What Does Jesus Mean In Greek

Jesus (name) – Wikipedia

Jesus

Pronunciation
Gender Male
Origin
Word/name Hebrew
Other names
Related names Joshua,Yeshua,Isa

Isous(o; Iesus in Classical Latin) is an ancient Greek form of the Hebrew and Aramaic names Yeshua and Y’shua (Hebrew: ). It is used as a given name for boys and men. Because its origins lay in the name Yeshua/Y’shua, it is etymologically connected to another biblical name, Joshua, because both names derive from the same root. “Jesus” is not commonly used as a given name in the English-speaking world, but its equivalents, like as the SpanishJesus, have had long-standing popularity among persons from other language backgrounds.

Etymology

There have been a number of different hypotheses as to the actual etymological meaning of the nameYhôua(Joshua,Hebrew:), includingYahweh /Yehowah saves, (is) salvation, (is) a saving-cry, (is) a cry-for-help, (is) my aid, andYahweh /Yehowah saves, (is) salvation, (is) a As may be seen in the Hebrew text of Ezra 2:2, 2:6, 2:36, 2:40, 3:2, 3:8, 3:9, 3:10, 3:18, 4:3, and 8:33, as well as in the Biblical Aramaicat text of Ezra 5:2, Ezra 3:19, 7:7, 7:11, 7:39, 7:43, 8:7, 8:17, 9:4, 9:5, 11:26, 12 These Bible passages are about 10 different people (in Nehemiah 8:17, the name refers toJoshuason ofNun).

  1. This historical transition may have occurred as a result of a phonological shift in which gutturalphonemes, such as, were diminished.
  2. However, this has changed recently (-yah).
  3. During the Second Temple era, the name Yeshua/Y’shua was widely used by Jews, and numerous Jewish religious luminaries, including Joshua in the Hebrew Bible and Jesus in the New Testament, were known by this name.
  4. In contrast, both the Western Syriac Christian tradition and the Eastern Syriac Christian tradition employ the Aramaic names (in Hebrew script: )Yeshu and Yisho, respectively, which include the ayin.
  5. Earlier, in the 3rd century BCE, theSeptuaginthad already transliterated the Hebrew name (Yeshua) into Koine Greek as nearly as possible, resulting in the name (Isous).

When speaking Hebrew or Aramaic during this period, the diphthongalvowel of the Masoretic name Yehoshua or Yeshua would not have been present in the pronunciation of the word, and some scholars believe some dialects dropped the pharyngealsound of the final letter ayin, which had no equivalent in ancient Greek in any case.

  1. According to thePanarionofEpiphanius of Salamis, the nameIsous is derived from Hebrew/Aramaic and means “healer or physician, and savior,” and that the early Christians were known as Jessaeans before they were known as Christians.
  2. From Greek, (Isous) made its way into Latin, at the very least by the time of theVetus Latina.
  3. The word (Isous) was transliterated into the Latin word IESVS, where it remained for centuries.
  4. Minuscule(lower case) letters were formed about the year 800, and a little time later, theUwas invented to separate the vowelsound from the consonantalsound, and theJwas invented to distinguish the consonant from the vowelsound.
  5. The name Jesus comes from the Middle English word Iesu, which means “Jesus” (attested from the 12th century).
  6. Because of this, early 17th century works such asthe first edition of theKing James Version of the Bible(1611) continued to print the name with an I, as did the Frenchman Pierre Ramus in the 16th century.

The English language borrows the Latin names “Jesus” (from the nominative form) and “Jesu” (from the genitive form) (from the vocative and oblique forms). “Jesus” is the most often used version, with “Jesu” appearing in a few older, more ancient manuscripts as well.

Declension

The name is declined in an irregular manner in both Latin and Greek:

Latin Greek
nominative Jēsūs Iēsūs(Iēsus) Ἰησοῦς
accusative Jēsūm Iēsūm(Iēsum) Ἰησοῦν
dative Jēsū Iēsū Ἰησοῦ
genitive
vocative
ablative

Biblical references

Jesus (Yeshua) appears to have been in common usage in the Land of Israel around the time of Jesus’ birth, according to archaeological evidence. As an added bonus, Philo’s reference to Joshua (o), which means redemption () of the Lord inMutatione Nominumitem 121 suggests that the etymology of Joshua was known outside of Israel. Jesus Barabbas, Jesus ben Ananias, and Jesus ben Sirach are some of the other characters with the name Jesus. In the New Testament, an angel advises Mary to name her child Jesus inLuke 1:31, and an angel tells Joseph to name the kid Jesus in Matthew 1:21, both of which occur during Joseph’s first dream.

