What Did Jesus Say About Forgiveness

6 Things Jesus Says About Forgiveness

Blog about the Bible God wants us to forgive those who have harmed us, and it is one of the most difficult things we must do. However, what if the offense against you is so severe that it appears unforgivable? What if the offense against you is so painful that it appears unforgivable? What is the best way to forgive someone who has broken your heart or damaged someone you care about? Jesus, who was in pain on the cross and cried, “It is finished,” provides us with the most perfect example of forgiveness “Father, please forgive them!

Here are a few passages from the Bible in which Jesus speaks about the grace of forgiveness and why it is so important to have it:

  1. “If you forgive others for the wrongs they have done to you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you for the same wrongs. However, if you do not forgive others, your Father will not forgive you for the wrongs that you have committed against them.” – Matthew 6.14-15 GNTD
  2. – Matthew 6.14-15 GNTD
  3. “If your brother sins, admonish him, and if he repents, accept his repentance and forgiveness. Likewise, if somebody sins against you seven times in one day and each time he comes to you and says, ‘I repent,’ you are required to accept his apology.” According to the GNTD version of Luke 17.3-4, “And when you get up and pray, forgive everyone or everything that you may be holding against them, so that your Father in heaven will forgive the wrongs you have done.” “Do not judge others, and God will not judge you
  4. Do not condemn others, and God will not condemn you
  5. Forgive others, and God will forgive you,” says Mark 11.25 GNTD. – Luke 6.37 GNTD
  6. – Luke 6.37 GNTD
  7. “Peter then approached Jesus and said, “Lord, if my brother continues to transgress against me, how many times do I have to forgive him?” (Matthew 18:15). ‘Seven times?’ I ask. Then Jesus clarified that it was not seven times but rather seventy times seven.” In the Gospel of Matthew 18.21-22, Jesus says, “Drink it, all of you
  8. This is my blood, which seals God’s covenant, my blood which has been poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.” – Matthew 26.27-29 GNTD
  9. Matthew 26.27-29 GNTD

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What Does the Bible Really Teach About Forgiveness?

There is no secret formula that can allow us to forgive without resentment. We must set it as a goal and work toward it on a continuous basis. Keeping in mind that the other person is just as guilty of sin as we are is a good place to start, according to the teachings of the Bible (Ephesians 4:32;Colossians 3:12-13). Knowing that we are all separated from God because of our sin might help us put things in better perspective. Perhaps one of the best ways to begin the process of forgiving someone is to pray that God would help you to see them as HE sees them, rather than as you perceive them.

  • Allow God to break your heart for them and, as a result, cure you of the pain you have suffered at their hands.
  • If this pattern of behavior persists, the offender has not repented, and the rule of severance should be applied to the case.
  • In the event that you are the one who has done wrong, how do you go about seeking and accepting forgiveness?
  • In order to beg forgiveness, you must first apologize to the person you have offended in the most kind manner possible and inform them that you will never again do so.
  • I am not saying that this will happen immediately; healing might take time depending on the nature of the crime and the extent to which someone was injured as a result of it.
  • It may take some time before it is appropriate for you to request forgiveness from someone, and you may end up aggravating the situation.
  • Forgiveness is vital, even if it is difficult.
  • If we block off the route of forgiveness from someone else, God himself will cut off the avenue of forgiveness from ourselves.

Photo courtesy of Christiana Rivers on Unsplash. The Reverend Dr. Larry White is the Pastor of Community United Methodist Church in Marathon, Florida, and an Adjunct Professor at Florida Keys Community College, where he teaches courses in World Religions and the New Testament.

What does the Bible say about forgiveness? What does it mean to forgive?

Answer Although the Bible does not provide a “dictionary” definition of forgiveness, it does provide several examples of it. The forgiveness of God is the most inspiring of all instances of mercy and grace. Despite the fact that the following verse does not use the word “forgive,” it clearly captures the notion of God’s forgiveness: Psalm 103:8–12: Psalm 103:8–12: The Lord is merciful and kind, and he is slow to anger and overflowing in love toward His people. Neither will he always accuse us, nor will he hold on to his wrath indefinitely; he does not treat us as our faults merit, nor does he recompense us according to our transgressions.

  1. It’s vital to remember that forgiveness only works in the context of a sinful situation.
  2. Now, please pardon the crimes of the servants of the God of your father, who have done wrong in your name.
  3. As a result, the priest will make atonement for them for the sin that they have done, and they will be forgiven.
  4. And thus I tell you, every type of sin and slander may be forgiven, but blasphemy against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven.
  5. This is referred to as confession.
  6. 1 John 1:8–10: The Bible says in 1 John 1:8–10: If we assert that we are sinless, we are deceiving ourselves, and the truth is not in us at all.
  7. If we assert that we have not sinned, we make God out to be a liar, and his word is no longer in us.
  8. In the Old Testament, God permitted a sacrificial animal to be sacrificed in lieu of a sinner who had committed a sin.
  9. It is a restitution for past wrongs.

They will be pardoned because the priest will atone for their sins with the ram, which will be offered as a guilt sacrifice.” In the words of the writer of Hebrews, “The law requires that practically everything be cleaned with blood, and there is no forgiveness without the shedding of blood” (Hebrews 9:22).

