What Is Jews For Jesus

Messianic Jews and Jews for Jesus, explained

Vice President Mike Pence joined a self-identified rabbi from a controversial Jewish organization that believes Jesus is the Messiah in a memorial service for the 11 victims of last Saturday’s Tree of Life synagogue massacre in Pittsburgh. At a rally in Michigan on Monday night, Vice President Mike Pence invited a religious leader, Loren Jacobs, to pray for the victims of the tragedy. Though he self-identifies as a rabbi, Jacobs is a member of the Messianic Jewish movement, which believes that Jesus Christ is the prophesied Old Testament Messiah.

When compared to historical Jewish traditions, Messianic Judaism is seen more like an evangelical Christian movement than a legitimate Jewish tradition by the major Jewish traditions and by the state of Israel itself.

He did, however, pray for the blessing of four Republican candidates running for office in the state’s midterm elections next week, according to the Associated Press.

During the event, he also made reference to “Jesus the Messiah,” which is a concept that is diametrically opposed to the theology of the vast majority of traditional Jewish traditions.

Jacobs’ controversial status within Judaism, as well as his decision to give Jacobs an opportunity, all combined to make him a particularly flammable figure.

Messiahic Judaism is a controversial movement that has been criticized by mainstream Judaism and a few Christian organizations.

The Messianic Jewish movement grew out of Christian evangelicalism

During the early 1970s, Moishe Rosen, an ethnically Jewish man who subsequently converted to Christianity and became a Baptist preacher, created the nonprofit organization Jews for Jesus. This was the beginning of what we now know as the Messianic Jewish movement. Although there is no official membership, the group claims to have a registry of about 200,000 “interested” parties. It evangelizes the gospel message to ethnic Jews by emphasizing the parallels between Christianity and Judaism, and by arguing that Jews who embrace Jesus as the Messiah may still keep a strong connection to their Jewish ancestry and traditions.

Jewish traditions and holidays are encouraged for Messianic Jews to maintain — Rosen’s New York Timesobituary in 2010 noted that he observed the major Jewish holidays of Passover and Yom Kippur throughout his life, and that his marriage ceremony took place under the traditional Jewish chuppah, or canopy.

However, while Jews for Jesus and similar organizations are outspoken opponents of anti-Semitism — and many, such as Chosen People Ministries, openly decry it — the implicit theology of many of these organizations ultimately places (non-Messianic) Jews in the position of “rejectors of Christ” who “need to be saved.” As a result, Judaism without Jesus is labeled as incorrect or insufficient.

Jews are seen with sympathy in mainstream evangelicalism today, with the belief that they are still in the process of learning all of the truths of the faith.

— Laura Seay (@texasinafrica) is a social media influencer in Africa.

The topic of whether Messianic Judaism “counts” as Judaism is an open and, in many respects, unsolvable one.

According to Jacobs, who is currently serving as the self-designated senior rabbi and founder of the Messianic Congregation Shema Yisrael in Bloomfield Hills (Michigan), “the truth is that Jesus is the Messiah, the King of the Jews, and he can fulfill us and complete us in our Jewish identity,” according to the Washington Post after the rally.

He was deprived of his rabbinical ordination by the Union of Messianic Jewish Congregations in 2003, according to an NBC News story published on Tuesday.

The organization did not directly address the libel allegations, but posts on Jacobs’s website refer to an atheological battle over the interpretation of biblical texts, and Jacobs appears to have criticized other religious leaders’ willingness to apply academic historical-critical methods to the investigation of biblical texts.

Pence’s choice of Jacobs was a politically loaded act

When it comes to the Pittsburgh massacre, Pence did not directly invite Jacobs to the rally; instead, he was invited by state GOP congressional candidate Lena Epstein, who is running in Michigan’s 11th District. However, he specifically invited the religious leader to come up to the podium and pray for the victims. In part because of its contentious standing within Judaism, Messianic Judaism continues to be a highly politicized religious movement. When considered in that perspective, Vice President Pence’s pick of a Messianic Jewish rabbi was exceedingly controversial.

It should be noted that Messianic “Judaism” is a Christian sect that is considered derogatory to the Jewish community.

This was not an ecumenical gesture; rather, it was a demeaning political act.

