned wicked spirits (demons) are awaiting their final judgment and are well aware that they will ultimately be cast into the lake of fire along with Satan (Revelation 20:10), so they will be filled with rage when they are released because they despise humans and will therefore lash out at them.

Hell Was Not Made for Humans

Throughout the Bible, Jesus makes it plain that hell was not designed to be a place for humans to live. In Matthew 25:41b, Jesus declares that “the eternal fire reserved for the devil and his angels” is a reference to the afterlife. No one is obligated to go to hell. They have a choice in the matter. God never sends someone to hell; rather, it is the sinner who sends himself to hell by rejecting God’s One and Only Son (John 3:18). Jesus died on the cross for those who would put their confidence in Him, and He pledges to free them from the lake of fire if they do (John 3:16).

You are not being forced to travel there; rather, you have chosen to go there on your own.

That is my prayer for you because, if He returns in the Second Advent before you are saved, I despise the thought of your everlasting destiny and the fate you will have for all of eternity if you are not saved.

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Did Jesus Go to Hell Between His Death and Resurrection?

We know from Jesus’ response to the thief that when someone dies, they are instantly brought into the presence of the Father. Luke 23:42 states: “Truly I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise,” referring to the moment of death. This remark also informs us that Jesus died and was resurrected by His Father. Beyond that, we know virtually nothing about Jesus’ whereabouts over those three days. It’s important not to read too much into a parable or narrative, as this might lead to confusion.

Did Jesus Go to Hell? Bible Verses for this Theory

1 Peter 3:18-20 is the scripture of Scripture most frequently cited by people who believe in the existence of hell. “Because Christ also died for sins once and for all, the just for the unjust, in order that He might bring us to God, having been put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit; in which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison, who once were disobedient, when the patience of God waited in the days of Noah, during the construction of the ark, in which a few, namely, eight persons, were brought safely through the water.” “In which also He went and made proclamation to the spirits now in prison,” they say, referring to the verses in question.

  1. According to legend, Jesus descended into Hell and preached to the souls of the damned.
  2. There is no indication in the Bible that a lost soul who has died receives a second opportunity at redemption.
  3. However, there is another reading of this verse that is more logical.
  4. You may have daily words of encouragement emailed to your inbox.
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Interpreting the Scripture

Jesus was crucified in the body, yet he was raised to life by the Holy Spirit after his death. The term “brought alive” is a passive verb, which means that someone other than Jesus was responsible for bringing Jesus back to life. Either Jesus was brought back to life by the Spirit, or He was brought back to life by His spirit. In either case, the Spirit had to have played a role. The chapter then goes on to tell us who these souls in prison are: they are those who did not listen to Noah (who was preaching repentance to the world in the power of the Holy Spirit under the direction of God at the time of his imprisonment).

However, just eight persons heeded the warning and were saved—”brought safely through the floodwaters” The term “jail” is used in a metaphorical sense.

Furthermore, a wide gap has been established between us and you, in order that anyone who seek to pass over from here into you will not be able to do so, and that none who wish to cross over from there will be able to do so.” Jesus did not go to hell for those three days, according to the Bible, which is not mentioned anywhere else.

Most people believe Jesus’ physical body stayed in the tomb, just as ours will remain in the grave once we die.

The distinction is that God did not allow Jesus’ body to degrade like other people’s bodies did.

Other Bible Verses and Sources Used to Support the Hell Theory

Other Bible scriptures, such as Romans 10:6-7, Ephesians 4:8-9, and Acts 2:27, that have been cited to support the belief that Jesus went to hell between his crucifixion and resurrection have also caused confusion. However, as discussed in this ZondervanAcademic.com article, these verses are frequently taken out of context and given meaning that is not intended by the author. The Apostle’s Creed was later amended to include the phrase “and he fell into hell.” Did Jesus Descend into Hell Before He Was Resurrected?, a film by Garrett Kell, explored this question.

Why Did Jesus Return to Earth After Resurrecting?

One of the reasons Jesus remained on earth for 40 days after His resurrection rather than immediately going into heaven was to show to His disciples that He was, in fact, still alive. After all, they were well aware that Jesus had been executed by the Roman authorities and that His body had been removed from the cross and placed in a burial tomb. And when that happened, they were overwhelmed with sorrow and anxiety, and many of them even went into hiding to avoid being discovered. They had been under the impression that Jesus was the anticipated Messiah—and now their expectations had been dashed.

However, when Jesus came among them following the resurrection, their lives were forever altered.

The Lord appeared to several groups of disciples over those 40 days, demonstrating to them beyond any reasonable question that he had been risen from the grave by the power of God.

Another reason, however, for Jesus’s continued presence on earth was to instruct and equip His followers for the mission of teaching the rest of the world about Him and His message.