  1. It just postponed the judgment until a more suitable sacrifice could be provided in order to pay the full cost of sin and make reconciliation possible.
  2. As a result, it will never be possible to make perfect individuals who approach the altar through the same sacrifices that are repeated endlessly year after year.
  3. It is because of this that the worshipers would have been cleansed once for all, and they would no longer have felt responsible for their misdeeds.
  4. It is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to cleanse a person of his or her sin.
  5. However, once this priest had given a single sacrifice for all time, he was invited to sit at the right hand of the Almighty.
  6. And once sins have been forgiven, there is no longer a need for a sin offering to be made.
  7. “This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the remission of sins,” Jesus said to His followers during the Last Supper, alluding to that sacrifice (Matthew 26:28).
  8. Acts 13:38: As a result, dear friends, I want you to be aware that the remission of sins has been declared to you through Jesus Christ.
  9. The sole need is that sinful individuals acknowledge their wrongdoing, repent of it, and place their faith in Jesus Christ as their Savior.
  10. “Be patient with one another and forgive one another if any of you has a grudge against someone.” “Ask forgiveness as the Lord has forgiven you” (Colossians 3:13).
  11. Christians should be prepared to forgive those who have wronged them in some way or another.

In Matthew 18:21–35, Jesus provides an illustration of his point: Afterwards, Peter approached Jesus and said, “Lord, how many times do I have to forgive my brother or sister who trespasses against me?” “Can you do it up to seven times?” “I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times,” Jesus said.

  • The settlement was interrupted when a man was brought to him who owed him ten thousand bags of gold was handed to him.
  • “ When he said this, the servant went to his knees in front of him.
  • “ However, when that servant stepped outside, he saw one of his fellow servants who owed him a hundred silver pieces, which he promptly paid.
  • I requested that you pay back what you owed me.’ ” Then his colleague went on his knees and pleaded with him, saying, ‘Be patient with me, and I will repay you.'” He, on the other hand, declined.
  • When the other slaves witnessed what had transpired, they were angry and immediately hurried to their lord to inform him of what had occurred.
  • ‘You naughty servant,’ he said, referring to the fact that he had cancelled all of his debt because you had urged him to do so.
  • When you do not forgive your brother or sister from your heart, my heavenly Father will punish everyone of you in this manner.” The expression “forgive and forget” is one that we hear a lot, yet it may be deceptive.

Abuse is something that will stay with a person for the rest of their lives.

Parents who have had their children kidnapped will very certainly think about that crime every single day they live on this planet.

It is not mentioned in the Bible that remembering and forgetting have anything to do with the storage of knowledge in the brain.

Perhaps God had forgotten about Noah and misplaced him among the floodwaters for a period of time before remembering and deciding to check on him at a later date.

Whenever the Bible states that God “remembered” Noah, it signifies that God decided to intervene on Noah’s behalf and provided a wind to aid in the swift receding of the floodwaters.

(Jeremiah 31:34; cf.

After individuals sin, God does not forget about them; instead, He chooses not to act on the basis of their transgressions when they are forgiven.

The terms forgive and forget are actually synonyms in the phrase forgive and forget.

A person may recall that something occurred, but he or she may choose not to act on that memory, which is known as biblical forgetfulness.

In some cases, victims of crime will be given the opportunity to talk with the criminal before the punishment is handed down.

However, on rare occasions, the victim will express her gratitude to the attacker by saying, “I forgive you.” Are there any legal implications of this pardon, considering that the convicted offender has not confessed or begged for forgiveness?

On the one hand, the victim frequently forgives the criminal in order to avoid being consumed by hatred for the perpetrator.

God, on the other hand, forgives individuals when they confess their sins and beg for forgiveness; forgiveness can only be obtained by trust in Christ, which entails a spiritual development in the individual.

The objective of biblical forgiveness is not just to help the victim, but also to return the offender to his or her former state of being.

Consequently, in some instances, the person who has been wronged is justified in refusing to “let it go” until the wrongdoer has shown a desire to be forgiven.

To just forgive his adolescent son for breaking his rules (as well as the law) by drinking and driving would be irresponsible, especially if the son refuses to accept that what he did was wrong.

In certain cases, offering unrequested forgiveness diminishes the notion of forgiveness and fails to recognize the gravity of the transgression.

Naturally, on some of those occasions, the request may be made in bad faith, or, even if the request is genuine, the person may later commit the same offense against us in the future.

In some cases, the person who has been wronged is justified in simply “letting it go,” even if forgiveness has not been requested; in other cases, the person who has been wronged is justified in waiting until the offending party has confessed and asked for forgiveness before attempting to repair the relationship.

  1. It is only after confrontation with the sinner that confession occurs that reconciliation and forgiveness can be offered.
  2. People should let minor slights and crimes go unpunished in the family and in the church as a general rule—to “turn the other cheek,” as Jesus said—in order to avoid further repercussions (Matthew 5:39).
  3. Under no circumstances is it permissible to harbor resentment, nurture bitterness, or spread rumor about the offense committed against you.
  4. Is there anyone against whom I have sinned and whom I need to seek forgiveness?
  5. If someone has sinned against me and sought for forgiveness, and I have refused to forgive them, is there anyone else who has done the same?