“You shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins,” the angel says.

At the same time, it accomplishes the dual objectives of recognizing Jesus as the savior and emphasizing that the name was not chosen at random but rather in response to a divine order.

Other usage

During the 1380s, John Wycliffe used the spellingIhesusand also used the spellingIhesu(the letter ‘J’ was then awash glyphvariant of ‘I’, and was not considered to be a separate letter until the 1629 Cambridge 1st RevisionKing James Biblewhere the name “Jesus” first appeared) in oblique cases and also in the accusative, and sometimes, seemingly without reason, even for the nominative. Unlike Tyndale, who used Iesuin oblique cases and in the vocative on occasion in the 16th century, the 1611King James Version uses Iesus throughout, independent of syntax and case.

Jesu (pronounced JEE -zoo; derived from the Latin Iesu) is a pronoun that is sometimes used to refer to Jesus in English.

Other languages

The nameJesus is used in numerous languages, including East Scandinavian, German, and several others. Other examples of language use are as follows:

Language Name/variant
Afrikaans Jesus
Albanian Jezui
Arabic ʿIsàعيسى(Islamic or classical arabic) /Yasūʿيسوع(Christian or latter Arabic)
Amharic ኢየሱስ(iyesus)
Aragonese Chesús
Aramaic / Syriac ܝܫܘܥ(Isho)
Arberesh Isuthi
Armenian Հիսուս (Eastern Armenian) Յիսուս (Western Armenian)(Hisus)
Azerbaijani İsa
Belarusian Ісус(Isus) (Orthodox) /Езус(Yezus) (Catholic)
Bengali যীশু(Jeeshu/Zeeshu) (Christian)’ঈসা(‘Eesa) (General)
Breton Jezuz
Bulgarian Исус (Isus)
Catalan Jesús
Chinese simplified Chinese:耶稣;traditional Chinese:耶穌;pinyin:Yēsū
Coptic Ⲓⲏⲥⲟⲩⲥ(Isos)
Cornish Yesu
Croatian Isus
Czech Ježíš
Dutch Jezus
Estonian Jeesus
Filipino Jesús(Christian and secular) /HesúsorHesukristo(religious)
Fijian Jisu
Finnish Jeesus
French Jésus
Galician Xesús
Garo Jisu
Georgian იესო(Ieso)
German Jesus
Ewe Yesu
Greek Ιησούς(Iisúsmodern Greek pronunciation)
Haitian Creole Jezi
Hausa Yesu
Hawaiian Iesū
Hebrew Yeshua /Y’shuaיֵשׁוּעַ
Hindustani ईसा / عيسى (īsā)
Hmong Daw Yexus
Hungarian Jézus
Icelandic Jesús
Igbo Jisos
Indonesia Yesus (Christian) / Isa (Islamic)
Irish Íosa
Italian Gesù
Japanese イエス (Iesu)/イエズス (Iezusu)(Catholic)/ゼス(zesu) ゼズス(zezusu)(Kirishitan)イイスス(Iisusu)(Eastern Orthodox)
Jinghpaw Yesu
Kannada ಯೇಸು (Yesu)
Kazakh Иса (Isa)
Khasi Jisu
Khmer យេស៑ូ (Yesu), យេស៑ូវ (Yesuw)
Kikuyu Jeso
Kisii Yeso
Korean 예수 (Yesu)
Kurdish Îsa
Latvian Jēzus
Ligurian Gesû
Limburgish Zjezus
Lithuanian Jėzus
Lombard Gesü
Luganda Yesu
Māori Ihu
मराठी-Marathi येशू – Yeshu
Malagasy Jeso, Jesoa, Jesosy
Malayalam ഈശോ (Īsho), യേശു (Yēshu), കർത്താവ് (Kartāvŭ) (Karthavu is the literal translation of ‘Lord’)
Mirandese Jasus
Maltese Ġesù
Mongolian Есүс
Neapolitan Giesù
Norman Jésus
Occitan Jèsus
Piedmontese Gesù
Polish Jezus
Portuguese Jesus
Romanian Iisus (Eastern Orthodox) / Isus (other denominations)
Russian Иисус (Iisus)
Sardinian Gesùs
Serbian Isus / Исус
Sicilian Gesù
Sinhala ජේසුස් වහන්සේ – Jesus Wahanse (Catholic Church), යේසුස් වහන්සේ – Yesus Wahanse (Protestantism)
Shona Jesu
Slovak Ježiš
Slovenian Jezus
Somali Ciise
Spanish Jesús
Swahili Yesu
Tajik Исо (Iso)
Tamil Yesu (இயேசு)
Telugu యేసు – ఏసు -Yesu
Thai เยซู – “Yesu”
Turkish İsa
Turkmen Isa
Ukrainian Ісус (Isus)
Urdu عیسیٰ
Uzbek Iso
Venetian Jesu
Vietnamese Giêsu, Dêsu
Welsh Iesu
Xhosa Yesu
Yoruba Jesu
Zulu uJesu