Christian-Jewish Relations: Jews for Jesus

A conservative Christian evangelical group dedicated to converting Jews to Christianity, Jews for Jesus (JFJ) was founded in 1993. Jews for Jesus: History, Beliefs, and Methods of Evangelizing, Objections to Jews for Jesus, Jewish Responses, and Christian Responses

History

Jews for Jesus is a conservative, Christian evangelical group that strives to convert Jews to Christian belief and practices. Jews for Jesus: History, Beliefs, and Methods of Evangelizing, Objections to Jews for Jesus, Jewish Responses, and Christian Responses.

Beliefs of Jews for Jesus

Jews for Jesus is a conservative Christian evangelical group that tries to convert Jews to Christianity. -History-Beliefs of Jews for Jesus-Methods of Evangelizing-Arguments Against Jews for Jesus-Jewish Responses-Christian Responses

Methods of Evangelizing

Jews for Jesus is a conservative, Christian evangelical group that strives to convert Jews to Christianity. -History-Beliefs of Jews for Jesus-Evangelizing Methods-Arguments Against Jews for Jesus-Jewish Responses-Christian Responses

Arguments Against Jews for Jesus

A conservative Christian evangelical group dedicated to converting Jews to Christianity, Jews for Jesus (JFJ) was founded in 1993. Jews for Jesus: History, Beliefs, and Methods of Evangelizing, Objections to Jews for Jesus, Jewish Responses, and Christian Responses

Jewish Responses

Jews for Jesus is a conservative, Christian evangelical group that strives to convert Jews to Christian belief and practices.

Jews for Jesus: History, Beliefs, and Methods of Evangelizing, Objections to Jews for Jesus, Jewish Responses, and Christian Responses.

Christian Responses

Christians have expressed a variety of opinions in reaction to the JewsforJesus campaign. The Reverend Clark Lobenstine of the United Church of Christ, among others, believes that Jews for Jesus goes “beyond the borders of proper and morally grounded religious outreach” (Washington Post). A single religious body, the Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, has gone so far as to denounce Jews for Jesus on the grounds that it is “destructive to the spirit of interreligious respect and tolerance” (ADL).

Other churches, on the other hand, have a different point of view.

Some of these churches are in support of Martin Rosen and the ideals of Jews for Jesus, while others are in opposition.

Who are the Jews for Jesus, and what do they believe?

JewsforJesus’ initiative has elicited a range of reactions from Christians. Some Christians, such as the Reverend Clark Lobenstine, believe that Jews for Jesus goes “beyond the confines of proper and morally grounded religious outreach” and should be stopped (Washington Post). Jewish for Jesus has been condemned by one group, the Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, for being “damaging to the spirit of interreligious respect and tolerance,” according to the organization (ADL). The Interfaith Conference, an organization that represents a diverse range of religious traditions, claims that Jews for Jesus is a coercive movement that preys on Jews who are vulnerable to coercion or manipulation.

However, many churches are reluctant to upset Jewish leaders because they think it is their responsibility to convert them to Christianity.

According to the following sources: Jews for Jesus; Jews for Judaism; The Washington Post (August 17, 2004); Cho, David, “Conversion Outreach Plan Stirs Outrage”; The Anti-Defamation League (ADL)

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Christians have reacted in a variety of ways to the JewsforJesus movement. Some Christians, such as Reverend Clark Lobenstine, believe that Jews for Jesus goes “beyond the confines of proper and morally grounded religious outreach” (Washington Post). Jewish for Jesus has been condemned by one group, the Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, for being “damaging to the spirit of interreligious respect and tolerance” (ADL). According to the Interfaith Conference, a non-profit group that represents a diverse range of religious traditions, Jews for Jesus is a coercive force that preys on vulnerable Jews.

However, many churches are fearful of offending Jewish authorities, which is why some Christians think it is their responsibility to convert Jews to Christianity.

Some of these churches are in support of Martin Rosen and the ideals of Jews for Jesus, while others are against. Jews for Jesus; Jews for Judaism; The Washington Post, (August 17, 2004); Cho, David, “Conversion Outreach Plan Stirs Outrage”; The Anti-Defamation League (ADL)

Who Are Messianic “Jews”?