Are you going to simply “let it go” if there is an unresolved issue, or are you going to confront the offender directly? (Holding on to a grudge is not an option according to the Bible!) Would I be willing to forgive if the person who wronged me came to me and begged for forgiveness?

Forgiveness Bible Verses

Biblical Teaching on Forgiveness – Examine biblical passages that provide biblical advice on forgiveness and the importance of forgiving others as we have been forgiven by the blood of Jesus Christ. Because of God’s kindness and mercy, we are always allowed to begin anew in our relationship with him. Because of the death and resurrection of Jesus, we are offered complete and total forgiveness of our sins when we confess them. Taking into consideration our fresh beginning, God requires that we forgive others and provide forgiveness in the same way that we have been shown grace.

  1. The sorrow and anguish that others inflict on us is real and significant.
  2. When we forgive someone, we are not implying that what they did was acceptable; rather, we are giving them to God and freeing ourselves from their grip on us.
  3. We’ve produced a lengthy essay on What Does the Bible Say About Forgiveness?
  4. As we read the following Bible texts, let us offer up this prayer to help us take the necessary steps toward a restored connection with God and with others: “Father, please forgive me when I let anger and bitterness to flood my heart because I refuse to forgive someone who has wronged me.
  5. Teach me how to relinquish my rights and choose to forgive in the same manner that You have forgiven me.
  6. Download a copy of the powerful Bible verses on forgiveness for your own personal use.
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What Did Jesus Say About Forgiveness?

(In addition, a confession: I desperately need to participate in the upcoming Online Bible Study, but have been putting it off like the plague.) There are a plethora of viewpoints on forgiveness available online. Experts will tell you that you are under no obligation to forgive. In today’s media, there are several stories about not forgiving those who have wronged us, or about how it is cruel to advise people to forgive because it invalidates the abuse they have endured and the trauma they may be slowly working their way through.

I kind of want to fist-pump the air in response to that, but I know in my heart that that is not what my soul requires.

It seems like a ginormousno-but-thank-you-very-muchright now, thinking about what the Lord is leading me to address with Him as I approach this next Online Bible Study,Forgiving What You Can’t Forgetwith Lysa TerKeurst, and how grateful I am for that.

Have a conversation with Jesus with the hashtag talktomelaterJesusissuperbusy.

What I came up with was. a series of questions. There are so many questions, especially in the Christian world, and you may be feeling some of them as well if you are reading this. Here are a handful of the topics that Lysa will be covering in her research:

  • Is there a set of exceptional circumstances that cannot be excused
  • If someone has injured you, is it fair to forgive them while also protecting yourself from them and their unchanging, harmful conduct
  • So, what should I do with relatives/family members who have actually damaged me and have not repented, especially when it appears other Christians in my immediate vicinity want me to just get over it? What about the individuals I care about but don’t care for? Is it true that forgiveness absolves individuals of their sins? If you ask me, forgiveness and reconciliation are the same thing.

Fortunately, Lysa unpacks a lot of this in her “Journey through what the Bible truly teaches about forgiveness” closing chapters (which are alone worth the price of the book!) and while we won’t be able to discuss everything in detail here today, let’s concentrate on what Jesus had to say on the subject. This is what my grandmother, Grams McClure, told me: go directly to Jesus. Forgiveness was a theme that Jesus addressed frequently, either directly or in parables such as the narrative of the loving father and his disobedient, prodigal son, among others.

What Jesus Said About Forgiveness

The merciful will be rewarded, since mercy will be extended to them. — Matthew 5:7 (KJV) The Shema (the central prayer of Jewish morning and evening prayers) was cited by Jesus in Mark 12:29-31 in response to the inquiry “What is the most essential commandment?”, according to John Mark’s interpretation. Hear this, O Israel: The Lord our God is one, and there is no other. God commands us to love him with all our hearts and minds and strength. We are to love him with all our hearts and souls and with all of our might.’ Another is, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ (Extracted from Leviticus 19:18) “Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.,” Jesus taught in regards to forgiving.

  • “Be compassionate, just as your heavenly Father is merciful,” Jesus says.
  • Yikes!
  • If we desire grace, we must be the ones who provide it.
  • Wholeheartedly.
  • so important that He included it in His instructions to His disciples on how to pray.
  • Moreover, not only should one turn the other cheek, but one should also forgive over and again.
  • “As many as seven times?” I inquire.

The way Jesus answered, on the other hand, took them all by surprise!

• Matthew 18:21-22 (or seventy-seven in your Bible translation) But,why?

Why is it that it appears that the injurer gets off scot-free but the hurt suffers the consequences in the long run?

Because of this, I have to take a step back and consider the more meta questions: Is God truly good?

After wrestling with those difficulties — after kicking, fighting, and crying in front of the Lord — the decision is unambiguous: yes.

Right?

It’s for my own personal liberation as much as for His glory.

But what about the folks who were the source of the suffering?