See also

  • Name of Jesus
  • Isa (name)
  • Joshua (disambiguation)
  • Holy Name of Jesus

References

  1. It is also known as the Holy Name of Jesus, Isa, or Joshua (depending on who you ask).

Bibliography

  • Graham DaviesJames K. AitkenJames K. Aitken (2016). “Another ‘Deliverance’ Word from the SAHD” “Lexeme: (from the SAHD ‘Deliverance’ Words” (PDF). Robinson, Neal’s Semantics of Ancient Hebrew Database is 15 pages long and has 15 entries (2005). “Jesus”. Jane Dammen is a character in McAuliffe (ed.). The Qur’an is an encyclopedia of knowledge. Brill, doi: 10.1163/1875-3922 q3 EQCOM 00099
  • Stegemann, Ekkehard (Basle)
  • Stegemann, Ekkehard (Basle) (2006). “Jesus”. Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider published a book titled (eds.). Brill’s New Pauly (doi: 10.1163/1574-9347 bnp e522560)
  • Brill’s New Pauly (doi: 10.1163/1574-9347 bnp e522560)
  • Bri
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What Does the Name ‘Jesus’ Mean?

The name Jesus literally translates as “Savior.” It is the same name as Joshua, who appears in the Old Testament of the Bible. The crown of glory has been granted to our Lord because “He rescues His people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21). For sinners who are feeling the weight of the world, the name Jesus is a source of great encouragement. Considering he is already known as the King of kings and the Lord of lords, it is possible that he may have legally adopted a more prestigious title.

He, on the other hand, does not do so. Many of the rulers of this planet have referred to themselves as “great,” “conquerors,” “bold,” “magnificent,” and other like titles. In his own words, theSon of God is satisfied to refer to himself as Savior.

Where the Name Jesus Came From: Hebrew and Greek Origins

Eastern Bible Dictionary states that the name Jesus is a Greek variant of the Hebrew name Joshua, which was originally Hoshea (which means “salvation” in Hebrew) (Numbers 13:8,Numbers 13:16). This form was modified by Moses to Jehoshua (Numbers 13:16; 1 Chronicles 7:27), which is also known as Joshua. Then, following Israel’s exile in Babylon, it adopted the form Jeshua, which is derived from which we obtain the Greek name Jesus. It was given to our Lord to serve as a reminder of the purpose of his mission, which was to rescue mankind (Matthew 1:21).

The Importance of Jesus’ Title as Christ

Before and after the biblical Jesus, there have been a slew of persons with the name Jesus. However, only this Jesus is referred to as Jesus Christ or Christ Jesus, not the other Jesuses. The term Christ serves to further emphasize his exclusive identity and purpose. According to Easton’s Bible Dictionary, the term “Christ” refers to the anointed one. The Greek term “anointed” refers to the Hebrew word “Messiah,” which is the title given to Jesus by the Romans. This term appears 514 times in the New Testament, all of which are associated with Jesus.

Jesus’ given name includes the terms Christ, Anointed/Messiah, which is significant because of the Old Testament prophecies regarding the coming Messiah.

