What Does Jesus Say About War And Peace

What Does the Bible Say About War?

  • Was God telling the Israelites that they needed to go to war? The Bible’s stance on nuclear weapons is unclear. Whether or not my nation should intervene in foreign wars
  • Should my country go to war with another country in order to overthrow a foreign ruler
  • God’s love cannot be demonstrated when He commands warfare, genocide, and other terrible activities in the Old Testament. Should a Christian consider joining the military? Should a Christian exercise his or her right to conscientious objector status? Should a Christian adhere to a pacifist philosophy?

Contents

References to the Bible Just War Theory is a theory that holds that a war is just if it is carried out by a just person. Christian Pacifism and the Positions of the Churches on War

Biblical References

Early in the history of the Old Testament, battle was frequently seen as a holy war, a fight that was launched and directed by God. A battle of this nature was proclaimed by God Himself (Exodus 17:16; Numbers 31:1-3; 1 Samuel 15:1-3), and every aspect of the conflict was fraught with religious overtones. God’s ongoing assistance was ensured by the performance of sacrifices (1 Samuel 7:8-10; 13:9). The sacredark of the covenant, which represented God’s presence and was frequently carried into combat, was a powerful symbol (1 Samuel 4:3).

Israel began to look forward to the day when the never-ending cycle of conflict would come to an end: The law will issue forth from Zion, and the word of the LORD will issue forth from Jerusalem.

Their swords will be beaten into plowshares, and their spears will be beaten into pruning hooks.

(Isaiah 2:3–4, New International Version)

New Testament

War is widely condemned in the New Testament, and Jesus highlighted the need of peace in his teachings. He counseled us to refrain from retribution and revenge, and to extend our love even to our adversaries and adversaries’ opponents. “You’ve probably heard the expression, ‘Eye for an eye, and tooth for a tooth.'” But I warn you: do not stand up to someone who is bad. Turn to face the person who has struck you on the right cheek and give him the other as well. As for anyone wanting to sue you and steal your tunic, let him have your cloak, too.

  • Give to those who ask, and don’t turn away from those who want to borrow from you because they are asking.
  • Nevertheless, I advise you to love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be considered sons of your heavenly Father.
  • Never take revenge on someone for what they’ve done to you.
  • If at all possible, and to the extent that it is within your power, maintain peace with all mankind.
  • “However, if your adversary is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink; otherwise, you will heap blazing coals on his head.” Do not allow evil to dominate you; instead, use good to defeat evil.

Jesus did not oppose earthly governments or their right to maintain armies (Matthew 8:5-10). Other New Testament passages acknowledge the necessity of maintaining armies as well as the legitimacy of military occupations in the name of justice (Luke3:14, Acts 10:1-6)

Just War Theory

War is uniformly condemned in the New Testament, and Jesus placed a strong emphasis on the need of peace. In order to prevent vengeance and revenge, he instructed us to extend our love even to those who were our adversaries. It has been stated, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’ You may have heard that phrase before. Nevertheless, I warn you: do not stand up to a bad guy. You should also turn to face the person who struck you on the right cheek. As for anyone wanting to sue you and steal your tunic, let him have your cloak as well.

  1. Make a donation to the person who requests it, and do not turn away anybody who requests to borrow from you.
  2. But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you in order to be adopted as sons of your heavenly Father.
  3. Never take revenge on someone for what they’ve done to you or your family.
  4. Attempt to live in harmony with all men to the extent that it is practicable.
  5. “However, if your adversary is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink; otherwise, you will heap blazing coals upon his head.” Rather of allowing evil to triumph, use it to your advantage.
  6. Others in the Bible acknowledge the necessity of keeping armies as well as the value of military vocations in their own contexts (Luke3:14, Acts 10:1-6)
  • Armed conflict must only be fought in reaction to specific and severe damage that has been done to a nation by an aggressor. The development of good or the avoidance of evil must be the motivation for conflict. In order for war to be successful, its ultimate goal must be to bring about peace. War is not justified by feelings of vengeance, rebellion, a desire to injure, rule, or exploit others, or other comparable motivations.
  • Armed conflict should only be fought in reaction to specific and severe damage that has been done to a nation by an aggressor. The pursuit of good or the avoidance of evil must be the motivation for war. In order for war to be successful, it must first and foremost bring about peace. War is not justified by feelings of vengeance, rebellion, a desire to injure, control, or exploit, or other comparable feelings.

Christian Pacifism

Pacifism, or the opposition to all war, is a minority stance in most Christian denominations, but it is the prevailing doctrine in some, such as the Mennonite Church and the Society of Friends (SOC) (Quakers). Pacifists take their cue from Jesus, who never raised a fist against those who persecuted him. The mob came to capture Jesus and one of His followers attempted to protect Him with a sword as the mob arrived to arrest Him. Put your weapon back in its sheath, Jesus warned, for “those who pick up the sword will perish by the sword,” he said.

An other argument in favor of pacifism stems from the conviction that the kingdom of God is distinct from the rest of the world (Matthew 5:20, 7:13-14, John 18:36).

A number of other Bible passages are cited in support of the pacifist position, including Matthew 5:9, Romans 12:18-19, 2 Corinthians 10:3-4, 1 Peter 2:21-23, 3:8-11, 13-17, and Hebrews 10:32-34.