Does that mean they can just keep slapping my other cheek?

I have the ability to move my cheek!

“Boundaries That Help Us Stop Dancing with Dysfunction,” chapter 9 of the book and study, by Lysa, delves into this topic in great depth.

Everyone did not have access to Jesus because He did not allow everyone access to Himself.

Those who were plainly attempting to taunt or ridicule Him, such as Herod, did not receive a retort from Him (Luke 23:8-9).

While listening to and obeying God the Father, he maintained his love for Him while still setting personal limits for himself.

As Christ-followers, we have the privilege of following in his footsteps. The depths of this research, however, are going to be explored, friends. When we are processing forgiveness with the Lord, we may have to deal with the following:

  • Unfelt anguish
  • Unprocessed wrath
  • Untapped sentiments of rejection
  • Unjust abandonment
  • Unimaginable abuse
  • These are all things that may happen to anyone.

What does Jesus have to say about this? Come to Me, My cherished one. Without further ado. Our Lord Jesus Christ is our Savior, and he loves us more than we can humanly comprehend. He does not call us to forgive in order to do us harm. He orders us to forgive for our own sake, for the sake of our hearts, and for the sake of our own freedom. Quickly. Deeply. As many times as necessary. And, of course, clutching His hand the whole way! Lysa wrote this wonderful prayer in her Forgiveness Journal, which you can read here.

I give my consent.

  • I’m curious what Jesus has to say about it. Invite My Beloved to join Me at My home. As soon as possible. Our Lord Jesus Christ is our Savior, and he loves us more than we can comprehend. His call to forgiveness is not intended to do us harm. It is for our own well, the good of our hearts, and the good of our freedom that Jesus asks us to forgive. Quickly. Deeply. It will be repeated as many times as it is required. All the while, I’m clutching His hand. This wonderful prayer was written by Lysa in her Forgiveness Journal. Give this matter up to God, I beseech You. I give up my right to protest.

Show me what I need to take away from this experience. And then, in place of my suffering, please grant me Your serenity. I want to begin something that hasn’t been finished in me yet. I want to be at peace with Him. Don’t you think so? You may be certain that I am right there with you if you are suffering with this subject, dear reader. But I’m eager to embark on the adventure and welcome His healing into my life.

25 Bible Verses On Forgiveness To Bring You Peace

Most people find forgiveness to be a difficult task. People behave in ways that might be offensive to us in everyday life. Although it may seem natural to hold onto a grudge, the Bible teaches us to forgive one another. Recent research on forgiveness has revealed that practicing forgiveness may have a positive impact on both our mental and physical health. But how can we go about practicing forgiveness and experiencing the calm that comes with it? Reading these Bible passages on forgiveness can motivate you to forgive others and will remind you that we have all been forgiven as a result of Jesus’ death on the cross for our sins.

Bible verses about forgiveness

When I’m grappling with the problem of forgiving, these are the Bible scriptures I look to for guidance. They serve as a constant reminder of how strong God’s forgiveness is. If we turn to Jesus, we will discover complete forgiveness of our sins, as well as freedom and peace in our lives. Psalm 103:12 (KJV) He has withdrawn our offenses from us as far as the east is from the west, according to the scriptures. 1 Thessalonians 1:7 We have redemption via his blood, as well as forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s mercy, because we are in him.” 1 John 1:9 (New International Version) “If we confess our sins, he is true and just, and he will forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness,” the Bible says.

The book of Isaiah 1: 18 In the words of the Lord, “Come now, let us resolve the problem.” The Bible says, “Though your sins are scarlet, they will be as white as snow; though they are red as crimson, they will be as wool.” Micah 7:18-19 (KJV) “Where can I find a God like you, who forgives iniquity and forgave his people for their trespass against the remnant of his inheritance?” You do not remain enraged indefinitely, but rather take pleasure in showing kindness.

19 It is you who will have mercy on us once more; you will trample our sins underfoot and cast all of our transgressions into the depths of the sea.” 10:17 (Hebrews 10:17) His final words are, “Their misdeeds and illegal conduct will no longer be remembered by me.” Jeremiah 31:34 (KJV) “Because I will forgive their wickedness and will no longer remember their transgressions,” says the Lord.

Jesus’ forgiveness

Jesus serves as the ultimate model of forgiveness for all of us. While in agony on the crucifixion, Jesus cried out, pleading with the Father to pardon them, saying, “Father, forgive them, for they have no idea what they are doing.” (See Luke 23:34.) Do you want to know how many times the Bible commands us to forgive? “Not seven times, but seventy seven,” Jesus instructs us to model our forgiveness of others after the way God has forgiven us, forgiving “not seven times, but seventy-seven.” Luke 5:20 (NIV) “Because of their faith, Jesus declared, ‘Friend, your sins are forgiven.’ Luke 6:37 (KJV) “Do not pass judgment on others, and you will not be judged.” You will not be condemned if you do not criticize others.

If you forgive, you will also be forgiven.” Matthew 18:21-22 (KJV) “In response to this, Peter approached Jesus and asked, “Lord, how many times do I have to forgive my brother or sister who has sinned against me?” ‘Can you do it up to seven times?’ ‘I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times,’ Jesus said.” 14-15 (Matthew 6:14-15) “Because if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you when you offend against him.