Jesus left His followers with an assignment: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19).Wondering if that command is still relevant?

According to some, Ephesians 4:7-10 teaches that Jesus descended to hell or Hades in order to free the people who were imprisoned there and bring them to heaven or into God’s presence. The belief is that, prior to His death, all Old Testament Christians were in Abraham’s bosom, which is considered to be the paradise portion of the underworld. Hades, also known as Sheol, was traditionally thought to be a place of the dead divided into three areas or compartments: (1) the abyss or tartarus, which was thought to be the place of confinement for demons who sinned during the days of Noah; (2) torments, which was thought to be the place of suffering for all unbelievers until the time of the resurrection of the unjust and the Great White Throne Judgment when they will be cast eternal The fact that Christ had not yet died to atone for their sin meant that they were not yet able to enter God’s presence without passing through a mediator.

  1. After His death, however, the barrier was broken through, and He was able to bring them out of jail and into God’s presence once more.
  2. Instead of the Old Testament believers who were imprisoned in Paradise, Jesus’ captives were those whom He conquered via His death and resurrection.
  3. 2:14-15).
  4. There is some speculation that this text refers to a triumphant declaration that He made while His body was in the tomb, however Bible students and academics are divided on the subject.
  5. Remember that Elijah was brought up into the presence of the Lord.
  6. Please keep in mind that Sheol or Hades is a reference to a region of the dead, and the specific state and location (heaven or hell) depends on whether or not the passage is talking to believers or unbelievers.

In certain cases, depending on the context, it simply refers to the graveyard. Topics that are related to this include: resurrection, hell, and heaven.

Everyday Religion: Following the path of Jesus after the Resurrection

Other people’s perceptions were significant. The name “Rabboni” (teacher) was given to him by Mary Magdalene when she recognized him, as part of his mission to educate the people. A teaching event was described in John 21:1-25, and the episode at the Sea of Galilee was an example of such a teaching event. A stranger arrived and instructed them to “cast the net on the right side of the boat,” as Peter, Thomas, and two other disciples were out fishing. They heeded his advise, and the net soon became suffocating from the weight of the fish.” Jesus taught them to fish and fed them so that they would be able to teach others how to feed his sheep in the future.

The gospel of John states in verse 25 that “Jesus accomplished many other things as well.” It’s possible that even the entire earth would not have enough space for all of the books that would be written if every single one of them were recorded.” As recounted in Mark 16:19, Jesus left our planet after 40 days of ministry.

  • Following Jesus’ ascension, the disciples were confronted with a slew of obstacles and concerns concerning their roles and obligations.
  • Christians today are confronted with difficulties and, like the disciples, they ask the same question: “What do we do now?” His life, activities, and words continue to be instructional to us all today.
  • Even when he was abused, he maintained his peaceful demeanor.
  • He was able to heal the ill and the lame.
  • He reprimanded the money changers in front of the crowd.
  • His message is unambiguous: Proclaim the faith in both words and deeds.

Theology Thursday: Where Did Jesus Go When He Died?

Dr. Valerie J. De La Torre contributed to this article. When it comes to Jesus Christ, who is the second member in the Trinity, the second article of the Apostles’ Creed is a broader grouping of assertions that are centered on him. This section reveals Christ’s birth, suffering, death, burial, resurrection, and ascension, as well as his predicted return to judge all of mankind (Matthew 25:31-46). In order to understand the short word that proclaims that Jesus “descended into hell,” we must first understand what it means.

We discover early references to Christ experiencing human mortality, whether viewed literally or symbolically, which makes it a fascinating factor to consider (Acts. 2:27-31; Romans 10:7; Colossians 1:18; I Peter 3:19, 4:6; Ephesians 4:9). So, what exactly happened to Jesus when he passed away?

Did Jesus Go to Hell?

The area referred to as “hell” in this creedal declaration was formerly referred to in the Bible asGehenna, which means “the land of the dead” in Greek. It is seen as a region of perpetual torment for individuals who are rejected at the final judgment. The Hebrew name Sheol is used to describe the location in the Old Testament, and it alludes to the grave — a place far removed from God’s presence where the virtuous and the wicked both stay — in the Old Testament. As a result, the issue must be raised as to whether this is the location where Jesus was taken after his death.

  • According to a subsequent interpretation, this site of descent represents Christ’s victory over the Kingdom of Satan, which was accomplished in death.
  • That is, the promise of the approaching judgment at Christ’s return, in which the final victory over death and evil will be revealed, is supported by this second viewpoint.
  • Although a later medieval opinion argued once more that only Christians of the pre-Christian time were in fact recipients and beneficiaries of Christ’s preaching in Hades, as intimated in Matthew 27:52 and again in Hebrews 12:23, this position was rebutted by a later medieval view.
  • In other words, the anguish of the crucifixion alone was a vicarious suffering of what it could be like to be separated from God in hell.