According to another school of thought, pacifism is an unrealistic ideal, and that pacifists unfairly profit from the blessings of freedom achieved by those who are prepared to give their lives in combat.

They point to the success of nonviolent resistance movements such as the Swedish and Danish resistance to Nazism during World War II, Gandhi’s independence movement in India, Martin Luther King Jr.’s civil rights movement in the United States, and the Solidarity labor movement in Poland as examples of what can be accomplished.

Numerous Christian pacifists believe that nonviolent resistance is the only way to break the destructive cycles of injustice and hatred that have pervaded human history.

Church Positions on War

Here are the official war positions of the three main Christian faiths in the United States, as published by their respective organizations:

Roman Catholic

A violation of the fifth commandment is the willful destruction of human life (2307). Because of the horrors and injustices that accompany all conflict, the Church calls on everyone to pray and to take action in order for the divine Goodness to release us from the old bonds of war that have bound us for centuries. The prevention of conflict is the responsibility of all individuals and all governments in 2308. According to the United Nations, “as long as the threat of war continues and there is no international body with the essential competence and capacity, states cannot be denied the right of justifiable self-defense, even after all attempts at peace have failed.” 2309 The stringent criteria for lawful defense by armed action necessitate careful deliberation and study.

At the same time, the following conditions must be met: the damage inflicted by the aggressor on the nation or community of nations must be long-lasting, severe, and certain; all other means of putting an end to it must have been demonstrated to be impractical or ineffective; there must be realistic prospects of success; and the use of arms must not result in evils and disorders that are more serious than the evil that is being eliminated.

  1. When assessing this situation, the destructive capacity of current weapons of mass destruction is taken into consideration.
  2. The examination of these prerequisites for moral legitimacy is the obligation of those who are responsible for the common good, and it is their prudential judgment that is required.
  3. In this particular instance, public authorities have the authority and responsibility to impose on individuals the requirements essential for national defense.
  4. If they carry out their responsibilities with integrity, they will make a genuine contribution to the common benefit of the nation as well as the preservation of peace.
  5. 2312.
  6. It is important to note that just because a war has unfortunately broken out does not imply that everything between the fighting sides becomes legal.
  7. Conduct taken with the intent of violating the law of nations and its universal principles, as well as the commands that direct such actions, are considered crimes.

So the eradication of an entire people, nation, or ethnic minority must be denounced as a sin against God and the human race.

“Every act of war aiming at the indiscriminate destruction of entire towns or huge territories with their populations is a crime against God and man, deserving of the strongest and most emphatic condemnation,” according to Article 2314 of the Constitution.

2315.

They believe it is the most effective method of guaranteeing international peace and security.

No amount of nuclear weapons can bring about world peace.

Spending vast quantities of money to manufacture ever-new sorts of weaponry obstructs attempts to assist needy populations and stymies the growth of individuals and nations.

2316.

When it comes to promoting violence and war among states and undermining the international legal system, short-term pursuit of private or collective interests cannot be considered lawful.

Throughout history, injustice, excessive economic or social inequities, jealousy, mistrust, and pride have raged among individuals and nations, threatening peace and causing conflict.

Everything done to combat these illnesses leads to the establishment of peace and the avoidance of war: From Copyright 1997, United States Catholic Conference, Inc., Catechism of the Catholic Church, second edition, United States Catholic Conference, Inc.,

Southern Baptist

Peace and War, Chapter XVI. Christians have a responsibility to pursue peace with all peoples and all ideals of morality. Their actions should be guided by the spirit and teachings of Christ, and they should do all in their ability to put a stop to war. The gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ is the only effective treatment for the war spirit. The acceptance of His teachings in all aspects of human and national affairs, as well as the actual application of His law of love, are the most pressing needs of the world.

2:4; Matthew 5:9,38-48; 6:33; 26:52; Luke 22:36,38; Romans 12:18-19; 13:1-7; 14:19; Hebrews 12:14; James 4:1-2; Isaiah 2:4.

From

United Methodist

We think that war is incompatible with the teachings and example of Jesus Christ and should be avoided. Thus, we oppose the use of war as a standard instrument of national foreign policy and believe that the first moral obligation of all nations is to resolve any conflict that arises between or among them through peaceful means; that human values must take precedence over military claims when governments determine their priorities; that the militarization of society must be challenged and stopped; that the production, sale, and deployment of armaments must be reduced and controlled; and that the production, sale, and deployment of nuclear weapons must be reduced and controlled.

We thus support universal and comprehensive disarmament under stringent and effective international supervision.

The United Methodist Publishing House owns the copyright for the year 2000.

Military Service

We despise violence and call for the peaceful resolution of all international conflicts, including those between states. Because these sins manifestly thwart God’s loving designs for humans, the Christian conscience has grappled with the terrible realities of violence and conflict since the beginning of the church’s history. We look forward to the day when there will be no more conflict and people will be able to live together in peace and fairness as a result of their efforts. Some of us feel that war and other acts of violence are never acceptable to Christians and should be avoided at all costs.