However, if you do not forgive others for their mistakes, your Father will not forgive you for your sins as well.”

Forgiveness and Compassion: a story from Rwanda

As the perfect example of forgiveness, we have Jesus to look to. While on the crucifixion, Jesus cried out in anguish and begged the Father to forgive them because they were completely unaware of what they were doing. “Father, forgive them,” he said. The Bible says (Luke 23:34) Are you curious about how many times the Bible instructs us to forgive others? “Not seven times, but seventy seven,” Jesus instructs us to model our forgiveness of others after the way God has forgiven us, forgiving “not seven times, but seventy-seven times.” In the book of Luke, verse 20 says “Because of their faith, Jesus declared, ‘Friend, your sins are forgiven.’ ” The Bible says in Luke 6:37 that “Do not pass judgment on others, and you will not be judged yourself.

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You will be forgiven if you forgive others.” Matthew 18:21-22 (King James Version).

Is it possible to do it seven times?’ I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times, I have answered you.” 14-15 (Matthew 6:14-15) “Because if you forgive other people when they offend against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you when you do the same.

Bible verses about forgiving others

Despite the fact that we may find it difficult to forgive others, the Bible teaches us to provide to them the same grace that our Heavenly Father has extended to us. Take a minute to ponder on these texts about forgiveness and ask God to assist you in forgiving people who are in your immediate environment. Colossians 3:13 is a biblical passage. “If any of you holds a grudge against someone, be patient with one another and forgive one another as soon as possible. Allow yourself to be forgiven as the Lord has forgiven you.” Paul writes in Ephesians 4:31-32, “Get rid of all bitterness, fury, and anger, as well as brawling and slander, as well as any other sort of malice you may have.

“This is how you should pray, then: ‘Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven,'” says the author.

Please provide us with our daily bread today. Let us ask you to forgive us our debts, just as we have forgiven our creditors. Allow us to avoid temptation while protecting us from the bad one.'”

Bible verses about a new beginning

When we get forgiveness of our sins, we are transformed into a new creature. Because of Christ’s sacrifice on our behalf, we have the opportunity to experience the fullness of our relationship with God. These forgiveness quotes speak about the fresh start we are given when we are forgiven by our heavenly Father! 2 Corinthians 5:17 (New International Version) Therefore, if someone is in Christ, the new creation has come into being: the old has passed away and the new has come into being! 1 Peter 1:3 (New International Version) “Holy, holy, holy, holy is the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ!

“However, whomever has been forgiven little loves little,” says the author.

“Many will see and dread the Lord, and they will place their confidence in him.” Ezekiel 11:19 is a biblical verse.

Christian forgiveness quotes

These well-known forgiveness quotations serve as a gentle reminder of the immeasurable riches of God’s kindness and mercy. Because of who He is, we have the ability to be completely forgiven.

  • When you’ve had an experience of grace and feel like you’ve been forgiven, you’re a lot more forgiving of other people, don’t you think? “You’re a lot more considerate of other people.” “I think that no matter how many times I transgress, God is always more willing to forgive me than I am to offend,” says Rick Warren. As Charles Spurgeon put it, “No child of God sins to such an extent that he becomes himself incapable of being forgiven.” “A great many people wish to bring their faith, their works, and their good acts to Him in order to be saved,” writes John Bunyan. ‘Bring your sins to Him, and He will carry them away into the wilderness of oblivion, where you will never see them again.’ In the words of Dwight L. Moody, “You have been forgiven
  • Now behave as if it.” In the words of A.W. Tozer, “There are certain things that will never change.” One thing to remember is that you have been forgiven. As long as you are in Christ, when he looks at you, he will not notice your sins because they are covered by Christ. “He sees you in a more positive light than you perceive yourself.” Lucado, Max
  • Lucado, Max

Our favourite Bible stories about forgiveness

The prodigal son is a figure of speech that refers to a son who has abandoned his family. The story of the prodigal son is one of the most well-known of Jesus’ parables and teachings. It demonstrates to us that we can always rely on God’s mercy and forgiveness. There is absolutely nothing we can do to avoid being enveloped in God’s overwhelming grace! Luke 15:11-22 (KJV) “There was once a man who was the father of two sons. ‘Father, please give me my half of the estate,’ the younger son requested of his father.

  1. “ Not long later, the younger son gathered all he possessed, embarked on a journey to a foreign land, and while there, spent his fortune in reckless living.
  2. Thus, he went to a citizen of that nation and rented himself out to him, who then sent him out into the field with pigs to graze.
  3. ‘I am no longer worthy to be addressed as your son; treat me as if I were one of your hired employees.’ As a result, he got up and walked to his father’s house.
  4. Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you,’ the son confessed to his father.
  5. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet to complete the look.
  6. Let’s hold a party and eat a lot of food.
  7. When Jesus recounted this tale, he was trying to get us to realize that we must forgive people over and over again.
  8. When he began to settle, he was visited by a man who owed him ten thousand talents, which he promptly paid.