The Meaning of Jesus’ Name as Savior

As previously established, the name Jesus refers to a rescuer. This is the unique role He has. He frees his people from the penalty of sin by washing them clean in His own atoning blood on the cross. He delivers people from the tyranny of sin by instilling the sanctifying Spirit in the hearts of believers. When He removes them out of this world and places them in His presence, He saves them from the presence of sin. The Lord will save people from all of the consequences of their sins when He returns to earth in a gorgeous form at the end of time.

It is His responsibility and pleasure to extend mercy.

Why Do Christians Pray “In Jesus’ Name”?

Take a look at this video to hear Don Whitney, professor of biblical spirituality at Southern Seminary, discuss why Christians frequently finish prayers with the phrase “in Jesus’ name.” The act of praying in Jesus’ name signifies that we are come in the righteousness of Christ, rather than our own righteousness. Our prayers aren’t worthy of being heard by God, but Jesus’ prayer is, and we come in his name.” In addition, it implies that we are coming in and asking the kinds of questions that we imagine Jesus would ask if he were in our position.

In comparison to the bigger truth, which is that we come in the righteousness of Christ, this is a smaller truth. “Because of Jesus, God hears our prayers.” You can listen to the remainder of the interview here.

What Does it Mean to Take the Name of Jesus in Vain?

The third commandment of the Ten Commandments states that one should not use God’s name in vain (Exodus 20:7). The phrase “in vain” refers to something that is “empty, idle, insincere, or frivolous.” As a result, to take God’s name in vain implies to speak it in a way that is empty, idle, insincere, or frivolous in its intent. And one of the most apparent methods of accomplishing this is by the use of profanity in one’s speech. We’ve all heard the name of Jesus used as a punctuation mark to emphasize a point.

Paul tells us in Philippians 2:9-11 that “God has also highly elevated Him and given Him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow.”

Research Source:

Dr. Walter C. Kaiser Jr., of Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, has written a book on Jesus in the Old Testament. Based on the book The Gospel of Matthew by J.C. Ryle (Chapter 1). Photograph courtesy of Thinkstock/Eskemar

Jesus’ Name and its Meaning in Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic

In the New Testament, the power of Jesus’ name is a prominent subject that runs throughout the whole book. Demons flee, the sick are healed, and all of creation bends its head in adoration when the name of Jesus is spoken. When it comes to language, the name Jesus bears a great deal of significance in its native culture, and this is true both in the Greek and in the Hebrew languages. When you say Jesus’ name in English, you’re saying Isus, which is a translation of the GreekIesous, which is a transliteration of the Aramaic nameYeshua, which is a transliteration of the HebrewYehoshua, or Joshua, which comes from the Hebrew A combination of the Hebrew verbyasha, which means “he rescues,” and the personal name Ya, which is short for Yahweh, gave rise to this moniker for God.

From Joshua to Yeshua: Jesus’ Name in His Native Tongue (Aramaic)

As a second temple Jew growing up in early first century Israel, Jesus’ native language would have been Aramic, as would have been expected of him. Thus, his given name would have beenYeshua, which is merely the Aramaic version of the Hebrew nameYehoshua (Jesus Christ) (Joshua). The sound -h was omitted from the name Yehoshua at some time throughout the history of the Hebrew language, resulting in the spellingYeshua. This is the form that appears to have been chosen in later Hebrew, and it is the one that has made its way into Aramaic and other languages.

But how did we get from Yehoshua and Yeshua toJesus in the first place?

From Yeshua to Iesous: Jesus’ Name in the Langua Franca (Greek)

However, while Aramaic would have been Jesus’ native language, he would very have have comprehended and spoken Greek, as it was the dominant language at the time. With this in mind, Greek is the universal language that would have been used by everyone in the Mediterranean region for the sake of trade and other social interactions. The possibility that Jesus would have been addressed as Iesous by anybody, even by Greek speakers, is extremely remote. It’s likely that people still referred to him as Yeshua.