  • We are grateful for the witness of pacifists who will not allow us to grow complacent in the face of war and terrorism.
  • War, violence, and coercion in international affairs must be eliminated as a result of the development of the rule of law in international affairs.
  • As a result of national governments’ need for military duty, we recognize the terrible tension that has been generated.
  • It is expected that pastors will be accessible for counseling with all young adults who are facing conscription, including those who conscientiously reject to participate in a conscription system.
  • People who sincerely choose to serve in the military forces or accept alternative service are also welcomed and encouraged to participate in the Church’s mission, which we support and extend.

According to the United Methodist Church’s Book of Discipline, page 164G (2000 edition). The United Methodist Publishing House owns the copyright for the year 2000.

What Does the Bible Say About War and Peace?

The relationship between war and peace is a vicious circle. The reality of the matter is that the cycle will continue no matter how long we remain on this planet. There has been a continuous cycle of murder from the first murder in the Bible (Abel was slain by Cain). In the beginning, war begins at the base of lust for flesh, lust for the eyes, and pride in one’s own life, and peace is only achieved temporarily when one side feels threatened enough to surrender. Specifically, what does the Bible teach about war and peace is the subject of discussion.

See also:  Where Was Jesus Raised

War in the Bible

Laws Concerning the Conduct of War Deuteronomy 20:1–2 is a biblical passage. Because the LORD thy God, who took you out of the land of Egypt, is with you when you go out to battle against thine enemy and sees horses and chariots and a people more than thou, do not be terrified by these things. In the meantime, after you have drawn near to the combat, the priest will approach and address the assembled crowd (read Deuteronomy 20:1-20 in context) Deuteronomy 23:9 (Deuteronomy 23:9) As soon as the army marches forth against thy adversaries, keep thyself away from all wickedness and evil.

  • Luke 14:31 (KJV) Or what monarch, while preparing to wage war against another king, does not first sit down and consider whether he will be able to confront the opponent’s force of twenty thousand with ten thousand?
  • 2 12:31 (Samuel 12:31) Afterwards, he dragged out the people who were there, and he put them under saws, and under harrows of iron, and under axes of iron, and he forced them to pass through the brickkiln; and he did this in all of the cities of the children of Ammon.
  • In 1 Chronicles 20:3, the Bible says And he dragged out the individuals who were within and cut them with saws, iron harrows, and axes, among other things.
  • And David, together with the rest of the people, returned to Jerusalem.
  • Moreover, the children of Judah captured the remaining ten thousand survivors and transported them to the top of the rock, where they were thrown to the ground and shattered into pieces.
  • War necessitates the use of strategy.
  • And I, along with my entourage, will go into town and approach the city.

20:32 (Judges 20:32) And the children of Benjamin declared, “They have been stricken down before us, just as they were in the beginning.” The children of Israel, on the other hand, responded, “Let us run, and lure them away from the city and into the roads.” 2 Samuel 5:23 (NIV) David enquired of the LORD, who responded by saying, “Do not go up with them; rather, fetch a compass behind them, and come up against them over near the mulberry trees.” Jeremiah 51:12 is a biblical verse.

Set the bar high on the city’s walls and call it a day. Put up a tight watch, station the watchmen, and prepare the ambushes, because the LORD has both conceived and carried out his threat against the residents of Babylon.

Peace in the Bible

Prophecies Concerning the Establishment of Peace Psalm 46:9 (KJV) He brings warfare to a halt over the entire world; he breaks the bow and cuts the spear in two; he burns the chariot in the flames of wrath. Isaiah 2:4 (KJV) In addition, he will judge among the nations and reprimand many people; and they will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruninghooks; no more will country pick up sword against nation, nor will they learn war any longer. Hosea 2:18 is a biblical passage.

  1. 9:10 (Zechariah 9:10) The chariot will be removed from Ephraim, the horse from Jerusalem, and the war bow will be removed from the battlefield.
  2. It is our responsibility to maintain peace and be peaceful.
  3. If the spirit of the ruler rises up against thee, do not abandon thy position; for submitting brings vast offenses to a close.
  4. Mark 9:50 a.m.
  5. Make sure you have salt in your lives and are at peace with one another.
  6. Romans 14:19 is a Bible verse that says As a result, let us seek out those things that promote peace and those that might be used to edify one another.

Hebrews 12:14 is a verse that states that Continue to pursue peace with all people and holiness, without which no one will be able to see the Lord: 3:17 (James 3:17) However, the knowledge that comes from above is first and foremost pure, followed by peaceable, mild, and easily received, full of kindness and beneficial fruits, devoid of prejudice, and devoid of hypocrisy.

Final Thoughts

Prophecies Regarding the Establishment of World Peace 46:9 in the Psalms He brings warfare to a halt over the entire world; he breaks the bow and cuts the spear in two; he burns the chariot in the flames of destruction. 2:4 (Isaiah) In addition, he will judge among the nations and reprimand many people; and they will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruninghooks; no more will country pick up sword against nation, nor will they learn to wage war any longer. Hosea 2:18 is a verse from the Bible.

And he will preach peace to the people of the world; and his reign will extend from sea to sea, and from the river to the ends of the earth.’ Calling on all people to maintain peace and be peaceful Chapter 10 verse 4 of the book of Ecclesiastes Do not quit your position if the ruler’s spirit rises against you; for submitting to the spirit of the ruler will pacify grave offenses.