Christians have reacted differently to the JewsforJesus movement. Some Christians, such as the Reverend Clark Lobenstine, believe that Jews for Jesus goes “beyond the confines of legitimate and morally grounded religious outreach” (Washington Post). One organization, the Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, has gone so far as to criticize Jews for Jesus for being “damaging to the spirit of interreligious respect and tolerance” (ADL). Jews for Jesus, according to the Interfaith Conference, an organization that represents a diverse range of religious traditions, is a coercive movement that preys on vulnerable Jews.

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Some Christians think that it is their responsibility to convert Jews to Christianity, yet many churches are wary of offending Jewish authorities.

Jews for Jesus; Jews for Judaism; The Washington Post (August 17, 2004); Cho, David, “Conversion Outreach Plan Stirs Outrage”; The Anti-Defamation League (ADL)

An Ethnic Church for Jews

It is common to see Messianic Judaism presented as an ethnic church for Jews–something like to a Korean or Chinese church, but with an emphasis on reaching out to Jews. Most experts, on the other hand, believe that only around half of the members of most Messianic Jewish congregations are natural-born Jews. Many Messianic congregations require non-Jews who join to undergo a type of conversion to Messianic Judaism, despite the fact that many within the community think that conversion to Judaism is impossible.

Non-Jews who join Messianic communities are referred to be “spiritual Jews,” “completed Jews,” or “Messianic gentiles” by those in the congregation.

Messiahic Jews believe in supersessionism, which is the view that Jesus was the fulfillment of a promise made by God to the Jews in the Torah (Hebrew Bible), and they embrace this concept.

Those who practice Messianic Judaism, for example, adhere to some precepts of the Torah, such as resting on Shabbat, refraining from eating pork and shellfish, and celebrating biblical feasts such as Sukkot and Passover.

Missionary Activity

It is common to see Messianic Judaism presented as an ethnic church for Jews–something like to a Korean or Chinese church, but with an emphasis on reaching out to Jewish people. Most experts, however, believe that only around half of the members of most Messianic Jewish congregations were born Jews. Many Messianic congregations require non-Jews who join to undergo a type of conversion to Messianic Judaism, despite the fact that many within the community think that conversion to Judaism is almost impossible.

The term “spiritual Jew” refers to non-Jews who have converted to Judaism and become members of Messianic synagogues.

A common belief among Messianic Jews is supersessionism, the notion that Jesus was God’s fulfillment of a promise made to the Jews in the Torah (Hebrew Bible).

Messianic Jews, for example, adhere to some of the regulations of the Torah, such as resting on Shabbat, not eating pork or shellfish and keeping biblical holidays such as Sukkot and Passover, among other things.

While adhering to rabbinic law, the faith rejects the authority of the Mishnah and Talmud, which it considers to be outdated.

Messianic Jewish Communities Today

Messianic Judaism is sometimes depicted as an ethnic church for Jews–something like to a Korean or Chinese church, but with a focus on reaching out to Jews specifically. Most experts, on the other hand, believe that only around half of the members of most Messianic Jewish congregations were born Jews. Many Messianic congregations require non-Jews who join to undergo a type of conversion to Messianic Judaism, despite the fact that many within the community think that conversion to Judaism is not possible.

Non-Jews who join Messianic congregations are referred to be “spiritual Jews,” “completed Jews,” or “Messianic gentiles” by those who are not Jewish.

Messianic Jews believe in supersessionism, which is the idea that Jesus was the fulfillment of the promise made by God to the Jews in the Torah (Hebrew Bible).

Messianic Jews, for example, adhere to some of the commandments of the Torah, such as resting on Shabbat, not eating pork or shellfish and keeping biblical holidays such as Sukkot and Passover, among others.

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Messianic Judaism is sometimes described as an ethnic church for Jews–similar to a Korean or Chinese church, but with outreach tailored specifically to Jews. However, according to the majority of experts, only approximately half of the members of most Messianic Jewish congregations were born Jews. Non-Jews who join a Messianic congregation may be expected to undergo a type of conversion to Messianic Judaism, despite the fact that many in the organization think that it is impossible to convert to Judaism.

Non-Jews who join Messianic communities are frequently referred to as spiritual Jews, finished Jews, or Messianic gentiles.

Supersessionism, the idea that Jesus was the fulfillment of the promise made by God to the Jews in the Torah (Hebrew Bible), is recognized by Messianic Jews.

For example, adherents in Messianic Judaism adhere to some of the commandments of the Torah, such as resting on Shabbat, refraining from eating pork and shellfish, and celebrating ancient holidays like as Sukkot and Passover.