This means that they were only able to write in the Greek Alphabet. A couple of changes would have been necessary for the scribes to be able to spell Yeshua correctly in Greek. Y-e-sh-u-aI-e-s-o-u-s The first three letters are understandable. In Greek, there is no aspirated -sh sound, which means

From Iesous to Jesus: Why We Don’t Call Him Joshua

It was the LatinIesus who succeeded the GreekIesous, and it is from this that we derive our spelling Jesus. Understanding why we spell and pronounce particular names in the Bible the way we do requires some background knowledge of the historical context in which our Bible was written. At first appearance, the solution appears to be rather straightforward. Our Old Testament is derived from the Hebrew Bible, while our New Testament is derived from the Greek texts of the early Christian church. Yes, that’s correct.

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What we have are copies of copies of copies of copies of copies of copies of the originals.

Our most recent translations, such as the NIV or the ESV, are as near to the original as is feasible to the text.

A Rose By Any Other Name

This has been a fairly nerdy post about one of my favorite subjects, which you can read about here. It doesn’t really matter if we call Jesus or Joshua by their given names at the end of the day, though. What matters is that Jesus’ name, and indeed his whole identity, is founded on the reality that Yahweh is a God who heals people from their sins. Yahweh is a God who is defined by his ability to save people. That is the name that was given to Jesus by the angel as well as by his father and mother.

And it is in the name of Jesus that every knee will bend in heaven, on earth, and under the surface of the earth.

And that is the term by which we, as Christians, identify ourselves.

Does the name “Jesus” actually mean “Hail, Zeus”?

Despite the fact that this is a geeky post on one of my favorite subjects, I hope you enjoyed it! It doesn’t really matter if we call Jesus or Joshua by their given names at the end of the day, either. What matters is that Jesus’ name, his entire identity, is built on the fact that Yahweh is a God who saves people from their sins and from their oppression. In Yahweh’s eyes, salvation is what defines him. Because of this, the angel and his parents have given Jesus the name “Jesus.” As God manifested himself in the flesh, he assumed this persona.

The name by which every tongue will acknowledge the Lordship of Jesus Christ will be that name.

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What the Name “Jesus” Means for Believers

God’s Son is known by the human nameJesus (Greek: Isous). This was not a choice made by Joseph and Mary; rather, it was an order from on high (Matt. 1:21; Luke 1:31). That is not to argue that the name “Jesus” was unique, because there were other males with the same name (Col. 4:11). Until the beginning of the second century AD, it was a common given name among Jewish people. 1As a result, people referred to him as “Jesus of Nazareth” in order to distinguish him from other people who shared the same name.

Why did God, through angels, decree that this name be given to his incarnate Son in the first place? The answer to this question may be found in both the historical context of the name and its etymological meaning. “Jesus” was a historical figure.

The Origins of the Name “Jesus”

“Jesus” or “Joshua” are derived from Hebrew words that indicate “the Lord is salvation.” 7The Scriptures use God’s name with the word “salvation” to emphasize that the Lord, and only the Lord, rescues his people from evil by his sovereign love and mercy. 8Normally, we should proceed with caution when deducing the meaning of words from their etymology rather than from their usage, but the Scriptures plainly teach, “Thou shalt call his name Jesus: for he shall redeem his people from their sins” (Matt.

As a result, according to John of Damascus, the name “Jesus” refers to the fact that he is the Savior.

The Greek term “he shall save” means “he will save” or “he will deliver.”

Hope in His Name

“Jesus” or “Joshua” are derived from Hebrew words that indicate “the Lord is salvation.” 7The Scriptures pair God’s name with the word “salvation” to emphasize that the Lord, and only the Lord, rescues his people from evil by his sovereign mercy. “Thou shalt call his name Jesus: for he shall rescue his people from their sins,” the Scriptures expressly state. “Thou shalt call his name Jesus: for he shall save his people from their sins,” the Scriptures expressly teach (Matt. 1:21). As a result, according to John of Damascus, the name “Jesus” denotes that he is the Saviour.

The Greek term “he shall save” means “he shall save his people from their enemies.”

  1. “Jesus” or “Joshua” are derived from Hebrew words that indicate “the Lord is salvation.” 7The Scriptures use God’s name with the word “salvation” to emphasize that the Lord, and only the Lord, rescues his people from evil by his sovereign mercy. 8Normally, we should use caution when interpreting the meaning of words from their etymology rather than from their usage, but the Scriptures plainly teach, “Thou shalt call him name Jesus: for he shall rescue his people from their sins” (Matt. 1:21). As a result, according to John of Damascus, the name “Jesus” signifies that he is the Savior. 9Unlike Joshua, Jesus does not just save his people from physical perils
  2. He also grants them triumph over the spiritual evil that separates them from God. The Greek term “he shall save” means “he shall save his people from their dangers.”