Salinity is good for you; keep your peace with one another.

Romans 14:19 is a Bible verse that states Rather than pursuing things that bring about peace, let us pursue things that help us to edify one another.

‘Hebrews 12:14’ is a verse that says It is necessary to pursue world peace as well as holiness, without which no one will be able to see the Lord: 3:17 (James) However, the knowledge that comes from above is first and foremost pure, followed by peaceable, mild, and easily received, full of kindness and beneficial fruits, devoid of prejudice, and devoid of hypocrisy, among other characteristics.

War and peace

“The concept of shalom resounds throughout the whole Bible.” The topic of peace is a major motif in the Bible. ‘Shalom’, the Hebrew word for peace, refers to a state of tranquility that encompasses much more than the absence of fighting. It is a holistic concept that considers the well-being of the body, the mind, the spirit, and society as a whole. The concept of shalom resounds throughout the whole Bible. Despite the fact that the term “shalom” does not appear in the first couple of chapters of Genesis, the concept of “peace” is central to the Creation stories.

  • Alternatively, in some ancient creation tales, the world is created as a by-product of war, or people are created to serve as gods’ slaves.
  • God creates the earth in peace, and it is a place of unparalleled welcome for all of humanity.
  • And God was pleased with them.
  • The first murder and retribution are carried out very immediately, as does the shortening of the human lifetime.
  • The world has been irreparably damaged, and shalom has been thrown into disarray.
  • The law of the Old Testament can be interpreted as an attempt to mold the behavior of the country in the direction of shalom or peace.
  • As an example, the law specifies how a person infected with a contagious disease should be treated, as well as how society should act humanely when there is a financial disparity.
  • To achieve shalom, the punishment of criminals must be fair and transparent in all aspects of their lives.
  • Even though we have mostly progressed beyond this legislation in our current culture, it is still considered very progressive as a way of restricting retribution and preventing blood feuds in an ancient civilization.

Even in biblical texts such as the Psalms and prophetic writings, which contain pleas for divine justice such as: “Repay them for their deeds and for their evil work; repay them for what their hands have done and bring back on them what they deserve,” the concept of punishment that is proportional to (and not greater than) the crime is prevalent.

(Obadiah 15:1–3).

Specifically, they describe this in terms of nations transforming their weapons into farm implements and natural harmony: “They shall judge between many peoples, and they shall arbitrate between powerful nations far away; and they shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, nor shall they learn the art of war any longer.” (Micah 4:3-4; Jeremiah 4:3-4) One day the wolf will dwell with the lamb, one day the leopard shall lie down with the kid, one day the calf and the lion and the fatling will live together, and one day a small child will lead them.

  1. (See Isaiah 11:6-8 for further information.) Those who strive for peace will be regarded as God’s offspring, according to the scriptures.
  2. For it is to us that a child is born, that a son is given to us.
  3. Moving into the New Testament, we continue to see a strong emphasis on the subject of peace (or eirene, in Greek).
  4. God was pleased to reconcile all things to himself through Christ, whether on the earth or in heaven, by bringing about peace via the blood of his crucifixion on the cross.

This letter is addressed to a vulnerable and persecuted early church, and it describes victory in terms of stubborn (peaceful) refusal to collude with the violent Roman Empire:They triumphed over by the blood of the Lamb and by their testimony; they did not love their lives so much that they would fear death.

In this city, the curse has been lifted (Revelation 22:3), the tree of life has been planted for the healing of the nations (Revelation 2:2), and a description of murderers being barred from the city (Revelation 15:15) demonstrates that this is a completely non-violent society, for everything has been made new (21:5).

The Bible’s perspective on war Despite all that has been said so far, it cannot be denied that the Bible contains a significant quantity of carnage, and that at times the Bible appears to condone battle or accepts it as a normal part of life: In the spring, during a season when monarchs are preparing to go to battle.

2 Samuel 11:1 is a passage from the Bible. Some of these issues are described more below. The Bible presents a constantly evolving perspective on combat. Generally speaking, the process may be stated as follows:

  1. Warfare is physical, and God fights on Israel’s side (e.g., Joshua 1:3-6)
  2. Israel’s disobedience, on the other hand, can turn God into an enemy rather than an ally (e.g., Joshua 7:1-5)
  3. And Israel’s disobedience might turn God into an adversary rather than an ally (e.g., Joshua 7:1-5). Warfare is an image used to describe God – the divine warrior (e.g. Psalm 18:7-15)
  4. Jesus speaks and acts in the name of peace, and the church is urged to fight spiritual forces of evil rather than physical ones (e.g. Matthew 26:50-56
  5. Ephesians 6:10-18)
  6. War is an image used to describe God – the divine warrior (e.g. Psalm 18:7-15)
  7. When it comes to the ultimate annihilation of all wickedness (e.g., Revelation 19:11-16), warfare is often utilized as a picture.