As a result, the servant went to his knees and pleaded with him, saying, ‘Please be patient with me, and I will pay you everything.’ And, out of compassion for him, the master of that servant released him from his obligation and forgave him his debt “In any case, when that same servant went out, he encountered one of his fellow servants who was indebted to him for a hundred denarii.

As soon as his other servants realized what had transpired, they became quite upset, and they immediately rushed to their lord and informed him of what had occurred.

And shouldn’t you have shown charity to your fellow servant in the same way that I showed mercy to you?’ And his lord was furious with him, and he was imprisoned until he could pay off his obligation in its whole.

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Learn to Forgive (and Maybe Forget) With These 17 Bible Verses

When someone does something that causes us to be unhappy, it can be difficult to let go and go on. In reality, carrying resentment or ill will toward another person is nothing more than a form of punishment for ourselves. Fortunately, there are Bible scriptures regarding forgiveness that can assist you in dealing with this particular issue. The majority of them are about how we must forgive in order to avoid being forgiven ourselves. It is also necessary for us to forgive, since God forgives us regardless of our faults.

Forgiveness is not the same as forgetting.

We forgive in order to provide ourselves with peace of mind, and in the hope that someone will return the favor if we have ever offended them in the future.

You can refer to these texts whenever you need a gentle reminder that carrying a grudge is detrimental to everyone, least of all oneself.

20 Bible Verses about Forgiveness

Because of this, forgiveness has become a key subject of psychological study since the 1980s. The therapeutic value of being a person who forgives quickly was revealed by studies in the following decades. According to research, those who forgive more frequently exhibit the following characteristics:

  • Relationships that are stronger
  • Emotional wellness
  • A slower response to rage
  • And clearer consciences

For hundreds of years, the Bible has emphasized the significance of forgiveness and the necessity of repentance. It informs us that God is overflowing with kindness toward us and urges us to emulate His example in our interactions with others. Because of our love for one another, Jesus says us, the rest of the world will recognize us as His disciples (John13:35). And love demands the act of forgiving. The following are 20 Bible verses on forgiveness that reflect God’s loving kindness and our need to provide one another mercy and grace in our relationships.

1. Do not bear a grudge (Leviticus 19:18)

“Refrain from seeking vengeance or harboring ill will against anybody among your people; instead, love your neighbor as yourself. I, the Lord, am the one who speaks.” Jesus is credited for distilling the entire Old Testament law into two directives:

  1. “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind” (Matthew 22:37)
  2. “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Matthew 22:39)
  3. “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Matthew 22:37)
  4. “Love your

These weren’t revolutionary ideas. As you read through the Old Testament, you will notice God reiterating these concepts over and time again. Throughout this text from Leviticus, God warns against harboring animosity and seeking retaliation against people who are a part of God’s covenant community.

2. Moses prays for forgiveness (Numbers 14:19–23)

“I implore you to forgive the guilt of these people in line with your great love, just as you have forgiven their sins from the time they left Egypt until now.” The Lord responded by saying, “As you requested, I have shown my gratitude to them. Although I live, and while the glory of the Lord permeates all of creation, not one of those who witnessed my glory and the signs I performed in Egypt and the wilderness but who disobeyed me and tested me ten times will ever see the land that I promised on oath to their forefathers will ever be able to claim it as their own.

Unfortunately, this is not the case.

Moses finds himself in the position of interceding on behalf of his people on a regular basis.

God forgives Israel once more, but He also warns Moses that if Israel continues to disobey Him, there will be repercussions for their actions.

Sadly, our generation will not be among those who reach the promised land. Remembering that forgiveness does not always absolve the forgiven of the consequences of their actions may be of great use when dealing with difficult situations.

3. God doesn’t give us what we deserve (Psalm 103:10–12)

He does not treat us as our faults merit, nor does He recompense us in proportion to our wrongdoings. The reason for this is that God’s love for those who reverence him is as enormous as the heights of the sky above the earth; he has withdrawn our sins from us as far as the east is from the west. Our Lord Jesus Christ advises us to love our adversaries in order to be like our heavenly Father in heaven. The author reminds us that God “raises his sun on the wicked and on the righteous, and showers rain on the upright and on the unjust” (Matthew 5:45).

He does not reply to us in the manner in which we deserve, but He does so in order to display His love for us.

He delivers us from the consequences of our sins.

In a lyrical fashion, it expresses God’s desire to create an endless distance between our wrongdoing and ourselves when we forgive.

4. Cleansing us from our sins (Isaiah 1:18)

In the words of the Lord, “Come now, let us resolve the problem.” The Bible says, “Though your crimes are red as crimson, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red as crimson, they shall be like wool” (Isaiah 1:18). The prophet Isaiah begins the book of Isaiah by describing God’s judgements against Israel, which serves as the book’s introduction. Rather than being merely punitive, God desires that His people make a conscious decision to live in a different way. Isaiah gives the following instructions to God’s people in the first chapter: “Make yourself clean by washing and scrubbing.

Learn to do what is right and to seek justice.

Take up the cause of the fatherless and the widow, and make your case heard ” (Isaiah 1:16-17).