Resolution in the Context

When spoken as part of one’s baptismal vows in ancient times, this credo was intended to draw attention to the Trinitarian nature of the ceremony, and we must examine this fact. This was seen as a profoundly symbolic and representational experience of dying and rising, which it was. The old life was now dead, and the new life was now being physically performed in the same way that Jesus’ death and dying, as well as his resurrection from this real grave experience, had been modeled. It seemed like life had triumphed over death all over again.

When considering this essential portion of the Apostles’ Creed, let us also take into consideration an updated version of the phrase which states: “he descended to the grave.” In the following creedal statement, the emphasis is on Christ’s resurrection on the third day, which points to the larger picture of this creedal declaration as a whole, and leaves no mistake as to its goal.

As a result, we can argue that Jesus came from the highest reaches of heaven only to descend to the lowest depths of hell on our behalf, ensuring that this would never become our permanent home.

Check out all of the articles from Theology Thursday and make sure to check back each week for a new installment.

These are the author’s own views and opinions, and they do not necessarily reflect those of Grand Canyon University. The views and ideas stated in this article do not necessarily reflect those of the university. Any sources that were quoted were up to date at the time of publication.

Jesus’ 10 Amazing Appearances After His Resurrection

“What is it about you that you are looking for the living amid the dead? He is not here, but has risen from the dead!” Luke 24:5-6 (KJV) How did your Easter celebration go? Due to the fact that all of our relatives live a long distance away, my family and I had a fantastic day with close friends. After church, we filled ourselves silly with food and spent the rest of the evening playing games. A wonderful celebration of Jesus’ resurrection took place that day. I have a strong impression that Jesus’ followers had a totally different Resurrection Sunday experience.

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Jesus was the subject of several stories.

According to the truth, Jesus appeared to His disciples and followers a total of ten times before His ascension, with the first appearance occurring immediately after His tomb was discovered to be empty.

Mary Magdalene and the Women

You will no doubt recall how Mary Magdalene and two other women rushed to Jesus’ tomb early on Sunday morning only to discover that the stone had been moved away from the tomb. Luke 24:5-6 is one of my all-time favorite Bible scriptures because the angel replies to them, “Why are you looking for the living among the dead?” He is not here, but has risen from the dead!” The women have to have been taken aback. Is it true that He has risen from the dead? Can you image their shock and astonishment?

“They rushed out swiftly from the tomb, filled with terror and great gladness, and ran to announce the news to the disciples,” according to Matthew 28:8.

The disciples’ unbelief didn’t last long since they soon came face to face with the Messiah himself.

Interestingly, Matthew claims that the ladies touched Him, but John claims that they did not, and both Mark and Luke make no mention of it at all.

Jesus In Galilee

“However, he assured them, ‘Do not be alarmed.'” You are on the lookout for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has resurrected from the dead! He isn’t in the room. Take a look at the location where they buried Him. but instead of going, tell His disciples—as well as Peter—that He is going ahead of you into Galilee, and there you will see Him, as He promised you.” Mark 16:6-7 is an example of a parable. In Mark 16, Mary Magdalene returns to the disciples to inform them that she has seen Jesus alive and well again and that they must travel to Galilee to see him.

When this happened, according to Matthew 28:16, they immediately traveled to Galilee.

However, it appears that they did go, and that they discovered Jesus there, exactly as He had promised.

According to 1 Corinthians 15:6-7, where Paul describes a large gathering of disciples, “After that, He was seen by more than five hundred brethren at the same time,” this is consistent.

Later That Same Day

During the same day of Mary Magdalene’s vision of Jesus, as well as following the assembly in Galilee, Jesus appears two more times. For starters, in Luke 24:13-32, we learn about two disciples who are on their way to a place named Emmaus. It was a small village located approximately seven miles outside of Jerusalem. On their trip to this town, they came across someone who they mistook for a man, but who turned out to be Jesus, who they were completely unaware of. It was during this stroll and conversation that they learned the story of Christ’s death and resurrection.

  • It was late in the afternoon by then, and the disciples invited Him to remain for dinner with them.
  • It was at this point that the disciples’ eyes were enlightened, and they knew who the stranger really was.
  • We may presume that Jesus appeared to the rest of the disciples, with the exception of Thomas, soon afterward.
  • John 20:19 tells us that it was late at night at this point, and the disciples had gathered behind locked doors because they were fearful of Jewish persecution (recall how Peter was badgered around the fire the night he rejected Jesus three times?).
  • It did not take place on Pentecost, as most people think, which was the day Jesus ascended to heaven.
  • When Jesus finished speaking, He breathed on them and said, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit.'” In John 20:22, He adds, “And when He had finished speaking, He breathed on them and said, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit.” If you forgive the sins of another, that person will also be pardoned.