Although the Bible appears to support violence in the opening part, there is a strong undercurrent of subversion against militarism throughout the whole book of Joshua. The United States is frequently reminded that the war is not theirs, but God’s (e.g. Exodus 14:14,25). Women use household tools to subdue and slay men in the field of battle (Judges 4:21, 9:53). Gideon is informed that he has amassed an insufficient number of men for victory (Judges 7). David is prohibited from constructing the Temple because he has shed an excessive amount of blood (1 Kings 5:3; 1 Chronicles 22:8).

  • Perspectives on war from a Christian perspective Varied Christians have held different positions on the legitimacy of fighting in different parts of the world throughout history.
  • Persecutions of people who were in doctrinal conflict were as awful, as was the case during the reigns of Mary I (Catholic against Protestant) and Elizabeth and James I/VI (Catholic against Protestant) (Protestant against Catholic).
  • Example: Dirk Willems, who was being followed across an ice lake by religious persecutors, was one such person.
  • Tertullian wrote something along these lines at the turn of the second century: “How would a Christian man fight without a weapon, which the Lord has taken away?” Because the Lord, in disarming Peter, also unbelted every soldier in the army.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The refusal to participate in the World Wars was expressed by certain Christians, particularly Quakers and some Baptists.
See also:  Why Did Jesus Choose Peter

A number of Christian organizations, including Quakers, Anabaptists, Mennonites, and the ‘Simple Way’ movement in Philadelphia, have adopted pacifism as a core component of their practices in recent years.” Christians, particularly Quakers and some Baptists, were vocal in their opposition to fighting in the World Wars.” This group of Christians rejects what they refer to as the “myth of redemptive violence” — the idea that a violent action might bring about a just and lasting settlement to a situation of injustice or contention.

The theologians Walter Wink and John Howard Yoder, as well as the anthropologist and philosopher Rene Girard, are among the contemporary researchers who have investigated these issues.

Even while respecting Jesus’ command to turn the other cheek, these individuals would argue that, in the defense of another, the use of equal or more violence might be justified.

This concept was first introduced by Augustine (around 400 AD), and it was subsequently refined by Thomas Aquinas throughout the thirteenth century. Classical ‘just war theory’ holds that a war may only be conducted if and only if all of the following requirements are satisfied:

  1. Justification – to avert a serious public calamity
  2. Comparative justice requires that the moral wrongs be disproportionately concentrated on one side. Competent authority – the nation must be governed by a lawful authority that is capable of distinguishing between right and wrong in legal concerns
  3. All other options have been explored
  4. This is the last alternative. The likelihood of achieving success According to the principle of proportionality, the projected gains are proportionate to the predicted harm that the conflict would create. Another set of criteria must be followed in order for the conflict to be successful, including the use of proportional force, the distinction between non-combatants and combatants, and the handling of prisoners of war.

When weighed against these considerations, it is arguable how many conflicts in recent times might be considered defensible in the first place. Aside from that, current twists on warfare such as weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the development of global superpowers make it difficult to negotiate the application of these circumstances. Summary: There is no one “Christian” viewpoint on combat, although the vast majority of Christians recognize that violence is completely undesirable and seek ways to prevent, evade, or refuse to participate in it.

What does Christianity teach about war and peace? – War and peace – GCSE Religious Studies Revision

While the Bible does not provide Christians with a definitive answer on whether war is permitted or not, it does have a lot to say about justice, the sanctity of life, the importance of resolving conflict, and the importance of working toward peace. Most Christians believe that war should be avoided whenever possible, and that it should only be used as a last resort when all other attempts to resolve a problem through peaceful means have failed. Many Christians believe that war is the result of humanity’s failure to live up to God’s expectations.

  • According to the book of Isaiah, they will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks; no nation shall lift up sword against nation, nor shall they learn war any longer.
  • For the same reason, you pay taxes as well, because the authorities are ministers of God, and they are responsible for precisely this purpose.
  • Romans 13:6-7 is a passage of Scripture.
  • Some Christians, on the other hand, are pacifists, believing that war is never justifiable.

What do Christians say about justice?

While the Bible does not provide Christians with a definitive answer on whether war is permissible or not, it does have a lot to say about justice, the sanctity of life, the significance of resolving conflict, and the need of fighting for world peace. When at all feasible, most Christians think that war should be avoided, and that it should only be used if all other attempts to resolve a situation via peaceful methods have failed. The inability to live up to God’s standards, in the eyes of many Christians, is the root cause of conflict.

According to the book of Isaiah, they will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks; no nation shall raise up sword against country, nor shall they learn war again.

Ensure that they all get their dues, including taxes to those who owe taxes. Verse 6-7 in Romans 13:6 The vast majority of Christians believe that fighting for your nation is one of these ‘dues.’ But some Christians are pacifists, believing that war can never be justified under any circumstances.

How is the sanctity of life relevant to war?

Believers in God believe that God created them and that each person is made “in the image of God.” As a result, Christians believe that human life is holy and should be preserved. Murder is prohibited under the Ten Commandments, and in Matthew, Jesus instructs his followers to: “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” 5:44 (Matthew 5:44) A number of Christian leaders feel that at times, declaring war is the only option to overcome injustice or protect the principle of the sanctity of life.

When someone slaps you on the right cheek, Jesus instructed his disciples to turn to him on the other cheek as well.

To avoid responding in the same way as the disciples, Jesus instructs them.