Adapted fromReformed Systematic Theology: Volume 2: Man and Christby Joel R. Beeke and Paul M. Smalley (Reformed Systematic Theology: Volume 2) Joel R. Beeke (PhD, Westminster Theological Seminary) is the author of more than one hundred books in various genres. Besides serving as the president and professor of systematic theology and homiletics at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary, he also serves as a pastor at the Heritage Reformed Congregation in Grand Rapids, Michigan, as the editor of the journalBanner of Sovereign Grace Truth, as the editorial director of Reformation Heritage Books, as the president of Inheritance Publishers, and as vice president of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society.

Professor Joel Beeke is assisted by Paul M.

He previously worked as a pastor in the Baptist General Conference in the midwestern United States, where he spent the preceding twelve years.

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Jesus: Name Meaning, Popularity and Info on BabyNames.com

In most cases, the name Jesus is a male given name of Greek origin that translates as “God Is Salvation.” Messiah (Yeshua) is a Greek version of the Hebrew name Yeshua, which is also the source of our current name Joshua. In Spanish-speaking nations, it is most frequently used as a given name for boys. In English, it is pronounced GEE-zus, and in Spanish, it is pronounced Hey-ZOOS.

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People who like the nameJesusalso like:

Manuel,Joshua,Jose,David,Daniel,Jacob,Christopher,Aurora,Jennifer,Sofia,Alexandra,Irene,Lily,Paulina

Names that sound likeJesus:

Ja,Jace,Jack,Jackie,Jacques,Jake,Jay,Jess,Jesse,Jessie,Jock,Joe,Joey,Joie,Jose,Josh,Joshua,Joshwa,Josiah,Josie,Josue,Joy,Joyce,Juji,Jessica,Jo,Jacey,Jui,Jag,Jase

Stats for the NameJesus

To listen to the song on iTunes, click the button. American Jesus is a bad example of religion. Tom Waits’ song “Chocolate Jesus” Bobbie Bare performs Drop Kick Me Jesus (Through The Goalposts Of Life). The Indigo Girls are calling out to Jesus. Morrissey’s song, “I’ve Forgiven Jesus,” is an example of forgiveness. Jesus is the King, and the Queen is Jesus. The Velvet Underground’s song “Jesus” Garnet Rogers performs a duet with Jesus and Elvis. The ministry of Jesus built my hotrod. Jesus Christ is a completely new creation.

  1. Jesus, You Know Who I Am-Genesis Robbie Williams’ song “Jesus in a Camper Van” is a classic.
  2. King Missile declares that Jesus is “very cool.” Peter, Paul, and Mary were there when Jesus met the woman.
  3. Bush, Jesus, and the Internet Carrie Underwood’s song “Jesus Take the Wheel” In the words of George Michael, Jesus is like a child.
  4. King Missile proclaimed that Jesus was “very cool.” Mrs

Should You Really Be Calling Jesus by the Name Yeshua?

Is Yeshua the correct spelling of Jesus’ given name? It is believed by followers of Messianic Judaism, Jews who embrace Jesus Christ as the Messiah, and they are not alone in their belief. In fact, some Christians believe that individuals who refer to Christ by his Hebrew name, Yeshua, rather than by his English name, Jesus, are worshipping the incorrect savior. These Christians believe that naming the Messiah by his given name, Jesus, is equivalent to calling the Messiah by the name of the Greek deity Zeus.

What Is Jesus’ Real Name?

Was the name Yeshua used to refer to Jesus in his early life? Messianic Jews, or Jews who believe that Jesus Christ is the Messiah, believe this, and they are not alone in their beliefs. As a matter of fact, some Christians believe that individuals who refer to Christ by his Hebrew name (Yeshua) rather than by his English name (Jesus) are worshipping the incorrect Messiah.

They feel that using the name Jesus is equivalent to referring to the Messiah by his Greek deity Zeus’s name, which they consider to be insulting.

The Connection Between Jesus and Zeus

The names Jesus and Zeus have absolutely nothing to do with each other. This hypothesis is based on fabrications and has made its way across the internet, where it has been joined by a slew of other false and misleading material.