The religion, on the other hand, is not bound by rabbinic law and rejects the authority of the Mishnah and the Talmud.

Ask the Expert: Jews for Jesus

Question: I have a buddy who has been interested in Jews for Jesus as a result of hearing about it. What, in your opinion, is the most effective method to tackle this subject? – AriAnswer: For many Jews, the question of Jews for Jesus is a sensitive one. I want to address the idea that your buddy is looking at Jews for Jesus because he (or she) is going through a difficult time and is searching for support in any way he or she can find it before I get into how to talk about it with your friend in more detail.

  1. As part of your discussion, you could want to inquire about whether or not he is currently experiencing any difficulties in his life.
  2. In the event that your buddy has been researching the theology of Jews for Jesus in depth, you might be able to assist him in clarifying some of the theological difficulties that are at stake.
  3. Christian theology is founded on the belief that Jesus was the promised Messiah and that he died in order to atone for mankind’s sins.
  4. Judaism, on the other hand, does not acknowledge Jesus as the messiah.
  5. You can also seek assistance from Jews for Judaism, a non-profit group dedicated to countering the activities of evangelical Christian organizations that want to convert Jews.
  6. Religion and faith are difficult and profoundly personal topics to discuss openly.
  7. Rather than telling kids what to believe, we may and should provide them with opportunity to learn about our own history and culture, so that they can make an informed decision when they make their religion choices.

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In response to the following question: I have a buddy who has developed an interest in Jews for Jesus. In your opinion, what is the most effective method to tackle this subject? – AriAnswer: For many Jews, the question of Jews for Jesus is a difficult one. I want to address the potential that your buddy is looking at Jews for Jesus because he (or she) is going through a difficult time and is searching for support in any way he or she can find it before I go into how to talk about it with your friend in a constructive way.

  • As part of your discussion, you could want to inquire about whether or not he is dealing with anything challenging at the moment.
  • In the event that your buddy has been researching the theology of Jews for Jesus in depth, you might be able to assist him in clarifying some of the theological difficulties that are at issue.
  • Jesus’ identity as the messiah and his death as atonement for mankind serve as the foundation of all Christian doctrine.
  • Jewish tradition simply does not acknowledge Jesus as the messiah as a result of his death and resurrection.
  • Additionally, Jews for Judaism, an organization dedicated to countering the activities of evangelical Christian organizations that want to convert Jews, might be of assistance.
  • It is difficult to talk about religion and faith without becoming emotionally charged.

In order for them to make an informed decision about their faith, we must provide them with opportunity to learn about the history and culture of our own background, so that they may make an informed decision. Greetings and Best Regards

Are ‘Jews for Jesus’ Jewish? – The Boston Globe

Question: I have a buddy who has been interested in Jews for Jesus as a result of this website. What, in your opinion, is the most effective technique to taking on this subject? – AriAnswer: Jews for Jesus is a sensitive issue for many Jews. I want to address the idea that your buddy is looking at Jews for Jesus because he (or she) is going through a difficult time and is searching for support wherever he or she may find it before I go into how to talk about it with your friend. Jews for Jesus has a strong emphasis on outreach, which may have struck a chord with your buddy if he has been seeking for a means to connect with other people for any reason.

  • Make sure your buddy understands that you are rooting for him and that you are willing to assist him in locating additional community resources if he is interested.
  • Although Jews for Jesus prefer to identify to themselves as Jews, they are categorically Christian theologically.
  • The adherence of mitzvot (commandments) is the foundation of Jewish theology, which is designed to accelerate the advent of the Messiah – who has not yet appeared.
  • Jew for Jesus adheres to a theology that is at odds with Judaism, regardless of whether they understand Hebrew, pray from an asiddur, or observeShabbat.
  • Jews for Judaism will provide you and your buddy with knowledge on how Judaism differs from what is often practiced in Messianic Jewish communities, as well as chances to deepen your engagement with Judaism.
  • We have no influence on how our friends and family members feel about God and Judaism, no matter how much we would like to.
  • Best of luck!
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Jews for Jesus

Question: I have a buddy who has just been interested in Jews for Jesus. What, in your opinion, is the most effective technique to taking on this topic? – AriAnswer: Jews for Jesus is a contentious issue for many Jews. But, before I get into how to talk about it with your buddy, I want to address the possibility that your friend is looking at Jews for Jesus because he (or she) is going through a difficult time and is searching for support wherever he or she may find it. Jews for Jesus has a strong emphasis on outreach, which may have resonated with your buddy if he’s been seeking for a means to connect with other people for any reason.