Luke 22:36 (NIV) This shows that Jesus acknowledged the need of being able to defend oneself in the face of persecution.

Holy war

As Christians, we believe that God created us and that each individual is made “in the image of God.” Accordingly, Christians believe that life is holy and should be safeguarded at all costs. Murder is prohibited under the Ten Commandments, and in the book of Matthew, Jesus instructs his followers to: “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” Mathew 5:44 is a verse from the Bible that says Some Christians feel that, at times, declaring war is the only way to overcome injustice or preserve the notion of the sanctity of life in order to achieve victory.

‘If somebody slaps you on your right cheek, turn to him on your left cheek as well,’ Jesus instructed his disciples.

Jesus is admonishing his disciples not to respond in the same manner.

Verse 36 of the Gospel of Luke According to this, Jesus acknowledged the need of being able to protect one’s own life.

What does the Bible say about war?

QuestionAnswer When reading Exodus 20:13, many people make the error of assuming that the Bible is saying “You shalt not kill,” and then attempting to apply this mandate to the context of a conflict. Although the Hebrew term precisely means “the purposeful, premeditated death of another person with malice,” it is most commonly used to refer to “murder.” The Israelites were frequently instructed by God to go to battle with other countries (1 Samuel 15:3; Joshua 4:13). For a variety of offenses, God has mandated the death sentence (Exodus 21:12, 15; 22:19; Leviticus 20:11).

  1. War is never a desirable thing, but it is occasionally unavoidable under certain situations.
  2. Sometimes the only way to prevent immoral individuals from causing significant harm to innocent people is to go to battle with them.
  3. “However, in the towns of the nations that the LORD your God is giving you as an inheritance, do not leave alive anything that breathes,” says Deuteronomy 20:16-17.
  4. “Go and totally annihilate that evil people, the Amalekites; wage war on them until you have fully destroyed them,” says 1 Samuel 15:18.
  5. The fact that Jesus is always in complete accord with the Father (John 3:16) means we cannot claim that conflict was simply the result of God’s desire in the Old Testament.
  6. The second coming of Jesus will be extremely violent in nature.
  7. 11).

13 warns that it will be brutal and gory (and it will be).

17-18).

20).

Jesus is not a believer in nonviolence.

How many more millions of people would have died if Hitler had not been vanquished by the Allies during World War II?

How much longer would they have been forced to live as slaves?

Some conflicts are more “fair” than others, but war is always a result of sin on the part of the participants (Romans 3:10-18).

With sin, hate, and wickedness prevalent throughout the globe (Romans 3:10-18), war is unavoidable.

Most importantly, during times of war, we should be praying for God’s wisdom for our leaders, praying for the protection of our soldiers, praying for a swift resolution to disputes, and praying for a minimum number of civilian fatalities on both sides of the battleground (Philippians 4:6-7).

Return to the page with the most recent Bible questions. What does the Bible have to say about fighting?

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QuestionAnswer When reading Exodus 20:13, which states, “You must not kill,” many people make the error of assuming that this commandment is applicable in a combat setting. Although the Hebrew phrase properly means “the purposeful, premeditated death of another person with malice,” it is most commonly used to refer to murder. War with other countries was frequently ordained by God, and the Israelites frequently followed through (1 Samuel 15:3; Joshua 4:13). In various cases, God has commanded the death punishment (Exodus 21:12, 15; 22:19; Leviticus 20:11).

Even while war is never a desirable thing, it is sometimes unavoidable.

Sometimes going to battle is the only option to prevent immoral individuals from causing significant harm to innocent people.

However, according to Deuteronomy 20:16-17, “Do not leave alive anything that breathes in the towns of the nations that the LORD your God is giving you as an inheritance.” As the LORD your God has instructed you, completely annihilate them.” Another verse states, “Go and thoroughly destroy those evil people, the Amalekites; wage war on them until you have entirely annihilated them.” God, it should be noted, is not opposed to all violence and conflict.

  • We cannot claim that war was simply God’s desire in the Old Testament because Jesus is always in complete harmony with the Father (John 10:30).
  • There will be a great deal of violence upon Jesus’ second coming.
  • 11).
  • 13 describes the scene as “bloody and horrific.” All those who stand in His way will be eaten by the birds (v.
  • In His hatred for His foes, whom He would fully defeat and sentence to a “fiery lake of burning sulfur,” He has no mercy on them (v.
  • A common misconception is that God opposes war at all times.
  • It is sometimes essential to wage war in a world populated with wicked individuals in order to prevent even greater evil from taking place.
  • I’m not sure how much longer African-Americans would have been forced to live as slaves if the American Civil War had not occurred.
  • However, while certain battles may be more “fair” than others, they are always ultimately a result of human sin (Romans 3:10-18).
  • With sin, hate, and wickedness pervading the earth (Romans 3:10-18), war is unavoidably unavoidable.
  • Most importantly, during times of war, we should be praying for God’s wisdom for our leaders, praying for the protection of our soldiers, praying for a swift resolution to disputes, and praying for a minimum number of civilian losses on both sides of the battlefield (Philippians 4:6-7).

The page you were looking for was not found. When it comes to warfare, what does the Bible say?

What does it mean that there will be wars and rumors of wars before the end times?