More Than One Jesus in the Bible

Jesus Christ, in reality, was not the only Jesus mentioned in the Bible; there were other others. Jesus Barabbas is one of several people with the same name that are mentioned in the Bible. He is commonly referred to as simply Barabbas, and he was the prisoner. Pilate was released rather than Jesus Christ: “Which one do you want me to release to you: Jesus Barabbas, or Jesus who is considered the Messiah?” Pilate inquired of the multitude after it had assembled. (Matthew 27:17, New International Version) In the genealogy of Jesus, an ancestor of Christ is referred to as Jesus (Joshua) in Luke 3:29, according to the Bible.

and Jesus, whose surname is Justus.

Are You Worshiping the Wrong Savior?

The Bible does not give preference to one language (or translation) over another in terms of significance. We are not required to invoke the Lord’s name entirely in Hebrew, as we are in other languages. Furthermore, it makes no difference how we say his name. And it shall come to pass that everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord will be saved, according to the text of Acts 2:21. (ESV). God is aware of those who invoke his name, regardless of whether they do it in English, Portuguese, Spanish, or Hebrew.

In the words of Matt Slickat, Christian Apologetics and Research Ministry, “Some believe that if we don’t pronounce Jesus’ name correctly, we are in sin and serving a false deity; however such allegation cannot be supported by the Scripture.” It is not the same as how you pronounce

What does the name “Jesus” mean?

Neither one language (or translation) is given precedence over another in the Bible. We are not required to invoke the Lord’s name completely in Hebrew, as we are in the Bible. No matter how we say his name, it doesn’t make a difference. And it shall come to pass that everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord will be saved, according to the scripture Acts 2:21. (ESV). It makes no difference if someone shouts out to God in English, Portuguese, Spanish, or Hebrew; God is aware of all who cry on his name.

In the words of Matt Slickat, Christian Apologetics and Research Ministry, “Some argue that if we don’t pronounce Jesus’ name correctly, we are in sin and serving a false deity; however such allegation cannot be supported by the Scripture.

What does the name “Jesus” mean?

The Bible does not give preference to one language (or translation) over another in terms of importance. We are not required to invoke the name of the Lord solely in Hebrew. It also doesn’t matter how we say his name. “And it shall come to pass that everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord shall be saved,” says Acts 2:21. (ESV). God is aware of those who invoke his name, regardless of whether they do it in English, Portuguese, Spanish, or even Hebrew. Jesus Christ is still the same Lord and Savior as he was when he died.

“Some believe that if we don’t pronounce Jesus’ name correctly, we are in sin and serving a false deity; nevertheless, such allegation cannot be supported by the Scriptures,” says Matt Slickat of Christian Apologetics and Research Ministry. It is not the same as the pronunciation of

The origin of the name Jesus

Whenever we say “Jesus,” we’re actually speaking about ananglicized version of the Greek nameIsous, which correlates to the Hebrew nameYeshua, which is an abbreviated form of the full nameYehoshua. Yehoshua is composed of two distinct pieces. The prefix “Yeho” is a shortened form of the Tetragrammaton, which is the four-letter name of God in Hebrew language (YHWH). This prefix can be found in a variety of Hebrew names, including:

  • Jehoshaphat (YHWH has judged)
  • Jehoiachin (YHWH has established)
  • Jehonathan (YHWH has given)
  • Jehoshaphat (YHWH has judged)
  • Jehoshaphat (YHWH has given)

The second half of the name is derived from the Hebrew word “yasha,” which means “rescue,” “deliver,” or “save,” among other things. The fact that Yahweh will save is communicated via the name of Jesus!

Jesus: the dramatic significance of a common name

It’s important to note that Yeshua is an extremely common given name. It wouldn’t be much different if He had been born in the twenty-first century in Philadelphia under the name John Smith. Let us pause for a minute to reflect on the importance of giving Jesus such a common name. A dream in which an angel of the Lord appears to Joseph and encourages the young man to accept the pregnant Mary as his wife includes the following instruction: “Because Joseph her husband was faithful to the law, and yet did not want to expose her to public disgrace, he had in mind to divorce her quietly.” Following this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph son of David, do what the Lord commands you.”

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