  • Make sure your buddy understands that you are rooting for him and that you are willing to assist him in finding additional community resources if he is interested.
  • Though Jews for Jesus prefer to identify to themselves as Jews, they are categorically Christian theologically.
  • The foundation of Jewish theology is the observance of mitzvot (commandments) in order to accelerate the advent of the Messiah – who has not yet arrived.
  • Jew for Jesus adheres to a theology that is at odds with Judaism, regardless of whether they know Hebrew, pray from a siddur, or keep Shabbat.
  • Jews for Judaism will provide information about how Judaism differs from what is often practiced in Messianic Jewish communities, as well as chances for you and your buddy to deepen your engagement with Judaism.
  • We have no influence over how our friends and family members feel about God or Judaism, no matter how much we wish we could.

In order for them to make an informed decision about their faith, we must provide them with opportunity to learn about the history and culture of our own background so that they may make an informed decision. Wish you the best of luck!

  • Members of Jews for Jesus do not attend church
  • Instead, they attend a “Messianic Synagogue. “
  • Prayer is not held on Sundays, but rather on Saturdays, which is the Jewish Sabbath day. You are not converting to Christianity, they claim, but rather becoming “a fulfilled Jew” by accepting Jesus as your Messiah. Brit Chadasha (Hebrew meaning “New Covenant”) is the name given to the New Testament. It is not the cross, but “the tree” that is in question. Rather than being baptized, it is immersed in a mikveh. A matzah is used instead of a communion wafer. Congregants dress in a tallit and kipa, and they carry a Torah scroll out of the Holy Ark, just like they do in every other synagogue in the world. In the end, they point out with pride, Jesus himself was a Jew.

A “Messianic Synagogue” is where members of Jews for Jesus gather instead of attending church. Prayer is not held on Sundays, but rather on Saturdays, which is the Jewish Sabbath day; They claim that by embracing Jesus as the Messiah, you are not converting to Christianity, but rather becoming “a fulfilled Jew.” Known in Hebrew as Brit Chadasha (which means “New Covenant”), the New Testament is the second book of the Bible. In fact, “the tree” is what it is, not the cross. Although not a baptism, mikveh immersion is a kind of religious cleansing.

In the same way that every other synagogue, congregants dress in a tallit and kipa and take a Torah scroll from the Holy Ark.

Why Jews Don’t Believe In Jesus, why Jews reject Jesus

Jews have been rejecting the Christian notion of Jesus as the promised Messiah for more than 2,000 years. Why? “Why don’t Jews believe in Jesus?” is one of the most often asked questions we hear here at Aish.com. Let’s take a look at why – not to discredit other religions, but rather to clarify the Jewish viewpoint on the matter. Jews do not recognize Jesus as the messiah for the following reasons:

  1. Jesus did not bring about the fulfillment of the messianic prophesies
  2. In fact, Jesus did not possess the personal criteria for being the Messiah. Verse in the Bible that are “referring” to Jesus are mistranslations. Jewish religion is founded on the revelation of the nation

But first, some background information: What is the Messiah’s actual identity? Mashiach is a Hebrew term that literally translates as “anointed.” The word “Messiah” is an English translation of the Hebrew wordMashiach, which literally translates as “anointed.” It is most commonly used to refer to a person who has been anointed with oil and therefore introduced into God’s ministry. Exodus 29:7, 1 Kings 1:39, 2 Kings 9:3; 1 Kings 1:39; 2 Kings 9:3;

(1) Jesus Did Not Fulfill the Messianic Prophecies

What is it that the Messiah is expected to achieve? In biblical prophecy, one of the most important themes is the promise of a future period of perfection, marked by worldwide peace and the acceptance of God as Creator. (Isaiah 2:1-4, 32:15-18, 60:15-18; Zephaniah 3:9; Hosea 2:20-22; Amos 9:13-15; Micah 4:1-4; Zechariah 8:23, 14:9; Jeremiah 31:33-34) (Isaiah 2:1-4, 32:15-18, 60:15-18; Zephaniah 3:9; Hosea 2:20-22; Amos 9:13-15; Micah 4:1-4; Zechariah He will, according to the Bible, do the following:

  1. Build the Third Temple (Ezekiel 37:26-28)
  2. Bring all Jews back to the Land of Israel (Isaiah 43:5-6)
  3. And bring all nations back to the Land of Israel. Bring about a new period of world peace by putting an end to all forms of hatred, oppression, suffering, and sickness. “Country shall not pick up sword against nation, nor shall man study war any longer,” the Bible declares. (See Isaiah 2:4) Disseminate worldwide knowledge of the God of Israel, which will bring all of mankind together as an one family. According to Zechariah 14:9, “God will reign as King over all the earth — on that day, God will be One, and His Name will be One” (God will be One, and His Name will be One).

The construction of the Third Temple (Ezekiel 37:26-28); the return of all Jews to the Land of Israel (Isaiah 43:5-6); and other activities are outlined in the Bible. Bring about a new period of world peace by putting an end to all forms of hatred, oppression, suffering, and sickness on the global stage. “Nation shall not pick up sword against nation, nor shall man study war any longer,” according to the verses. In Isaiah 2:4, the Bible says, Disseminate worldwide knowledge of the God of Israel, which will bring all of mankind together as an one entity.

(2) Jesus Did Not Embody the Personal Qualifications of Messiah

The Messiah will surpass Moses as the greatest prophet in history, and he will be the greatest prophet of all time. In accordance with Targum (Isaiah 11:2; Maimonides – Teshuva 9:2), Prophecy can only exist in Israel if the country is occupied by a majority of world Jewry, which has not been the case since 300 BCE, and it has not been since then. Prophecy came to an end during the reign of Ezra, when the bulk of Jews remained in Babylon, with the deaths of the last prophets — Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi – marking the end of the Old Testament.

The appearance of Jesus on the scene around 350 years after the end of prophecy ruled out the possibility that he was a prophet.

B. Descendant of David

It is predicted that the Messiah would surpass Moses as the greatest prophet of all time. In accordance with Targum (Isaiah 11:2; Maimonides – Teshuva 9:2) Israel can only be a place of prophecy if it is home to a majority of the world’s Jewish population, which has not been the case since the year 300 BCE. Prophetic period came to an end under the reign of Ezra, when the bulk of Jews remained in Babylon, with the deaths of the three prophets — Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi – marking the end of the Old Testament.

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C. Torah Observance

The Jewish people shall be led by the Messiah to complete Torah compliance in their lives. According to the Torah, all mitzvot are eternally binding, and anybody who seeks to modify the Torah is immediately labeled as a false prophet and excommunicated. (Deuteronomy 13:1-4) Throughout the Christian “New Testament,” Jesus declares that the Torah is no longer valid and that its prohibitions are no longer applicable to the Christian faith. To give an example, John 9:14 tells that Jesus prepared a paste in violation of Shabbat, prompting the Pharisees to declare (in verse 16), “He does not keep Shabbat!”

(3) Mistranslated Verses “Referring” to Jesus

It is only via close examination of the original Hebrew text that biblical texts can be understood – and this examination shows several inconsistencies in the Christian translation.

A. Virgin Birth

According to Christian tradition, the concept of virgin birth derives from the biblical passage Isaiah 7:14, which describes a “alma” giving birth. The word “alma” has traditionally been used to refer to a young lady, but Christian theologians came along centuries later and changed it to mean “virgin” instead. This is consistent with the pagan concept of people being pregnant by gods that was prevalent in the first century.

B. Suffering Servant

According to Christian tradition, the concept of virgin birth derives from the biblical passage Isaiah 7:14, which describes a “alma”giving birth. “Alma” has traditionally been used to refer to a young lady, but Christian theologians interpreted it as “virgin” centuries after the word was first used. This corresponds to the pagan concept of people being impregnated by gods that was prevalent in the first century.

(4) Jewish Belief is Based Solely on National Revelation

A person’s endeavor to convince others that he or she is the authentic prophet of God has resulted in the founding of hundreds of religious organizations throughout history. Personal revelation, on the other hand, is a shaky foundation for a religion because it is impossible to know whether or not it is accurate. Because no one else was there when God spoke to this individual, they must take his word for what he said. A person claiming personal revelation may accomplish miracles, but this does not always establish him or her as a legitimate prophet.