QuestionAnswer “Tell us. what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the era,” Jesus responded to the disciples’ query in part. “And you will hear of wars and rumors of wars,” Jesus said in Matthew 24:3, “and you will hear of wars and rumors of wars” (Matthew 24:6). When there is an outbreak of warfare, particularly in the proximity of Israel, many people are prompted to question whether the new conflict is a sign of Jesus’ imminent return to the earth as recorded in this chapter.

  1. do not be afraid; for this must take happen, but the end is not yet.”.
  2. To interpret Jesus’ comments about “wars and rumors of wars” as implying that fighting is a harbinger of the end times is to misinterpret what He was trying to convey.
  3. In a similar vein, Jesus warned of false Christs (Matthew 24:5), famines, and earthquakes (Matthew 24:7), stating that “all of these are the beginning of the birth pangs” for the world (Matthew 24:8).
  4. Not that wars and war rumors are wholly unconnected to the end times, but it is a stretch to suggest that they are.
  5. Nevertheless, Jesus’ message appears to be that, until He brings peace in the Millennial Kingdom, there will always be conflict on the planet.
  6. There is no crisis today, whether it is a civil war in Africa, conflict between Israel and its neighbors, or the war on terror, that is a guarantee that the end times are approaching.
  7. Questions regarding the End Times (Return to: Questions about the End Times) What does it imply that there will be wars and rumors of conflicts before to the end of the world mean for Christians?
See also:  What Did Jesus Say About Himself In The Bible
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QuestionAnswer The following is an excerpt from His response to the disciples’ query, “Tell us. what will be the sign of your coming and the end of the era.” “And you will hear of wars and rumors of wars,” Jesus said in Matthew 24:3. (Matthew 24:6). When there is an outbreak of warfare, particularly in the area of Israel, many people are prompted to question whether the latest battle is a sign of Jesus’ imminent return to the earth. We only need more people to read Matthew 24:6 in its entirety, which says, “.

  • (emphasis added).
  • In other words, we should not be alarmed or concerned by conflicts or rumors of wars, since “the end is not yet,” as Jesus stated.
  • All of the things that Jesus mentioned as not necessarily being signals of the end times are, unfortunately, exactly what most people consider to be signs of the end times.
  • It is described as severe conflict in the Bible as it speaks about the end times.
  • As a result, wars and rumors of war are not accurate indicators of the end of the world.

It makes no difference what wars and rumors of war are going on around us; our mission remains the same, and the mission is exactly what Jesus says will be a reliable predictor of the end times: “And this gospel of the kingdom will be preached throughout the entire world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come” (Matthew 24:14, emphasis added).

Questions Regarding the End of the World What does it imply that there will be wars and rumors of wars before to the end of the world mean for us today?

Contradictions: War and Peace

God is described as a God of peace in Romans 15:33, while He is described as a man of war in Exodus 15:3. Is this a logical inconsistency? Bodie Hodge, AiG–US, provides further explanation.

The “Problem”

God is described as a God of peace in Romans 15:33, while He is described as a man of war in Exodus 15:3. Lordis a man of battle, and Lordis His given name in this world. (Exodus 15:3; 15:4) Now, may the God of all peace be with you and your families. Amen. (See also Romans 15:33.)

The Solution

The most straightforward response to this seeming conflict is that both statements are correct depending on the moment and place in which they are said. With that in mind, let’s take a look at a few of alternative angles from which we may approach this. Think on the reality that war is frequently fought with the goal of bringing about a peaceful resolution. During World War II, Europe and Asia were immersed in a battle for survival. The United States was watching from the sidelines, hoping that the crisis would be settled without our intervention.

  • The surprise assault on Pearl Harbor by Japanese planes on December 7, 1941, precipitated the United States’ entry into World War II with Japan.
  • The United States became a country of war in an attempt to be a nation of peace and to contribute to the peacekeeping efforts across the world at the time.
  • He created a world that was once flawless and peaceful, and it is only because of mankind’s resistance that it has been subjected to conflict.
  • Bringing about this peace, on the other hand, frequently necessitates the use of force.
  • The Israelites had just been liberated from their cruel rulers when the book of Exodus begins, and God was in the thick of battle at the crossing of the Red Sea as the story begins.
  • Furthermore, we must weigh the victims of conflict as well as the beneficiaries of peacetime agreements.
  • In reality, he has expressed the polar opposite of what you think.
  • The promises of peace offered in Romans 15 and elsewhere are only available to God’s chosen people.

Conclusion

In the broader scheme of things, God did not only battle on the Israelites’ behalf against the Egyptians, but He also waged a war against sin and death, which is the ultimate goal of His existence. Christ defeated these adversaries on the Cross, and He now provides peace to all who place their faith in Him. In Romans and other epistles, Paul elaborates on the topic of peace (e.g.,Romans 5:1, 10:15, 16:20;Philippians 4:7, 9;1 Thessalonians 5:23;2 Thessalonians 3:16;Hebrews 13:20). Christians are no longer at war with God, but rather are at peace with him as a result of their faith in Christ (Ephesians 2:3, 14, 16).

AGodof peace and aGodof war are not incompatible with one another. Master Books has generously allowed AiG permission to distribute excerpts from this book on the internet. Thank you, Master Books! Please visit our online store if you like to purchase a copy.