He pledges to restore them to the whiteness of wool if they would repent of their actions and turn to Him in faith.

5. Remembering their sin no more (Isaiah 43:25)

“I, even I, am he who blots out your trespasses, for my own reason, and does not remember your offenses any longer,” says the author. Throughout the Bible, God identifies Himself as the One who takes away our sins. He tells us that He does it for His own sake, which means that He is motivated by mercy in the depths of His nature, which motivates Him to be patient and forgiving toward us.

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6. Turning from sin and seeking forgiveness (Isaiah 55:7)

Allow the wicked to turn from their ways and the unjust to turn from their thoughts. Allow them to turn to the Lord, and he will have pity on them, as well as to our God, who will freely pardon them.

God has a deep desire to extend mercy, and He is always encouraging people to repent of their sinful behaviors and thoughts. Individuals should be cautious about expecting God to forgive them for behavior that they have no intention of changing.

7. Looking forward to Christ’s forgiveness (Jeremiah 31:34)

“They will no longer teach their neighbor, nor will they say to one another, ‘Know the Lord,’ for they will all know me, from the least of them to the largest,” says God. “Because I will forgive their wickedness and will no longer remember their transgressions,” says the Lord. As a result of the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, Jeremiah talks of a day when God’s covenant people would have God’s law engraved on their hearts. When that time arrives, God’s people will have a personal relationship with Him and will walk in His forgiveness.

8. The Lord is merciful and forgiving (Daniel 9:9)

Despite the fact that we have rebelled against the Lord our God, he is kind and forgiving. Daniel was a prophet who lived in Babylonian exile at the time of his death. When this book was written, Israel was undergoing a period of terrible judgment. Despite the fact that Daniel is one of the few biblical figures who does not exhibit many defects, he nonetheless views himself to be a participant in Israel’s sin and rebellion against the Lord. And, despite the fact that they are on the receiving end of God’s wrath, Daniel exhibits his confidence in God’s mercy and forgiveness by doing so.

9. God delights to show mercy (Micah 7:18–19)

A God such as you, who forgives sin and the transgression of the remnant of his inheritance, who where is he to find such a God? You do not remain enraged indefinitely, but rather take pleasure in showing kindness. You will have compassion on us once more; you will trample our sins underfoot and cast all of our sins into the depths of the sea, as you have done before. Micah, in a rhetorical question, inquires as to whether there are any other gods besides Yahweh. The answer is, without a doubt, no.

The significance of Micah’s words is frequently overlooked.

The people of Israel served a God who, in contrast to the other deities of the region, took pleasure in demonstrating forgiveness to others.

10. Forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:9–13)

As a result, here is how you should pray: “Our Father in heaven, may your name be sanctified, may your kingdom come, and may your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Please provide us with our daily bread today. Let us ask you to forgive us our debts, just as we have forgiven our creditors. And save us from falling prey to temptation, but deliver us from the wicked one instead.” The prayer that Jesus taught the disciples includes the topic of forgiveness as a central subject. Not only does He instruct them to pray for mercy, but He also encourages them to seek forgiveness in accordance with the forgiveness they grant to others.

This is a common approach in which Jesus speaks about forgiveness.

Furthermore, in the parable of the unmerciful servant, in which a servant is forgiven a big debt, but refuses to forgive a much lesser amount owed to him by a peer, he elaborates on this message.

11. Forgiven as we forgive (Matthew 6:14–15)

Because if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you when you sin against him. However, if you do not forgive others for their crimes, your Father will not forgive you for your sins as well. The Lord’s prayer (Matthew 6:9–13) is a lengthy prayer in which Jesus covers a lot of topics. He speaks to the following:

  • Worship
  • A want to see God’s kingdom revealed
  • Daily necessities
  • Forgiveness
  • Temptation
  • Preservation
  • And other issues.

When Jesus is finished with the prayer, the sole subject on which he elaborates is forgiveness. Jesus desires for us to understand the connection between getting forgiveness and providing forgiveness. God has forgiven more than we will ever be able to forgive, but there is something more at work here as well. Thekingdom of Godis all about reconciliation, and we are obligated to express God’s desire for peace in the way we live. Paul explains it in the following way: The source of all of this is God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ and entrusted us with the ministry of reconciliation: that God was reconciling the entire world to himself through Christ, and that God was not holding individuals accountable for their sins.

There can be no reconciliation if there is no kindness shown.

The invitation to reconciliation with God does not end there; we are also invited to participate in the ministry of reconciliation.

12. Forgive, and you will be forgiven (Luke 6:37)

“Never pass judgment, and you will never be judged. You will not be condemned if you do not criticize others. If you forgive, you will also be forgiven.” The first few of comments made by Jesus are unfavorable. You don’t want to be compared to others? Then don’t pass judgment. Do you want to avoid being condemned? Don’t pass judgment. His last comment, on the other hand, is different. It helps to put a positive spin on things. God, on the other hand, is known for His kindness, in contrast to Satan, who is the accuser.

The ability to forgive quickly displays a thorough awareness of and respect for the price of compassion.