Breakfast at the Beach

By this point, Jesus had paid four separate visits to His followers. The fifth occasion occurred on the eighth day following His resurrection. The Gospel of John records Jesus paying a visit to seven of His disciples in the Sea of Tiberias while they were out fishing one morning in the book of John. This is another well-known scene in which Jesus (in disguise once more) inquires of His disciples as to whether or not they had caught any fish. As you recall, they responded with a “No.” Consequently, Jesus instructs them to “cast your net on the right side of the boat, and you will catch some.” Despite the fact that many pastors and professors have thought they were, the Bible does not tell us how long the disciples had been fishing or if they were dissatisfied and fatigued from not having caught anything.

Following that, Jesus pulls Peter away and commands him to tend to His sheep, which he promptly does.

This is what Jesus says to Peter three times on the night before His crucifixion, in response to Peter’s three denials of the Lord’s authority. At the end of the story, everyone discovers that Jesus has chosen Peter to be the pastor of the new church he founded.

The Evening of the Eighth Day

Thomas had not yet saw Jesus resurrected, despite the fact that he had no doubt heard all about it from the other disciples. That was all about to change, though. Jesus’ apparition to Thomas is described in detail in John 20:26-29, which is the only story we have. Later that evening, after eating breakfast with several of Jesus’ followers on the beach that morning, Jesus appears in the midst of the closed upper room for a second time and instructs Thomas to touch His scarred hands and side. During this time, Thomas comes to believe the fact that Jesus is indeed alive, and Jesus famously responds, “Because you have seen Me, you have believed.” It is blessed are those who do not see but nonetheless believe” (Matthew 7:14).

Jesus’ Appearance to James

Neither the Gospels nor the New Testament expressly describe Jesus appearing secretly to His half-brother, James. However, we do know that He met with him at some point before the disciples traveled to Galilee, as previously stated. According to 1 Corinthians 15:7, when Paul writes, “After that, He was seen by James and then by all the apostles,” it appears that Jesus made a pit stop at His hometown of Nazareth before continuing on His journey to Galilee. A significant meeting since it was at this time that James came to the conclusion that Jesus, his older brother, is the Son of God.

James entirely dedicates the remainder of his life to serving as the co-pastor of the early church with Peter.

It was because of this that he became extremely influential and powerful, to the point that he was slain.

Paul’s Turn

The road to Damascus is where we learn that Jesus met with Paul, and Paul was commissioned as an apostle shortly after that meeting took place. Due to the prerequisites for being an apostle, which include having been a disciple of Jesus as well as seeing His execution and resurrection, this is very notable. Because Jesus had already risen to the throne of glory, it was impossible for Paul to have become a disciple. In 1 Corinthians 15:7, Paul says, “Last of all, He was perceived by me as one who had been born out of season.” A reference to Jesus personally appointing Paul as an apostle is made in the phrase “born out of due time.” Paul was well aware of how important his appointment was.

“For I am the least of the apostles, and I am not fit to be called an apostle since I persecuted the church of God,” Paul says in humility in verses nine and ten, immediately following.

The Ascension

In Acts 1:3-11 we read about Jesus’ ascension to heaven, which is the only other time He appears apart from His encounter with Paul. He summoned His disciples together to inform them that they should not leave Jerusalem but should instead wait for the Holy Spirit to come. You should keep in mind that they had already been blessed with the gift of the Holy Spirit, and that they were now only waiting for the Spirit to baptize them. “For John genuinely baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now,” says the apostle Paul.

“He was carried up, and a cloud received Him, and they were no longer able to see Him.” “And while He was ascending, two men in white attire appeared beside them, and they said, “Men of Galilee, why are you standing here staring up into heaven?” they replied.

According to verses 9-11, “This same Jesus, who was carried up from you into heaven, will come in the same manner in which you saw Him ascend into heaven.” The Lord is returning, praise be to Him.

Love Beyond Measure

Jesus longs to be with us at all times. Him and us both seek an eternal bond of friendship and love. His constant reappearances following His resurrection are proof of this. His death and resurrection were not going to separate him from the people he cares about the most. It didn’t deter Him back then, and it doesn’t deter Him now, either. His loyalty knows no bounds, and His love knows no bounds, and one day He will return to take us home to heaven so that we can be with Him for the rest of our lives forever.

Have you seen Jesus in the last few days?

He’s looking forward to seeing you.

Will you open the door for Him?

Further Reading

How great that James has finally realized the truth about who Jesus really is. He went on to accomplish great things in the early church, including bringing a large number of people to faith in Jesus’ redeeming grace. Unfortunately, the Pharisees did not consider it to be particularly beneficial. Read “The Unsettling Truth of James’ Martyred Death” to find out what happened to James at the end of his life and the legacy he left behind for us all. Please follow and like us on Facebook:

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