What Does the Gospel Teach Us About War?

Millions of Americans will be thinking about war on Memorial Day, which is observed on May 28th. This weekend, of course, is a national holiday in which we gather to express our gratitude for the rights that have been earned for us by those who have given their lives in the name of freedom. As Christians, we may express our gratitude to those who have defended life and freedom at the greatest possible risk. We should, however, utilize this national occasion to pause and consider what the gospel has to say about war and how we should respond to it as Christians.

  1. These Christians would argue that it is at the very least incongruous for believers in the gospel to celebrate anything gained by military victory.
  2. While the New Testament does not mandate us to live in peace with all people, it does command us not to seek vengeance against those who have wronged us (Rom 12:18-21).
  3. In addition, Jesus and his apostles forbade the church from taking vengeance on anybody (Matt.
  4. 5:38-44).
  5. 5:12).
  6. 12:14-21), in Romans 13, Paul talks of the Roman state “carrying the sword” against “evildoers” on God’s behalf (Rom.
  7. According to the rest of the Bible, Paul’s advice is appropriate.

Furthermore, even though these soldiers were serving a pagan Roman Empire, Jesus never ordered them to leave their positions in the military, yet he was more than prepared to order prostitutes to leave their places of work.

Peace is difficult because it is idealistic, which makes it impossible to achieve.

Another picture of peace is a regenerated creation in which there is no longer any need for warfare (Isa 2:4).

We have not yet seen everything that is beneath Jesus’ feet (Heb 2:8).

The pacifists are correct in their assertion that war is always terrible.

However, they are mistaken in believing that such peace can be achieved by avoiding war.

This is not a time of peace, but rather of terror.

Anyone who responds to news of turmoil or persecution in another country with the words “Just bomb them” is not a Christian and is speaking outside the path of Christ.

Christians, on the other hand, have always seen war as a tragedy, even if it is the least horrible of the choices that we have to choose from.

After Jesus’ arrest, Jesus chastised Peter for assuming that the response to Jesus’ imprisonment would be the proclamation of a violent counter-action (Matt 26:52).

Truth be told, matters of war and peace are never simple to resolve on this side of the Promised Land.

This idea of “just war” restricts military action to legitimately established governments and establishes tight boundaries on the scope of such fighting.

We shouldn’t wear tie-dyed shirts and think that a United Nations-enforced cease-fire can put a stop to the violence.

If we want real peace, we must image it in the form of the true Emperor of all the universe ruling over a world that is completely devoid of violence, such that we cannot even comprehend the brutality we formerly seen on CNN or Animal Planet.

On that day, and perhaps not until that day, there will be no sound of rattling swords, shooting guns, or bombs bursting in the air to disturb the peace.

FAQ: Did Jesus Come to Bring Peace or a Sword — Peace Catalyst International

Today, we’ll continue our blog series by answering some of the questions we’re asked the most frequently. If you missed them, you may catch up on them by reading our past postings on the subject. Are there any realistic prospects for achieving lasting peace between Christians and Muslims? , What is the relationship between peacemaking and evangelism, and why should we bother with peacemaking? Question 4 on the Frequently Asked Questions list: “I did not come to bring peace, but a sword,” Jesus declared (Matthew 10:34).

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called the children of God,” Jesus remarked in Matthew 5:9.

What is the best way to reconcile these two well-known peace passages?

  • Whether or not this sword passage teaches that violence will always be a part of our interactions with non-Christians
  • Whether or not it teaches that our relationships with non-Christians will always be defined by conflict
  • Does it take precedence over other verses in the Bible that speak about peacemaking?

The context of this scripture about Jesus carrying a sword is that he is commissioning his disciples to spread the Gospel across the world. First and foremost, Jesus instructs them to go in peace: “If the home is worthy, bestow your blessing of peace upon it.” However, if it is not worthy, you may revoke your blessing of tranquility” (Matt 10:13 NASB). Several years later, when Jesus sent out the seventy disciples, he stated this practice in a slightly different way: “When you enter a home, say first, ‘Peace be to this house.'” If there is a person of peace there, your peace will rest on them; if there isn’t, your peace will return to you” (Luke 10:5-6 literal translation).

This means that there are persons of peace in the world who will either react to the gospel or will not respond to the gospel.

I did not come to bring peace, but rather a sword to the table.

Jesus’ disciples are peacemakers and evangelists who breathe blessings of peace into the homes of the families in which they reside.

Families will be separated as a result, and war will erupt as a result.

According to Luke, the image of the sword represents division rather than violence: “Do you suppose I come to bring peace to the earth?” Jesus asks.

The image of the sword was not used to symbolize any type of violence or belligerence on the side of Jesus’ followers, but rather the divided consequences that can sometimes result from evangelical endeavor.

For want of a better phrase, there is the notion that disagreements are unavoidable.

Is it possible that this kind of thinking becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy?

In order to be consistent with the Bible, we must at a bare minimum affirm both realities.

The image of the sword refers to how unbelievers may respond to the gospel, not how we preach the gospel to them. As God’s children, our goal is to reflect the Prince of Peace, regardless of the impact that we have on the world.

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