13. If they repent, forgive them (Luke 17:3–4)

“You should rebuke your brother or sister when they commit an offense against you, and you should forgive them when they repent. Forgiveness is required even if they sin against you seven times in a day and seven times come back to you with the words ‘I repent.'” The level of forgiveness that Jesus invites us to is difficult to achieve. The Lord doesn’t just urge us to forgive someone who has repented of sinning against us; He requires it—even if it happens numerous times during the day! However, rather of concentrating on the difficulties of demonstrating this level of forgiveness, we must remember that this is God’s attitude for us.

We will never be able to exhaust God’s patience and forgiveness for us. In learning to appreciate, enjoy, and rest in this truth, we are motivated and encouraged to put it into action.

14. Forgive them, for they know not what they do (Luke 23:34)

“You must chastise your brother or sister when they commit an offense against you, and you must forgive them when they repent. Forgiveness is required even if they transgress against you seven times in a day and seven times come back to you and say “I repent.”” To forgive in the way that Jesus invites us to is a difficult undertaking. Instead of just encouraging us to forgive someone who repents of offending against us, Jesus requires it—even if this occurs numerous times each day! However, rather of concentrating on the difficulties of demonstrating this level of forgiveness, we must acknowledge that this is God’s love for us.

In learning to appreciate, enjoy, and rest in this reality, we become motivated and empowered to put it into practice.

15. Live at peace with everyone (Romans 12:18–21)

“If your brother or sister commits a transgression against you, admonish them; and if they repent, accept their forgiveness from God. Forgiveness is required even if they transgress against you seven times in a day and seven times come back to you with the words “I repent.”” The type of forgiveness that Jesus invites us to is difficult to attain. Jesus doesn’t just urge us to forgive someone who has repented of sinning against us; He expects it—even if it happens numerous times a day! However, rather of concentrating on the difficulties of demonstrating this level of forgiveness, we should remember that this is God’s attitude for us.

As we learn to appreciate, rejoice, and rest in this truth, we are motivated and encouraged to put it into action.

16. In Him we have forgiveness of sins (Ephesians 1:7)

Our redemption is secured by his blood, which results in our repentance and forgiveness of our sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace. There is absolutely nothing we can do to earn God’s forgiveness. God’s abundant grace is the sole reason we have the luxury of salvation. God’s grace is unending. And that is one of the most beautiful aspects of forgiving. It is a gift given to those who do not deserve it. As we follow Jesus’ example and extend forgiveness to those who do not deserve it, we bear witness to a God who prevails over justice through compassion.

17. Be kind and compassionate (Ephesians 4:31–32)

Get rid of any bitterness, hatred, and anger, as well as brawling and slander, as well as any other sort of animosity you may have. Be kind and sympathetic to one another, forgiving one another, just as God has forgiven you through Jesus Christ. According to Jesus, our love for one another is a sign that we truly belong to Him and that we are His children (John 13:35). When we walk with Jesus, we should be transformed into persons who are kind, gentle, and actively dedicated to preserving our tie of love.

18. Forgive as the Lord forgave you (Colossians 3:13)

If any of you harbors a grudge against someone, be patient with one another and forgive one another as soon as possible. Allow yourself to be forgiven as the Lord has forgiven you. In other words, the cross serves as a lens through which we are to see the world.

When we truly understand what Jesus was prepared to go through in order to forgive us, it becomes much simpler for us to be gracious toward others. To be forgiven is a difficult task, and few of us will be willing to walk the path that Jesus was compelled to take in order to be reconciled with us.

19. Jesus came to save sinners (1 Timothy 1:15–16)

If any of you holds a grudge against someone, be patient with one another and forgive one another. As you have forgiven others, so should you. In other words, the cross serves as a lens through which we are to see the universe. We find it much simpler to be gracious toward others when we truly absorb what Jesus was ready to go through to save us from our sin. To be forgiven is a difficult task, and few of us are willing to walk the path that Jesus was compelled to take in order to be reconciled to us.

20. If we confess our sins, Jesus will forgive us (1 John 1:9)

His faithfulness and justice will be shown toward us in that if we confess our sins, he will forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. Confession, according to James, is the first step toward healing (James 5:16). John affirms that this is correct. It is essential that we are upfront and honest about our stumbles, mistakes, and misbehavior if we want to continue our connection with Jesus (and with one another). Good news is that our merciful God faithfully forgives our sins.

His cleansing power goes much beyond that; He cleanses us from the inside out.

We don’t have to bear the burden of our mistakes and shortcomings on our shoulders.

Canceling each other’s debts

When we refuse to forgive, we are essentially holding individuals in a state of debt. However, unlike a financial debt, no one knows what the terms of repayment will be. A grudge is a way of expressing, “You owe me something, but I’m not sure what it is,” or “You owe me something, but I’m not sure what it is.” The act of forgiving removes the need to pay. When God forgives us, He does not absolve us of our wrongdoing or remove the consequences of our actions. He simply states, “I am no longer going to hold you liable for the debt you have accrued against Me.” He does not elaborate.

As everyone who has ever been debt-free will tell you, there is no finer feeling in the world than being free of financial obligations.

The New International Version of the Bible is used unless otherwise stated in the references.

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