  1. It has absolutely nothing to do with his prophetic claims.
  2. 13:4).
  3. If God is going to create a religion, it only seems reasonable that He will notify everyone about it, rather than just a few select individuals.
  4. All of Moses’ miracles in the wilderness were accomplished because they were required, rather than as confirmation of his prophesy as some have claimed.
  5. The Revelation on Mount Sinai, which we witnessed with our own eyes and heard with our own ears, rather than relying on the testimony of others, was a powerful experience.
  6. The Torah also teaches that “God did not establish this covenant with our forebears, but with us — who are all still living today” (God did not create this agreement with our forefathers).

(Deuteronomy 5:3) Judaism does not believe in miracles. Everyone who stood on Mount Sinai 3,300 years ago had a firsthand eyewitness account of what they were witnessing. Read on for more information: “Did God Speak at Mount Sinai?”

Waiting for the Messiah

Messianic redemption is desperately needed across the world. Our need for redemption will be heightened to the extent that we are conscious of the difficulties that face our society. According to the Talmud, one of the first questions asked of a Jew on Judgment Day is: “Did you long for the coming of the Messiah?” What steps might we take to speed the arrival of the Messiah? The most effective method is to love all of mankind unconditionally, to observe the commandments of the Torah (to the best of our ability), and to urge others to do so as well.

One visible proof is that the Jewish people have returned to the Land of Israel and have re-established its agricultural production.

The Messiah might appear at any time, and everything is dependent on our deeds.

Because, as King David proclaims, “Redemption will come today – if you would just heed to His voice.” For more research:

  • Messianic salvation is desperately needed in this world. Our need for atonement will be heightened to the extent that we are conscious of the difficulties facing society. In accordance with the Talmud, one of the first questions asked of a Jew on Judgment Day is, “Did you long for the coming of the Messiah?” What steps can we take to accelerate the arrival of Messiah? For the most part, the ideal solution is to love all of mankind unconditionally, to uphold and encourage others to uphold and fulfill the mitzvot of the Torah. Although the world appears to be heading toward destruction, there is some hope for the future. One visible indicator is that the Jewish people have returned to the Land of Israel and have re-established its agricultural and agricultural infrastructure. Young Jews are also re-entering the Torah tradition in large numbers, which is a significant development. Messiah might appear at any time, and everything will rely on our deeds. As soon as we are ready, God is ready as well. Because, as King David proclaims, “Redemption will come today — if you would just heed to His word. Continue reading this for more information.

FOOTNOTES

(1) In response, it is asserted that Joseph adopted Jesus and via adoption passed on his ancestry to his children. However, there are two issues with this claim: a) There is no scriptural foundation for the concept of a father handing along his tribe line through adoption. A priest who adopts a son from another tribe does not have the authority to elevate him to the position of priest. b) Joseph would never be able to give on via adoption what he does not already possess. Because Joseph was descended from Jeconiah (Matthew 1:11), he was subjected to the curse of that monarch, which decreed that none of his descendants would ever sit on the throne of David (Matthew 1:12).

In spite of the fact that Jeconiah repented, as recounted in Talmud Sanhedrin 37a and elsewhere, it is not apparent from the early sources whether or not his repentance was accepted to the extent that the royal line persisted through him.

In this case, there are four major issues with the claim: The existence of Mary as a descendant of David has not been established.

b) Even if Mary can trace her ancestors back to David, this is of little use to Jesus, because tribal identity is only established through the father, not the mother.

Mary did not come from a legitimate messianic family, even if the familial line could be traced down to her mother.

The third chapter of Luke is irrelevant to this issue since it covers the ancestry of David’s son Nathan, not Solomon, and hence is not relevant to this discussion.

In addition, these two individuals are mentioned in Matthew 1:12 as descendants of the doomed Jeconiah.

In his “Guide for the Perplexed,” Maimonides spends a significant portion of his writings to the fundamental premise that God is incorporeal, which means that He takes on no bodily form.

He is limitless and exists beyond of time and space.

Saying that God takes on human form reduces God to a little and insignificant figure, undermining both His oneness and divinity. As the Torah states, “God is not mortal” (God is not mortal) (Numbers 23:19). Thank you to Rabbi Michael Skobac of Jews for Judaism for his assistance.

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